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The 



Home Missionary 



Pte *by /,, ; July, I 808 



/><?/. Z.YA7. No. 1 



New York 
Congregational Home Missionary Society 

Congregational Rooms, Fourth Ave. and 2 2d St. 

Entered at the Post-Office at New York, N. Y., as Second-Class [Mail] Matter 



Contents for July, 1898 



PAGE 

Seventy-Second Annual Meeting.. i 

Extracts from the Annual Sermon 8 

General Howard's Opening Address 10 

Special Committee on Annual Report 12 
How can Woman best Serve the 

Country ? 14 

Our Opportunity in Alaska 16 

The Fifth Wheel 17 

California in 1 849 20 

Some Results 28 



PAGE 

The New Mormonism 29 

The New Mormonism : Its Relig- 
ious Aspect 31 

" The Western Reserve " of Ohio . 34 
From Rev. W. G. Puddefoot's Ad- 
dress 37 

The Twentieth Century City 39 

The City and Home Missions 42 

From Rev. Dr. Meredith's Address 48 

Our Mission in Alaska 49 



The Home Missionary 



Is published quarterly, at thirty cents a year, postage paid. It is sent without charge, on 
request, to be made annually, to Life Members ; Missionaries of the Society and its Aux- 
iliaries ; Ministers securing a yearly collection for it in their congregations ; also to individu- 
als, associations, or congregations, one copy for a year for every ten dollars collected and paid 
over to the Society or an Auxiliary. Suitable names should accompany the payment. 
Pastors are earnestly requested to serve Home Missions by promoting the use of this journal 
and "Congregational Work" at the Monthly Concert and among their people. 

Immediate notice of discontinuance or change of post-office address should be given. 



THE 



HOME MISSIONARY 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING 



APRIL, 1899. 



Go, . . . Preach the Gospel. — Mark xvi. 15. 

How shall they Preach, except they be sent? — Rom. x. 15. 



VOL. LXXI. 



NEW YORK: 

CONGREGATIONAL HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY, 

CONGREGATIONAL ROOMS, FOURTH AVE. AND 22D ST. 
1899. 



INDEX TO THE HOME MISSIONARY 



Volume LXXI 



JULY, 1898— APRIL, 1899 



PAGE 

About the Box 123 

Addresses by : Bacon, Dr. L. W., go ; Bailey, 
Mrs. Lydia Tichenor, 16 ; Barton, Dr. W. 
E., 34 ; Caswell. Mrs. H. S., 17 ; Gladden, 
Dr. W, 42 ; Gen. O. O. Howard, 10 ; 
Jelinek, Rev. John, 158; Lewis, Rev. John, 
156 ; Luck, Rev. C. W., 31 ; Meredith, 
Dr. R. R., 48 ; Palmer, Mrs. Alice F., 14 ; 
Prucha, Rev. John, 155 ; Puddefoot, Rev. 
W. G., 37 ; Robinson, Dr. W. A., 12 ; 
Strong, Dr. Josiah, 39 ; Willey, Dr. S. H., 

20; Young, Eugene 29 

A Frontier Meal 180 

A Gambling Bedfellow 184 

A Glorified City (Isa. XVI.) 46 

A Lady Church-planter, Her Article 97 

Alaska, Our First Church in 219 

Alaska, Later from 116 

Alaska, Our Mission in 49 

Alaska, Our Opportunity in 16 

American Missionary Association 96 

Among the Mormons 231 

Annual Meeting, The 247 

Annual Report of Executive Committee 12 

Annual Report, Special Committee on 12 

Annual Sermon, Dr. T. B. McLeod 8 

" Any Christians About Here ? " 182 

Appeal from Alaska 166 

Altruism of Christianity 38 

Atkinson, Geo. H., goes to Oregon 21 

Aunt Judy's Work for Home Missions T17 

Bacon, Dr. Leonard W., Address of 89 

Bacon, Rev. David 91 

Badger, Rev. Joseph 92, 93 

Bailey, Mrs. Lydia T., Address of 16 

Baldwin, Rev. Theron 95 

Barton, Clara, Her Work 14 

Barton, Dr. W. E. , Address of 34 

Benevolent Gifts, $30,000,000 Annually 38 

Benevolent Gifts, Two Per Cent, of a Week's 

Increase 38 

Bible and Tract Societies, Work of 113 

Books Sought for Alaska 166 

Brown, John, in Western Reserve 37 

Bryce, James, His Warning 14 

Bryce, Prof., his View of our Danger 41 

Busybody Hotel, The 232 

California, Fifty Years' Work in 165 

California in 1849 20 

Caswell, Mrs. H. S., her Paper to State 

Unions 17 

Children and Other Domestic Animals 180 

Chinese Christian, A 236 

Christian College in Cal 27 

Christian Endeavorers for Alaska 50 

Churches Organized in Oregon. . . 178 

Churches, The Mother of 217 

Cities, Their Rapid Growth 42 

Cities, Their Corruption 42 

Cities, European, Like American 42 

Cities to Dominate the Nation 41 

City Population Grows 3 per cent, to 33 39 

City (the). Great Field of Home Missions ... 40 

Clapp, Supt. C. F., Article by 171 

College of California Founded 165 



PAGE 

Collins, Rev. C. T., Founder of our Bohe- 
mian Missions 154, 155 

Combinations of Capital, Their Danger 43 

Commission on Cuba, Report of 224 

Congregationalism and City Work 9 

Connecticut, Missionary Society of, 100th 

Anniversary 89 

Connecticut Missionary Society, Work in 

" Western Reserve." 35 

Conversion of John Healey 188 

Cook, Mrs. Joseph, Word for the Boys 18 

Cooperation for the Public Welfare 47 

Cooperative Church Society 20 

Country's Wealth Growing $7,000,000 daily. . 13 

Cross, Rev. R. T., Article by 107 

Cuba, Report of Commission on 224 

Cubans in Florida, Work Among 13 

Drop the Letter " W" 19 

Douglas, Alaska, Moving for Church Building. 116 
Douglas, Alaska, All Sects Uniting 117 

Earth's Highways Open for the Gospel 49 

Evangelisten (the), Dano-Norwegian Paper. . 169 
Executive Committee Elected 6 

Finns (the), Work Among 169 

First Church of Custer County, Idaho 174 

Fisher, Supt. S. V. S., Article by 168 

Frontier, Work on the*. 244 

Gladden, Dr. W. , His Address 42 

Grant, General U. S., His Confidence 41 

Gray, Rev. D. B., His Sunday-school Work., no 

Gray, Rev. D. B., Article by 122 

Griffin, Edward Dorr 90 

Gulick, Alice Gordon, Her Work in Spain.. . . 16 

Her Old Home Revisited 97 

His First Frontier Experience 179 

Home Missionary Veteran 160 

Home Missionary Wife, Article by 123 

Home Missions, Aunt Judy's Work for 117 

Home Missions, Foundation Work in 109 

Home Missions, New Stage of 39 

Home Missions, 100 Years of 89 

Home Missions the Country's Hope 47 

Hood, Rev. E. Lyman, Article by 160 

Howard, General O. O., Work in California. . '27 
How Can Woman Best Serve Her Country? . . 14 

Howe, Julia Ward, Her Battle Hymn. 15 

How the Box Helps 124 

If God's People only Knew 122 

Illinois Band ... 95 

Illustrations: First Cong. Ch., San Francisco, 
Cal., First Building, 164; Second Building, 
165 ; Present Building, 218 ; Juneau, Alas- 
ka, 166 ; Juneau, Alaska, Street in, 167 ; 
Mooar, Rev. George, D. D., 164; Rev. 
John Jelinek, 158 ; Rev. John Lewis, 156 ; 
Rev. John Prucha, 155 : Rev. S. H. Wil- 
ley, D.D., 160 ; View in Broadway, Cleve- 
land 153 

Increased Demand for Home Work 13 

In 1920 Ten Millions more in Cities than Out. 40 
" I want to die, that's all, John " 187 



IV 



Index 



PAGE 

Jelinek. Rev. John, His Address 158 

Jernberg, Prof. R. A 170 

Johnston, Mrs. Lettice H., Article by 174 

Kenney, Minnie E., Article by 117 

Kossuth, Louis, His Prophecy 38 

Leonard, Dr. D. L., Article by 100 

Letters and Articles from Contributors : L.W. 
Bacon, 89 ; Mrs. Lydia I. Bailey. 16 ; W. 

E. Barton, 34 ; Mrs. D. S. Birlew, 172 ; 
Mrs. H. S. Caswell, 17 ; C. F. Clapp. 177 ; 
R. T. Cross, 107 ; S.V. S. Fisher, 168 ; W. 
Gladden, 42 ; D. B. Gray, 122 ; E. Lyman 
Hood, 160; O. O. Howard, 10; Mrs. L. H. 
Johnston, 174 ; Kansas, 113 ; Minnie E. 
Kenney, 117; Lady Church-planter, 97; 

D. L. Leonard, 100 ; F. F. Lewis. 170 ; C. 
W. Luck, 3 t ; T. B. McLeod, 8 ; R. R. 
Meredith, 48 ; Oklahoma, 113 ; Mrs. Alice 

F. Palmer, 14 ; W. G. Puddefoot, 37 ; A. 

E. Ricker, 180; W. A. Robinson, 12 ; H. 
A. Schauffler, 153 ; Josiah Strong, 39 ; Mrs. 
H. M. Union, 123, 179 ; Mrs. Joseph Ward, 
109 ; S. H. Willey. 20 ; L. L. Wirt. 116, 
166 ; Eugene Young 29 

Lewis, Rev. F. F.. Article by 170 

Lewis, Rev. John, His Address 156 

Little Log Church. Story of 174 

Little Robbie's Grave 98 

Luck, Rev. C. W., His Address 31 

McLeod, Dr. T. B., Ann. Sermon 8 

Meredith. Dr. R. R., His Address 48 

Minutes of 72d Annual Meeting 1 

Miss Columbia and Mrs. Britannia, Union of. 49 

Miskovsky, Prof. L. F 150 

Mormondom, Some Experiences in 100 

Mormonism, Secret of its Power 30 

Mormonism, its Nature 30 

Mormonism, its Religious Aspect 31 

Mormonism, its Two Sides 32 

Mormons, Among the 231 

Mormon Schools, Unique 102 

Mormon Dancing Parties 103 

Mormon's First Wife, Interview with 101 

Mormon's First Wife, Her Warning 101 

Mormons, their 1,200 Missionaries 33 

Mormons, their 1,000 Students 33 

Mormons, their Unchanged Spirit 33 

Mother of Churches, The 217 

National Prosperity 115 

National Society and its Auxiliaries. . . .... 12 

Nebraska, Missionary Gifts to 107 

Nebraska, Work in 242 

Negroes and Indians, Early Missions to 89 

'• New Jerusalem " to be Ours 41 

New Mexican Natives, General Character. .. 173 

New Mexico, Work in 172 

New Mormonism 29 

" New Settlements," Early Missions to go 

Night Services on the Prairie 112 

Nineteenth Century Missionary Giving 112 

Notes by the Way (Mrs. H. M. Union 1 ...123, 179 

Obedient to the Heavenly Vision 237 

Officers of the Society 6 

Oklahoma, Hard Work in 114 

One Hundred Years of Home Missions 89 

One of the Rough Places 113 

Opening Address of General Howard 10 

Oregon, its First Missionary 21 

Our Cities : Six increased to 443 39 

Our First Church in Alaska 219 

Our Institutions based on Two Principles. ... 40 

Our Mission in Alaska 49 

Our Opportunity in Alaska 16 

Our Organizing Council on Wheels 170 

Our Scandinavian Work '. 168 

Our Slavic Home Missionary Work 153 



Our Two Civilizations : Urban and Rural. ... 39 
Out-Stations Ripened into Churches 179 

Pacific Theological Seminary 165 

Palmer, Mrs. Alice Freeman, Address by. ... 14 

Pastoral Visiting 231 

Pilgrim Fathers, Soul Food, but Little Corn.. 37 

Pilgrim Seed Ripened in Ohio 34 

Polygamy 29 

Prucha, Rev. John. His Address 155 

Puddefoot, Rev. W. G., His Address 37 

Report of Commission to Cuba 224 

Resolutions at Annual Meeting 3, 5, 6, 7 

Ricker, Rev. A. E.. Article by 186 

Robinson, Dr. W. A., His Report 12 

Roll of Members at Annual Meeting 3 

Sacred Money 107 

San Francisco, Cal., Beginning in 22 

San Francisco, Cal., Destructive Fire in 24 

Saved by Hope 44 

" Save Utah to Save America " 34 

Scandinavians, Widely Scattered 168 

Seward, Hon. W. H., His Prophecy 28 

Shoshone Falls, Idaho 105 

Six-wived Mormon Bishop 100 

Slavic Hour at Annual Meeting 154 

Smith, Joseph, and Mormonism 29 

Society's Change of Name, 1893 96 

Some Results of Home Missions 28 

Starved out Preachers 115 

States Claiming " Western Reserve " 35 

Stickney, John Henry, Gift of $100,000 96 

Strong, Dr. Josiah, His Address 39 

Strong, Dr. Josiah. His "Twentieth Century" 13,38 

Sturtevant, Rev. Julian M. 95 

Sunday-school, Founding of no 

Sunday-school Work, its Value 172 

Tent and Saloon Preaching 183 

Thankful, Hopeful, But Handicapped 230 

The American City 8 

" The Bosses " Corrupting Cities 40 

The Busybody Hotel 232 

The City and Home Missions 42 

The Fifth Wheel 17 

The Miner's Dying Hours 186 

" The Pacific " Newspaper Started 25 ' 

"The People " to Save Our Cities. . 45 

" Together," the Women's Motto. ; 18 

Twentieth Century City 39 

Twentieth Century: its Changes 48 

Twenty-six Miles' Travel to a •' Dedication " no 

Ward, Mrs. Sarah F., Her Article 99-109 

Warren, Rev. J. H., His Book 27 

Wedding, A Profitable 247 

Western Reserve, a Second New England... 36 

" Western Reserve " of Ohio 34 

What Aunt Tudy's Mittens Did 121 

Willard, Francis E.. Her Work ..15 

Willey, Dr. H. S., Address of 20 

Willey, Samuel Hopkins, Pioneer in California 160 
Willey, Samuel Hopkins, his Ordination. ... 161 
Willey, Samuel Hopkins, his Travelling Com- 
panions 162 

Wirt, Superintendent Loyal L., in Alaska. . . 17 
Wirt, Superintendent L. L., Union for His 

Support 49 

Wirt, Superintendent L. L., his Plans 50 

Wirt, Superintendent L. L., Later from 116 

Wirt, Superintendent L. L., Appeal 166 

Woman's Department, Annual Meeting of . . . 2 

Woman's Department, Organized 18S2 96 

Woman, What She Can Do 115 

Women Educate the Voters \ 15 

Wouldn't Lend His Gun 185 

Year in Oregon 177 

Year of Destiny for Larger California 20 

Yeast 115 

Young, Eugene, Address of 29 



\€ 



3o4^ 



The Home Missionary 



Vol. LXXI JULY, 1898 No. 1 

MINUTES OF THE SEVENTY-SECOND ANNUAL MEET- 
ING OF THE CONGREGATIONAL HOME MISSION- 
ARY SOCIETY. 

The Congregational Home Missionary Society convened for its Sev- 
enty-second Annual Meeting in the Plymouth Congregational Church, 
Cleveland, Ohio, at 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, June 7, 1898, with the President, 
Major-General Oliver O. Howard, of Vermont, in the chair. The 
devotional services were led by the Rev. Geo. R. Leavitt, of Wis- 
consin. 

The Rev. Thomas B. McLeod, of New York, preached the annual 
sermon, from Luke xix. 41 : "And when he came near, he beheld the city, 
and wept over it." 

Addresses of welcome were given by Rev. John G. Fraser and 
Rev. Livingston L. Taylor, of Ohio, and President Howard made 
a response. 

On motion of Mr. Jos. Wm. Rice, of Rhode Island, Rev. Charles W. 
Shelton, of Connecticut, was appointed Recording Secretary, pro tern., 
and Mr. James T. Brinckerhoff, of New York, Assistant Recording Sec- 
retary. 

After singing, the benediction was pronounced by Rev. Samuel H. 
Willey, of California, and the body adjourned until 9 a.m., Wednesday. 

Wednesday Morning, June 8.— At nine o'clock the Society spent 
half an hour in devotion, led by Rev. Rufus M. Taft, of Massachusetts. 

At 8:30 the President took the chair. 

Upon recommendation of the Nominating Committee, the following 
were elected as the Committee of Arrangements : Rev. J. G. Fraser, Rev. 
C. S. Mills, Rev. L. L. Taylor, Mr. L. F. Mellen, Mr. H. Clark 
Ford, and Mr. R. O. Beswick. 

Rev. Robert A. George, of Ohio, read the Scriptures and offered 
prayer. 

President Howard delivered his annual address, and the Rev. W. E. 
Barton, of Massachusetts, spoke on " The Western Reserve." President 
C. F. Thwing, of the Western Reserve University, extended an invitation 
to the Society to visit the University. 

1 



2 The Home Missionary July, 1898 

At 10:30 the time was given to the Sixteenth Annual Meeting of the 
Woman's Department, Mrs. Harriet S. Caswell, Secretary, presiding. 

An opening address by Mrs. Caswell was followed by addresses from 
Mrs. J. H. Heald, of Arizona, Mrs. G. E. Birlew, and Mrs. L. A. Col- 
lings, of New Mexico. Miss G. Whiteman, of Utah, Mrs. E. R. Cheney, 
of Indiana, repr3sented the work in their fields. 

Mrs. Lydia T. Bailey, of Washington, spoke on "The Need of the 
Hour." Mrs. Alice Freeman Palmer, of Massachusetts, on " How can 
Woman Best Serve Our Country ? " 

A collection amounting to $123.24 was taken for the general treasury, 
and prayer was offered by Mrs. Louise A. Kellogg, of Boston. 

The Misses Marie Zoltak and Katie Vavrina, Slavic pupils of the 
Bethlehem Training School, sang a duet in Bohemian. 

President Howard made the closing address and prayer, and at 12:30 
a recess was taken until 2 o'clock. 

Wednesday Afternoon. At 2 o'clock, after singing, and prayer by 
Rev. C. H. Taintor, of Illinois, the Illinois Home Missionary Society was 
represented by Rev. George H. Wilson, who spoke on "Twenty Years 
of Self-support ;" by Rev. Julian M. Sturtevant, on " Home Missions 
and Christian Institutions;" and by the State Secretary, Rev. James 
Tompkins, on "The Purpose and Plan for Further Progress." 

After singing, Rev. C. H. Taintor, Western Secretary of the Congre- 
gational Church Building Society, spoke on "Church Building in the 
Western Reserve." 

Rev. W. E. Barton, of Massachusetts, presented the " Work of Chris- 
tian Education in the Old West." 

The remainder of the afternoon was occupied by the Slavic Depart- 
ment, under the direction of Rev. Henry A. Schauffler. 

After singing by a Bohemian choir, addresses were delivered by Rev. 
John Prucha, pastor of the Bohemian Department of Bethlehem Church, 
Cleveland ; Rev. John Lewis, Polish missionary, Detroit, Michigan ; Rev. 
John Jelinek, missionary to Slovaks, Braddock, Pennsylvania ; Prof. L. 
F. Miskovsky, Principal of Oberlin Seminary, Slavic Department ; and 
Mr. Stech, a Slovak convert. 

Recess was then taken till 7:30 p.m. 

Wednesday Evening. — At 7:30, after singing, the Scriptures were 
read and prayer was offered by Rev. E. F. Williams, of Illinois. 

On motion of Rev. J. B. Clark, of New York, it was voted to fill 
vacancies in the Nominating Committee by the appointment of Rev. W. A. 
Robinson, of New York, Rev. G. M. Boynton, of Massachusetts, and 
Deacon D. N. Camp, of Connecticut. 



July, ii 



The Home Missionary 



Addresses were delivered by Rev. Leonard W. Bacon, of Con- 
necticut, on " One Hundred Years of Home Missions," and on " The 
New Mormonism," by Mr. Eugene Young, of New York, and Rev. C. W. 
Luck, of Utah. 

Rev. William G. Puddefoot, of Massachusetts, made the closing 
address and offered prayer. 

The benediction was pronounced by Rev. J. D. Kingsbury, of 
Massachusetts, and at ten o'clock the meeting adjourned until nine 
o'clock Thursday morning. 

Thursday Morning. — The Society came together at nine o'clock for 
a half hour of devotional service, led by Rev. H. G. Hodgdon, of 
Michigan. 

At 9:30 the Scripture was read by President Howard, and prayer was 
offered by Rev. A. A. "Myers, of Tennessee. 

Secretary J. B. Clark, of New York, presented the Annual Report of 
the Executive Committee, and, on motion, it was accepted. The report 
on the Annual Report of the Executive Committee was presented by Rev. 
W. A. Robinson, of New York, and, on motion, was accepted. 

Treasurer William B. Howland, of New Jersey, submitted the 
Treasurer's report, which, on motion, was accepted. 

It was voted that the reading of the Roll be omitted, and that the 
Recording Secretary pro tern., and the Assistant Recording Secretary, be 
authorized to complete it. The following names of Annual and Life 
Members were presented : 

ROLL 



James T. Brinckerhoff, 
Mrs. Harriet S. Casweli, 
Rev. Washington Choate, 
Rev. Joseph B. Clark, 
Gen. Oliver O. Howard, 



ANNUAL MEMBERS 
Officers 

William B. Howland, 
Rev. John D. Kingsbury, 
Rev. Thomas B. McLeod, 
Rev. R. R. Meredith, 
John H. Perry, 



Delegates from Churches 
Idaho 
Weiser, Rev. Charles W. Luck. 

Illinois 
Chicago, Rev. Edward F. Williams. 



Joseph Wm. Rice, 
Charles A. Savage, 
Asa A. Spear, 
Wm. Ives Washburn. 



Chicago, University, Hattie E. Kline. 

Indiana 
Anderson, Hope, Mrs. E. L. Crandall. 



Alas sack use Its 
Somerville, Clinton Hill, Miss Miriam L. 

Woodberry. 
Winchester, First, Mrs. Joshua Coit. 
Worcester, Plymouth, Rev. Rirfus M. Taft. 



Michigan 
Detroit, First, Mrs. George M. Lane. 
" Woodward Ave., N. J. Smith, Jr. 



The Home Missionary 



July, ii 



Greenville, Frank W. Hodgdon. 
Lansing, Rev. William H. Warren. 
Olivet, First, Rev. W. E. C. Wright. 
Salem, First, Dea. W. B. Thompson. 

" Second, Rev. William II. Hanaford. 

New Hampshire 

Portsmouth, North, Mrs. Laura E.Mathews. 

Neiv York 
West Bloomfield, Mrs. Newton W. Bates. 

Ohio 

Akron, West, Mrs. J. L. Davies. 

Mrs. W. E. Merriman. 

Andover, Home Miss. Soc. of Cong. Ch. 
Mrs. D. H. Christy. 

Berlin Heights, Miss E. Elvora Hine. 

Brecksville, Mrs. E. L. Bourn. 

Myrtle M. McCreery. 

Benton, Miss Ann C. Hitchcock. 

Chatham, Mrs. E. Ballon. 

Cleveland, Euclid Ave., Thomas Willson, 
M. II. Wood. 

Cleveland, Hough Ave., Miss Alice I .. 
Williams. 

Cleveland, Jones Ave., Rev. T. Henry 
Jones, Rees D. Lewis, T. H. Evans. 

Cleveland, Madison Ave., Charles E. Tay- 
lor. 

Cleveland, Olivet, Mrs. J. L. Young. 
Pilgrim, W. J. Sheppard. 
Plymouth, William J. Park. 

Elyria, Second, William M. Morse. 



Freedom, A. C. Whitney, Mrs. A. C. 

Whitney. 
Hudson, Miss Emily E. Metcalf. 

Rev. Charles H. Small, Ohio H. 

M. Soc. 
Hudson, Mrs. Charles H. Small. 
Jefferson, Mrs. L. J. Luethi. 
Kirtland, Rev. U. C. Bosvvorth. 

Mrs. L. A. M. Bosworth. 
Lorain, Ohio II. M. Soc, Thomas I). 

Phillips. 
Madison, Mrs. L. B. Wolfe. 
Medina, First, Rev. Barnard G. Mattson, 

Ohio State Asso. 
Medina, First, Mrs. A. E. Thomson. 

" Mrs. II. P. Foskett. 
North Amherst and Brownhelm, Rev. P. E. 

Harding, Mrs. P. E. Harding. 
North Fairfield, Rev. George AN'. Wells. 
Oberlin, Mrs. J. M. Merrill. 
Olmsted, Second, Rev. John Patchin. 
Saybrook, First, Rev. C. L. Johnson. 
Tallmadge, O. S. Treat. 
Toledo, Central, Mrs. G. B. Brown. 

Ohio State Asso., Rev. Albert M. 

Hyde. 
Unionville, Mrs. H. A. N. Richards. 

Miss L. Estelle Cleveland. 
Wakeman, Second, John M. Whiton. 
Whittlesey, Miss Eva Hartman. 

Vermont 

Bennington, Second, Miss Annie C. Park. 



LIFE MEMBERS 





A rizona 


Rev. 


( leorge II. Wilson, 




Michigan 


Mrs. 


J. H. Heald. 


Mrs. 


Edwin R. Cheney, 


Rev. 


Nehemiah Boynton 


1 )avi 


Connecticut 

d X. (amp, 


Rev. 


L. P. Rose. 
Kansas 


J. W 
Rev. 


. Bradshaw, 

Jno. P. Sanderson. 


Rev. 


Charles W. Shelton. 


Rev. 


L. P. Broad. 




New Mexico 


Rev. 


Illinois 
Moritz E. Eversz, 


Rev. 


Massachusetts 
Charles R. Bliss, 


Rev. 
Mrs. 


Frank II. Allen, 
Frank II. Allen. 


Rev 


. ]. Ilenn, 


Rev. 


Joshua Coit, 




New York 


J- c. 


Rilner, 


Fran 


k ( '. lloyt, 


Rev. 


Newton Y* . Bates, 


Rev. 


j. M. Sturtevant, 


Mrs. 


Louise A. Kellogg, 


Rev. 


Frank S. Fitch, 


Rev. 


Charles H. Taintor, 


Rev. 


W. G. Puddefoot, 


Mrs. 


William Kincaid, 


Rev. 


James Tompkins, 


Rev, 


Charles B. Rice. 


Rev. 


Henry G. Miller, 



July, ii 



The Home Missionary 



Rev. Wm. A. Robinson, 
Rev. Albert L. Smalley, 
Mrs. Albert L. Smalley. 

North Dakota 
Rev. John L. Maile. 

Ohio 
Mrs. E. C. Ballod, 
Emma L. Brown, 
Rev. G. A. Burgess, 
Rev. Wm. Eugene Cadmus, 
Rev. Dennis H. Christy, 
Miss Anna Cooke, 
J. G. W. Cowles, 
Miss Caroline E. Crandall, 
Prof. A. H. Currier, 
Rev. Charles Cutler, 
Rev. Wm. L. Dawson, 
Rev. C. E. Dickinson, 
Rev. S. C. Dickinson, 



W. J. Dickinson, 
Mrs. W. J. Dickinson, 
Rev. Sylvester R. Dole, 
A. W. Eldred, 
H. Clark Ford, 
Rev. John G. Eraser, 
Mrs. A. R. Hale, 
A. M. Hinman, 
Rev. Wm. J. Jacobs, 
Rev. Henry M. Ladd, 
Rev. James H. McKee, 
Rev. E. T. MacMahon, 
Rev. David Marcelius, 
L. F. Mellen, 
Rev. Charles S. Mills, 
Dea. James W. Moore, 
Mrs. James W. Moore, 
Dana J. Pratt, 
Hinds Smith, 
Rev. Charles A. Stroup, 



Mrs. Charles A. Stroup, 
Rev. A. W. Swengel, 
Rev. Livingston L. Taylor, 
Rev. Clarence A. Vincent, 
Mrs. George W. Wells, 
A. J. Williamson, 
Mrs. W. H. Winans, 
Rev. Joseph Wolfe. 

Oregon 
Rev. Cephas F. Clapp. 

Pennsylvania 
Rev. R. R. Davies, 
Rev. Thomas W. Jones. 

Texas 
Rev. Luther Rees. 

Wisconsin 
Rev. Homer W. Carter, 
Rev. Jona. G. Smith. 



It was voted that the thanks of the Society be given to the Rev. 
Thomas B. McLeod, of New York, for his pertinent and suggestive 
sermon, and that a copy of it be requested for publication. 

It was voted that the minutes, the sermon, and the report of the 
Executive Committee be printed, and also other papers, addresses, and 
reports, at the discretion of the Executive Committee. 

Rev. R. R. Meredith, of New York, called up the constitutional 
amendment of which notice was given last year. After full discussion 
the amendment was tabled, and notice was given by Rev. T. B. McLeod, 
of New York, of an amendment to the Constitution at the next annual 
meeting. The amendment proposed that the third and fourth clauses 
of Article V. of the Constitution shall read as follows : " That the Execu- 
tive Committee shall be arranged in five divisions of three each, one 
division shall be elected by ballot by the Society each year, at the Annual 
Meeting, to serve for five years, and the members elected shall be 
ineligible for a reelection for one year after the close of their term." 

On motion of Rev. R. R. Meredith, of New York, as amended by 
Rev. C. S. Mills, of Ohio, it was 

" Resolved, That the Executive Committee be instructed to take all steps which in their 
judgment are necessary in order that in case the amendment to the Constitution proposed 
for action next year shall be adopted it may go into immediate operation." 

The motion as amended was carried. 

The Committee on Nominations made a report, which was accepted, 
and the persons nominated were chosen by ballot, as follows : 



The Home Missionary July, ii 



PRESIDENT 
Oliver O. Howard, of Vermont. 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 

Joseph R. Hawley, of Connecticut, 
Rev. John K. McLean, of California, 
Wyixis W. Baird, of Illinois, 
Rev. Edwin B. Webb, of Massachusetts, 
Harvey J. Hollister, of Michigan, 
Nelson Dingley, Jr., of Maine, 
Rev. Edward P. Goodwin, of Illinois, 
Cornelius D. Wood, of New York, 
Rev, Edward D. Eaton, of Wisconsin. 

RECORDING SECRETARY 
Rev. William H. Holman, of Connecticut. 

AUDITOR 
George S. Edgell, of New York. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.— TO SERVE UNTIL 1901 

William Ives Washburn, of New York, 
Rev. John D. Kingsbury, of Massachusetts, 
Rev. Charles H. Richards, of Pennsylvania, 
Hon. John II. Perry, of Connecticut, 
George W. Hebard, of New York. 

On the Report of the Executive Coin mi t tee for 1S99. — Rev. L. L. Taylor, of Ohio ; 
Rev. James Brand, of Ohio ; Deacon D. N. Camp, of Connecticut ; H. Clark Ford, 
of Ohio, and LuciEN C Warner, of New York. 

Mr. A. A. Spear, of New York, read a report of the Committee on " The Relation 
between the National and the State Society." On motion, the report was accepted and 
referred to the next Annual Convention. 

On motion of H. Clark Ford, it was Resolved, that this Society- 
favor a joint Annual Meeting of the National Missionary Societies repre- 
senting the Congregational Churches of the United States. That the 
Executive Committee of this Society be authorized to communicate this 
action to the other Societies, and to make any and all arrangements neces- 
sary to carry into effect this resolution. That this action be communicated 
to the National Council of the Congregational Churches of the United 
States, which convenes next month in Portland, Oregon, with the request 
that the National Council give this memorial its favorable consideration. 

Voted, That the reading of the Minutes be dispensed with, and that 
they be referred to the Executive Committee for Correction. 

At one o'clock the meeting adjourned. 



July, 1898 The Home Missionary 7 

Thursday Afternoon. — At two o'clock the Society came together, 
and devotional services were conducted by Rev. Charles A. Savage, of 
New Jersey. 

Addresses were delivered by Rev. Samuel H. Willey, of California, 
on "California in '49" ; and by Rev. George M. Boynton, of Massa- 
chusetts, on " Sunday-School Work on the Pacific Coast." 

Addresses were made by the following representatives from the field : 
Rev. M. E. Eversz, of Illinois ; Rev. Luther Rees, of Texas ; Rev. 
John L. Maile, of North Dakota ; Rev. C. F. Clapp, of Oregon. 

At five o'clock a recess was taken until 7:30. 

Thursday Evening. — In the absence of General Howard, Rev. 
Joshua Coit, of Massachusetts, presided. 

At 7:30, after singing, prayer was offered by Rev. G. A. Burgess, of 
Ohio, and the following resolution was adopted : 

Resolved, That the thanks of the Congregational Home Missionary Society are 
hereby extended to the churches and pastors of this city for their invitation and cordial 
reception, and especially to Plymouth Church and its pastor, who have opened their 
church house for the sessions of this Annual Meeting. 

Also, to Mrs. Taylor, the wife of the pastor of this church, and to her band of 
young ladies for their most efficient service at the meeting of the Woman's Department. 

Also, to those who have led in the services of song, and to the organist and choir for 
their aid in worship. 

Also, to the officers of the railroads, both East and West, for their courtesy in con- 
ceding reduced rates to those attending this meeting. 

The following resolution was unanimously adopted by a rising vote : 
In view of the fact that this Seventy-second Anniversary of the Con- 
gregational Home Missionary Society is made memorable by the presence 
of Rev. Samuel H. Willey, of San Francisco, who was commissioned by 
this Society just fifty years ago to labor in California, and who, at the age 
of almost fourscore years, has crossed the Rocky Mountains to partici- 
pate in this meeting, 

Resolved, That this Society most heartily appreciates the long and faithful service of 
the Rev. Samuel H. Willey, in the cause of Christian Education and the extension of 
Christ's Kingdom on the Pacific Coast, and we pray the benediction of heaven to rest 
upon him as he turns his face again towards the Golden Sunset. 

Resolved, That we give expression to this our appreciation, and our prayer, by a ris- 
ing vote. 

After singing by the choir, addresses were made by Mrs. L. Tichenor 
Bailey, on " The Opportunity in Alaska " ; and on " The Twentieth 
Century City and Home Missions," by Rev. Josiah Strong, of New 
York ; Rev. Washington Gladden, of Ohio ; and Rev. R. R. Meredith, 
of New York. 



8 The Home Missionary July, 1898 

Closing prayer was offered, and the benediction was pronounced by 
the Rev. Samuel H. Willey, of California. 

At 10:30 the Seventy-second annual meeting of the Congregational 
Home Missionary Society was adjourned. 

Charles W. Shelton, 

Recording Secretary pro tern. 
James T. Brinckerhoff, 

Assistant Recording Secretary. 

CHRISTIANIZING OUR CITIES 

By Rev. Thomas B. McLeod, D.D. 

[Extracts from the Annual Sermon, in Cleveland, June 7, 1S98. — Text : Luke xix. 41. 
"And when he was come near he beheld the city, and wept over it."] 

" Brethren, a new situation confronts us. The problem of the 
churches of America to-day is The American City, and the kind of 
character and destiny ahead of the Republic is to be determined by the 
way in which we go about the solution of this problem. Whatever the 
problem may have been when this Society was organized and its policy 
denned, the problem to-day is the city. 

" Between the various classes, which are yearly on the increase in our 
cities, and the church, a great gulf is fixed; a gulf which, alas ! is not being 
bridged, but rather widened and deepened by much that passes under the 
name of philanthropy. We have in these last days developed a fad for 
slumming, and the prime preparation for slumming seems to be a faculty 
for slurring the church. In order to have a proper compassion for the waif, 
for the outcast, for the newsboy and the chimney sweep, and the poor, 
abused laboring man, we must be able to upbraid the rich, to defy the 
cultured and the prosperous, and to ridicule cushioned pews and paid 
preachers. 

" The problem before us is attracting the attention and absorbing the 
thought of many men and women outside of the church. But I respect- 
fully submit that the problem is one which the Church of Jesus Christ 
alone can solve. When the humanitarian and the social reformer have 
had their say and spoken their last word about shorter hours and healthier 
homes, and public gardens and public parks, and public baths and free 
libraries, free lectures, free art galleries, free concerts, and a free Sabbath; 
about education and legislation and sanitation and arbitration, and propose 
these things as the necessary, all-sufficient means of social and civic redemp- 



July, 1898 The Home Missionary 9 

tion, then the church steps in and says : ' Gentlemen, these things which 
you propose as a remedy are a result ; they are not a producing power, 
but only the product of a power lying further back and deeper down. 
They are not a cause at all, but a consequence of the energy of Christ 
working through his church in the world.' 

" This is a problem for the church. She is the channel, the organized 
instrument of the power which alone can regenerate and redeem the 
city. The best that education can do is to put a weapon in a man's 
hand, but the man may be a villain or a saint. The best that legislation 
can do is to clip the tiger's claws. It cannot tame the tiger's nature. 
The best that moral reform can do is to provide a clean shirt, but the 
shirt may cover a putrescent heart. As well hope to cure an earthquake 
with porous plasters or extinguish Etna with a squirt-gun as to save the 
city by means of sociology. Men must be altered at the core. Change 
men, and their laws will change themselves. The social order will be 
just when men are just ; the social order will be kindly when men are 
kindly. Give men the gospel and you give them an entire new world. 
Give them the gospel and you make them temperate, industrious, frugal, 
self-respecting, patriotic, moral. Give them the gospel and they will see 
that it is better to be righteous than to be rich ; to have a good conscience 
than all earthly comforts. . . . 

" There is a peculiar fascination in the contemplation of this work to 
which the hour seems to call us. There is a fascination in the very 
material we are to work upon. Poor and untractable and unpromising as 
it appears, it is just the kind of material on which the gospel was 
meant to work and show its power. Indeed, the history of Christianity 
sets forth the gospel as a force which begins at the bottom and works 
upward. Even so up through the basement of the social fabric, up 
through the air of the lowest and least comely, by means of temperance, 
kindness, fortitude, patience, purity, and faith, the purifying inspirations of 
the spiritual heavens pass into the higher circles of society, up from the 
bottom to the top, up from Nazareth to Jerusalem, up from the carpenter's 
bench and the fishing smack to the front of the world. . . . 

" And, my brethren, what church is better adapted and equipped for 
this work than our own ? And as for the emergency which is upon us, 
and which I have been trying to describe, the church which stands among 
other churches with a peerless record ; the church which has achieved such 
magnificent results ; which has adapted herself with such marvelous 
alertness and elasticity to new situations and new problems as they have 
arisen, may be depended upon to meet and match and master the present 
crisis, and thus justify the largest expectations of her most devoted 
adherents." 



io The Home Missionary July, 1898 

OPENING ADDRESS OF THE PRESIDENT 

Maj.-Gen. O. O. Howard 

"Brethren of The Home Missionary Society: We have come 
together under circumstances very different from what we contemplated 
at our parting a year ago in Saratoga. We were then longing for a new 
baptism of the Holy Spirit both upon our workers and our contributors, 
and we were very earnestly inquiring of the Master how the apparent 
apathy could be broken up, and how the people could be induced to open 
their hearts and minds to more enthusiasm, more earnestness, more con- 
secration to the work of winning men to Christ. There appeared to be a 
lull, a quiet as before a storm, and all lovers of Christ who were especially 
devoted to his cause were very anxious with regard to the future. 

" Our Lord has his own ways of leading men. He has led our people 
and our President in a way since then that they did not dream of, step 
by step, to face the new difficulties and new problems. In my judgment 
he is requiring us, as he did in the days of slavery, to remove obstacles 
out of his path. The obstacles that have now come to the front are 
centuries of extortion, murder, assassination, the slaying of hundreds of 
thousands of innocent people by slow starvation and avarice, and a 
prolonged tyranny which no pen can describe. 

" As you will remember, we wanted to do all things by peaceful 
methods. We wanted to extend our influence from men to men and from 
nation to nation by fostering every element of peace and good will. We 
seemed to think that the gospel properly proclaimed and sufficiently pro- 
claimed would accomplish not only the redemption of our own society, 
but the reformation of nations. Arbitration we had settled upon as 
something that would cause all wars to cease, and all bloodshed and 
cruelty resulting therefrom. We looked at our own supreme court. We 
saw how difficulties of every nature were settled by its decisions between 
States, so that war between the States was not likely to occur again. 

" We strongly believed that if we could have a national tribunal like 
that of our supreme court somehow established, not very clearly defined 
to our minds, which would carry out its decisions into practical execution, 
no possible contingencies would arise to make war a possibility, a neces- 
sity ; and yet, with a President thoroughly Christian, conscientious to the 
last degree, loving peace and peaceful methods with all his heart, we have 
come into the midst of another war — between this nation and Spain. Our 
navy, promptly organized and quickly enlarged, has already struck heavy 
blows, and the army, more than 100,000 strong, stands ready or is 
already en route to seize and hold territory beyond the limits of our 
domain. 



July, 1898 The Home Missionary 11 

" I feel myself that nations have not yet progressed far enough, nor 
have peoples been yet thoroughly instructed enough in the principles of 
human liberty and righteous law, to warrant a reasonable expectancy of 
universal arbitration. The stream will not rise higher than its fountain, 
and the level of the international law is the highest reach nations can 
attain and hold at the beginning of the twentieth century. God grant 
that they may progress more and more till the Christ spirit shall rule in 
the earth ! 

"According to my own settled conviction the Lord himself is present 
in the affairs of nations ; and if he does not, as he doubtless does not, 
initiate conflicts like the one in which we are engaged, yet he overrules 
them to the removal of obstacles which stand in the way of human prog- 
ress. Our missionary has his part to perform. While we are carrying 
relief to the Cubans ; while we are intervening by force to extinguish 
infamous government and establish a stable and wholesome one in Cuba — 
let us remember to do nothing in hate, to entertain no malice, to cherish 
no spirit of revenge, but to go forth to our work and to our sacrifice with 
an earnest desire to do the will of the Almighty. To this end it will be 
necessary for every man to examine himself, to lay aside every weight 
and besetting sin, and to look constantly towards his Master, to be filled 
with his spirit, that he may accomplish his purpose. 

" Further, there has been no time when the Gospel should be preached 
with more fervor and more universality, if I may so speak. I have seen 
lately thousands of young men looking up into the face of those who have 
been proclaiming the good tidings, of those who have been able to show 
them the way out of darkness into light, out of discontent into content- 
ment. There never was a time when the whole home field needed more 
work and more sacrifice than now. So let us look to all the churches and 
to all the brethren who love our Saviour, and ask them to make unusual 
sacrifices that we may be prepared as a people for the work that is upon 
us and in prospect. 

" When peace comes and our hearts are united, north and south, east 
and west — oh, that we might be prepared to carry the glad tidings of great 
joy in simplicity and in thoroughness to all who come to us from other 
nations ! 

" Brethren, I would not in any way undertake to lead or constrain 
your own convictions of duty, but I beg of you at this epoch, which 
appears to me to be the beginning of convulsions and revolutions in 
human society, to put yourselves, you who are leaders in missionary work, 
in the attitude of diligent hearers, ready to receive such revelation as the 
Lord our Saviour may give you directly or out of his holy Word." 



12 The Home Missionary July, 1898 

SPECIAL COMMITTEE'S ANNUAL REPORT 

By Rev. W. A. Robinson, D.D. 

[ The report of the special committee to which the Annual Report of the Executive 
Committee was referred was presented by its chairman, the Rev. W. A. Robinson, D.D., 
of Middletown, N. Y. In part it was as follows :] 

The seventy-second annual report of the Executive Committee of the 
Congregational Home Missionary Society gives clear evidence of the con- 
tinued fidelity and efficiency of the officers and missionaries of the 
Society, and inspiring tokens of the rich blessings of God upon their 
work. The number of deaths in the working force of missionaries has 
been smaller than usual, only seven names being marked with the star. 
The summary of the reports shows 1,681 home missionaries employed 
the past year in forty-four States and Territories. The churches and 
stations regularly supplied number 2,758, and many others have been 
supplied at irregular intervals. The Sunday-schools number 2,132, with 
nearly 160,000 scholars under the care of the missionaries. There have 
been 7,747 hopeful conversions reported, and 9,193 persons have been 
added to the aided churches, two-thirds of whom come on confession of 
faith. The Woman's Department has in this its sixteenth year, forty-one 
State Unions, that have contributed to the treasury nearly $44,000. It 
has given within the twelve months past over $100,000 to the treasuries 
of our five societies associated in work in the home land. Within twelve 
years the Woman's Department has thus contributed nearly one million 
of dollars. There has been an increase in the amount raised of $17,287 
above the previous year, and a reduction in the indebtedness of the 
Society by$2r,oo4, leaving the present debt 106,500. There is a slight 
increase in the aggregate of receipts, but not enough to warrant the 
holding of the work up to its full vigor and natural growth. The country 
has been gaining in population and wealth in a marked degree, but 
commensurate enlargement of home missionary work has not been 
possible, though the calls for it have been pressing and the opportunity 
critical. In growing cities and in important country fields, in the older 
States with their pressing problems, and on the frontier where founda- 
tions must be laid at once or never so readily begun, the Society has not 
been able to enter into the fields that are ready. Our churches ought no 
longer to permit the losses and the embarrassments that lack of funds 
entails. Three points especially impress us : 

First. — That the field occupied by this Society is coming more and 
more fully to be covered by our auxiliaries. The States in New England, 
as well as New York, Ohio, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin and Iowa have 



July, 1898 The Home Missionary 13 

auxiliary societies taking care each of its own field, and other States will 
ere long assume the same responsibility. It is indispensable to the best 
prosperity of the whole work that the special interests of one locality or 
section should never be suffered to eclipse in our view the united efficiency 
of all parts of the great whole, but that there should continue the hearty 
support of the parent Society. Loyalty should induce generous and 
cordial cooperation in the general work which comes especially under 
the management of the national organization. 

Second. — The increased demand that comes upon the Home Mission- 
ary Society to meet the exigencies of our national growth. Two new 
phases of the demand occasioned by our national expansion just now 
confront us. The rush to the Klondike gold region has suddenly 
rolled upon Christian America the duty of providing the ministries 
of the Gospel for multitudes in Alaska. The beginnings made by the 
Rev. Loyal L. Wirt are likely to prove to be the inception of a work 
which will soon assume far greater magnitude. 

Third. — Another field is likely soon to be thrust upon our care by the 
probable issue of the present war. Already at Tampa a promising 
beginning has been made by the Rev. E. P. Herrick, in his services with 
Cuban refugees. Should Cuba come under the oversight of our republic, 
who better than the American Congregationalists can minister to the 
religious needs of the Cuban people, emerging from the oppressions and 
sufferings which a country dominated by Papal superstition has imposed 
upon them ? Other societies than ours may appropriately look after the 
welfare of the negroes and mixed races there, but the Cubans proper, so 
far as accessible to Protestant influences, may most fitly be reached and 
helped by this Society. It certainly will be wise for our officers to be 
alert to the demands that may come, and for our gifts to make it possible 
that when the hour of opportunity strikes, they may go forward. If our 
patriotism and our faith move us to pray for the triumph of our noble 
sailors and soldiers, we cannot fail to honor the call which that triumph 
must make upon our home missionary enterprise and devotion. 

The ability and duty of our supporting churches and individuals must 
as fully as possible be impressed upon their attention. It may be that 
the cry of hard times interferes with consecrated giving where there is no 
warrant for it. The artificial demands of modern civilization greatly 
increase the expense of living, and class as necessities and essential com- 
forts things which a few years ago were hardly known or were considered 
as mere luxuries. This diminishes the giving of many a Christian, and 
cuts off also the providing by generous bequests to benevolent causes for 
a noble post mortem usefulness. It is stated by Dr. Strong, in his recent 
book, entitled " The Twentieth Century City," that our country is gain- 
ing material wealth at the rate of seven millions of dollars a day. Over 



14 The Home Missionary July, 1898 

one-fifth of our population are affiliated with the churches of our country, 
and this part of the population is not the poorest. But supposing that 
these Christian people were only one-seventh of the whole, the million 
dollar per day increase in wealth ought to insure the means for an ample 
and noble support of all the agencies of the Christian civilization. Let 
emphasis be laid upon our ability, and then let the supreme motive — 
the love of Christ — arouse and impel us to plan liberally and act nobly in 
meeting the responsibilities laid upon us in our day and generation. 



HOW CAN WOMAN BEST SERVE THE COUNTRY? 

By Mrs. Alice Freeman Palmer 
[From her Address at the Annual Meeting of the Woman's Department] 

It happened that only two years ago Mr. James Bryce, of England, 
was saying good-by to two American friends, and as this great member 
of Parliament — who has written the best book about us that was ever writ- 
ten — the man who understands us in our political aspirations the best, said 
good-by, he took their hands and said : " Don't make a failure of it in 
America ; you can go on twenty-five years more in your cities as you have 
been going the last twenty-five years and not make a failure of it. Don't 
you do it, for if you do you will set us Liberals back in Europe one hun- 
dred years." 

Ladies and gentlemen, this morning I have seemed to hear Mr. Bryce 
saying over again to us : " Don't you make a failure of it in America." 
His message was before this great relapse into the barbarism of war, which, 
as a Christian republic, we had never believed this generation could behold 
again. 

With such a message as my friend's ringing in my ears, you ask " how 
the women can best serve the country." And the question is asked of us 
women in a Christian church in the heart of our great nation, with the 
flags shutting us in on every side. And we are here, on this lovely June 
day, with the memories that on both sides of our great ocean the trans- 
ports are carrying our sons to battle. They are going across the Atlantic, 
and we wait for the guns to speak again. They are hurrying across the 
Pacific to die in the islands that most of us knew nothing about last Christ- 
mas. What does it mean, and what is the message to us women, us Chris- 
tian women, during this tremendous crisis in our history as a Christian 
nation ? 

I aeed not ask you what some women have done to serve their coun- 
try. I need not ask you what Clara Barton is doing to serve her country 



Hy. l8 9 8 The Home Missionary 15 

to-day, and I need not ask you, when we sing the great " Battle Hymn of 
the Republic," what Julia Ward Howe has done, though in her quiet home, 
in her quiet New England city, with her little children about her, she was 
brave enough and prophetic enough to write : 

" In the beauty of the lilies Christ was born across the sea ; 
Since he died to make men holy, let us die to make men free." 

That is what our boys sing on the way to Cuba. 

I need not ask what Frances Willard has done to serve her country. 
And surely I need not ask any Clevelander what Flora Stone Mather has 
done, and what Mrs. Johnston, now at Oberlin, has done, and what many 
another quiet mother and teacher has done to serve her country. 

The little district school teacher in the woods is answering the question 
of what Christian women can do to-day in this country as effectively as 
Hobson is answering it in his fashion on the Merrimac. And the day may 
come, if the district school teacher is faithful, when the boys that could 
not lie in the schoolhouse and keep the flag floating over them, cannot do 
it in the State capital or at Washington. 

What shall we women do to best serve our country to-day ? What are 
we doing ? You gentlemen have taken the tremendous responsibility in 
your hands this last thirty years since the great Civil War, for the first time 
in any civilized nation — in any nation, therefore — this experiment : You 
are having the vast majority of the voters of the nation of the next gen- 
eration educated entirely at the hands of women ; the vast number of our 
boys who are to be our men, our public-school boys, they are educated in 
the public schools — and the vast majority of them, alas! never get beyond 
the primary and the grammar school before they go out to the hard battle 
of life — and practically all the teachers of all the boys of the primary and 
grammar schools of the nation are educated entirely by women, and mostly 
by young women. That is one way in which we are serving the country. 

We must, secondly, have not only knowledge to serve our country with, 
but imagination. I have sometimes thought if Paul should come back 
and stand in our churches to-day he would add a word to these eager, am- 
bitious American women of ours : " One sin of your world is the lack of 
imagination." Let us be, as we say we are, one church and one land, free 
and strong in imagination." Let us use imagination. Let us bring the 
personal to bear. Let us be, as we say we are, one church and one land, 
free and strong and glad. Let us accept, with older people, fathers and 
mothers, the sacrifices of our girls as well as of their brothers. 

A splendid woman told me the other day that she did not dare to refuse 
her son his wish to enlist to serve his country. She said : " It breaks my 
heart, but I am so proud of him, and I dare not hold him at home." But 



1 6 The Home Missionary July, 1898 

two years ago she did refuse the request of one of her four daughters to 
go into home mission work. She dared do that. 

How shall we serve our country? By knowing it, by seeing it with the 
eye of the great loving imagination ; by giving royally, largely, gladly, as 
every one of us does give when we know, when we see, when we love. 

Just thirty years ago the edict went forth for religious toleration in 
Spain. If during all those thirty years we Christian men and women of 
America had spent just one day's cost of this war in the Christian educa- 
tion which our American girls would like to have carried there from our 
churches, do you reflect that we need never have given the life of one of 
our boys to free Cuba ? The women and girls of Spain would have made 
her free ; and out of a Massachusetts home, out of our Congregational 
churches, there went, not long after that edict, a Massachusetts girl, the 
wife of a young Congregational minister, a Mount Holyoke girl ; they 
went there together, with a wickedly small pittance, that ought to 
make every one of us blush when we think of it, and they have starved 
and struggled and fought until her girls — Alice Gordon Gulick's pupils, 
that she has educated, every one of them a Protestant woman — have in their 
schools in Spain to-day more young girls there training than all the men 
we are following up in Santiago harbor, trying to get at them in the fleet. 

Now, I say this because you ask me how we can serve our country. 
Let us serve it as Alice Gordon Gulick has served it and her God. In 
helping to conquer the land we are conquering now and conquering hos- 
tilely. Let us be wiser now ; let as spend the cost of the great war in this 
great peaceful warfare which we men and women will wage together to 
save America, that so she may help to save the world. 



OUR OPPORTUNITY IN ALASKA 

By Mrs. Lydia Tichenor Bailey, of Washington 

After giving a brief, realistic description of the character of the country 
and of the men who have rushed thither in search for gold, Mrs. Bailey 
said in part : 

" The deep need of these men, mentally and spiritually, is apparent. 
The climate is against them. The extremes of heat and cold are appalling. 
The winter, with its long nights and short, dreary days, is depressing in 
the extreme. They are deprived of social life, home life, church life, with 
no newspapers or magazines or libraries of any description, with no means 
of communication with the outside world. Without a stout heart the 
average man falls a prey to melancholy and despair. What shall be the 



July, 1898 The Home Missionary 17 

character of the outside help ? The saloon, as usual, has given a prompt, 
ready answer, and spares no pains in furnishing diversion. The demoral- 
izing dance hall, with all its accompaniments, follows these men, to teach 
them to forget their loneliness and their manhood. 

" Our work as Congregationalists in helping to shape and mold this 
new world has already begun. Heretofore we have left this Territory 
wholly to other denominations with the exception of the little A. M. A. 
mission at Cape Prince of Wales. Now, however, we have decided to 
share in this work, and Mr. Loyal L. Wirt has gone as missionary super- 
intendent for Alaska. He stopped first at Juneau, where the population 
is estimated at from 5,000 to 9,000. As there is but one evangelical church 
there, and that but poorly attended, he felt that there was a need of our 
work, especially as the people seemed ready to give him an enthusiastic 
welcome. On Douglass Island, near Juneau, where the great Treadwell 
mines are, the population is about 2,000, and no church organization and 
no regular service on the island. Mr. Wirt has hired, and with the aid of 
the people equipped, a hall at each place. He expected to organize a 
church and Sunday-school at once. Mr. Wirt is impressed with the great 
need of these coast cities in Alaska, as well as the interior. He pleads 
for more workers to be sent at once, as he wants good men for these 
churches, that he may go to the regions beyond. This call will be 
heeded. We feel sure of it, for this is the Christian Endeavor mission, 
and if the one hundredth part of the missionary enthusiasm generated in 
this great convention can be utilized and directed to this work, not one 
missionary or two, but a half score of men will be sent to these gold fields 
to occupy these important posts and save them for the nation and for 
Christ." 



THE FIFTH WHEEL 

[At the recent Annual Meeting of the Woman's State Organizations in Cleveland, Mrs. 
Caswell was asked to read a brief paper (to be followed by discussion) upon the following 
subject : "Is the Woman's Home Missionary Organization the Fifth Wheel to the Mis- 
sionary Coach ? " 

In response to requests that the paper be published, we give it space in this issue of 
The Home Missionary. Copies for the use of officers of the State Unions or of Auxilia- 
ries can be had on application to the Woman's Department.] 

Is the Woman's Home Missionary Organization the fifth wheel to the 
missionary coach ? The encyclopaedia tells me that the " fifth wheel is a 
wheel above the fore axle of a carriage, forming a support to prevent the 
careening of the carriage-bed." In this sense the woman's organization 
has been for these last years the " fifth wheel," to support and hold the 



18 The Home Missionary July, 1898 

missionary coach steadily on its way. The question then is, not whether 
this " fifth wheel " is needed, but whether the Woman's Home Missionary 
Union should be compelled in the coming century to furnish the entire 
support to the missionary coach. 

It is already an alarming symptom that our boys regard missions as dis- 
tinctively belonging to mother and sister as does the household cooking, 
bed-making, sewing, etc. Mrs. Joseph Cook says, " Really, I see no 
future for our Missionary Boards unless they begin to educate and inter- 
est and enlist the boys, and so train a constituency on whom they can 
depend." 

"Together" is a good word in this connection. ''And God said, It 
is not good that man should be alone ; I will make an helpmeet for him." 
"When Adam saw her, he said, This is now bone of my bone, and flesh of 
my flesh." Is there any significance in the fact that God blessed them 
together, and gave them together dominion over every living thing upon the 
earth ? Jesus said, "What, therefore, God hath joined together let no man 
put asunder." Does the sex line in missions have a tendency to put them 
asunder ? 

Says Mrs. Ide, " Is not together the rallying cry to raise just now in 
the church family ? Club women are agitating the question of " mixed 
clubs." A federation president recently said in a convention speech, "Let 
us make our own State federation broad enough to include men." Woman 
needed this organization. Nothing is effectual without system and or- 
ganization. She needed to learn business methods in mission work. 
"She has learned her lesson," says Mrs. Ide; "but while learning it she 
has gone from the golden mean to the tiresome extreme, and burdened 
herself with organizations too numerous to mention. The hair-splitting 
of collections, the turning aside of collections from our great benevolences 
into other channels, are some of the results of so many separate societies. 
Why not reorganize into "Together Societies" ? Really, now, wouldn't 
it be a relief, for a change, to belong to nothing but the original mission- 
ary society, "The Church"? Why not belong to it together and pull 
mightily together with zeal and heroism, in the work of the spiritual king- 
dom, taking for our motto that of the Student Volunteers and Endeavor- 
ers : " Loyalty to the church" ? We are doing a grand work as a woman's 
organization. W T e do not wish to make any change that will cause a back- 
ward step; but we will not hesitate to give our careful attention to any 
movement that will advance the cause for which we freely give our time, 
strength, money, and prayers. 

How can a change be effected, to insure greater interest among the 
men and boys, that will not diminish the interest of women and thus 
diminish the receipts to the Missionary Societies? The following sugges-' 
tions may at least open the discussion : 



July, 1898 The Home Missionary 19 

1. Drop the letter " W " from the published list of our organizations, 
calling them Home Missionary Organizations. Thus all are admitted 
without regard to sex or age. 

2. Elect the State officers as follows : President, a man ; Vice-Presi- 
dent, a woman ; Recording Secretary, a man ; Corresponding Secretary, 
a woman ; Treasurer, a man ; Assistant Treasurer, a woman. For the 
Auxiliaries : President, the pastor ; Vice-President, a woman. The other 
officers follow the order of the State officers. For the associations : Two 
Vice-Presidents for each — a man and a woman. 

3. The " Church Missionary Meeting " to be held on a Sabbath even- 
ing once a month. 

4. Let the Church of Christ return to the purpose of its organization, 
and become the great missionary center. Let all offerings from Home or 
Foreign Missionary Societies, Christian Endeavorers, King's Sons and 
Daughters, Mission Circles, and the Sunday-school flow into the church 
treasury, and through the church treasurer be sent to the National So- 
cieties as designated in the church report, giving each department credit 
for its offering. We should never again read in our magazines, " Church, 
$r ; Ladies' Missionary Society, $70," as though the church and the 
woman's society were two distinct organizations, with the church side- 
tracked while the other passes swiftly out of sight on the main line. 

Objection 1. — If we drop the letter " W," women will lose their in- 
terest. 

Answer. — If the interest of woman centers in that letter " W " she 
needs a "divine revelation." 

Objection 2. — You put men into office, but what time have men for 
work ? The woman, after all, must bear the burden. 

Answer. — Very likely. But if she is wise she will appeal to the man 
for aid and suggestion, and secure his cooperation. 

Objection 3. — If woman must do the work, why not call it still a 
woman's organization ? 

Answer. — The woman manages the household affairs ; but is the home 
called the woman's house ? The woman manages the affairs of society ; 
but is society therefore called woman's society? In all these matters and 
many others the woman takes the lead ; but the man cooperates with her 
to the extent of his ability. Women are* now associated with men in our 
colleges and universities; but do we for this reason call them Woman's In- 
stitutions? Young men and women work together in the Christian En- 
deavor Societies; but you never call these Woman's Societies. There 
seems to be no difficulty in organizing and carrying on with marked suc- 
cess cooperative institutions of learning and Christian Endeavor enter- 
prises. Why not have a cooperative church missionary society combining 
all missionary effort in each church ? 



20 The Home Missionary July, 1898 

Objection 4. — If women do not come together to pray and work for 
missions, and study missions, and circulate the literature and teach the 
children, how can the missionary interest be kept alive ? 

Answer. — The " Cooperative Church Society " does not hinder women 
coming together by themselves. In fact, this will be quite necessary, be- 
cause they must do much of the work of preparation for the monthly 
church missionary meeting. The men have little time for detail work. 
Women who are associated with men in study and social life meet by 
themselves for special consultation ; why not for missionary consultation ? 

While in New Mexico I saw people following the customs in dress and 
living that belonged to the seventeenth century. Women were constantly 
enduring the agony of inconvenience in every detail of work. When 
asked "Why?" the invariable answer was, "Our forefathers lived and 
dressed and cooked in this way." Shall we pursue nineteenth-century 
methods if the twentieth-century methods beckon us to enlarged effort 
in the interests of the spiritual kingdom ? 

CALIFORNIA IN 1849 

Bv Rev. Samuel H. Willey, D.D., a California Pioneer 

While speeding across the continent to attend the anniversary of this 
Society, it almost seemed as if I should find here the men whom I left in 
charge of it forty-nine years ago — Dr. Badger and Dr. Hall, its secre- 
taries; and among its executive officers Drs. Leonard Bacon, Joseph P. 
Thompson, William Adams, Asa D.Smith, E. F. Hatfield, Mr. Christopher 
R. Robert, Mr. Jasper Corning, and others — but I look for them in vain. 
Almost half a continent had j«st* been added to our country's domain, a 
vast territory, as yet unoccupied and but little known. 

The year 1846 was "the year of destiny " for the Territories of Oregon 
and California. It was on the 15th day of the month of June in that year 
that the long-pending question of our northern boundary was settled 
with Great Britain, giving us all of what has since come to be the two 
States, Oregon and Washington ; and in less than one month thereafter, 
namely, on the 7th day of July, our flag went up in California, which in- 
cluded also what is now Nevada, Utah, and Arizona. Those men were 
quick to see the significance of these events. They studied the map of 
the world. They saw that the globe was marked by four grand distinc- 
tive lines, having the general direction of north and south. These are the 
four ocean shores of the eastern and western continents. They saw that 
the shores of western Europe and eastern America were occupied, and 



July, 1898 The Home Missionary 21 

that upon them " is concentrated all the regenerative elements on the 
globe." Looking at the other ocean shores, they saw that that of eastern 
Asia was occupied by the densest mass of heathenism, while over against 
it that of western America was vacant, and that now, as it were in a single 
day, that shore had come to be a part of our own country. That fact 
alone was enough to make certain its early settlement, and the transfer 
thither of our laws, civilization, and religion. And they inferred at once 
that those forces, working for human welfare on both shores of the Atlantic, 
ought to be set at work on our shore of the Pacific for the regeneration 
of the masses of mankind inhabiting China, Japan, and the islands of the 
western sea. They recognized at once the responsibility devolved upon 
this Society, which they represented, and, though they were overburdened 
with the work in this great central West, they did not hesitate to begin it 
at once on the shores of the Pacific. They knew well the constituency of 
the Society for which they were acting — the churches and the pastors, the 
men and the women — and they had full confidence that this new under- 
taking would be sustained. They acted promptly. 

Before one year went round they had their first missionary under ap- 
pointment for Oregon, Rev. George H. Atkinson, to sail by way of Cape 
Horn, who arrived there in June, 1848, just fifty years ago. And before 
that year ended two others, commissioned for California, were on their 
way to that Territory, going by way of the Isthmus of Panama, on the 
first trip of the new steamship line. 

During the preparation for this mission there was really very little 
known concerning the country so recently acquired from Mexico, nothing 
at all concerning any discovery of gold. We expected that the country 
would be settled gradually, as other Western States had been ; that the 
people would be employed in the ordinary industries of American life, 
building them homes in towns and cities. We had heard that since the 
American occupancy, this process of settlement had already begun. We 
knew that there was a town called San Francisco, and that there was a 
small weekly paper published there, named "The Star." We had seen a 
copyof that paper, dated March 13, 1847, not quite a year after the change 
of flag, which said that "from 3,000 to 5,000 houses, probably, will go up 
here this year; " and another copy of the paper, dated May 8, said that 
" a meeting of citizens was held last evening for the purpose of ascertain- 
ing the prevailing sentiment in relation to the establishment of a church in 
the town of San Francisco." These things, among others, made it very 
clear that no time ought to be lost in establishing the institutions of the 
gospel in this newly acquired territory. But, though so little was known 
of these vast regions that pour their waters into the Pacific ocean, it was 
manifest that they were about to be used in the interest of a new de- 
velopment of Christ's Kingdom. The people qualified for the work were 



22 The Home Missionary July, 1898 

ready. Populations would flow in. Cities and States would arise, and the 
question what should be their character must be determined during their 
growth. There must be trained there a missionary people, awake to their 
opportunity as neighbors of so large a portion of mankind on the oppo- 
site ocean shore, perishing without the knowledge of the gospel. Com- 
merce would come to their aid, and a growing intercourse, opening the 
prospect of future Christian triumphs new and inspiring. 

It was in view of such facts and motives that the Society's mission 
was planned and entered upon, fifty years ago. 

On our way from New York to the Isthmus our steamship ran up to 
New Orleans, about December 15, 1848, to exchange mails. While there 
what should meet us but the authentic news of the discovery of gold in 
California, and the resulting revolution in industry; social conditions, and 
cost of living — in one hour throwing our plans and anticipations into 
chaos and uncertainty. Mining for the precious metals was a business then 
unknown to our American industry. How could a mining country grow 
into the conditions of a civilized and Christian State? We thought of 
Mexico, and the prospect was not assuring. 

We kept on our way with a suddenly-gathered crowd of men, most of 
them undesirable in the extreme, as settlers of a new State. 

But in due time we reached California. The very first sight of the 
country filled us with wonder. The Bay of San Francisco, an inland sea, 
with its islands, bordered by fertile plains and circling hills, made up a 
landscape of beauty such as we had never seen before. And beyond the 
Contra Costa range were the great valleys of the Sacramento and the San 
Joaquin, while eastward still, away in the distance, stood the Sierra 
Nevada mountains, snow-capped, and rising into the region of clouds. 
On the other hand lay the Pacific Ocean, waiting to make us neighbors 
to those vast masses of mankind inhabiting its opposite shores, to whom 
we hoped somehow to be of some service. And here our country's flag 
was waving in the bright spring sunlight, bespeaking a new authority, our 
own national authority over all, now to invite the incoming of a new race 
of men. But coming down to the conditions around us, we found them 
strange and bewildering beyond description. As to business, there were 
two branches only — mining and furnishing supplies to the miners. There 
were, in the spring of '49, some 20,000 or 30,000 men at work in the foot- 
hills of the Sierras, and importing and forwarding them supplies employed 
San Francisco, a rough, ungraded town of some 8,000 or io,oco people, 
nearly all men, coming and going. It was a very rushing, noisy, reckless, 
busy place, but giving small promise of good for the future. There was 
not a Protestant church or house of worship or school of any kind in all 
California. One Protestant minister was in San Francisco, having come over 
from the Sandwich Islands while we were on the way, and was preaching 



July, 1898 The Home Missionary 23 

in what was once a schoolhouse, to those who cared to hear on the 
Sabbath. But the mass of the people hardly knew the Sabbath from any 
other day. Ships were arriving every day, passengers were landing and 
were pitching their tents in the chaparral and among the sand hills about 
the town, only to remain while getting ready to start for the mines ; 
goods were discharging from ships, and goods were being shipped to the 
miners ; miners were returning from the mountains, crowding the places 
of resort, strangers from many lands, speaking many languages. These 
things made all days alike, and filled them with a perpetual round of 
excitements, made intense in too many cases by strong drink and the 
gambler's passion. 

Outside of San Francisco and the miners, there was not much in 1849 
to engage the attention of the Home Missionary. Southern California 
was quite undisturbed by the excitement at the north, and kept on for 
years in its old style of life, there being but few English-speaking people 
there. But around the Bay of San Francisco some towns were springing 
up, and were in manifest need of Gospel ministry. Still other towns 
began to appear on the banks of the navigable rivers at points where 
miners' supplies were landed, to be transported thence by wagons. 
After San Francisco, these, of course, demanded first attention. In due 
time the mining camps must be visited in the mountains, in order to 
become acquainted with these new and strange conditions of life. But 
for a good while the possibilities of our missionary work were a study. 
The conditions were unexampled. A handful of Christian disciples was 
found in several places, but their continuance was in all cases exceedingly 
uncertain and their means very limited. If they were disposed to settle 
and be permanent, they could get no trustworthy title to any land. The 
whole country about the Bay of San Francisco and along the coast was 
covered by Mexican grants, some of which were valid, but many of which 
were fraudulent, and it was the work of many years to outlive the conse- 
quent legal disputes so that a man could safely buy him a home or a 
farm. Until he could do this he could not be expected to be very 
enthusiastic about building a church or a schoolhouse in the neighbor- 
hood. In San Francisco the places of worship, such as they were, were 
hard to find, even by those disposed to search for them ; and far too 
many, even, of those who in their Eastern homes always attended worship 
on the Sabbath, since they were here unknown in the midst of the crowds 
of strangers, let the day pass as did the rest. There were no associations 
connected with divine worship in a rough court room, a canvas tent, or in 
an unused carpenter shop, fitted up with benches. Nor were there in the 
miner's own costume — the pants and the red or blue flannel shirt. Con- 
gregations must be gathered at once in San Francisco, and as soon as 
possible in the larger places most likely to become prominent towns. At 



24 The Home Missionary July, 1S98 

the same time, by correspondence, and, so far as possible, by exploration, 
we were to find out what could be done for the miners in the mountains. 
The first thing was the building in each place of some kind of a house of 
worship. Two or three more missionaries had come to our assistance, 
and as everything depended on the minister in each case, everyone went 
to work. Subscriptions were solicited and donations were asked. The 
pastor of the first church in the mines spent days and weeks along the 
ravines where the miners were washing out the gold, arguing in behalf of 
his enterprise and discussing theology with the miners. They probably 
thought his church-building plans of little importance, but they w#uld 
give him an ounce or two, because he was evidently a good fellow. The 
pastor of another church in a fertile valley, after getting all he could by 
solicitation, and not having enough, noticed that hay was scarce and high- 
priced, and seeing acres of wild oats on the plains unclaimed by anybody, 
and just fit to be harvested, got some young men to go with him and cut 
a few tons, and I preached the sermon at the dedication of his church. 1 
got this sample answer to my solicitations : " No ; there will never be 
any churches built here ; the country is good for nothing but mining ; it 
is not fit to live in. Who would think of fetching his family here ? " 
Some very sober Eastern opinion came to us in the papers to the effect 
that ''California was a bubble and would soon burst." Nevertheless, we 
believed in the country and its future, and were willing to put our lives 
into it and help bail J up a Christian State. If we could have got the 
merest glimpse of what we see to-day we should have counted ourselves 
the happiest of men. In the little group of organizing members of my 
church in San Francisco was a lumber merchant from Maine, a warm- 
hearted Christian man, who brought all his family. Through his efficient 
agency, seconded by others, a house of worship was built; the lumber, 
every stick of it, was imported from Maine. It was situated in a resi- 
dence section of the city, quite safe from fire. Our subscriptions were 
made payable in installments as the work went on. One Saturday night, 
when the work was within a few weeks of completion, we had made our 
collections and paid all that was due. I had finished my Sabbath prepara- 
tions for the next day and was about to retire, when the fire alarm rang 
out quick and sharp. Looking from the window toward the business 
part of the city, we could see the flames already leaping high and borne 
aloft by a fierce wind ; they seemed certain to destroy everything to the 
water's edge. All night long the fire raged. It swept through the entire 
business part of the city, consuming everything in its way. Sabbath 
morning dawned on the city in ashes, a scene of desolation and smoking 
ruins. Our church building was at a safe distance; but how about our 
friends, the merchants, on whose subscriptions our future payments 
depended ? I found them exhausted and dust-covered, poking in the 



July, 1898 The Home Missionary 25 

ashes where their stores had been, having lost everything ! Should the 
work on the church building stop, or what should we do ? There was but 
one alternative, and that was to borrow. The rate*of interest was some- 
thing fearful at that time. And though by means of a loan we had the 
advantage of a good house of worship — and it was well filled — that debt 
crippled the young congregation for years. 

The efficiency of the church as a missionary agency in the city and 
in the State was vastly hindered. About six weeks after the great May 
fire, on the 15th of June, 185 1, our house of worship was dedicated. It 
was a great occasion for us, though the consequences of the fire to us 
and our friends greatly moderated our joy. Still the young business 
men were full of courage. The storeships anchored in the bay were full 
of consigned goods, and it was the work of but a comparatively few days 
to build temporary stores, such as would answer in our rainless summer, 
and bring ashore the goods and ship them to the miners. A week went 
by, and our congregation assembled at our usual hour of worship, eleven 
o'clock on Sabbath morning. The service opened as usual, and I had 
proceeded to the reading of Scripture, when tap, tap, tap, rang the fire 
alarm, and the congregation disappeared and ran for their places of 
business to save something if they could. I closed the Bible and followed 
them. The fire that day, however, burned only that portion of the city 
left by the May fire, and did not affect us so much, though it burned 
the houses of worship of two or three other congregations. These 
circumstances illustrate the experience of many of our congregations 
in the early years, when ali buildings were constructed of the most com- 
bustible materials, and no adequate protection could be had against fire. 
This constituted another of the uncertainties we had to contend with. But 
what were we ? Pastors at this time of four or five beginnings of churches in 
beginnings of towns, hundreds of miles apart? And what were the fifteen 
or twenty Protestant ministers and beginnings of churches ? While closely 
engaged in trying to build churches in cities and towns, how could we reach 
the great mass of our population in the mines ? How could we become 
acquainted with them, and learn who cared for the civil and religious 
welfare of the State, which had been organized a year and a half before ? 
We saw clearly that if we had a religious newspaper we could use the 
mails, and reach both the mining centers and the towns. But the cost ! 
The cost ! We corresponded, and conferred, and figured over the matter 
all the year of 1850. Finally it was agreed to venture. Everything 
promised well up to the time of the two great fires. The printing-office 
where the forms of the first number of " The Pacific " lay, already made 
up, was not burned, and we determined to print, and depend on the mines 
and the country for circulation. The cost of that first issue of 25,000 
copies was $525, and the subscription price was eight dollars a year. 



26 The Home Missionary July, 1898 

The paper was well received, and found an unexpected circulation in the 
mines. The very audacity of the undertaking made it friends. And so 
"The Pacific" became our traveling home missionary and has continued 
to be so ever since — now forty-seven years. All this time it has stood for 
sound evangelical religion, for missions the world over, for education, 
pure morals, civil freedom and honest politics. There was a special 
reason for its establishment in 185 1. There was a purpose on the part 
of some to bring about the introduction of slavery into at least the 
southern half of the State. To be sure, California had been made a free 
State, without a dissenting voice in the Constitutional Convention, in 
1849, and by vote of the people. But our admission to the Union was 
resisted ten months in Congress on account of the free-State clause. 
And thereafter plans were secretly forming to bring about the division 
of the State, in order to open the southern half to the introduction of 
slavery. These plans had the sympathy of our city, State, and United 
States officers. Supported by such powerful political influence, there 
was very great danger that they might succeed. During those trying 
years " The Pacific " did its best work in behalf of our State undivided 
and free. When once the conspiracies against it were exposed, public 
sentiment was found to be so strong against them that they gradually 
ceased. The paper, though outspoken against intemperance, gambling, 
and all forms of immorality so prevalent then, met with little opposition. 
There was, however, one exception. The managing editor passed the 
Sabbath on one occasion in a northern country mining town, preaching 
both morning and evening. In his correspondence with the paper the 
following week, he mentioned that the postmaster, a saloon keeper, kept 
the post-office in the rear of his saloon, obliging, everyone, men, women, 
and children alike, doing business there, to pass and re-pass his bar and 
the gambling tables. About a year after that, the editor was there again, 
passing the Sabbath and preaching as before. Early Monday morning 
there came quite a mob of excited men from the saloon to the hotel 
where he was, evidently intent on doing him harm. The spokesman was 
a young lawyer who, in glowing terms charged the editor with having 
slandered that town in his paper the year before. The paper containing 
the offensive matter was called for and produced. The editor, running 
his eye over it, reminded the crowd of the u fair play " characteristic of 
miners, and then read the description as he wrote it the year before, and 
appealed to them, sentence by sentence, if it was not true. There was 
not one who could deny it. Then he boldly appealed to them all whether 
they wanted their town to have such a reputation as these things would 
give it. As he proceeded, the saloon frequenters gradually fell away, 
and the more reasonable part of the crowd gathered around the editor, 
and when he was through they gave him cheers, and many warmly thanked 



July, 1898 The Home Missionary 27 

him for publishing the truth. Ministers, in the pursuit of their calling, 
were always treated with respect, even in the rough times. 

In the work of promoting education, our young churches were among 
the foremost from the very beginning. A Christian college was planned 
and conducted through its preparatory stage, and to a full college organ- 
ization for nearly twenty years, solely on home resources, and was unable 
in all that time to get any help from the East to speak of ; for the era of 
generous gifts to found Christian colleges in the new States had not yet 
come. 

Nor were our churches behind in philanthropic effort ; for the very 
first orphan asylum founded in the State was begun at the suggestion of 
one of the missionaries of this Society, and has been supported and con- 
ducted by the united effort of all the Protestant churches to this day. 
Of the great number of professional men who came to California in the 
earliest years, few joined congregations or attended worship. But there 
were a few, and their influence was conspicuous as a power for good. 
Some of the officers of the army and of the navy while stationed in 
California attended worship and entered heartily into our plans of 
Christian work from the very beginning. The value of their influence 
was beyond estimation. In the conflicts of succeeding years they all 
laid down their lives for our country, mostly on the battlefield, but their 
names are precious with us and our churches. To this class of officers 
belonged, in the latter years, the honored president of this Society, Major- 
General O. O. Howard. 

All these things are written in detail by Rev. James H. Warren, for 
nearly twenty years this Society's Superintendent of Home Missions in 
California, in a book waiting for means to appear for its publication ! 

The years that followed those early times of which I have been speak- 
ing saw rapid changes. Men found that California was good for some- 
thing besides mining. Many sent for their families. Women and children 
began to appear in our congregations. More missionaries were needed, 
and you sent them. The missionary societies of all the other denomi- 
nations sent them. Churches multiplied and grew. Their influence 
appeared in better morals and manners. The reckless multitude went 
their chosen way, and reaped the harvest of their own sowing, while the 
temperate, industrious and religious were thriving in the development of 
the newly found resources of the country. It is this latter class, organized 
in churches and institutions of progress, that builds a State. And it is 
through this class that the Home Missionary societies are determining 
the character of all the new States of this Union. It is this class that has 
made California what she is to-day — a great agricultural, mining, com- 
mercial and educational State. If in religion and morals we are not up 
to the standard we strive for, it should be remembered that our immigrant 



28 The Home Missionary July, 1898 

population was two-thirds of it foreign, and that a large part of it was not 
helpful in our Christian work, but very much the reverse. At first we 
were all young people, without experience, beginning on new ground, 
situated thousands of miles distant from the home States, unhelped by 
their example, wisdom and advice. This, in many trying times, was felt 
to be a privation almost too grievous to be borne. Nevertheless, there is 
in California a civil, religious and educational "foundation" laid in its 
first fifty years, ready for the superstructure to be built by the generations 
to come. There are our 200 Congregational churches, all but three of 
them the planting of this Society, and there are probably five times as 
many more, reckoning those of all the evangelical denominations ; there 
is our system of popular education, amply supported, and comparing 
favorably with the best in other States, crowned by two great universities, 
one with r,ooo, and the other with more than 2,000 students. For dis- 
tinctive Christian education there are academies and thriving young 
colleges, and two theological seminaries. And what California is to-day, 
the States of Oregon and Washington are in all substantial respects. We 
are even coming to be a missionary people, doing what we can to educate 
and Christianize the Chinese and the Japanese among us, and send them 
home witnesses of the truth in their own countries. And so we begin to 
realize already the high anticipations of those far-seeing men who were 
so prompt to plan these missions as soon as the country was ours. 

Those remarkably prophetic words of Mr. Seward in the Senate in 
1852 seem likely to come true: " The Pacific Ocean, its shores, its islands, 
and the regions beyond, will become the chief theater of events in the 
world's great hereafter." It was he, who, fifteen years later, effected the 
purchase of Alaska, a country then thought to be uninhabitable and com- 
paratively valueless. But what do we see to-day? An excitement over 
that country almost equal to that over California in 1848 ! And this 
Society is inquiring, in the spirit and with the promptness of those days, 
what opening opportunity in that vast region calls for their action. 

And now, as a new century is about to begin, what a prospect is there, 
on that Pacific Ocean shore, so lately unoccupied, of a new development 
of our Redeemer's Kingdom on the earth ! 



Some Results. — This Society's missionaries have organized in all 6,501 churches — ■ 
about 1,600 of them being Presbyterian, planted in the early years when that denomination 
did its home missionary work through this Society. Of the 5,614 Congregational 
churches in the United States reported in 1898, more than five-sixths were planted, and 
many more were fostered, by the Society and its auxiliaries. Of these, 2,979 have 
reached self-support. To the churches under its care 468,20s members have been added 
in these seventy-two years. The cash receipts into its treasury have been $17,965,798 ; 
family supplies, etc., $2,338,004 ; in all $20,303,802. 



July, 1898 The Home Missionary 29 

THE NEW MORMONISM 

By Eugene Young, Esq., a Grandson of Brigham Young 

[One of the most interesting and instructive addresses at the annual meeting was that 
of Mr. Young, who spoke of the Mormon system, its character, history, political maneu- 
verings, and purpose, as seen from the inside. Readers in whom these few extracts shall 
awaken a desire for the entire address may receive, without charge, a full report of it on 
application to the officers of this Society, by postal or otherwise.] 

Mormonism, eight years ago, crushed by the Government, its leaders 
in prison or hiding, its property confiscated and credit fatally impaired, its 
people half alienated and wholly threatened with disfranchisement, sued 
for mercy. Mormonism to-day, triumphant and arrogant, its property and 
prestige restored, its citizenship guaranteed by statehood, its influence se- 
cured by power in one of the branches of government, challenges the 
orthodoxy of your older beliefs and calls it heterodoxy. It throws down 
the gauntlet to the nations of all the earth and tells them that every gov- 
ernment is the heritage of the followers of Joseph Smith. 

What a pity it was that the religious people of America laid down their 
arms with the battle half won ! Why could they not have seen that when 
they stopped the teaching of polygamy they had merely carried the outer 
redoubts and that the citadel of this peculiar people stood unmasked to 
frown upon the nation ? Polygamy was doomed of itself to fall. Had 
no Christian opposer laid his influence against the practice, the younger 
generation in the church would have killed it. Its growth was always 
forced, and its strength was lessened yearly by the determined opposition 
it met from good men and women, whose highest feelings were seared by 
it. But Mormon ambition is another thing. Against it the hardest blows 
should have been aimed, with no mercy or cessation until the doctrine of 
union of church and state had been crushed beyond hope of revival. 
Mormon ambition is as broad as the world, as deep as simple faith. It 
has all the strength of fanaticism, combined with a discipline and organi- 
zation never excelled in the history of Christian churches. It has a potent 
honesty that does not hesitate at dishonesty, and an honor that is honor- 
able only in the sense that " the end justifies the means." Mormon ambi- 
tion seeks only its own ends, casting aside all other considerations and 
defying human judgment by its assertion that it has the authority of God 
for what it does. 

It is this ambition that has ever sown enemies for the followers of 
Joseph Smith. Its tendencies showed before the people became more 
than a mere handful, and the neighbors of the peculiar sect fought out 
then by violence what we, in time, will be compelled to fight out in the 
fields of politics and religion. 



30 The Home Missionary July, 1898 

In the strange tale of Mormonism you will find the evidences of the 
political longings of the nineteenth-century prophet. To the simple men 
and women whom Joseph Smith gathered about him he imparted a convic- 
tion that they and their children were to rule the earth before the second 
coming of Jesus Christ. They defied settled churches and government 
from the first, and it was not until they reached the wilderness of the West 
that they found the security which would enable them to build up their 
church and their people. . . . 

Now, as to the future. The selfish politician of the East would prob- 
ably say : "They're away out West, in Utah. Let them alone. Their 
concerns are none of ours." But it does not require much imagination to 
picture the time when the Mormon leaders will show that their concerns 
are those of the East. They delight in the balance of power, and no 
hierarchy knows better how to use it than they. Already two seats in the 
Senate are in their grasp. Already they have shown in Idaho their power 
to dictate who shall represent that State in the upper house of Congress. 
Already Wyoming politicians have found it convenient at times to call for 
the arbitrament of the church in senatorial criseg. Colorado is feeling the 
first faint stirrings of the new force. Arizona and New Mexico — future 
States — have learned to respect it. Nevada is a fair field that offers as 
many opportunities as Utah to the hosts of Zioti. With a Senate always 
close, what influence may not be had on the great affairs of a nation by 
men who hold such a force and who are skilled in using it? 

Can this power be broken ? Wise men of Utah, who have grown gray 
in the struggle against church dictation, will shake their heads with appre- 
hension. They had hoped the government would crush it out while it was 
making the attack on polygamy. They prayed for five years more of hu- 
miliation, for five years more of territorial bondage, for time in which the 
seeds of discontent and personal ambition could take root inside the sect. 
But now they will tell you that only the greatest vigilance, the most un- 
ceasing warfare will check the advance of the Saints. 

I once asked a politician what was the secret of the many great suc- 
cesses that marked his career. "Organization," he said, briefly. Yes, and 
therein lies the secret of the political success of Mormonism. No member 
of the church is too small and lowly to receive the attention of the priest- 
hood. Running from the office of the presidency is a web of stake presi- 
dents, bishops, elders, teachers, deacons, and high and low officials, that 
gathers within its meshes every political potentiality within the church. 

Should a young man in the church show a disposition to depart from 
the ways of his father, and to question the divine inspiration of the 
priesthood, he is marked for a stern gospel lesson. One day a call comes 
for him to carry the gospel into a foreign field, it may be to England, 
or Germany, or Russia, or to Hawaii, Tasmania, or New Zealand. Wher- 



July, 1898 The Home Missionary 



3i 



ever he goes he must look to himself for support. He must grind the 
principles of Mormonism into himself and make sacrifices which bind 
him ever afterward to his gospel. And he is never lost sight of after 
his return. The lash of the church is held over him always, and the 
voice of the priesthood comes to him in a tone of command. True, as 
you say, he may refuse to heed the missionary call. Ay, but he seldom does. 

Again, the women are a puissant factor in Utah now. They have 
been clothed with all the power of citizens, and on them the church can 
draw in time of need. Some optimistic ones have told me they would 
prove more independent than the men. But the record is against this 
idea. Everywhere and always women are the bulwarks of the church, 
and in Utah the priesthood has performed miracles with them. They 
have not been burned at stakes, nor have they faced angry beasts. But 
they have laid their hearts in the dust for men to trample because they 
thought they were, aiding the kingdom of God. "What more could a 
woman do than go to the stand of a court and because the priesthood 
said her polygamy must not be confessed, say she did not know who was 
the father of her child ? Who can hold a hope of independence in the 
face of this ? 

Selfishness must be relied upon to solve the problem in the end. 
Those who control the Mormon policy now are using their power for 
their own advantage. In business, in politics, in the priesthood itself 
their interests are paramount. Those equally ambitious see how they are 
being cozened out of their rights, and some day some of the powerful 
ones may combine to resent the dictation which makes others powerful at 
their expense. The presence of your own churchmen among them, in- 
dependent in business and other temporal affairs, w T ill help the growth 
of this feeling. The development of Utah's mineral resources, the 
broader spirit that will be brought by the men who are drawn by a new 
prosperity, will strengthen it, too. Education, the foe of the arts of 
darkness and mystery, must in time pierce the hypocrisy. But the menace 
of Mormonism will not be laid until after the nation and its churches 
have felt the bitterness of a determined struggle against it. 



THE NEW MORMONISM: ITS RELIGIOUS ASPECT 

From the Address of Rev. Charles W. Luck, of Idaho 

Whatever opinions we may hold of the Mormon leaders from 
Joseph Smith to Wilford Woodruff, I think we must admit that the rank 
and file of their followers are actuated by deep religious convictions 
Therein lies the danger that has been pointed out. Leaders can do 



32 The Home Missionary July, 1898 

nothing without followers. Unscrupulous leaders can do anything with 
followers blindly devoted. 

The Mormon leaders are shrewd, clever men. The majority of their 
followers have come from the peasant class of Europe and America. All 
through Utah may be found colonies of foreigners, poor, simple-minded 
folks, many of whom cannot even understand English. During one after- 
noon in the outskirts of the enlightened city of Ogden I stopped to inquire 
the way and found myself in a settlement of Swedes. From house to 
house I made fruitless inquiry, unable to find any one who could under- 
stand me, until I came across a little girl who acted as interpreter. On 
the other side of Ogden is a Dutch settlement where they still wear 
wooden shoes and eat cheese that would kill an American. What do or 
can such people know about religion or politics? They can know only 
what their trusted leaders think best to tell them. They are putty in the 
hands of designing men. 

Travelers who stop off a few days at Ogden or Salt Lake City and 
see the buildings and public improvements, which, by the way, are largely 
the product of Gentile enterprise and capital, naturally think that Mor- 
mons are quite like other people. If these travelers had fallen into the 
hands of some clever Mormon brother, who had introduced them and 
shown them the sights, they would probably have gone away with the idea 
that they had seen the inside of Mormonism and had fathomed its mys- 
teries. Henceforth they would be sure that the saints were pretty nice 
people and that the evil reports about them were calumnies. It is always 
difficult to distinguish between the personal qualities of the individual and 
the tendencies and defects of the system of which he forms a part. That 
distinction must be made if one would understand Mormonism and not do 
the individual a personal injustice. 

P5ut let the visitors go out through the settlements, let them live long 
enough in Utah to learn the true inwardness of Mormonism, then they 
will conclude that it has two sides, an inside and an outside. All ' the 
more precious parts of it,' to use Joseph Smith's phrase, 'are inside.' If, 
then, they would take their stand at the gate of the temple grounds some 
conference day and carefully scrutinize the people who flock from the 
thirty-six stakes of Zion into the great tabernacle, and mark the ignorance 
and animalism of their faces, they would begin to understand the power of 
the Mormon leaders. These are the people — not the scum of Europe and 
America, not the vicious and depraved ; but the ignorant, simple, religious 
people — on whose blind fidelity and superstitious zeal the leaders can count 
with certainty. It is their religion that makes them dangerous. Do 
not misunderstand me that all are of this class and quality. I am speak- 
ing of the predominant characteristics that would appear in a composite 
photograph. 



July, 1898 The Home Missionary 33 

No other power than religion can hold men and women with such an 
absolute grasp. Whoever studies the history of the Mormons cannot 
doubt that they were moved by deep religious enthusiasm. Unfortunately 
the truth of a religion cannot always be measured by the devotion of its 
adherents. Men suffer for what they believe to be true ; but that does 
not make it so. 

The religious aspect of Mormonism is, in some quarters, treated too 
lightly. Some say, " Let them alone ; they will come to naught. They 
number only about 250,000 ; an insignificant handful, compared with the 
Christians." The danger lies in the neglect of the small beginning. Far 
off in the Rocky Mountains is nourishing a small plant of whose bitter 
fruit the nations may yet have to eat. 

Others say, "Let them alone; they are not so very different from us. 
They are becoming enlightened. They have given up polygamy, you 
know. The younger ones see that it is bestial. If we pay no attention to 
them they will gradually change, and in the end will become an insignifi- 
cant sect of Christendom." 

The Mormons themselves will applaud either of these views. All 
they want is to be let alone. They will do the rest. That is all that any 
evil wants. The " let alone " policy always has advocates who are for 
peace at any price, so long as they do not have it to pay. They fear that 
active, positive measures will interfere with their business interests or politi- 
cal aspirations. There are not a few such in the leading Christian churches 
in Utah. And even their ministers sometimes unconsciously yield to the 
pressure, especially such as have a great desire to be popular ; for you 
must know that it is decidedly unpopular to oppose the Mormons in 
Utah. 

The Mormons are unceasing in their efforts to propagate their doc- 
trines. They have some 1,200 missionaries scattered through the world. 
In one school of the prophets there were 1,000 students last year. Now 
there are about 300. The others have gone forth to sound the trumpet of 
the everlasting gospel. 

To sum up. The power of the Mormon priesthood is dependent on 
the people's blind and superstitious adherence to their religion. The true 
inwardness of Mormonism is much misunderstood by travelers, casual 
observers, and persons who are interested in having it let alone. The 
failure to understand it is largely due to the persistent duplicity and 
studied deceptions of the Mormon leaders. The religious belief and pro- 
gramme of the Mormons have not changed. In them we find the cause 
of their political aspirations and intrigues. Their methods only have been 
modified to fit the times. Essentially their religion is heathenish and 
polygamous. It has nothing in common with Christianity except some of 
its phraseology. 
3 



34 The Home Missionary July, 189S 

Therefore, in closing, permit me to make these observations : Since 
believers in republicanism may not object to majority rule — even Mormon 
majority rule — we can avert the danger that threatens us only by convert- 
ing the Mormons. The weapons of our warfare are spiritual, '' mighty 
through God to the pulling down of strongholds." If we can correct their 
heathenish doctrines and corrupt practices, we have nothing to fear from 
the Mormons. They will be as good citizens as any. We cannot desire 
better citizens than some of Brigham Young's descendants. If the truth 
as it is in Christ Jesus cannot counteract the virus of Mormonism, God 
help our country ! 

Our methods should be modified ; our efforts mightily increased. 
Our cry may yet be, " Save Utah to save America ! " Yea, rather, under a 
higher law than self-preservation, let us cry, " Save the Mormons from their 
folly and superstition and degradation. Save them for their own sakes and 
for Christ's sake." 



THE "WESTERN RESERVE" OF OHIO 

From the Address of Rev. William E. Barton, D.U., of Boston, 

Massachusetts 

Few sections of our country possess so interesting a history, with 
more to interest the annalist or inspire the student of social and religious 
life, than this northeast corner of Ohio. After the original colonies along 
the coast, it may be said to lead in interest in suggesting providential 
guidance and in the faith and heroism of the brave men and women who 
made this wilderness blossom like the rose. Here were planted seeds that 
had grown from Pilgrim and Puritan stock in old New England, and 
here upon this new soil tlv-y bore a harvest such as would have been im- 
possible in one of the older colonies. Here were wrought out some 
problems which had vexed the older colonies, and whose solution was not 
clear until then. The work which here has been done for freedom and 
the furtherance of the kingdom of God in education and enlightened 
citizenship forms one of the most interesting and inspiring passages in our 
country's history. 

In the good old days when the generosity and geography of kings 
were in inverse ratio to each other, it was the custom of sovereigns in 
making grants upon the eastern coast of America to extend the lines of 
those grants through to the Pacific ocean, and they then cherished the 
opinion that the country would never be settled more than a dozen miles 
from the coast. Some of these grants expanded as the lines moved west- 



July, 1898 The Home Missionary 35 

ward, and others moved according to parallels of latitude. Thus it came 
to pass in the closing days of the last century, that this section of Ohio 
was severally claimed by Virginia, New York, Massachusetts and Con- 
necticut. 

Connecticut's claim, though not the earliest in date, was held to with 
the greatest tenacity, because bounded by her own parallels of latitude, 
and she was disposed to insist that this grant should be continued en- 
tirely across the continent. Such a grant, however, would include a slice 
of Pennsylvania, and take a good share from the claims of each of the 
farther west States. There arose a serious danger that the title to this 
portion of our country could not be settled without bloodshed between 
the colonies. The government cut the knot, however, by deciding that 
the Northwest Territory as a whole belonged not to the original colonies 
under the colonial charters but to the colonies as a whole by reason of 
their united conquests in the revolutionary war. 

In 1780 New York relinquished her claim to the Northwest Territory ; 
in 1784 Virginia did the same ; in 1785 Massachusetts followed, and on 
September, 14, 1786, Connecticut relinquished her claim under the grant 
made by Charles II. in 1662. Each of the States reserved a grant of land 
for its revolutionary soldiers or for other purposes. Two of the States 
made special conditions. Virginia, through her representatives, Paul 
Carrington and Lighthorse Harry Lee, refused to relinquish her claim to 
the Northwest except on the condition that slavery and involuntary ser- 
vitude should be made forever impossible here; and Connecticut, while 
relinquishing her right to the government of every portion of her strip 
toward the Pacific coast, was granted a right to the soil of this northeast 
corner of Ohio, and thus grew up the Western Reserve, the child of Con- 
necticut. 

In the year 1800 the first missionary work upon this reserve was 
done under the direction of the Connecticut Missionary Society, by Wil- 
liam Wick, at Youngstown, and Joseph Badger, the pioneer missionary 
hero of the Western Reserve. His quaint little autobiography, beginning 
when there were only two families in Cleveland, and covering the first 
period of growth in this region, is full of most interesting incidents, and 
illustrates the law of cause and effect in home missionary operations. Mr. 
Badger came from his home in Massachusetts upon a salary of seven 
dollars a week, bringing his family with him into what was then a track- 
less wilderness, riding from place to place amid danger and fatigue, and 
subject to the almost incessant sickness of the early colonists, laying with 
his companions the foundation of many of the strong churches, several 
of which he personally organized. 

He who would know a history that teems with interest and constantly 
illustrates the grace of God and the courage and faithfulness of man, 



36 The Home Missionary July, 1898 

should know how the gospel began to be preached in Austinburg, Hud- 
son, Warren, Tallmadge, Cleveland, and Oberlin, for time would fail me 
to tell how they, through faith, wrought righteousness, obtained promises, 
out of weakness were made strong, and thus added to the list of worthies 
whose noble deeds are recorded in the eleventh chapter of Hebrews. 

I may speak specifically of one or two elements in the life of the 
people of this reserve which has made their influence potent. First, I 
may mention that combination of personal independence combined with 
social solidarity which at once dedicated this region to high thought and 
concerted action. That the men of this region would be independent 
thinkers was to be expected from their training, but this thinking was 
made effective for righteousness, by certain social ties which broke up the 
isolation of pioneer life and fused the separated and homesick settlers 
into a body politic. 

First of these was their town meeting. Each town was a unit, pos- 
sessing political autonomy, and upon its forum every citizen was the 
equal of every other citizen. Secondly, there grew up almost immediately 
the public school, in which boys and girls were prepared for intelligent 
citizenship. The plans for an academy were almost contemporary with 
the founding of Hudson, whose work continues to this day, both on the 
original campus, and in the enlarged work of the Western Reserve 
University in this city. The work performed by Oberlin for higher and 
popular education soon ceased to be bounded by the Western Reserve, 
and reached to every portion of our land. 

To these two communal ties the early settlers added a third, which 
indeed was first, the Congregational church. We may waive all present 
reference to the plan of union which hampered the development of the 
Congregational idea, further than to say that that plan, infelicitous as it 
proved to be in some of its workings, was conceived on both sides in the 
broadest Christian spirit, and still presents many features well worth a 
trial by divided Christendom under somewhat more favorable auspices. 
The development of the life of these communities along the line of the 
Congregational idea was in entire harmony with the genius and institu- 
tions of the people who settled in the Western Reserve. 

Secondly, I may speak of the influence of the Western Reserve upon 
the cause of freedom. The fundamental principles in the life of the 
people of the Western Reserve were essentially those of New England 
at the best. The primitive crafts that came sailing into Lake Erie were 
transformed Mayflowers, with the spirit of the Pilgrims reincarnated in 
their passengers. The heavy creaking ox teams that made their way 
through the wilderness were piloted by the reanimated spirits of Thomas 
Hooker and John Davenport. 

In this land that soon began to flow with milk and maple syrup, they 



July, 1898 The Home Missionary 37 

established the four pillars of the Pilgrim community, the Pilgrim home, 
the Pilgrim church, the Pilgrim school, and the self-governing Pilgrim 
community, and the Pilgrim principle of freedom and respect for man- 
hood, as such, had here a freer field for development than even in New 
England itself. In some important particulars New England obtained 
not the promise, that it without the Western Reserve should not be made 
perfect. An illustration of this is found in the anti-slavery records of 
this newer New England. When Anthony Burns escaped from slavery 
at Boston and was demanded by his master, he went back to slavery, not 
without a solemn protest, but he went back. But when the Oberlin- 
Wellington rescue occurred, the fugitive did not go back to slavery. 
Thirty-seven prominent citizens of those two towns, whose names are 
held in immortal honor by those communities, went to jail in this city of 
Cleveland, and made the prison echo with songs like those of Paul and 
Silas, until a veritable earthquake of popular sentiment shook open the 
prison doors and the angel of the Lord led them forth in triumph amid 
the acclamations of a jubilant community. No man after that attempted 
to enforce the fugitive slave law on the Western Reserve. 

This part of the Northwest Territory, which by the ordinance of 
1787, was first dedicated at the shrine of freedom, was also first in dem- 
onstrating the impossibility of enforcing a law against the conscience of 
the people, and the rest of the anti-slavery portion of the nation thanked 
God and took courage. 

John Brown himself was almost a native of this reserve, and here he 
spent some of the best years of his life. The burghers in Hudson and in 
Kent count him as having belonged to them, and the cemetery at Oberlin 
holds the bodies of some who died in his engine-house fort, and whose 
souls with his go marching on. The soil of this Western Reserve has 
been consecrated with tears and prayers and blood. 



FROM REV. W. G. PUDDEFOOT'S ADDRESS. 

When the Pilgrim Fathers landed in America they had an abundance 
of spiritual food and a short allowance of corn. To read Governor Brad- 
ford's history of Plymouth Colony, and then turn to Mr. Atkinson's distri- 
bution of products, is like going into a new world. The Pilgrims had 
starvation staring them in the face ; their descendants are so full of the 
world's goods as not to know what to do with them. To see the poor 
men living on clams, because the corn was exhausted, often too weak 
to resist when attacked by the Indians, then to read that the work of 



J 



8 The Home Missionary July, i! 



seven men produces enough bread to feed a thousand people, is like a 
page from the "Arabian Nights." To see how painfully they cleared the 
land, how slow their progress, then turn to Dr. Strong's book on the "City 
of the Twentieth Century," and realize, if you can, that for forty years 
the wilderness was changed into farms at the rate of 16,000 acres a day; 
that a ton of the produce is carried a mile for so small a sum that we must 
go to China to find a coin to represent it; and yet, in spite of this, the poor 
man pays for his loaf at the rate of eight dollars for a barrel of flour made 
from ninety-cent wheat. To know that in the midst of this abundance 
crime has increased out of all proportion to the population ; that strikes 
and lockouts follow each other with swift certainty ; that thousands of 
hungry tramps travel all over the land, while thousands of honest men lack 
food for their families, is enough to make us pause and ask the cause of 
all the trouble. 

I think, without doubt, the real trouble is what Kossuth prophesied — 
" If shipwreck should ever befall your country, the rock on which it will 
split will be your devotion to your private interests at the expense of your 
duty to the State " — and Dr. Strong remarks that for more than a genera- 
tion since then our course has been laid directly towards that rock. 

Now, there will be no devotion to the State at the expense of self-inter- 
est until men have grown to an altruism which is not found outside of 
Christianity. The gifts of Christians to the cause of Christ have increased 
when compared with the past — larger in the aggregate, larger per capita, 
but not so large when compared with the increase of wealth. It is the one 
alarming symptom of the times, this enormous growth of material riches 
compared with the spiritual results. I do not forget the millions spent for 
benevolent objects, such as old people's homes, hospitals, fresh-air funds, 
colleges, etc. Call the amount $30, 000, 000 annually, and you have about 
the increase of wealth that is added to the nation in seven days, or less 
than two per cent, of that increase used for benevolent purposes for home 
and foreign missions. 

No nation or race has yet arisen that placed the spiritual condition 
above the material ; but until the spiritual and moral condition of the peo- 
ple is put first no nation can be really prosperous, no matter how great its 
riches. When we are stirred to do great deeds for God in the spiritual 
field, as we are now stirred to help the bodily needs of the Cubans, the 
millennial sun will be seen over the horizon ; when Senators and Congress- 
men will vie with one another in righting the awful wrongs in the nation 
as they do to straighten out other nations, we shall be better able to help 
the world. 



July, 1898 The Home Missionary 39 

THE TWENTIETH-CENTURY CITY 
By Rev. Josiah Strong, D.D. 

I was once asked to make a three-minute address on the evidences of 
Christianity. I did it. I am now desired to make a twenty-minute talk 
on The Twentieth Century City. I will try. 

At the beginning of the century now drawing to a close, we had a con- 
tinent to bring under the yoke of civilization. A vast army of occupation 
has been sweeping across the country and it has been the high commis- 
sion of this ffonored Society to keep step with this army and to make the 
victories of the cross co-extensive with those of civilization. Nobly has 
this Society and those of other denominations cared for the spiritual needs 
of scattered populations on the frontier. But Home Missions are now 
entering into a new stage, because our national life is now entering on a 
new period. 

I do not refer to the new national consciousness, which has just come 
to us, that we are an integral part of the world's great life ; nor to the 
fact that as immigration has made foreign missions, so following the flag 
seems destined to make Home Missions foreign missions. I refer to the 
fact that civilization has now crossed the continent ; the centers of popu- 
lation have been selected ; the era of the frontier is closing ; the era of 
the city is opening. 

The beginning and end of the nineteenth century represent two differ- 
ent civilizations. The one was rural, the other is urban. At its beginning 
there were six cities in the United States ; ten years before its close there 
were 443. Its beginning saw three per cent, of our population living in 
cities; its close will see not far from thirty-three per cent. During the ten 
years preceding the last census the cities of Ohio gained 414,000 in- 
habitants, while 775 townships of the State actually lost population. 

This redistribution of population, which has taken place chiefly in the 
latter half of the century, has been caused by the substitution of mechan- 
ical power for muscular. When a man's power was in his muscles or in 
those of horses and oxen, he could take it with him, and do his work a 
mile or ten miles from his next neighbor. But when a stationary steam- 
engine became the source of power, workmen gathered around it, and 
there followed inevitably the factory, the division of labor, the organiza- 
tion of industry, the city, the new civilization. 

We have left behind the age of homespun ; we have entered On the age 
of the factory. In that age life was independent ; in this, it is dependent. 
In that, it was simple ; in this, it is complex. In that, it was individual- 
istic ; in this, it is social. Then the family was industrially a little world ; 



4-0 The Home Missionary July, 1898 

now the world is rapidly becoming one great family. The supreme prob- 
lems of the old civilization were those of the individual ; the supreme 
problems of the new are those of society, which problems meet in the city. 
In other words, the city is the great problem of the new civilization, the 
new century ; and, while scattered populations must not be neglected, the 
great field for Home Missions in the future will be in the city. 

Within the narrow limits of time assigned me I cannot dwell upon the 
causes of this movement of population from country cityward. It is 
enough to say that they are permanent and compulsory, and that the cry, 
"Back to the soil," which is now heard on every side, is utterly fallacious 
as a solution of the problem of the city or as a mitigation of its evils. 
The concentration of population is the result of economic laws which are 
as imperative as gravitation. 

A school examiner once asked a bright boy whether God could make 
a square circle. The boy replied, " No, sir, he couldn't, and it would be 
very unwise for him to try." We might as well try to make a square cir- 
cle as to attempt to circumvent natural laws. We might as well seek to 
reverse the motion of the earth, we might as well issue a bull against the 
comet, or try to hang up Lake Erie on a clothes-line to dry, as to attempt 
to suspend or reverse the operation of economic laws by which popula- 
tions are being swept into the city to-day. The problem of the city must 
be faced ; it cannot be evaded. 

Note how imperative it is to find a speedy solution of this problem. 
If the movement of population from country to city from 1880 to 1890 
continues at the same rate until 1920, there will then be in the United 
States 10,000,000 more people in the cities than outside of them. Let us 
drop a plummet into this fact and sound its deep significance. 

Our free institutions are based on tw r o fundamental principles, that of 
local self-government and that of federation or union. They are alike 
necessary, the one to the exercise of our liberties, the other to their pres- 
ervation. A generation ago we waged a fearful war to save this principle 
of federation, and it was preserved in its integrity. Let me remark in 
passing that the line of sectionalism between the North and South, which 
was the scar left when the chasm was closed, is to-day being erased by the 
feet of 200,000 men marching shoulder to shoulder under one flag which 
floats alike over South and North, the home of Hobson and of Dewey. 

The Union is safe, and no doubt safe forever; but while patriotism a 
generation ago was at the front fighting for the principle of federation, 
that of local self-government was being quietly subverted at home. 

Through the development of the political machine and the " boss " 
our cities have lost the power of self-government. Especially is this true 
of the larger cities, the political corruption of which has made them a 
stench to the nostrils of the civilized world. 



July, 1898 The Home Missionary 41 

Our friendly but discriminating English critic, Professor Bryce, says 
that one conspicuous failure of our American institutions is the govern- 
ment of our great cities, and every intelligent man knows this to be true. 
So true is it, that our legislatures no longer trust the cities to govern them- 
selves. State constitutions draw a line around municipalities limiting 
their liberties. So generally have we come to recognize the danger of 
the city vote that we have for years relied upon the country vote to save 
State and nation from its consequences. 

We are now prepared to see the significance of the fact that, at present 
rates, in 1920 a city will dominate the nation. When it becomes fully 
conscious of jts power, it will no longer ask permission of the legislature 
to do this or that, but take its own affairs into its own hands ; and not 
only so — it will control the affairs of State and nation. What if the city 
is then incapable of self-government ? What if the city is dominated by 
the saloon and the gambling hell when the city dominates the nation ? It 
looks to me as if God had granted us a probation of about twenty years 
in which to make the city capable of self-government, and I know of no 
way of saving the city without saving the citizen. I know of no way of 
making the city capable of self-government without making the citizen 
capable of self-mastery. Here, then, is the future field for Home Mis- 
sions. Every motive of Christian patriotism appeals to us to save the 
city. 

A few men are called on to-day by the present war to die for their 
country. We are all called upon to live for our country, which demands 
even a higher heroism. I must not be understood to imply that there is 
occasion for discouragement, much less for panic. The city is to be 
saved, for the kingdom is coming, and the kingdom cannot come without 
the salvation of the city. Corrupt as it is, it is going to be purified. 

In the opening pages of Holy Writ we read that the first city was built 
by a murderer, and it would seem as if vice and crime had festered in 
the city ever since. But in the closing pages of Revelation, when John 
would picture to us a perfected civilization, a kingdom of God fully come 
in the earth, he does it under the figure of a city, a New Jerusalem com- 
ing down from God out of heaven. 

During the Civil War a friend of mine was chaplain of a regiment of 
cavalry. During one of the battles of the Wilderness he became sepa- 
rated from his regiment by carrying wounded men to the rear. Seeking 
to find his men, he came upon a tent somewhat apart, and found its owner 
in an officer's hat, in shirt sleeves, driving the tent stakes more firmly into 
the ground, which had been loosened in the wind. The chaplain said to 
him, "Colonel, can you tell me where such a regiment is?" The officer 
replied, " Yes, you will find them yonder." "Well," said the chaplain, 
" I understand that General Grant's headquarters are somewhere in this 



42 The Home Missionary July, 1898 

neighborhood ; do you know where?" The stranger replied, "They call 
me General Grant." The chaplain made the appropriate military salute, 
and the General said to him, " Chaplain, do you hear those volleys of 
musketry ? It almost breaks my heart when I think what they are cost- 
ing our boys. I couldn't stand it if I didn't know we were going to take 
Richmond." " Do you think," said the chaplain, "we are going to take 
Richmond?" "No," replied the General, " I don't think we are going 
to take Richmond ; I know we are going to take Richmond." 

Touching the issue of the long struggle between God's love and man's 
selfishness, between God's righteousness and man's sin, we do not think, 
we know. For we know that his is the power, that his is the kingdom, and 
when that kingdom is fully come and the city is fully saved, then his 
shall be the glory. 



THE CITY AND HOME MISSIONS 

By Rev. Washington Gladden, D.D. 

The American city of the nineteenth century has been notable for 
two things : the rapidity of its growth, and the corruptness of its politi- 
cal administration. The population of the nation at large has been 
growing apace, but the cities have grown, in many cases, at the expense 
of the urban districts. There is scarcely a town of 5,000 inhabitants, 
East or West, which lost population during the past fifty years ; and there 
are scores and hundreds of towns which have grown within that time from 
nothing to tens and hundreds of thousands ; while there are a great many 
fertile rural districts east of the Mississippi River of which the population 
is considerably less to-day than it was fifty years ago. The proportion 
of our population who dwell in cities had been steadily and rapidly 
increasing. 

This feature of American life is paralleled in Europe. The cities of 
the Old World have been growing during this century about as rapidly 
as those of the New ; and many of them, also, have grown at the expense 
of the agricultural districts. 

American cities are distinguished also for the inefficiency and dis- 
honesty with which their business is administered. This is not, I am 
bound to say, the universal fact, but I fear that it is the general fact. 
Most of these cities are burdened with enormous debts — debts which are 
crushing the life out of many industries ; and for a very large portion of 
these debts the community has never had and never will have any ade- 
quate return. The municipal governments have been used, in many 
cases, largely for spoiling the people. To accomplish this, alliances have 



July, 1898 The Home Missionary 43 

been formed by municipal politicians with the disorderly and vicious 
classes, and a free rein has been given to those malefactors who get their 
living by corrupting and debauching their fellow-men. Worse than this, 
however — far worse in every way — are the corrupt alliances which have 
been made between the city politicians and the managers of quasi-public 
corporations, by which most valuable franchises have been obtained for 
little or nothing, and large power to levy tribute upon the community has 
been gained for years to come. These corrupt relations between quasi- 
public corporations and city governments are a comparatively recent 
development in most of our cities. The great value of these franchises 
has not been appreciated until lately. The builders of street railways, 
the promoters of gas companies and electric lighting companies were 
regarded as public benefactors, and were readily given everything they 
asked for. But the municipal politicians have found out that such privi- 
leges are worth something — to them, at any rate ; and for the last decade 
they have been reaping freely where they had not sown, and gathering 
abundantly where they had not strewed. 

It ought to be understood that one of the most promising fields for 
the intending multi-millionaire of to-day is the ownership and manage- 
ment of these municipal properties. I doubt if there is any other busi- 
ness in which wealth is being accumulated so rapidly. Some of the 
combinations of capital, lately formed for this purpose are enormous. 
The profits of the undertaking largely depend, of course,, on the terms of 
the franchise. And the city councils have the power to grant the fran- 
chises. It is the simple truth to say that there are millions on millions 
of dollars in this country ready to be paid for franchises, by which the 
people may be taxed to enrich the managers of these corporations. It 
is pretty generally believed that a number of millions of dollars have 
already been used by these manipulators in electing municipal officers, 
and in debauching them after they were elected. It is to this cause, 
more than to any other, at the present time, that the corrupt character 
of our city governments is due. The men who most zealously seek 
municipal office are apt to be the kind of men who wish to use such 
opportunities of gain as the corporations afford them. There is a pow- 
erful, but silent, influence all the while at work in many communities 
to secure the nomination and election of men who can be used in this 
way. And the men who manage the political machines, the " bosses," 
are often believed to be receiving large contributions from the managers 
of these corporations, and are thus under obligation to aid them in 
securing the nomination of men who will be serviceable to them. 

The danger which threatens American institutions at this point is 
simply appalling. I do not think that many of our citizens have any 
conception of the kind of mischief that is going on. It is just at this 



44 The Home Missionary July, 1898 

point that the breaking strain is coming upon democratic government. 
It makes one's heart stand still, now and then, to think of the explosive 
force of popular fury which we are steadily accumulating. 

Such is the rather alarming outlook upon the American city at the 
end of the nineteenth century. It is not paralleled, we are told, by 
anything in the Old World. European cities, as a rule, are not worse 
governed to-day than they were half a century ago — the great majority 
of them are far better governed. The science of municipal administra- 
tion has been well studied in many of them, and the people are reaping 
the fruits of civilization. The cost of government is much less in many 
of these cities than in American cities, and the benefits of government 
are much greater. In most of these cities the great municipal properties 
are either owned by the municipality, or so controlled by it that the cost 
of the service rendered is greatly cheapened, and the public made a 
sharer in the profits of their business. Nor can this superiority of city 
government in Europe be due to monarchical or aristocratic forms ; for 
in Great Britain, whose municipalities are pure democracies, the most 
splendid instances of good municipal government are seen. It is clearly 
possible, in a democracy, to have good city government. Let no man 
seek to excuse our failure by charging it upon the form of our govern- 
ment : that is not where the blame belongs. 

Heavily weighted with the consequences of this failure, and with the 
sense of it, we are going over into the twentieth century. The prospect 
is ominous. The perils that threaten our peace and safety ought not to 
be ignored or belittled. If we were to judge of the future by the past, 
we should say that the twentieth century city was like to become the 
vestibule of Pandemonium. 

But, fortunately, in spite of Patrick Henry, we have other and better 
ways of judging of the future than by the past. " Forgetting the things 
that are behind," and struggling forward to the things that are before, 
is the voice of our high calling. " We are saved by hope " more than by 
experience, although there is an experience that worketh hope. And I 
wish to give you, in the few minutes that are left me, some of my hopes 
for the American city of the twentieth century, with the grounds of my 
hope. 

In the first place, then, I hope that the twentieth-century city in 
America will be a well-governed city — a city in which law will be re- 
spected by the magistrates and obeyed by the citizens ; a city whose 
streets will be safe by night and day ; a city in which the industries that 
debauch and degrade men shall not have larger opportunities than those 
which minister to their welfare ; a city in which the strong are not per- 
mitted to aggrandize themselves, through legal privilege, at the expense 
of the weak ; a city in which the great cooperative enterprises are 



July, 1898 The Home Missionary 45 

economically and efficiently conducted for the public good, and the 
revenues are carefully expended for the benefit of the whole people. I 
trust that it will be a city in which the people have learned to cooperate 
in a great many ways for their own profit, securing for themselves vast 
benefits at small cost, through associated effort. I trust it will be a 
city in which there shall not only be great parks and boulevards on the 
outskirts, but a great many small pleasure-grounds scattered throughout 
the whole area, within easy reach of all the homes. I hope that libraries, 
reading-rooms, and great art galleries and fine orchestras will provide 
for the education of all the people, without money and without price. 
I hope that the whole city will be so clean and healthful that every portion 
of it shall be safe and desirable for residence ; that it will contain no 
slums ; that there will be no vast preserves of opulence, in which none 
but the richest could live, and no sinks of squalor and misery in which 
none but the poorest would live. I hope that there will be no unem- 
ployed, rich or poor, in its population ; but that the city will find some 
way of making it certain that no able-bodied human being who is willing 
to work shall either beg or starve, and that every able-bodied human 
being who prefers to beg shall either work or starve. 

These may seem to be high hopes, but I think they are not irrational ; 
so much of all of them has already been realized elsewhere that we may 
confidently look to the coming century to bring us the substance of those 
great gains. 

But who are to do all these things for us? Who will quench the 
violence of partisanship, bridle monopoly, purge away corruption, banish 
pauperism, cleanse the slums, organize the. cooperation, open the parks, 
build the art galleries, equip the orchestras? Who will transform the 
nineteenth-century city, with its rotten politics and its wasteful admin- 
istration and rank extremes of riotous wealth and groveling poverty, 
into the well-ordered, thrifty, peaceful community which we have seen 
in our dream ? 

The people, I answer ; the people who live in the city ; the men and 
women of the palaces and the tenement houses ; the people in the stores 
and the shops, the banks and the factories — the people themselves must 
do it. Really, when you come to think about it, there is nobody else 
who can be expected to do it. No legions of angels are coming down 
from heaven to regenerate our cities ; the Congress at Washington — I 
hope that transition did not take your breath away — will not be able to 
attend to it, nor will it be well for us to put our trust in the legislature 
at Columbus, or at Harrisburg, or at Albany, nor in any boards or com- 
missions which it can contrive. No help is coming to us from any of 
these quarters. We are never going to get good government in our 
cities till the people of the cities give it to us. . . . 



46 The Home Missionary July, 1898 

There is a picture in the Sixteenth chapter of Isaiah of a regenerated 
and glorified city ; a city whose officers are peace and whose exactors are 
righteousness ; whose walls are salvation and whose gates are praise ; 
a city which has risen from misery and shame to honor and splendor. 
" Whereas," says the Mighty One of Jacob, "thou hast been forsaken and 
hated, so that no man passed through thee, I will make thee an eternal 
excellency, a joy of many generations." And the clear explanation of how 
it comes to pass is given in one simple sentence : " My people also shall be 
all righteous." That is the only way in which cities were ever redeemed 
or regenerated. 

Most true it is that many things might be done by the people of the 
more intelligent and fortunate classes, by which the emancipation and 
elevation of these ignorant and degraded classes could be greatly 
hastened. A considerable part of their degradation is due to the burdens 
which the prosperous and the strong wantonly impose on them. The 
tribute which these poor people pay for the enrichment of those who hold 
valuable franchises is very large. The gigantic inequalities of taxation, 
of which ex-President Harrison lately spoke so trenchantly, all work 
against them. These wrongs the rich and the poor can remedy if they 
will, at once, without asking leave of those who suffer them. And if 
such wrongs were remedied the task of reaching these multitudes with 
light and help would be far less formidable. Yet it would still remain 
true that for the great and beneficent ends which are involved in good 
city government these multitudes must be enlisted ; they must be civilized, 
educated, inspired with new ideas ; new paths must be opened to their 
thoughts ; new wants must be awakened in them ; a wholly new concep- 
tion of what life means must be somehow imparted to them. 

The city of the twentieth century which we saw in our dream is 
simply a great community cooperating for the common good ; and in 
order that the cooperation may be intelligent and effective, the people 
must know what is good and how to cooperate. And what a mighty 
change this involves in the characters of multitudes of them ! 

Well, there is no other way to get the good things that we have set 
our hearts upon. We must teach these people what life means ; we must 
bring some regenerating influence to work upon their characters, by 
which they shall be transformed in the spirit of their mind, and filled with 
the sentiments and impulses out of which social cooperation naturally 
springs. In short, they must be Christianized. That is what must some- 
how be achieved, if our dream of the twentieth-century city is to be 
realized. For the constructive idea of that cooperative municipality 
which we are thinking about is the Christian idea — simply that and 
nothing more ; the idea that we are children of a common Father, and 
therefore brothers, in deed and in truth ; the idea that we are members 



July, 1898 The Home Missionary 47 

one of another ; that each must live for all and all for each. Somehow 
we must manage to get this idea into the minds of all these people, if we 
want them to help us in building on the earth the kind of city that we 
have been thinking about. And, doubtless, nobody can succeed very 
well in getting it into other people's minds unless he has first got it in his 
own. 

This, then, is the thing that I am hoping for — that our communities 
are really going to be Christianized ; that a great many people are coming 
to see that the Christian law is meant to live by ; to do business by ; to 
rule politics ; to organize municipalities upon ; and that they are going 
to make the world believe it. Such a faith as that would have tremendous 
power, I believe, over the people in the slums and the tenement houses, 
to lift them up and make men of them. Before such a faith as that trans- 
forming society, rotten politics and grinding monopolies would shrivel and 
disappear ; under its banner light and beauty, peace and plenty, joy and 
gladness will be led in. 

This is our hope. Have we any reason for it ? I think that we have. 

In the first place, my own confidence goes down to this bedrock of all 
my beliefs, that what ought to be is going to be. If I believe in God at 
all I must believe that. I am sure that the kind of a city we have been 
thinking about is the kind that ought to exist on this continent, and 
therefore I confidently expect it to exist. 

In the second place, I can see signs that this is coming. The last 
years of the nineteenth century are witnessing a great awakening of 
thought and conscience upon this subject, and the whole trend of opinion 
is toward the idea that the Christian city must be a cooperative com- 
munity. This means that it must be a Christian community ; that the 
people must learn the Christian law and follow it in all their municipal 
administration. 

What has this to do with Home Missions ? I should think that it 
ought to have much to do with Home Missions. If the enterprise of 
Home Missions is the Christianization of this country, the cities must 
present strategic points of immense importance. You are not going to 
control these populations by liquor laws or Sunday laws or any other 
kind of laws enacted by rural influence and imposed upon them from 
without. The people themselves have got to be changed in their ideas 
and their central purposes. If there is a Home Mission field anywhere it 
is here. 

The Congregational Home Missionary Society is already doing some 
work among certain classes of these vast city populations. But what it is 
doing, compared with what is to be done, is a drop in the bucket. There 
is need of a thorough study of the whole problem. There is a demand 
for the highest order of Christian statesmanship in dealing with it. And 



48 The Home Missionary July, 1898 

there is not a moment to lose. For this problem of the city is urgent, 
insistent, ominous ; whatever strength we have, of mind or heart, of 
willing service or consecrated substance, it calls for, and calls now ! I 
know that the problem has its economic aspect and its political aspect ; 
I know that the industrial and the civic mechanism must be reshaped ; but 
deeper than all these is the inspiration of the people with Christian 
ideas and Christian motives. That is our work. God help our hands to 
find it, and to do it with all our might ! 

* 
ADDRESS OF REV. DR. R. R. MEREDITH 

The closing hour has come, and it comes so late at night that the 
remaining words must be few ; indeed there is no occasion for their mul- 
tiplication. We have had in the addresses of the evening, and in the 
addresses of the meetings which have preceded that of this evening, a very 
broad field spread out before us, in which there are scattered an army of 
earnest and Christ-like workers, doing a wonderfully Christ-like work. We 
have rejoiced as we have listened to the story of their success. We have 
sympathized with them in their defeats and sorrows, and our heart has 
gone out to them with a God-speed that has been a prayer, as we have 
regarded the year to come. 

We have been talking to-night about Home Missions in the twentieth 
century. The twentieth century is like the Arctic Circle, an imaginary 
line, and yet approaching it we feel, as when approaching the Arctic Cir- 
cle, a strange, weird emotion as if we were about to enter another land; 
and in the present case the transition seems likely to be accompanied by 
great changes, changes which shall modify our life in almost all forms and 
expressions — our commercial life, our national life, as well as our spiritual 
and church life. Everything is to be larger. This is due largely to the 
changes that are occurring, and that are likely to occur in the immediate 
future in our national policy and boundaries. The nation down to this 
time has kept itself largely to itself. But only those who are thinking of 
the matter very carefully realize the immeasurable change which has taken 
place in the last two or three months. You might as well take the pieces 
of that crushed shell and that little ball of wool which you see as a chicken 
and undertake to put the pieces of the shell back in their place with the 
chicken inside in its embryotic condition, and get the whole air-tight, so 
that the chicken would come forth naturally at some future time, as to 
undertake to get this nation to-day back to where it was the 20th of last 
April. For since then we have declared war, and that means that we have 
changed the policy of our government from the beginning in such a way 



July, 1898 The Home Missionary 49 

that we can never go back. We are assuming, responsibilities that we must 
carry, and regions of the earth that we supposed-we never should have 
anything to do with are to be laid on our hands, on our consciences, and 
we must govern them, and we must give the Gospel to them, and give to 
them the civilization which the Gospel has given to us. Now, it needs 
that one should stop and think how that magnifies every problem of our 
national, commercial and religious life. We have- been provincial ; hence- 
forth we are a world power, and we must learn to think up to this level 
and out to the reaches of these facts, and in our calculations as to money 
and as to men we must go up into the millions of money and the thou- 
sands of mgn, and we are to be brought into contact with the other 
nations of the world, and the l'esult is not to be a universal turmoil, but a 
universal peace. 

When Miss Columbia takes her seat in the next Congress of Nations, 
beside Mrs. Britannia, and they begin to talk good English together, the 
rest of the nations will stop and listen, and what they say will prevail. 
And it is no small door of hope that is open to us to-night as we close 
this meeting, that the English-speaking peoples of the world are to join, 
and in their union is to be found such power that we shall be able to com- 
mand peace among the nations of the earth, and to dictate such policies 
among men as will bring freedom and justice and truth and permanent 
peace to all mankind, and open the highways of the world for the Gospel, 
and all nations shall speak one tongue and the world shall belong to Christ. 



OUR MISSION IN ALASKA 

Ever since the beginning of recent settlements in Alaska the ques- 
tion of sending missionaries thereto by this Society has been often before 
its Executive Committee and officers. Such, however, has been the 
pressure from its nearer, more populous, and immediately promising 
fields, for the maintenance and enlargement of work already begun in 
them ; so restricted have been the resources of the treasury ; and so 
comparatively ample for the supply of accessible points in the new fields, 
have been the missions inaugurated by other evangelical organizations, 
that the Committee has not earlier seen the way clear to enter on this 
far-away, untried domain. 

Providentially, however, near the close of the seventy-second fiscal 
year, the time, the means, and the man seemed to conspire to warrant the 
Society in tentatively undertaking the work jointly with our brethren of 
the Congregational Sunday-school and Publishing Society. The two 
Societies share the service and unite in the support of the Rev. Loyal L, 



50 The Home Missionary July, 1898 

♦ 
Wirt, as Missionary Superintendent of Home Missionary and Sunday- 
school work in Alaska. Mr. Wirt has become favorably known by his 
several years of successful superintendence of our sister Society's Sunday- 
school plants on the Pacific coast, his headquarters being in San Fran- 
cisco. His father had long ago earned the hearty esteem of the friends 
of Home Missions by his self-denying frontier service in California and 
elsewhere ; and his son, -early inured to the trials, and inspired with love 
for the recompenses, of home missionary frontier life, comes into this new 
relation with alacrity, intelligence, and zeal. He has already entered 
on the active duties of the new mission, and his letters from his tem- 
porary headquarters, in Juneau, show that thus early he is not only draw- 
ing around him the Christian men and women of the region, but is making 
friends and helpers of people not heretofore wont to look kindly upon 
men seeking the spiritual welfare of others. 

After gaining a firm foothold in the coast towns and among the miners 
and their families thereabouts, Mr. Wirt will make such tours as time 
and strength may allow in the Yukon region and other parts of Alaska, 
learning by personal visitation the needs of the people, the possible oppor- 
tunities for missionary effort, by way of churches, Sunday-schools, etc. 

Friends of the cause cannot fail to see that our entrance on this new, 
strange and distant field marks an era in the Society's history. To this 
new movement our people in future years, when Alaska's many, varied, 
and wonderful resources shall have been developed, will look back with 
exceeding interest. And if Mr. Wirt's accounts already received are 
a fair foretaste of those yet to come, our readers of the present time will 
need no exhortation to watch for his coming letters. 

A word as to the expense. Three thousand dollars ($3,000) have 
been appropriated by the two Societies for Mr. Wirt's salary and expenses 
for this first year of experiment, and it is proposed to rely chiefly upon 
Congregational members of the Young People's Societies of Christian 
Endeavor to raise this sum". The new mission is to be known as "The 
Alaska Christian Endeavor Mission," and the fund for its support 
($3,000) is divided into three hundred (300) shares of ten dollars ($10) 
each. 

All the Christian Endeavor Societies in our Congregational churches 
are invited to take part in this most interesting mission by subscribing for 
shares according to their ability. In this way they can have that " specific 
object " for which they, in common with many other givers, so often ask. 
And where can a " specific object " be found more worthy or inviting ? 
The enterprise is now in the germ, but who can foretell whereto, with 
God's blessing, it may grow ? Who can measure the future recompense 
of those who share in its early development ? Pray for our Father's 
blessing upon the new mission and its superintendent. 



July, H 



The Home Missionary 



5i 



APPOINTMENTS 



MARCH, 1898 



Not in commission last year 

Arnold, Charles A., Ft. Calhoun, Neb. 

Barnum, H. S.,Mt. Dora and Tangerine, Fla. 

Butler, Jessie C., Central, Ala. 

Earl, James, Granite Falls and Belview, Minn. 

Jenkins, Josiah H., Buena Vista, Colo. 

Johnson, Jonas, Lincoln, Neb. 

Jones, Thomas R., Pittsburg, Penn. 

Rain, James W., Dayton, Ohio. 

Sutherland, Miss Hester M., Nimshew, No. Cal. 

Re-commissioned 

Ahnstrom, Jonas M., South Minneapolis, Minn. 

Battey, George J., Grand Island, Neb. 

Bessey, Will N., Lindewood, St. Louis, Mo. 

Bjorklund, Ernst V., Mankato and Kasota, Minn. 

Bollinger, Edward S., Astoria, Ore. 

Bormose, Niels N., Philadelphia, Penn. 

Bright, David F., Lyons, Colo. 

Butler, Elmer W., Melbourne and Eden, Fla. 

Chapin, Charles H., Paynesville, Minn. 

Chew, James, Thayer, Mo. 

Childs, E. P., Ashland, Ore. 

Crane, Edward P., Pelican Rapids, Minn. 

Danford, James W., Brownton and Stewart, Minn. 

Davies, W. C, Minersville, Penn. 

Dawson. W. E., Blaine, Wash. 

Davis, William, Elyria, Colo. 

Dickerson, C. H., Newark, N. J. 

Doyle, Amos A., Aberdeen, Wash. 

Drake, Ellis R., Villa Park, Denver, Colo. 



Eckel, Frank E., Julesburg, Colo. 

Edwards, John, Island, Little Muskingum, Law- 
rence, Marietta, and Stanleyville, Ohio. 

Egerland, Franz, Crete, Neb. 

Evans, W. L., Plymouth, Penn. 

Field, James P., Chillicothe, Mo. 

Fisher, Herman P., Crookston, Minn. 

Hassel, Richard B.. Everett, Wash. 

Hernandez, Sebastian, Los Ranchos de Atrisco, 
New Mex. 

Larson, Anton, Clintonville, Wis. 

Leufstedts, G. W., East Orange, N.J. 

Lich, John, Sioux Falls, So. Dak. 

Lindquist, N. J., Tacoma, Wash. 

McCroskey, John A., Riverdale, Mo. 

Moffatt, T. C, Wymore, Neb. 

Moore, George W., Frostburg, Md. 

Newell, William W., Duluth, Minn. 

Nott, Jarius L., Benson, Minn. 

Parsons, Henry W., St. Paul, Minn. 

Perry, F. S., Ogalalla, Neb. 

Roberts, Thomas S., Osawatomie, Kan. 

Robinson, Oliver T., Whitewater, Colo. 

Scott, George, Terry, So. Dak. 

Smith, William, Nanticoke, Penn. 

Stewart, W. E. M., Sheridan, Wyo. 

Totten, M. J., Caledonia, No. Dak. 

Upton, A. G., Weiser, Idaho. 

Wannamaker, Henry S , Elyria, Ohio. 

Wells, Mark, Baltimore, Md. 

Williams, Stephen, Forman, Havana, Rutland 
and Cayuga, No. Dak. 

Woth, Fried, Germantown, Neb. 



APRIL, 1? 



Not in commission last year 

Anderson, Frank H., Omaha, Neb. 

Brown, Henry B., Soldier Creek, Okla. 

Burr, William H., Condon, Ore. 

Comfort, James W., Marion, Ind. 

Fuller, Edgar R., Bakersfield, So. Cal. 

Ham, R. K., Ocean View, San Francisco, No. Cal. 

Hill, Charles F., Cardonia and Perth, Ind. 

Jones, Fred V., Reno, Nev. 

Lind, Nels J., St. Louis, Mo. 

Merrill, G. H., Etna, Oro Fino, Callahan's, and 

McCounaughey, No. Cal. 
Morgan, David W., Buena Park, So. Cal. 
Norseen, Oscar G., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Pederson, Jens H., Hoboken, N. J. 
Peebles, David, Bountiful, Utah. 
Radford, Walter, Custer, So. Dak. 
Reid, Francis W., Ocean View, No. Cal. 
Stanley, J. E., General Missionary in Fla. 
Tannehill, Mrs. A. H., Choctaw City, Okla. 
Thompson, Alexander W., Etiwanda, So. Cal. 

Re-commissioned 

Akeson, Ludwig, Dover, N. J. 

Andrewson, Severt M., Merrill, Wis. 

Atherton, Isaac W., Spring Valley and Jamul, So. 

Cal. 
Avery, Holly H., Steelburc:, Neb. 
Bigelow. Frank E., East Chicago, Ind. 
Booth, Edwin, Jr., Burwell, Neb. 
Brereton, John, Springfield, Mo. 
Brown, Aurelian L., Harbine, Neb. 
Brown, John F., Needles, So, Cal. 



Campbell, George C, Trenton, Neb. 

Chatfield, G. A., Crested Butte, Colo. 

Chew, James, Thayer, Mo. 

Cooper, John H., Santa Ana, So. Cal. 

Crawford, C. H., Baltimore, Md. 

Davisson, Augustus, Monterey, Penn. 

De Kay, George H., Norwalk, So. Cal. 

Dibble, William L., Guthrie, Okla. 

Emerson, Stephen G., Perris, So. Cal. 

Foster, Richard B., Okarche, Okla. 

Frost, Wilfred B., Central, Beech wood, Cedar- 
wood, and Grassig Valley, Ind. 

Graf, John F., Springfield, Mo. 

Gray, David B., Portland, Ore. 

Griffiths, D. Baines, Kansas City, Kan. 

Hale, Edson H., Decoto, No. Cal. 

Hampton, William S., Silver Creek, Neb. 

Hanson, Carl J., Kornstad, So. Dak. 

Hardaway, G. W., Longwood, Fla. 

Harding, William F., Terre Haute, Ind. 

Harger, Charles H., Littleton and Manchester, 
Colo. 

Harris, Benjamin, Palmyra, Ohio. 

Hood, E. Lyman, Berkeley, No. Cal. 

Huelster, Anton, Detroit, Mich. 

Hurlburt, Wallace, Freewater and Ingles Chapel, 
Ore. 

Isakson, Andrew J., Titusville, Penn. 

Jensen, Charles J., Unity, Easton, and Waupaca, 
Wis. 

Jones, John E., Crary, No. Dak. 

Lange, John G., Leigh, Neb. 

Miller, Charles G., Kansas City, Kan. 

Murray, E. W., Brisrbtwood, Ind. 

Nash, Fred. W., Indian Valley, Idaho. 



52 



The Home Missionary 



July, i! 



Okcrstein, John F.. Minneapolis, Minn. 
Osthoff, E. C. Lincoln. Neb. 
Paine, S. D., General Missionary in Fla. 
Palmer, Burton M.. Sunny Side, No. Cal. 
Peirce, Albert E., Washington and Cannelsburg, 

Ind. 
Petterson, John, Clear Lake. Wis. 
Poling, Daniel V.. Albany, Ore. 
Rogers, William. Green Valley, No. Cal. 
Rowell, N. L., Redondo Beach, So. Cal. 
Selden, Mrs. C. M., New York and Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Shaw, Edwin S.. Cooperstown, No. Dak. 
Shuman, Henry A., Monroe, Neb. 
Simpkin, Peter A., Gallup, New Mex. 
Skeels, Henry M., Harmon, Colo. 
Smith, James C, Alexandria, Ind. 
Smith, Edwin B., Louisville, Kan. 
Smith, Richard, Portland, Ind. 
Smith, Thomas, Porter, Ind. 



Snyder, Charles W.. Stillwater, Okla. 

Spanswick, Thomas W., West Guthrie, Okla. 

Stevens, Clarence H., Hydesville. No. Cal. 

Taggart, George A., Beaverton and Tualtin, Ore. 

Toomay, John B., Sedalia, Mo. 

Van Wagner, Allen J., Carthage, Mo. 

Vaughan, Lewis, Oriska, No. Dak. 

Wadsworth, George, Spencer, Neb. 

Wallace, Louis, Sierra Valley. No. Cal. 

Walton, Richard C, Kansas City, Mo. 

Warren, Leroy, Kansas City, Mo. 

Wheeler, Sheldon H., Compton, So. Cal. 

White, Levi, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Whitlock, Frank M., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Willett, George, Whittier, So. Cal. 

Winter, Alpheus, Tryon, N. C. 

Wolcott, W. H., Moreno and Alessandro, So. Cal. 

Woodford, Burton H., Dayton. Wyo. 

Young, Arthur G., Hope, No. Dak. 



MAY, 1898 



Not in commission last year 

Beitel, Julius H., Palisade and Eureka. 

Neb. 
Darling, Miss May, Mcintosh, Minn. 
Davies, Daniel D., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Diffenbacher. Benjamin F., Eagle, Neb. 
English. Isaac N.. Bertha and Clarissa. Minn. 
Haecker, M. C, Gillett, Colo. 
Harper, Thomas H., Newkirk, Okla. 
Hasett, C. A., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Lackey, James M.. Steilacoom. Wash. 
Le Bar, William H., Perry, Okla. 
Leffingwell, A. N., North Enid, Okla. 
Matthews, W. J., New Cambria. M 1. 
Merrill. H. E., San Jacinto, So. Cal. 
Miller, Charles I., Sykeston and Cathay, No. Dak. 
Maxie, Charles H.. Amery, No. Wis. 
Moore, Frank L.. Minneapolis, Minn. 
Norseen, Oscar G., Perth Amboy, N. J. 
Ohlson, Olaf, Glenwood, Wis. 
Pettinger. Samuel J.. Monterey. Penn. 
Rayon, Thomas F., Palermo, No. Cal. 
Ruge, L. H.. Medford, Okla. 
Slavinskie, Barbara, Bay City, Mich. 
Smith, Fred. H., Perkins, Okla. 
Teter, Joseph H., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Weatherman, Jerry B., Oklahoma, Okla. 

Re-commissioned 

Anderson, Emil A., Lake City, Minn. 
Andrewson, Andrew J.. Maple Valley, Wis. 
Arnett, Samuel G., Lorin, No. Cal. 
Barnes, Albert E.. Perham, Minn. 
Barnes, Alice R. N., Castle, Mon. 
Baker, William H., Springfield, Ohio. 
Bechtel. Philip, Charles Mix Co., So. Dak. 
Beauchamp, Jethro M., Lexington. Ore. 
Beebe, Julius R., Sanborn, No. Dak. 
Belt, S. D., Santa Monica, So. Cal. 
Beran, John, La Crosse, Wis. 
Bird, Martin B., Brainerd, Minn. 
Bjuge, Carl B., Minneapolis. Minn. 
Blakeslee, A. D., North Denver. Colo. 
Blomquist. Charles F., Fosston, Minn. 
Bostvvick, Elmer D., Big Timber, Mon. 
Bown, Frank A., Walker. Minn. 
Brewer, William F., General Missionary in Ga. 
Bryant, John W., Lorella. Ore. 
Burden, Thomas J., Five Forks, Ga 
Campbell. Wilber A. K. % Hannibal, Mo. 
Carroll, W. I., South Dallas. Tex. 
Chakurian. Enoch E., Adin. No. Cal. 
Cheadle, Stephen H., San Juan, No. Cal. 
Cibula, Jan, Braddock, Penn. 
Cinyburg, Miss Clara, St. Louis, Mo. 
Cone, James W., Ocheltrec, Kan. 



Coombe, Philip, San Francisco, No. Cal. 

Cox, Sydney H., Jersey City, N. J. 

Dahlgren, John A., Warren, Penn. 

Dent, Thomas J.. Aberdeen, So. Dak. 

Dickson, James P., San Francisco, No. Cal. 

Earl, Theodore R., San Diego and La Mesa, So. 
Cal. 

Edwards, Rosine M., Hillyard. Wash. 

Edwards, William, Abercrombie, No. Dak. 

Fellows, C. B., General Missionary in Minn. 

Field, F. A., Los Angeles, So. Cal. 

Fisher, Oren D., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Forrester, James C, Hoschton, Ga. 

Foster, Benjamin F., Lawrence, Kan. 

Foster, Festus, Waukomis, Okla. 

Francis, D. R., Trinidad, Colo. 

Galloway, Emil R., Sunol Glen, No. Cal. 

Gilliam. John W., North Rome, Ga. 

Goodsell, Dennis, Byron, No. Cal. 

Graham, William H., Hendricks, Ga. 

Griffiths, William E., Burtrum and Grey Eagle, 
Minn. 

Gross, Miss Anna A., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Hadden, Robert A., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Hankemeyer, Nathaniel W., Alva, Okla. 

Hayes, Francis L., Manitou, Colo. 

Hill, Dexter D., Los Alamitos, So. Cal. 

Hoffman, John A., Granada and Fraser, Minn. 

Holway, Theodore T.. Maplewood, Mo. 

Hoskins, Emanuel, Pescadero, No. Cal. 

Huntington, J. C., Mankato and Western Con- 
ference, Minn. 

Hutchinson, William A., Montrose, Colo. 

Ingham, J. E., Mazeppa, Minn. 

Jasper, G. A.. Loleta, No. Cal. 

Jelinek. Joseph, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Johnson, B. O., Renovo, Penn. 

Josephson, Hans F., Winona, Minn. 

Kelsey, William, Alpha, Parker, and Otter, Okla. 

Kidd, William D.. Cottonwood, No. Cal. 

Kimball, J., West Duluth and Aitkin, Min.i. 

Krause, F. C, Fitchburg, No. Cal. 

Lawson. Francis, Guerneville, No. Cal. 

Lee, Vinton, Iowa, La. 

Lemmon, Charles H., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Lopez, J. M., New York City, N. Y. 

Luark, Marcellius J., Murphy, No. Cal. 

Lucas, Oramel W., Pacific Grove, No. Cal. 

Lumpkin, Wilson, Carney, Okla. 

Lyman, William A., Pierre, So. Dak. 

McCallie, Thomas S., East Lake and Chatta- 
nooga, Tenn. 

McWilliams, John W., Waynoka, Okla. 

Mack, Charles A., Cando, No. Dak. 

Mair, William M., Henry, So. Dak. 

Michael, George, Detroit, Minn. 

Mills, Benjamin C Lake Charles, La. 

Moya, Miguel M., San Jost5, New Mex. 



July, 1898 



The Home Missionary 



53 



Murrman, Adam, Grand Junction, Colo. 
Musil, John, Cleveland, Ohio. 
Nelson, A. G., Center City and Sandstone, Minn. 
Nichols, Danforth B., Mission Hill, So. Dak. 
Noyce, George T., Brunswick and Willowdale, 

Neb. 
Olsen, Anton, Ekdall, Wis. 
Orr, James B., San Francisco, No. Cal. 
Palmer, Alice R., Chowen, Minn. 
Parsons, James, Los Angeles, So. Cal. 
Paulu, Anton, Vining, Iowa. 
Pederson, Ludwig J., Fargo, No. Dak. 
Pederson, L. J., General Missionary in Northern 

Minn. 
Perry, George H., Pocatcllo, Idaho. 
Peterson, Mathias, Vollmer, Idaho. 
Pettigrew, Nina D., Keystone, So. Dak. 
Phillips, J. W., Oakland, No. Cal. 
Preiss, John M., Endicott, Wash. 
Prucha, John, Cleveland, Ohio. 
Rathbone, Leland D., Santa Rosa, No. Cal. 
Reitinger, Miss Marie, Cleveland, Ohio. 
Riley, Charles A., Fairmount, lnd. 
Robberts, James F., Park and Altona, Okla. 
Robertson, George, Mentone, So. Cal. 
Rood, John S., Fargo, No. Dak. 
Rogers, S. J., Robbinsdale, Minn. 
Ruddock, Charles A., Winthrop, Minn. 
Rundus, John, Crete, Neb. 
Searles, George R., Hancock, Minn. 



Schauffler, Mrs. C. H., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Smith, A. J., Tacoma, Wash. 

Smith, Charles W v Flagler, Colo. 

Smith, J. F., Arcadia, Neb. 

Staub, John J., Portland, Ore. 

Stemen, John A., West Minneapolis, Minn. 

Stringer, Firth, St. Louis, Mo. 

Tade, Ewing O., Avalon, No. Cal. 

Thirloway, Timothy, Buffalo Gap and W. G. 
Flat, So. Dak. 

Travis, David Q., San Andreas and Mokelumne 
Hill, No. Cal. 

Twyford, Mrs. Lucy E., Morrison, Okla. 

Umsted, Owen, Longton, Kan. 

Wales, Fred H., Black Diamond, No. Cal. 

Waller, Edward, Tipton, No. Cal. 

Watson, W. H., Red Lodge, Mon. 

Watt, Richard, Graceville, Minn. 

Watt, Thomas E., Enid, Okla. 

Webb, Henry W., Gettysburg, So. Dak. 

Wellman, Wheeler M., Darlington, Okla. 

Wells, Charles W., Ranier, Ore. 

Wideberg, C. J., Arnot, Penn. 

Wilkinson, William A., North Branch and Sun- 
rise, Minn. 

Williams, Stephen, Forman, No. Dak. 

Williams, William H., Siloam Springs, Ark. 

Wrbitzky, E., St. Louis, Mo. 

Yarrow, Sidney R., Mill Valley and Sausalito, 
No. Cal. 



RECEIPTS 

For Account of Receipts by State Auxiliary Societies, see pages 73 to 84. 

MARCH, 1898 



MA1NE-$i 4 o. 9 3. 

Blue Hill, Ladies' Mission Circle, by 

C. J. Lord $2 00 

Cape Elizabeth, Y. P. S. C. E., by Miss 

E. L. Tobey 1 00 

Eastport, by H. Kilby n 01 

Gorham, by J. S. Leavitt, Jr 56 43 

Limerick, Miss E. P. Hayes 70 

North Bridgton, C. E. Soc, $1 ; Har- 
rison, C. E. Soc, Si, by Rev. A. G. 

Fitz 2 00 

Portland, Williston Ch., by A. S. Bur- 
bank 52 79 

J. H. Dow 5 00 

Sherman Mills, Rev. I. C. Bumpus... 5 00 

South Freeport, by A. Smith S 00 



NEW HAMPSHIRE— $1,659.61, of 
which legacy, $559.60. 

N. H. H. Miss. Soc, by Hon. L. D. 
Stevens, Treas 193 63 

F. C. I. and H. M. Union of N. II., 
Miss A. A. McFarland, Treas.: 

Concord, A Friend in the First Ch. 100 00 

Amherst, Mrs. E. Aiken 70 

"L. F. B." 15000 

Derry, Central Ch., by Rev. H. B. 

Putnam 57 80 

Epping, by G. S. Thompson 34 18 

Exeter, Mrs. E. S. Hall 510 00 

Littleton, First, by D. C. Renwich... 15 00 

Lyme, Mrs. A. G. Washburn, freight 1 00 

New Ipswich, J. E. F. Marsh 5 co 



Oxfordville, Mrs. A. L. Pierce $ 70 

Tamworth, Estate of Faxon Gannett, 

by J. D. Hidden, Ex 559 60 

Walpole, by C. E. Sparhawk. 22 00 

West Hampstead, N. Ordway 10 00 



VERMONT— $284.44. 

Vermont Domestic Miss. Soc, by W. 

C. Tyler, Treas 2066 

East Hardwick, by C. S. Montgomery 24 85 

Jericho, Second, by W. I. Byington. . 2 38 

Manchester, Miss E. J. Kellogg 5 00 

Newbury, Mrs. A. E. Keyes, for 

freight 5 00 

North Pomfret, by S. H. Warren 3 77 

St. Johnsbury, March 17 200 00 

Stockbridge, T. S. Hubbard 5 00 

Thetford, Miss M. I. Ward 2 00 

Vergennes, Y. P. S. C. E., by M. C. 

Norton 13 69 

West Hartford, by Mrs. F. T. Wheeler 2 09 



MASSACHUSETTS— $15,500.89 ; of 
which legacies, $10,651.05. 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc, by Rev. E. B. 

Palmer, Treas i,S°° °° 

By request of donors 127 00 

Woman's H. M. A., by Miss A. C. 
Bridgman, Treas. : 
For Salary Fund I1992 86 

Auburndale, D. M. Tyler 5 00 

Belchertown, by C. B. Southwick 21 93 



54 



The Home Missionary 



July, 1898 



Boston, Estate of Sally A. Dwight, 

by T. Weston $1,500 00 

Estate of Rev. E. K. Alden, D.D., 

by Prof. E. K. Alden, Ex 950 00 

W. A. Wilde, for Salary Fund 50 00 

H. Fisher 200 00 

Dennis, Union Ch., by N. A. Howes.. 2 50 

Dorchester, Second, by Miss E. Tol- 

man 257 33 

Enfield, Estate of J. B. Woods, by 

Rev. R. M. Woods, Trustee 80 00 

Florence, Ladies' Benev. Soc, by G. 

H. Ray 25 00 

Haverhill, Estate of John B. Case, by 

Hannibal G. Case, Ex 50 00 

Holyoke, First, by J. H. Wylie, Jr... 41 72 

Lancaster, S. R. Merrick 10 00 

Ludlow Center, First, by H. E. Miller 8 00 

Medford, E. Gaylord 1 00 

Mittineague, by E. H. Shepard 22 37 

Monson, by E. F. Morris 33 28 

Newton Center, Extra Cent a Day 

Band, by S. F. Wilkins 25 00 

Northampton, Estate of Numan Clark 25 00 

Dorcas Soc. of the First, by Mrs. 

J. E. Clarke 5625 

Northbridge, Estate of Laura A. Brig- 
ham, by George Benson, Ex 2,296 05 

Northfield, Trinitarian, by Miss M. T. 

Dutton 280 00 

Pittsfield, Legacy of Miss Sarah Mar- 
tin, by M. C. Clapp and F. W. 
Rockwell, Exs., for Parsonage 

Fund 4>75o 00 

Rehoboth, by F. A. Bliss 5 00 

South Deerfield, by C. B. Tilton 16 00 

Turner's Falls, Y. P. S. C. E., by 

Mrs. L Griswold 5 75 

Whately, First, by C. K. Waite, to 

const. W. J. Gould a L. M 43 85 

Worcester, On account of Estate of 
Harriet W. Damon, by S. Jenni- 

son and W. S. Barton, Exs 1,000 00 

C. H. Morgan, Plymouth Ch., by 

F. W. Chase 100 00 

Mrs. S. A. Howard, $10 ; W. D. 
Spear, $10, by W. D. Spear 20 00 

RHODE ISLAND— $201.00. 

Providence, S. S. of Academy Avenue 

Ch., by H. Stone 1 00 

Rhode Island, X 200 00 

CONNECTICUT— $23,797. 34; legacies,$28,o 4 6.3 3 . 

Miss. Soc. of Conn., by Rev. W. H. 

Moore '5404 

Woman s H. M. Union, Mrs. W. W. 
Jacobs, Treas. : 
For Salary Fund : 

Hartford, First. Friend 1500 

Middleton, First, by Mrs. J. H. 

Bunce, contents of Mrs. A. E. 

Foster's Dime Bank 5 00 

New Britain, So. Ch., by Mrs. S. 

H.Wood 203 

Norfolk, by Mrs. G. T. Johnson.. 10 00 

Norwalk, First, Y. P. S. C. E., by 

Mrs. A. B. Hill 5 00 

Poquonock, C. E. S., by Mrs. F. 

M. Case 500 

South Canaan, Aux., by Mrs. E. 

E. Manley 3 00 

Taftville, Miss. Soc, by Mrs. S. 

E. Carr 2 60 

Sr. and Jr. C. E. Soc 6 00 

West Winsted, Second, by Mrs. 

H. Gay 25 co 

Woodbury, First, Ladies' Miss. 

Soc, by Mrs. D. R. Rodger 6 00 



Berlin, Estate of Franklin Woodruff, 

by Col. William Bulkley, Ex $1,076 33 

A Member of the Cong. Ch 10 00 

Bethel, A Friend 5 00 

Bloomfield, Y. P. S. C. E., by F. C. 

Bidwell 840 

Branford, Estate of Timothy P. Gil- 

lett, by William J. Gabb, Adm 3,500 00 

Bridgeport, Y. P. S. C. E. of the South 

Ch., by R. S. Jewett 8 85 

Connecticut, A Friend 10 00 

East Haven, by Mrs. W. S. Cokee... 29 12 

Farmington, A Friend 5 00 

Greenwich, A Friend in the Second.. 5 00 
Guilford, Estate of Dr. Alvan Tal- 

cott, by C. Griswold, Adm 300 00 

Hartford, Asylum Hill, by C. E. 

Thompson 5 00 

" Highwood," Norwalk 10 00 

Long Ridge, by S. S. Crane 2 00 

Madison, First, by F. A. Kelsey 29 00 

Mansfield, Second, by B. F. Koons. .. 30 00 

Meriden, Center Ch., by W. F. Smith, 50 00 

'• N. F," First Ch 5 00 

New Haven, Young Ladies' Mission 

Circle of United Ch., by Miss R. M. 

Munger 50 00 

New Milford, Y. P. S. C. E., by Rev. 

F. A. Johnson 10 00 

Norfolk, Miss M. C. Seymour 5 00 

Norwalk, Legacy of Mrs. Julia A. 

Lockwood, by Col. F. St. John Lock- 
wood, Ex 1,000 00 

Norwich, R 10 00 

Old Lyme, First, by W. F. Coult 7 50 

Salisbury, Y. P. S. C. E., by Miss S. 

R. Norton, for Salary Fund 5 00 

Sharon, Estate of Sarah I. Hotchkiss, 

by her Ex 4,85000 

Sound Beach, First, by Mrs. G. A. 

Heusted 30 00 

Southbury, by Rev. W. H. Barrows.. 15 00 
South Manchester, Bequest of Mrs. 

Mary Perkins 1,000 00 

Southport, Estate of Mrs. Hetty D. 

Gookin, by J. H. Perry, Ex 5,820 00 

Stratford, S. S., by E. H. Judson 10 00 

Terryville, by G. C. Clark, to const. 

Mrs. R. Baldwin a L. M 6713 

Thompsonville, C. Kingsbury 5 00 

Torrington, First, by L. Hodges 10 00 

West Hartford, Estate of Maria Whit- 
man, by M. A. Andrews, Adm.... 10,000 00 
Winchester, Estate of Mary C. 

Holmes, by R. E. Holmes. Ex 50000 

Windsor, First, by S. H. Barber 25 00 

Winsted, First, by J. P. Cook 50 34 

NEW YORK— $2,502.60. 

Received by William Spalding,Treas. : 

Block Creek 4 34 

Busti 4 00 

Caroline Depot, Mrs. F. E. Bates.. 10 00 

Little Valley 4 00 

Lockport, East Ave. Ch., $4-5°; C. 

E. Soc, $5.46 9 96 

Middletcwn, North Street Church 10 00 

New York City, Forest Ave , Ch., 

$20.00; S. S., $15.00; C. E. Soc, 

$15.00 50 00 

Parishville 15 00 

Randolph, Ch., $18.15- Junior C. E., 

$1.00; S. S. class of boys, $1.50. 20 65 

Syracuse, Good Will 7 00 

Danforth, add'l , to const. H. A. 
Manchester and D. E. Hayden 

L. Ms 4 18 

Westmoreland 12 50 



84 63 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. J. J. 
Pearsall, Treas.: 
Baiting Hollow, A lover of the cause 



151 63 



July, ii 



The Home Missionary 



55 



Barryville, Aux $700 

Brooklyn, Ch. of the Pilgrims, for 

Salary Fund. 100 00 

Lewis Ave., C. E. S 7 00 

Buffalo, First, for Salary Fund 45 00 

Burr's Mills 5 00 

Corning, Aux 15 00 

Ellington, C. E. S 5 00 

Java 700 

Middletown, First, Ladies 1 Guild.. 6 00 

New Village, for Salary Fund 5 00 

New York, Broadway Tab. Ch., S. 

W. W 39 00 

Philadelphia, C. E. S 5 60 

Portland, Young Ladies' Circle.... 5 00 

Riverhead, C. E. S 5 00 

Rodman, Aux 20 00 

Walton 10 00 

291 60 

Aurora, D. A. Walker 15 00 

Barryville, $3 ; Eldred, $2, by Rev. J. 

F. Whitney 5 00 

Berkshire, First, by S. L. Ball 68 55 

Brooklyn, South Ch., $94-52 ; South 
Ch. Mission School, $10, by E. D. 

Ford • 104 52 

Plymouth Ch., by H. L. Pratt 258 70 

Puritan Ch., by H. W. Goll 100 00 

Candor, E. A. Booth 100 00 

Farmingville, by F. I. Terry 3 44 

Howells Depot, by G. S. Hall 4 12 

New York City, Manhattan Ch., by 
F. H. Meserve. to const. Prof. J. 
T. Woodhull and Mrs. W. G. King 

L. Ms 109 30 

Broadway Tabernacle, by N. C. 

Fisher 1,131 23 

Cash 100 00 

North Lawrence, Mrs. N. Williams . . 5 00 

Northville, by J. T. Downs 18 13 

Orient, by M. B. Brown 26 3" 

Seneca Falls, by H. W. Knight 7 25 

Winthrop, by L. T. Cole 275 

NEW JERSEY— $276.31. 

Asbury Park. First, by G. A. Smock. 15 00 

Bloomfield, Mrs. D. B. Coe 50 00 

Dover, Swedes, by Rev. L. Akeson. . . 3 25 
East Orange, Trinity Ch., by H. R. 

Halsey 150 64 

Jersey City, Waverly Ch., by Rev. J. 

C. Emery 721 

Ridgefield Park, F. W. Martins 6 00 

Upper Montclair, S S. of Christian 

Union Ch., by F. W. Dorman 4421 

PENNSYLVANIA— $82.58. 

Woman's Missionary Union, Mrs. T. 
W. Jones, Treas.: 

Guy's Mills 5 00 

Allegheny, S. M. Y 5 00 

Edwardsdale, Bethesda Ch., by Rev. 

D. L. Davis 6 00 

Mt. Carmel, First, by Rev. R. N. 

Harris 8 47 

Nanticoke, Y. P. S. C. E., by M.Morris 2 00 

Neath, by D. Davis 2 58 

Philadelphia, Pilgrim Ch., by R. 

Rowen n 49 

Pittsburgh, First, by Dr. T. W. Jones 19 29 
Wanamie and Glen Lyon, by Rev. J. 

J. Jenkins 16 75 

Wilkesbarre, First Welsh Ch., by 

Richard George 6 00 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA-$39o. S o. 

Woman's H. M. Union of the Asso., 
Mrs. J. H. Denison, Treas.: 
Washington, D. C., of which $95 for 
Salary F und $124 00 

Washington, First, of which $50 from 
Gen. E. Whittlesey, by W. Lam- 
born 227 00 

Jr. C. E. of the Fifth, by N. L. 

Tade 1 00 

Mt. Pleasant Ch., by W. D. Quin- 
ter 38 50 

NORTH CAROLINA— $20.00. 

Woman's Missionary Union, Miss A. 
E. Farrington, Treas. : 
"A. E. F" 5 00 



Tryon, Ch. of Christ, by Rev. A. 
Winter 



ALABAMA— $20.45. 

Abacoochee, Flowery Grove Ch., 

Barfield, Mountain Grove Ch., and 

Oxford, Smith s Chapel, by Rev. E. 

J. Loveless 

Cottonwood, Oak Grove Ch., by Rev. 

E. Brackin 

Hanceville, Mountain Grove Ch., and 

Tidmore, Nectar Ch., by Rev. J. D. 

Foust 

Leon, Liberty "Ch., and Brantley, Oak 

Grove Ch., by Rev. J. L. Stewart. . 



8 LOUISIANA— $12.70. 

Hammond, by J. Q. Adams 

Iowa, by V. Lee 

Welsh, by Mrs. L. Robinson 

ARKANSAS— $4.95. 
Charleston, A Friend 

FLORIDA— $67.44. 

New Smyrna, by Rev. H. Cartledge. . 
Ormond, Union Ch., by Rev. D. M. 

Breckenridge 

Tampa, Rev. E. P. Herrick 

Tangerine, by G. H . Wood 

Tavares, Union Ch., $1.25; Clarcona, 

Union Ch., $2.50, by Rev. L. J. 

Donaldson 

Winter Park, by P. Dale 



TEXAS- 



3.72. 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. E. 
Heflin, Treas.: 

Dallas, First 

Dallas, First, by F. A. Hatch 

Paris, First, by Rev. L. Rees 

Sherman, Mrs. E. Heflin 



OKLAHOMA- 



(1.72. 



MARYLAND-$6.oo. 
Frostburg, by Rev. G- W. Moore 



6 00 



Alva, Olivet Ch., by Rev. N. W. Hank- 

emey er 

El Reno, by Rev. J. L. Read 

Jennings, First, by Rev. C. J. Rives. 



3 75 
3 7° 



5 33 
3 5° 
3 87 



21 


20 


5 
2 


04 
27 


3 

22 


75 
18 



20 00 

22 72 
13 OO 



9 5° 
15 OO 
13 70 



56 



The Home Missionary 



July, 1898 



Morrison, by Rev. C. W. Snyder 

Wakita, Salem Cong. N. W. Dist. 
Apoc, by Rev. I. W. Wisel 

ARIZONA-$i 5 . 5 o. 

Crittenden, by Rev. E. H. Ashraun.. 

NEW MEXICO— $19.50. 



Cubero, A Friend 

Gallup, First, by Rev. P. A. Simpkin. 



OHIO-$i, 787.08. 

Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, D. D.: 

Alexis, by Rev. N. S. Colton 

Ashtabula, First, C. E., by Rev. M. 

Baird 

Swedish, by Rev. C. A. Widing.. 

Brownhelm, by Saml. Bacon 

Burton, by Rev. E. O. Mead 

Chatham, by Mrs. C. A. Moody 

Chillicothe. by H. J. Hamon, Tr... . 
Cincinnati, Walnut Hills, by E. J. 

Wood 

Riverside, by S. M. Goodman 

Cleveland, Euclid Avenue, by J. 

Snow 

Irving Street, by E. M. Reece 

Bethlehem Ch. and S. S., by A. R. 

Teagle 

Ch. and S. S., by A. R. Teagle. 
Bohemian C. E., by Rjv. J. 

Prucha 

Cyril Chapel, by Rev. J. Musil... 

Columbus, Rev. 6. Talbot 

South, by Rev. J. W. Barnett 

Conneaut Center. Pa., by C. B. Cory 

Edinburg, by Rev. S. R. Dole 

Fairport Harbor, by Rev. W. D. 

Ferguson 

Fredericksburg, Y. P. S. C. E., by 

Harry Dile 

Garrettsvillc, Rev. and Mrs. H. O. 

Allen 

Grafton, by Miss L. Cordrey 

Ironton, by Rev. A. G. Manville. . . 

Jefferson, by Rev. L. J. Luethi 

Kelloggsville, by Rev. H. J. Taylor 
Kirtland, by Rev. U. C. Bosworth.. 

Lafayette, by F. E. Carlton 

Lawrence, by John Romier 

Lexington, by Rev. H. F. Thompson 
Little Muskingum, by Rev. John 

Edwards, D. D 

Madison, by A. S. Stratton 

Marysville. by Rev. W. S. Bugbey. 

Mecca, by N. M. Buck 

Newark, Plymouth, by Rev. W. 

Pease 

New Castle, Pa., by Rev. W. R. 

Evans 

Newton Falls, by Rev. C. F. Wise- 
man 

North Amherst, by Rev. P. E. Hard- 
ing 

North Monroeville, by Rev. J. J. 

Dalton 

Norwalk, of which A Friend 85, by 

Rev. T. J. Collier 

Oberlin, Estate of Lucy C. Hardy, 
Rev. Hinds Smith, Fx., in full 
to const. Mrs. L. F. Main, 
Mrs. Charles A. Brown, Mrs. 
Irving Smith, Mis. Albert 
Phillips, Miss Winnie Brown, 
Miss Emma Courtenay, John S. 
Kemp, Miss Orra Tucker, Miss 
L. M. Baker, and Mrs. Julia 

Ketcham L. Ms 

Rev. A. D. Barber, D.D 

Painesville, First, by L. E. Judson. 



$2 00 
1 52 



15 00 
4 5° 



3 


00 


6 


00 


7 


75 


40 


oo 


29 


00 


4 


12 


35 


61 


3 


52 


84 


41 


22 


65 


7 


26 


61 


08 


5 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


3 


35 


a 


1 » j 


4 


00 


7 


00 


15 


00 


5 


00 


fc 


DO 


10 


OO 


15 


OO 


I 


75 


10 


00 


II 


57 


5 


1 < 1 


9 


00 


10 


00 


4 


55 


12 


.0 


4 


00 


15 


00 


3 5° 


12 


00 


10 


5° 


22 


SO 


10 


45 



Parkman, by Rev. George Martin.. $6 00 
Pettisville, of which $5 from C. E., 

by Rev. W. D. Trover 10 00 

Pittsfield, by Miss A. Frances 

Whitney n 00 

Ridgeville Corners 7 00 

Rockport, Rev. C. W. Rice 4 00 

Rootstown 3 co 

W. J. Dickinson 20 00 

Ruggles 5 00 

St. Mary, by A. A. Bunce 10 00 

Sandusky, Ladies' Union 6 00 

Saybrook, S S. class 1 35 

Alta Hough 50 

Julia Hilkitt 44 

Shawnee, by R. D. Rees 3 00 

Somerdale. by B. C. Allott 5 00 

Steubenville. by Mrs. M. W. Camp- 
bell 9 31 

Sullivan, S. S., by Rev. G. Hill 3 50 

Tallmadge. of which $4 from Y. P. 
S. C. E , in full to const. John W. 
Seward a L. M., by John W. 

Seward 50 25 

Thomastown.by Miss Rachel Davies ' 500 

Toledo, Second. Rev. T. P. Thomas 1 00 

Plymouth, by Rev. G. W. Belsey 23 75 

" B . ' ' 2 00 

Plymouth, in full 1 36 

Wakeman. by W. G. Ferver 2 60 

West Millgrove, by M. M. Whitman 6 50 

York, by L. W. Mahn 6 66 

Youngstown, Plymouth, by J. H. 

Parker 10 45 

Walter A. Snow 3 00 

i>3*5 74 
Special Gifts for Ohio Debt : 

Andover 200 

Eagleville 2 00 

Hamilton 3 co 

Lafayette, Mr. and Mrs. M. G. 

Chase ... 5 00 

Medina, ac.d'l 1896 



30 96 



515 00 

IC 00 

28 90 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. G. B. 

Brown. Treas. : 

Akron, First 

Chatham 

Mission Band 

Clarksfield 

Cleveland, Madison Avenue 

Elyria, Y. P. S. C. E., for Salary 

Fund 

Greenwich 

Kent, C. E 

Lima 

Litchfield 

Lodi 

Lorain, Mission Band 

Lyme 

Madison 

Mansfield, First 

Marietta, Harmar 

North Fairfield 

North Ridgeville, C. E. . . . 
Oberlin, First, L. A. S., Miss 
May's Dime Bank 

Second, L. S., Dime Bank 
Toledo, First 

Central 

Plymouth, in part 



Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser. D.D., 

Treas. of Cleveland Bohemian 

Board : 

Chatham, S. S., by Mrs. C. A. Moody 

Cleveland, Euclid Ave., by Justin 

Snow 



20 


OO 


10 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


3 


01. 


5 


OO 


2 


OO 


3 


32 


5 




2 


O' 1 


6 


00 


5 


OO 


4 


00 


6 


OO 


20 


00 


10 




2 


50 


4 


OO 


5 


OO 


4 


90 


20 


OO 


9 


00 


4 


89 



16 OO 

iQ 37 



July, li 



The Home Missionary 



57 



Ohio Woman's Home Miss. Union, 
by Mrs. G. B. Brown: 
Akron, First, C. E., Salaries Beth- 
lehem B. and M. T. S $5 00 

Alexis, Willing Workers 2 50 

Ashland, L. A. S 500 

Brecksville, W. M. S 300 

Cincinnati, Vine St., W. H. M. S.. 15 00 

Walnut Hills, W. H. M. S 700 

Jr. C. E., salaries 5 00 

Claridon, W. M. S 5 00 

Cleveland, Euclid Ave., Jr. C. E., 

salaries 3 00 

Plymouth, W. H. M. S 600 

Trinity, L. A. S 4 00 

Cuyahoga Falls, Y. L. M. S., sala- 
ries 4 00 

Elyria, salaries 5 00 

Hudson, C. E., salaries 2 50 

Marietta, First, W. H. M. S 14 00 

North Bloomfield, K. D 3 00 

L. H. andF. M. S 200 

Oberlin, First, L. A. S 65 00 

Olmsted, Second, W. M. S 5 00 

Paddy's Run, W. M. S 500 

Sheffield, W. M. S 2 00 

Toledo, Central, VV. M. U 7 00 

Wakeman, W. M. S ' 250 

Wellington, W. M. S 10 00 

Zauesville, W. M. S " 250 

190 00 

Cleveland, Swedish Ch., by Rev. D. 

Marcelius 2 50 

Mrs. C. H. Fisher, deceased, by Mrs. 

C. H. Randall 40 00 

Elyria, W. J. Nevins 1 00 

Toledo, Central Ch., by C. C Jenkins. 9 90 



INDIANA— $322.28. 

Received by Rev. E. D. Curtis, D.D 

East Mt. Carmel 

Fremont 

Indianapolis, Mayflower Ch 

Jamestown 

Oriand 

Porter 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. A. H. 

Bell, Treas.: 

Amboy 

Brightwood 

Crooked Creek 

Dunkirk, Willing Workers 

East Chicago 

Elkhart 

Ft. Wayne 

Hammond 

Indianapolis, Plymouth Ch 

Mayflower 

Y. P. S. C. E 

Jr. Y. P. S. C. E 

Michigan City 

Porter 

South Vigo 

Terre Haute, Second 



Alexandria, First, by Rev. J. C. Smith, 
Elkhart, S. S., $5 ; Ch., $21, by Rev. 

F. E. Knapp 

Glezen. Hosmer Ch., by Rev. E. D. 

Curtis 

Indianapolis, People's Ch., by Rev. 

O. D. Fisher 



Whiting, Plymouth Ch., $8.25 ; Y. P 
S. C. E., $2.13 ; Jr. C. E., $1, by E. 
D.Haines 



$11 38 



2 


5° 


2 


4i 


23 


00 




60 


43 


00 


7 


So 



84 01 



9 


60 


1 


55 


12 


00 


45 


00 


IS 


00 


5 


00 


25 


00 


1 3 


oo 


2 


00 


10 


OD 


20 


OO 


7 


5° 


1 


J 7 


5 


00 


174 


92 


3 


65 


26 


00 


2 


32 


20 


00 



ILLINOIS-$2o 5 .oo. 

Illinois H. M. Soc, by Rev. J. Tomp- 
kins : 
By request of donors, of which 
$34.54 for Salary Fund 200 00 

Peoria, M. H. Bradley 5 O o 

MISSOURI— $143 97. 

Grandin, by Rev. M. J. Norton 2 73 

Kansas City, Rev. A. K. Wray 33 32 

Kidder, by Rev. A. L. Gridley 13 10 

St. Louis, Central Ch., by R. L. Con- 
ner 3000 

People's Tabernacle, by Rev. W. 

Johnson 8 25 

Springfield, First, by S. Rogers 48 30 

Central Ch., by C. E. Huntington.. 5 50 
Willow Springs, by Rev. M. W. 

Woods '. 2 75 

MICHIGAN— Legacy, $84.68. 

Homer, Legacy of Mrs. C. C.Evarts, 
by G. H. French, Ex 84 68 

WISCONSIN— $169.63. 

Received by Rev. T. G. Grassie: 
Woman's H. M. Union 12 oo 

Antigo, Woman's Miss. Soc 6 60 

Ashland 31 60 

Clintonville 30 co 

Embarrass 14 43 

Hayward, $34.00; Y. P. S. C. E., 

$8.73 42 75 

137 38 
Bruce and Apollonia, by Rev. M. 

W. Williams 1 60 

Clear Lake, Swedish, by Rev. J. Pet- 

terson 125 

Clintonville, Scand. Ch., by Rev. A. 

Larson 3 00 

Merrill, Scand., by Rev. S. M. 

Andrewson 2 15 

Milwaukee, Bohemian Ch., by Rev. 

J. Jelinek 10 00 

West Superior, Hope Ch., by Rev. L. 

A. Brink 1425 

IOWA— Legacy, $163.79. 

Iowa Falls, Estate of Alfred Woods, 
by E. Nuckolls, Ex 163 79 



MINNESOTA— $1,169.10. 

Received by Rev. J. H. Morley : 
Woman's H. M-. Union, Mrs. M. W. 

Skinner, Treas.: 

Alexandria 

Austin 

Barnesville, C. E 

Burtrum. $2.10 ; Jr. C. E., $1.... 
Cannon Falls, $12.25; S. S., $3.01. 

Claremont 

Cottage Grove 

Crookston 

Duluth, Morley 

Pilgrim 

Edgerton 

Elk River 

Etta. S S 

Excelsior 



10 


30 


20 


08 


4 


00 


3 


10 


15 


26 


2 


00 


7 


73 


5 


00 


-8 


00 


3 


5° 


2 


00 


7 


5° 


5 


CO 


4 


00 



58 



The Home Missionary 



July, 1898 



Fairmont 

Faribault 

Fergus Falls 

Freeborn 

Glenwood 

Hawley 

Hutchinson 

Little Falls 

Madison 

Mankato 

Mantorville 

Mapleton 

Marshall 

Mazeppa 

Merriam Park 

Minneapolis, Lena Hollister 

Monticello 

Morris, S. S 

Pilgrim 

Fifth Avenue, $26; Jr. C. E., 
$1.83 

Lyndale, $41.21 ; Young Ladies, 
$6; C. E., $8.16; Primary, 
$4-08 

Plymouth 

First 

A Friend 

Fremont Avenue 

Vine, $2.45 ; S. S., $2.58 

Open Door 

Lovvry Hill 

Como 

Park Avenue 

New Brighton 

New Paynesville 

New Ulm 

Northfield, to const. Mrs. Barbara 

Ferguson a L. M 

Orrock, S. S 

Plainview, Aux. and C. E 

Princeton 

Round Prairie, S. S 

St. Anthony, Park 

St. Charles 

St. Louis, Park 

St. Paul, Plymouth 

Saratoga 

Sauk Center 

South Park, $2 ; Jr. C. E., $3.60 . 
Stewartville, $3 ; C. E., $1 ; Jr. C. 

E., Si 

Pacific 

Park 

Wadena 

Waseca 

Waterville, $5.51 ; C. E., $4.49... 

West Dora 

West Union 

Winona, First 

Second 

Worthington 

Zumbrota 



Less expenses. 



Faribault, by Rev. G. S. Ricker 

Freeborn, $3.50 ; Freedom, $2.50, by 
Rev. W. Fisk 

Kasota, $1.08 ; Mankato, Si. 17, by 
Rev. S. V. S. Fisher 

Minneapolis, Rodelmer 

Perham, by Rev. A. E. Barnes 

St. Paul, German People's Ch., by 
Rev. W. Oehler 

Silver Lake, Bohemian Free Reformed 
Ch., by J. S. Jerabek 

Staples, by Rev. D. W. Cram 

Winona, Scand., by Rev. H. F. Joseph- 
son , 



$6 21 
80 75 

5 35 

6 00 



5 °° 
15 00 
5 00 

4 5° 

5 co 
8 80 

54 °o 
2 00 
20 00 
10 00 
» 45 
4 48 

65 *5 

27 83 



50 45 
46 09 
17 21 
5 00 
16 75 

5 03 
40 00 
36 40 
15 00 
23 24 

3 00 

6 50 
2 50 



65 

4 50 
2 50 
2 70 

12 CO 

5 '.» 1 
2 27 

24 84 

2 OO 



5 00 

12 35 
3 53 

5 00 
10 00 

6 34 
10 CO 

116 00 

13 2 5 
25 36 
22 8i 

,123 44 
36 09 



36 00 



KANSAS— $1,642.14. 

Received by Rev. L. P. Broad : 

Alma 

Alton 

Cawker, C. W. Bemis 

Independence, Ingraham Memorial. 

Kiowa 

Lawrence, Plymouth 

McPherson 

Muscotah 

Onaga, $2.50 ; Y. P. S. C. E., $23.11 
Overbrook, $5.50; Y. P. S. C. E., 

$4-30; Ladies' Miss. Soc, $5 

Pittsburg 

Scatter Creek, Y. P. S. C. E 

Topeka, First, Y. P. S. C. E 

Westmoreland 



Received by Rev. A. C. Hogbin, 
Treas. : 

Bala 

Burlington 

Chapman 

Dry Creek 

Garnett, Ch., $10.71 ; Y. P. S. C. E., 

$i-5° 

Kanwaka 

McPherson 

Milford 

Mt. Hope 

Onaga 

Ottawa 

Partridge, Ch., $12.81 : Y. P. S. C. 

E., 86 cents 

Sabetha 

Seneca 

Wallace 



Received by Rev. J. G. Dougherty : 
Kansas City, First, $31.62: Woman's 
H. M. S.. $14.38; Y. P. S. C. E., 
$'0 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. F. A. 

Wilkinson, Treas 

Wellsville 



Atchison, S. S., by Rev. O. C. Helm- 
ing 

Blue Rapids, Ch., $'3-7°; S. S., $3.36, 
by Rev. W. Haresnape 

Brookville, by Rev. J. N. Embree ... 

Centralia, by G. A. Trant 

Clay Center. Clarence Eastman Mem. 
Ch.,C. E. Soc, $5 ; Jr. E. Soc.,$2, 
by Rev. C. L. Mills 

Cora, by Rev. L. C. Markham 

Council Grove, by Rev. L. Armsby 

Fredonia, by Rev. H. C. Shoemaker.. 

Goodland, First, by Rev. T. Gray . . . 

Great Bend, First, by L. C. Schnacke 

Hiawatha, by Rev. E. L. Hull 

Highland, by B. A. Sutton 

Kansas City, Bethel Ch., by Rev. E. 
Richards 

Lawrence, by H. M. McDowell 

Plymouth Ch., $136.17 ; S. S., $19.05, 
by C. L. Edwards, to const. John 
Charlton, Mrs. A. E. N. Raymond, 
and F. H. Olney L. Ms 

Manhattan, First, by C. P. Blachly.. . 

Neosho Falls, $20; S. S., $7-50, by 

Mrs. W. W. P. McConnell 

Rev. S. B. Dyckman 

Netawaka, by Rev. F. G. Mitchell .. . 

Osawatomie, by Rev, T, S. Roberts.. 



July, 1898 



The Home Missionary 



59 



I 


25 


I 


40 


I 


IS 


I 


35 


I 


15 


4 


65 


1 


3° 


1 


25 


1 


40 


6 


15 


5 


50 


25 


00 


1 


25 


1 


45 


1 


15 


1 


25 


2 


17 



Parsons, First, by Rev. A. W. Bishop $18 98 
First Ch.,Y. P. S. C. E., Woman's 
Miss. Un., by Rev. A. W. Bishop. 3 00 

Seabrook, by Rev. J. E. Kirkpatrick. . 1 58 

Smith Center, First, by Rev. D. H. 
Piatt 8 10 

Stafford, by Rev. F. P. Strong 3 50 

Topeka, First, by H. C. Bowman 167 70 

Central Ch., by Rev. C. M. Sheldon 24 60 

Wakefield, Ch., $47-55 ! S. S., $10 ; Y. 
P. S. C. E., f 10 ; Ladies' Miss. Soc, 
$10 77 55 

Wichita, Plymouth Ch., by E. E. 
Robertson 2 3 79 



NEBRASKA.-I809.44. 

Received by Rev. H. Bross: 

Alva 

Berlin 

Brule 

Bruning 

Douglass 

Eagle 

Eureka 

Gloversville 

Hemingford ' 

Indianola, by Rev. L. A. Turner 

Lincoln, German 

Lyman 

Maple Creek 

Palisade 

Reno 

Superior, German, S. S 

Sutton, German 



58 82 

Received by H. G. Smith, Treas. : 

Ainsworth 7 9+ 

S. S 10 00 

Cambridge n 53 

Chadron 38 40 

Clay Center 7 00 

Creighton, $4; S. S., $1; Ladies' 

Soc, $3; Y. P. S. C. E., $10 18 00 

David City 17 4 1 

De Witt 3 7° 

Exeter, C. E 5 °° 

Flag Butte 1 95 

Franklin 20 00 

Harvard 13 26 

S.S 2 03 

Holdredge 854 

Kearney 825 

Lehigh 19 50 

McCook, $27.94 ; Dorcas Soc, $10.. 37 94 

Park 2 40 

Shickley 1 00 

Spencer 6 00 

Springfield 3 00 

Steelburg, $9 ; S. S., $2 11 00 

West Cedar Valley 8 75 

Wisner, Y. P. S. C. E 5 00 

York. $58.81; S. S., $10; Y. P. S. 

C. E., $16.50 85 31 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. J. W. 

Dawes, Treas 145 42 

498 33 

Less expenses 1 50 



Alma, $5.25; Neponee, $6.04, by Rev. 

W. S. Hills 

Arborville, by F. N. Recknor 

Cowles, Rev. S. Deakin 

Crawford, by Rev. H. V. Rominger. 
Dodge, Howells. and Fairview, by 

Rev. W. A. Davies 

Grand Island, First, by Rev. G. J. 

Battey 



496 83 


II 


29 


6 


40 


5 


00 


3 


°5 



$2 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


45 


82 


4 


3° 


9 


00 


4 


00 



20 45 

3 4° 

24 00 



Grant, First, by Rev. George W. 

Knapp 

Havelock, First, by Rev. j! ' E, 

McKenney '. 

Hay Springs, First Ch., $7.34; Y.P 
S. C. E., $2.16; S. S. 50c, Mrs. I 
Knight, Treas., by Rev. W. P. 
Pease 

Irvington, by C. R. Brewster. .... . 

Lincoln, First Ch., $20.10; S. S., $10.00; 
C. E. Soc, $14.22; Pilgrim Chapel, 
S. S., $1.00; jr. C. E., 50c, by G. 

A. Loveland 

German Ch., by Rev. E. C. Osthoff 

Long Pine, First, by Rev. J. E. Storm 

Monroe, by Rev. H. A. Shuman. . 

Norfolk, Ch., $35.61; S. S., $17.62, by 
Rev. J . Jeff eries 

Omaha, Cherry Hill, Ch., $5.65; "s. S.", 
Birthday Box, $8.80; Saratoga, Ch, 
$6.00, by Rev. La Roy S. Hand 

Palisade, First, by R. J. Vennum 

Taylor, First, by Rev. J. Porton 



NORTH DAKOTA— $176.97. 

Received by Rev. J. L. Maile : 

Abercrombie 

Amenia, W. C. T. U., Lyall J. Gow- 
land 

Valley City, Ladies' Miss. Soc, 

$5.00; Y. P. S. C. E., $7.30 

Received by Mrs. Mary M. Fisher, 
Treas. : 

Buxton, Ladies' Miss. Soc 

Cummings, Junior Endeavor Soc. . . 

Portland, Miss Mary Killen , 

Wahpeton, Ladies' Miss. Soc, $7.00; 
Y. P. S. C. E., $5.75 



41 85 
Received by Rev. J. L. Maile : 
By Mrs. Mary M. Fisher, Treas. 
Woman's Soc. : 

Buxton 500 

Cooperstown, Ladies' Soc 2 40 

Hankinson, Junior Endeavor Soc. 1 50 

Wahpeton ,; r . ■ 100 00 



Received by Rev. M. E. Eversz : 
Glenullen, Mark's Ch., German 

Bethesda, Ch., German 

Fessenden, Churches, German 



3 


3° 


5 


00 


12 


30 


5 


00 


2 


5° 


1 


00 


12 


75 




Wimbledon, First, by Rev. J. L. 
Martin 



SOUTH DAKOTA-$ 2 68. 43 . 

Received by Rev. W. H. Thrall : 

Milbank, S. S 

Watertown, Rev. H. T. Williams... 



6 00 



12 18 

5 °° 



17 is 



Received by M. E. Eversz : 
Mound City, Field, German, H. 

Vogler 13 23 

Received by Rev. E. W. Jenney : 

Alcester 43 00 

Gothland 50 00 

Huron, Friends 12 00 

105 00 

Aurora, by Rev. T. H. Hill 5 00 

Beresford, by Rev. E. W. Jenney.... 36 25 

Canton, by Rev. R. M, Coate 7 45 



6o 



The Home Missionary 



July, i! 



Centerville. by Rev. H. Menke 

Clark, by Rev. Q. C. Todd 

Columbia, $6.65; Shelby, $1.71, by 
Rev. I. R. Prior 

Custer City, First, by Rev. W. Rad- 
ford 

Henry, by Rev. W. M. Mair 

Ipswich, by Rev. E. I. Grinnell 

Keystone, by Mrs. N. D. Pettigrew.. 

Lebanon, by Rev. C. H. Dreisbach. . 

Sioux Falls, German Emanuel Ch., by 
Rev. J. Lich 

South Shore, $15.40: Troy, $2.60; 
Mazeppa, $2.00, by Rev. P. Winter, 

Wessington Springs, Fauston, Tem- 
pleton Ch., by Rev. S. F. Huntley.. 

Willow Lakes, by Rev. W. G. Carlson, 

Worthing, Union Ch., by Rev. J. H. 
Brotherton 



COLORADO— $132.15. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. B. C. 
Valentine, Treas 

Boulder, First, by Mrs. A. M. Sawyer. 
Denver, Olivet Ch.,byRev. J. E. Col- 

lom 

Flagler, First, by Rev. C. W. Smith.. 

Fruita, by Rev. A. Shepherd 

Lyons. First, by Rev. D. F. Bright.. 

Otis, by Rev. G. Dungan 

Whitewater, Union Ch., by Rev. O. 

T. Robinson 



WYOMING— $2.00. 
Glen Rock, by Rev. O. L. Corbin.... 



MONTANA-S12.62. 

Received by Rev. W. S. Bell: 

Bonner 

Logan 

Madison 



Castle, Mrs. A. S. Barnes, Thank-offer- 
ing 

Columbus and Laurel, by Rev. J. 
Pope 

IDAHO-$ 2 6.8 5 . 

Challis. First, by Rev. G. Foster 

Hope, by Rev. V. W. Roth 

Pocatello, by Rev. G. H. Perry 



fr2 OO 
2 65 



14 ID 

1 OO 
7 OO 

2 OO 
2 40 

9 00 



Ventura 

Vernondale. 



1 00 

40 65 
10 00 



2 10 
60 
92 



3 62 



5 00 
4 00 



5 00 

1 85 

20 00 



CALIFORNI A-$ 5 ,i 4 i .69. 

Received by Rev. J. K. Harrison 2,534 83 

Received by Rev. J. T. Ford: 

De Luz 5 00 

Highland 33 25 

Los Angeles, First 54 88 

Park 27 50 

East, $21.05; Mrs. J. E. Cushman. 

$20 41 05 

Plymouth 12 00 

Third 2000 

National City 825 

Pasadena, First 79 60 

Lake Avenue. 11 07 

Rialto. Y. P. S. C. E 1 85 

San Bernardino 26 00 

San Jacinto 26 50 

Sierra Madre 15 00 



39° 


61 


140 


i.O 


4 




1 


5° 


62 


75 


21 


30 


22 


36 





So 


10 


00 


3 


00 


22 


5° 


22 


50 


10 


00 


J 9 


00 



163 00 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. M. M. 

Smith, Treas 

Avalon 

Buena Park 

Claremont, $57.75: Y. P. S. C. E., 

$5 

Corona, $16.30; Mrs. Sarah B. Ford, 

$5 

East Los Angeles, $17.36; For 

Salary Fund, $5 

Highland, Y. P. S. C. E., $10; of 

which for Salary Fund $5 ; Jr. C. 

E., $4 

Los Angeles, First, $148 ; Y. P. S. 

C. E., $5 ; Young Ladies' Miss. 

Soc, $10; West End, $3.30; W. 

M. S., $10.20; Y. P. S. C. E., 

$1.50; S. S. of Bethlehem Ch., 

for Salary Fund, $1 ; Plymouth 

Ch., $30 ; Bethlehem. $11.50 

Mentone, $8; Y. P. S. C. E.. $2.... 

Moreno 

National City, Ladies' Aid Soc 

Ontario, $19.50 ; Y. P. S. C. E., $3 . 
Pasedena, Y. W. Miss. Soc. of First, 

for Salary Fund 

Perris 

Pomona. Pilgrim, $107 ; Y. P. S. C. 

E., $6 ; S. S., $50 

Riverside, to const. Mrs. E. F. Goff 

and Mrs. Sarah L. Atwater L. 

Ms., $120; Y. P. S. C. E., $5 .... 

San Jacinto 

Saticoy, S. S 

Sierra Madre, Aid Soc 

Ventura, $18.80; Y. P. S. C. E., 

$1-5° 

Vernon, S. S 

Vernondale 

Villa Park 

Whittier 



959 i» 

Alessandro, $5.00 ; Moreno, $10.00, by 

Rev. W. H. Wolcott 15 00 

. Belmont, E. L. Reed 10 00 

Buena Park, by Rev. D. W. Morgan. 8 10 

Byron, by Rev. D. Goodsell 3 50 

Chula Vista, by A. C. Crockett 49 00 

Corona, by Rev. W. N. Burr 34 08 

Fresno, German, by Rev. J. Lcgler.. 3 25 

Guerneville, by Rev. F. Lawson 15 00 

Highlands, S. S., by S. H. Bassett. . . . 6 58 

Hydesville, by Rev. C. H. Stevens... 13 00 

Los Angeles, Friends 10 00 

Mokelumne Hill, by Rev. D. Q. Tra- 
vis 400 

Needles, First, by Rev. J. F. Brown.. 15 00 

Oleander, by Rev. J. Overton 32 70 

Ontario, by Rev. A. E. Tracy 105 75 

Perris, by Rev. S. G. Emerson 35 43 

Pescad^ro, Ch. and S. S., by Rev. E. 

Hoskins 7 50 

Pico Heights, by Rev. J. M. Schaefle. 25 co 

Pomona, Pilgrim Ch., by J H.Dole.. 339 46 

Riverside, First, by C. W. Derby... 93 62 

Rocklin, by Rev. W. C. Day 15 00 

San Diego, First, by J. C. Packard... 245 co 
San Francisco, Richmond Ch.. by Rev. 

P. Coombe 30 00 

San Juan, First, by Rev. S. H. 

Cheadle 20 00 

San Rafael, First, by Rev. W.H. Atkin- 
son 5 25 

Santa Ana, First, by Miss M. Cotter. . 12 00 

Santa Barbara, by C. P. Low 45 00 

Santa Monica, Prohibition Ch.. by 

Rev. S. D. Belt 26 oc 




July, 1898 



The Home Missionary 



61 



Santa Rosa, First, by Rev. L. D. 
Rathbone 

OREGON— $85.97. 
Received by Rev. C. F. Clapp : 

Al bany 

Ashland, by Rev. E. P. Childs 

Forest Grove, $12 ; $15. 8g 

Oregon Woman's H. M. Union... 

Corvallis, by Rev. F. O. Krause 

Hood River, Riverside Ch., by 

Rev. J. L. Hershner 

Portland, by Rev. D. B. Gray 

Ranier, by Rev. C. W. Wells 

WASHINGTON— $74.81. 

Received by Rev. M. E. Eversz : 

Endicott, Friend 

Ritzville, First, German 



J26 8 S 



12 27 
20 48 



7 


30 


7 


°3 


5 


00 


5 


00 


4 


5° 



Eagle Harbor, by Rev. J. Bushell. . $10 25 

Edmonds, by Rev. H. W. Chamber- 
lain „ 4 IO 

Kalama, First, by Rev. A. R. John- 
son 100 

Lake Park, by Rev. H. Gregory 60 

New Whatcom, First, Y. P. S. C. 
E., by Hattie V. Hinsdale 5 00 

Ritzville, First, by Rev. G. H. New- 
man 10 00 

Steilacoom, Oberlin Ch., by Rev. 

W. F. Rose 2 00 

Tacoma, First, by Rev. A. J. Bailey 32 36 

March Receipts— Contributions 23,014 33 

Legacies 34,505 45 

Interest 399 50 

Home Missionary. .. 3391 

Literature 9 01 

$57,962 02 



APRIL, ii 



MAINE-$ii 9 .88. 

Calais, Y. P. S. C. E. of First, by Rev. 

C. G. McCully $10 00 

Cumberland Mills, Warren Ch., by J. 

Graham 101 43 

Gardiner, Mrs. H. A. Ballard 2 40 

Harrison, $3. 05 ; No. Bridgton, $3, 

by Rev. A. G. Fitz 6 05 



NEW HAMPSHIRE— $195.34. 

F. C. I. and H. M. Union of N. H., 
Miss A. A. McFarland, Treas. : 
Bristol, in full to const. Mrs. O. B. 
French a L. M 7 54 

Concord , A Friend 5 00 

Dover, First, by E. R. Brown 98 05 

Hampton, Y.P. S. C. E., by Mrs. M. 

Leavitt 5 00 

Hillsboro Bridge, A Friend 1 00 

Nashua, Pilgrim Ch., by P. A. Ham- 
mond 63 94 

Plaistow and North Haverhill, by L. 

C. Noyes 481 

Suncook, P. A. Mills 10 00 



VERMONT— $3,145.34; of which leg- 
acy, $3,079.84. 

Barre, C. C. Barnes 2 50 

Hartford, J. G. Stimson 50 00 

Royalton, Estate of C. B. Drake, by 

W. Skinner, Adm 3,°79 84 

St. Johnsbury, North Ch., by H. A. 

Hawley 13 00 



MASSACHUSETTS — $7,468.72 ; of 
which legacies, $2,893.54. 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc, by Rev. E. 

B. Palmer, Treas 3:5°° °° 

By request of donors, of which $47 
for Salary Fund 510 72 

Barre, Mrs. B. Fisk, by Mrs. A. E. 

Cutler 100 

Becket, North Ch., by H. A. Jennings 18 00 

Boston, Estate of Rev. E. K. Alden, 
D.D., by Prof. Edmund K. Alden, 

Ex 2,850 00 

W. A. Wilde, for Salary Fund 50 00 



Colerain, Y. P. S. C. E., by C. M. 

Crooks $3 60 

Dalton, First, by H. A. Barton, to 
const. W. H. Hitt, G. W. Converse, 

and Mrs. M. Crozier L. Ms 150 00 

Holliston, First, by W. P. Gage 48 56 

Lee, A Friend 50 00 

Needham, S. S., for Salary Fund, by 

Rev. C. W. Shelton 6 00 

Northampton, Estate of Numan Clark 25 00 

First, by H. S. Parsons 10 00 

Southampton, by H. G. Healey 62 30 

South Hadley, Estate of M. B. Grid- 
ley, on account, by L. T. Tiffany, 

Ex 18 54 

Springfield, North Ch., by E. E. Ham- 
ilton 16500 



CONNECTICUT— $2,056.36; of which 
legacy, $1,041.83. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. W. W. 

Greenfield Hill.'L. M. S., by Miss 

M. C. Meeker 

Hartford, First, a Friend 

Kent, Y. P. S. C. E., by Miss M. A. 

Hopson 

New Britain, South Ch., by Mrs. S. 

H. Wood, Thank-offering 

Woodstock, L. B. S., by Miss F. H. 

Butler 



For Salary Fund : 
Berlin, Second, by Miss F. C. 

Robbins 

Bridgeport, North Ch.,4 O'clocks, 

by Miss M. E. Smith 

Danbury, First, L. S. S., by Miss 

M. E.Stone 

Derby, Second, by Mrs. C. T. 

Baldwin 

Kensington, Mrs. A. A. Hart, by 

Mrs. H. S. Merwin 

Meriden, First, Guardian Sewing 

Circle, by Mrs. C. B. Merriam. 
Middle Haddam, Second, L. M. C, 

by Miss L. F. Tibbals 

New Britain, South Ch., by Mrs. 

S. H.Wood 

Watertown, by Mrs.T. P. Baldwin 



20 00 
25 00 



78 38 



10 00 

9 32 

25 00 



74 36 
18 00 



155 68 



6 2 



The Home Missionary 



July, iS 



Berlin, by C. S. Webster $37 00 

Bristol, First, by L. G. Merrick 86 31 

Central Village, by Mrs. E. H. Lilli- 

bridge 11 18 

Columbia, by J. Hutchins 15 11 

Derby, Mrs. C. T. Beardsley 2 00 

East River, an aged friend, $4.00 ; a 

young lady friend, $1.00 5 00 

Goshen, Mrs. M. Lyman 10 00 

Hadlyme, R. E. Hungerford 10 00 

Litchfield, Mrs. H, W. Kilbourn, by 

Rev. J. Hutchins 5 00 

Middletown. Y. P. S. C. E. of South 

Ch., by Miss L. Sauer, for Salary 

Fund 25 00 

Nevv Haven, Grand Avenue, by D. 

M. Smith 100 00 

New London, Estate of J. N. Harris, 

by R. Coit and H. R. Bond, Exs. . . . 1.041 83 

Norwich, Park Ch., by H. L. Butts. . . 316 84 

Rockville, Mrs. A. M. Gibson 70 00 

Salisbury, by J. R. Harrison, special. 12 27 

A Friend 1 75 

Stafford Springs, by W. H. Heald 19 71 

Stamford, by E. M. Goulder 6 00 

Westville, by R. R. T. Grant 7 62 

Willimantic, by A. C. Everest 34 60 

Wilton, Y. P. S. C. E., by W. H. 

Benjamin S 08 



NEW YORK-$2,999. 3 6. 

Received byWilliam Spalding, Treas. 

Antwerp 

Bridgewater 

Brooklyn, Lewis Ave 

Rev. R. S. Storrs. D.D 

Buffalo, People's Ch 

Carthage 

Cortland 

Deer River 

Franklin 

J. Marshland 

Moriah 

Rockville Center 

Syracuse. Plymouth 

Summer Hill 

Wilmington 



14 


11 


iS 


50 


151 


50 


3° 


o< 


2 


62 


28 


90 


5° 


OO 


6 


25 


75 


OO 


1 


1 .1 


4 


I' 


1 


OO 


15 


OO 


3° 


OO 


2 


75 



427 73 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. J. J. 
Pearsall, Treas. : 

Albany, First Ch., for Salary Fund. 41 27 

Antwerp 1 5 25 

Aquebogue, S. S 5 00 

Binghamton, First, Helpers 50 00 

Plymouth, Aux 5 00 

Brooklyn, Henry Ward Beecher 
Miss. Circle of Plymouth Ch., 

special 1100 

Beecher Memorial, L. U., for Sal- 
ary Fund 14 05 

Tompkins Ave., L. B. S., for Sal- 
ary Fund 175 00 

Central, L. B. S., special 47 00 

Ch. of the Pilgrims, special 25 00 

Zenena Band, Central Ch 225 00 

Clinton Ave., Y. L. G 65 00 

Buffalo, First, for Salary Fund 18 63 

People's Ch., Silver Circle, for Sal- 
ary Fund 5 00 

Fairport 10 00 

Gloversville 30 26 

Greene, Aux., for Salary Fund 7 76 

Honeoye, Aux., for Salary Fund... 5 50 

Cheerful Givers 5 00 

Java Village 5 00 

Little Valley 5 00 

Moravia, Mrs. C. L. Tuthill 100 00 

New York City, Broadway Taberna- 
cle Ch 10 00 

North ville 20 00 



Oswego $10 00 

Silver Circle, for Salary Fund.. , . 5 00 

Warsaw, for Salary Fund 56 75 

West Newark 6 66 

979 13 

Aquebogue, by G. L. Wells 4 65 

Binghamton, First, by A. G. Sheak. .. 53 8c 

Mrs. E. Taylor 10 00 

Bloom ington Grove, by Rev. W. 

Hathaway 35 00 

Brooklyn, Clinton Ave., by J. Stike- 

man 1,200 co 

Y. P. S. C. E. of Ch. of the Pilgrims, 

by S. C. Prentice 5 00 

M . L. R — 50 00 

Candor, by E. J. Woodford 550 

Elbridge, by C. H. Van Vechten 10 20 

Hamilton, by O. S. Campbell 32 00 

Middletown. First, by C. L. Boyd 8 60 

S. S. of the First, by S. W. Mapes.. 567 

Newark Valley, by Mrs. H. Winship. 9 01 
New York City, Broadway Tab., A 

Friend 25 00 

Pilgrim Ch., by S. Scott 88 50 

Niagara Falls, by C. R. Thome 13 78 

Oriskany Falls, by C. H. Barker 4 20 

Riverhead, by Rev. W. I. Chalmers.. 8 00 

Tallman, by T. W. Springsteen 5 00 

Utica, Plymouth Ch., by A. H. Evans 5 00 

Warsaw, S. S., by H. L. Martin ■ 8 59 

Wellsville, Y. P. S. C. E., by J. A. 

Farr 5 00 



NEW JERSEY— $215.19. 

East Orange. K., for Salary Fund 

First, $67.60; G., $5, by G. A. 

Wheeler 

Jersey City, First, by W. W. Ingersoll 



PENNSYLVANIA-$ 49 .5o. 

Philadelphia, Roxboro, Miss P. Fobes 
Plymouth, Elm Ch., by Rev. T. 

McKay 

Renovo, Swedish Ch., by Rev. B. O. 

Johnson 



MARYLAND~$5.2 5 . 

Baltimore, Canton Ch., by Rev. T. 
M. Beadenkoff 



GEORGIA— $43.83. 

Atlanta, Central Ch., special for 
Cuban sufferers in Florida 

Columbus, First, by Rev. G. W. Cum- 
bus 

Comer, by Rev. M. G. Fleming 

Dawsonville, by Rev. E. Darnell 

Duluth, by Rev. W. F. Brewer 

Fort Valley, by Rev. J. F. Blackburn 

Hoschton, by Rev. J. C. Forrester . .. 

North Rome, by Rev. J. W. Gilliam . . 

Roberta, by Rev. G. Home 

Strickland, by Rev. A. J. Lyle 

Taylor, by Rev. W. H. Graham 



ALABAMA— $42.56. 

Asbury, Union Hill Ch., and Perote, 
Corinth Ch., by Rev. S. Weatherby 

Ashland, Christian Home Ch., Miller- 
ville. Bethel Ch., and Milner, Union 
Hill Ch.,by Rev. T. Wright 



72 60 
42 59 



40 00 
6 00 



15 08 

5 °° 
1 co 
25 
1 00 
8 00 

4 00 
1 00 

5 °° 

1 00 

2 50 



July, 1898 



The Home Missionary 



63 



Catalpa, Carr's Chapel, Clio, Concord 
Ch., and Henderson, Wesley Chapel, 
by Rev. N. H. Gibson 

Central, Equality Ch., Kent, Mt. 
Olive Ch., and Tallassee, Texas, 
Union Ch., by Rev. A. C. Wells .... 

Chepultepec, New Hope Ch., Tid- 
more, High Rock Ch., and Tid- 
well, by Rev. J. W. Grant 

Chullafinnee, Fairview Ch.,and Ed- 
wardsville, Salem Ch., by Rev. G. 
W. Vaughan 

Clanton, Mountain Spring Ch., and 
South Calera, by Rev. J. L. Busby. 

Courtland, Memorial Ch., by Rev. R. 
Hardin 

Echo, Friendship Ch., by Rev. E. 
Mathison 

Hilton, Antioch Ch., by Rev. T. A. 
Pharr 

Lightwood, Union Ch., by Rev. C. 
Hill 

Opelika, Jefferson Ch., by Rev. L. J. 
Biggers 

Shelby, Ch. of the Covenant, by Rev. 
A. T. Clarke 

Spio, Mt. Pisgah Ch.,and Wicksburg, 
St. Johns Ch., by Rev. W. C. Mar- 
shall 



L0UISIANA-$2.oo. 

Calcasieu Parish, Indian Village Ch., 
by Rev. E. Paradis 



FLORIDA— $50.91. 

Haines City, Ch. of Christ, by Rev. S. 

J. Townsend 

Interlachen, First, by Rev. W. D. 

Brown 

Lake Helen, by Rev. M. Noble 

Orange City, First, by S. M. Morse. 

Tampa, by Rev. E. P. Herrick 

Wausau, by Rev. S. B. Judah 



OKLAHOMA— $45.42. 

Received by Rev. J. S. Hawkes : 

Alvaretta 

Cold Water 

Curin 

Hillsdale 

Springdale 

Vernon 



Darlington, Plymouth Ch., by Rev. 

W. M. Wellman 

Independence, by Rev. B. R. Turner. 
Park, $1.00; Bulah, $4.65, by Rev. J. 

F. Robberts 

Seward, $6.00; Bethel, $3.65, and 

Deer Creek, $3.26, by Rev. L. S. 

Childs 

Waynoka, by Rev. J. W. McWilliams 



ARIZONA— $67.70. 

Phcenix, Walter Hill, to const. Mrs. 

W.Hill aL. M 

Tucson, First, by Mrs. F. J. Warren. . 



KENTUCKY-$ 3 .oo. 

Williamsburg, by Rev. W. G. Oiin- 
ger 



10 


00 


I 


43 


I 


75 


I 


00 




75 




25 




25 




85 



3 °° 

6 50 
20 00 
15 20 

4 7 1 
1 50 



6 70 



5 6s 



12 91 

5° 



50 00 
17 70 



OHIO— $2,201.97 ! of which legacy, 

$1,382.76. 

Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, D.D.: 
Ashtabula, Second, by E. S. Miller. $14 03 

Belden, by E. Kellip 3 S i 

Chardon, by M. L. Maynard 5 30 

Cleveland, Plymouth, by S. H. Stil- 

son 22 70 

Pilgrim, by H. L. Holt 6000 

Cuyahoga Falls, by Miss M. B. 

Clark q 75 

Elyria, First, by Hon. G. H. Ely . . . 280 00 

Etnaville, by Rev. W. Lewis..-. 3 32 

Fairport, L. M. S., by Rev. W. D. 

Ferguson 3 00 

Fredericksburg, by Rev. L. J. Tra- 
vis 7 00 

Garrettsville, Y. P. S. C. E., by 

Rev. H. O. Allen 500 

Girard, by J. L. Phillips 2 00 

Glenroy, by Edward Michael 2 00 

Hartford, by Mrs. R. Parsons 5 00 

Hudson, by Miss E. E. Metcalf, 
toward L. Ms., of which $10 from 

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Webster 24 00 

Johnsonville, by Mrs. M. W. Rob- 
erts 1 50 

Mansfield, Mayflower, by W. M. 

Gelkison 16 39 

Newport, Ky., Y. P. S. C. E., by M. 

Roderick 5 00 

Norwalk, by Rev. T. J. Collier 1 10 

Oberlin, First, by S. M. Loveland. . 54 65 

Paddy's Run, by J. Scott, $1 ; 

special, $7 8 00 

Palmyra, by Rev. B. Harris 3 60 

Radnor, S. S., by G. N. Davis 4 31 

Richmond, by Rev. W. D. Fergu- 
son 3 00 

Sharon, Pa., Ch., $6 ; S. S., $13.57, 

by W. J. Thomas 1957 

Thomaston , Miss R. Davies 5 00 

Wayland, Y. P. S. C. E., by A. R. . 12 25 

Wellington, Y. P. S. C. E., by A. R. 
Palmer 10 00 

590 98 

Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, D.D., 
Ohio Woman's Home Missionary 
Union, Mrs. G. B. Brown, Treas.: 

Akron, West, W. M. S 

Austenburg, W. M. S 

Ceredo, West Va., W. M. C 

Chadron,W. M. S 

Cleveland, First, W. H. M. S 

Columbus, Plymouth, W. H. M. S . 

Edinburg, Personal 

Mansfield, Mayflower 

Marietta, Oak Grove Mission Band 

Wauseon, C. W. A. Dime Banks of 
Mrs. E. L. Barker and C. Green- 
ough 



Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, Treas- 
urer Cleveland Bohemian Board : 
Cleveland, Plymouth, by S. H. Stet- 
son 

Pilgrim, by H. C.Holt 

Hudson, by Miss E. E. Metcalf 

Kansas City, Mo., Miss M. A. Ken- 
drick 



3 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


6 


00 


9 


80 


4 


00 


5 


00 


3 


00 


1 


5o 


10 


00 


49 


3° 



Amherst, by Rev. W. L. Dawson 

Ashtabula, Finnish Ch., by Rev. F. 

Lehtinen 

Elyria, W. J. Fitts and wife 

Greenwich, by W. A. Hossler 



24 70 
go 00 



118 70 



3 °° 
20 00 
8 23 



6 4 



The Home Missionary 



July, 1898 



Portsmouth, First, by Rev. W. H. 

Baker $2 00 

Rootstown. Lloyd Hinman 10 00 

Sylvania, Y. P. S. C. E., by Mrs. E. 

W. Comstock 6 50 

Tallmadge, Estate of Daniel Hine, by 

G. M. Wright, Trustee 1,382 76 



INDIANA- $50.45. 

Woman's H. M. Union, by Mrs. W. A. 
Bell: 

Alexandria 

Anderson 

Angola. 

Ft. Recovery 

Kokomo 

Ridgeville 

50 00 

Cannelburg, by Rev. A. E. Peirce. .. . 45 



lLLINOIS-$ 2 8.oo. 

Chicago, M. R. Blackburn 

Greenville, Bertha and DaisyWilliams 



MISSOURI— $521.61. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. K. L. 
Mills, Treas.: 

Aurora 8 40 

S. S 3 22 

Bonne Terre 25 00 

Y.P S. C. E 2 50 

Hamilton 14 10 

Kidder 6 00 

St. Louis, Memorial Ch 10 00 

Hope 500 

People's Tabernacle 725 

Hyde Park 5 00 

Plymouth 19 50 

Compton Hill 19 80 

Central 32 00 

Pilgrim 148 89 

Reber Place 12 00 

Olive Branch 18 

First, to const. Mrs. W. H. Little, 
Mrs. Matilda Baker, and G. S. 

Anderson L. Ms 160 55 

Mary and Martha Soc 1 50 

Sedalia, First 162 

Springfield, First 4° 73 

Willow Springs 4 19 

527 43 

Less expenses 26 37 

501 06 

Meadville, by W. W. Sturges 8 00 

St. Louis. Hope Ch., by Dr. J. M. 

Campbell 8 05 

Springfield. German Ch., $2.50; S. S., 

$2.00, by Rev. J. F. Graf 4 50 



WISCONSIN— $25.12. 

Birnamwood and Norrie, by Rev. J. 

L. Smith 

Falun, Swedish Ch., by Rev. N. I. 

Nelson 

Glenwood, Swedish Ch., by Rev. O. 

Ohlson 

Maple Valley, Scand., by Rev. A. J. 

Andrewson 

Washburn, Second Scand. Ch., by 

Rev. H . Peterson 



16 75 

75 
1 40 
1 22 
5 00 



IOWA-$6.oo. 

Long Creek, Welsh Ch., by D. D. 
Davies 



MINNESOTA— $540.07; of which leg- 
acy, $500. 

Anoka, by Mrs. H. E. Butters 785 

Clearwater and Hasty, by Rev. J. L. 

Jones 1 00 

Glencoe, Bohemian Meeting by Rev. 

P. Reitinger 20 22 

Park Rapids, Legacy of Susan A. 

Conard, by W. J. and N. N. Conard, 

Exs 500 00 

Sauk Rapids, Swedish Ch., by Rev. J. 

Rood 1 00 

Winona, Mrs. E. W. Morris 10 00 



KANSAS— $169.48. 

Received by Rev. L. P. Broad : 

Goshen 1 12 

Paola 635 

Topeka, First, Jr. Y. P. S. C. E., 
for Salary Fund 3 00 

10 47 
Received by Rev. A. C. Hogbin : 

Centralia 7 65 

Collyer, Ch., $4.25 ; S. S., $2.00. ... 6 25 

Sabetha 4 50 

18 40 
Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. F. A. 

Wilkinson, Treas 126 75 

Bloomington, S. S., of which from 

Easter offering $1.61, by Miss M. 

Eastman 4 36 

Collyer, Buffalo Park, Wallace and 

Macon, by Rev. R. H. Harper 3 00 

Goodland, First, by Rev. T. Gray.... 1 00 

Longton, by Rev. 0. Umsted 50 

Pittsburg, Tabernacle, by Rev. E. B. 

Smith 5 00 

NEBRASKA— $99.50. 

Blair, by Mrs. G. E. Haller 555 

Carroll, Welsh Ch.,by Rev. S. Jones. 1 75 

Crete, Germans, by Rev. F. Egerland 5 00 

Fairmont, First, by Mrs. W. Wheeler 17 75 
Germantown and Oak Creek, German 

Chs., by Rev. F. Woth 250 

Hastings, German Ch., by Rev. C. W. 

Wuerrschmidt 6 00 

Inland, by D. Stimbert 7 00 

Lincoln, Swedish Emmanuel Ch., by 

Rev. J. Jones 2 00 

Rev. E. C. Osthoff 3 00 

Milford, by Rev. G. A. Munro 1 51 

Neligh, Ch., by Rev. J. F. Bacon .... 14 40 

Princeton, by Rev. R. Hilkerbaeumer 3 04 
Santee Agency, Pilgrim Ch., by F. B. 

Riggs 30 00 



NORTH DAKOTA-$2 7 . 3 6. 

Received by Rev. J. L. Maile : 
Mrs. Mary M. Fisher, Treas. State 
Woman's H. M. Union : 

Dexter, Ladies' Miss. Soc 

Fargo, First, Ladies' Miss. Soc... 

Harvey, Ch 

Wahpeton, Ladies' Miss. Soc .. . 



Oberon, by Rev. O. P. Champlin. 



7 


00 


10 


00 


1 


86 


5 


00 


23 


86 


3 


50 



July, 1898 



The Home Missionary 



65 



SOUTH DAKOTA— $28.83. 

4berdeen, Plymouth Ch., by Rev. T. 

J. Dent $2 44 

Academy and La Roche, by Rev. L. 

E. Camfield 4 00 

Howard, S. S., by Rev. J. Gray 2 50 

Knox and Boyd Co., German, by Rev. 

H. Hess 2 00 

Mission Hill, by Rev. D. B. Nichols.. 7 89 

Plankinton, First, by Rev. J. Davies, 10 00 



COLORADO— $4.00. 

Harman. S. S. Easter-offering, by 
Rev. H. M. Skeels 



IDAHO-$i. 5 o. 

Vollmer, Swedish Miss., by Rev. M. 
Peterson 



CALIFORNIA— $1,660.46. 

Received by Rev. J. K. Harrison: 

Adin 4 00 

Alameda, Y.'P. S. C. E 50 00 

Antioch 13 65 

Auburn, $10.53; V. P. S. C. E., $10. 20 53 

Beckwith 1 00 

Callahan's 375 

Campbell 5 30 

Cloverdale 32 55 

Cottonwood, S. S 4 00 

Crockett 3 00 

East Oakland, Pilgrim 5 00 

Ferndale j 7 65 

Fitchburg 5 00 

Fresno . 17 50 

Fruitvale, $3.15 ; Grass Valley, S. 

S., $16 19 15 

Lorin, $10.25 i S. S., 20c 10 45 

Mill Valley 5 00 

Mission, San Jose 175 

North Berkeley 36 95 

Oakland, First, S. S 22 00 

Ocean View 430 

Reno, Nev 21 00 

Rio Vista 47 S° 

Sacramento 89 §5 

San Francisco, First 4*7 75 

Olivet 2 00 

S. S. of Third 7 35 

San Jose 90 50 

Saratoga, $26.55 ; S. S., $2 ; C. E., 

$5; W.M.S.,$2 35 55 

Suisun, S. S 11 00 

Sunol 18 50 

Tulare, $21.35 ; Jr. C. E., $3.65 25 00 

Weaverville, $19.10; Rev. F. B. Per- 
kinses 2410 

Woman's H. M. Union : 

Alameda t6 55 

Berkeley, First 75 25 

Guerneville 2 20 



Lorin $1 00 

Oakland, First 30 50 

Plymouth Ave 50 00 

First, by Mrs. Lafferty 25 co 

Fourth, Wiliing Workers 15 00 

Pacific Grove 553 

Petaluma 30 00 

San Francisco, First 15 25 

Third 20 00 

San Jose, Kingdom Ex. Soc 81 00 

Y. P. S. C. E 28 50 

Santa Cruz 30 80 

S. S 5 00 

Santa Rosa 7 00 

Stockton 63 00 

Tipton 5 00 

1,569 46 

Less expenses 29 25 



1,540 21 



2 00 
45 00 
15 00 



4 


25 


16 85 


14 


00 


4 


15 


10 


00 


7 


00 


2 


00 



Woman's H. M. Union, Southern Cal., 
Mrs. M. M. Smith, Treas.: 

Mentone 

Pasadena, First 

Y. P. S. C. E. of the First 

Cottonwood, First, by Rev. W. D. 

Kidd 

Island, $11.65 ; Lokta, $5.20, by Rev. 

G. A. Jasper 

Kenwood and Glen Ellen, by Rev. J. 

D. Foster 

Palermo, First Ch. of Christ, by Rev. 

W. H . Robinson 

Rosedale, by Rev. A. K. Johnson 

San Diego, Second, and La Mesa, 

First, by Rev. T. R. Earl 

Tipton, by Rev. E. Waller, , , , 



OREGON-$ 3 .45. 

Scappoose, $2. 53; St. Helen's, 92c, by 
Rev. C. E. Philbrook 



WASHINGTON— $68.30. 

Eureka, First, by Rev. A. R. Olds 4 10 

Pullman, First, by Rev. H. C. Mason 1 75 
Ritzville, German Zion Ch., by Rev. 

G. Schenerle ... 10 45 

Seattle, W. H. M. U., by Mrs. E. B. 

Burwell, Treas 50 00 

Tolt, by Rev. G. Kindred 2 00 

April Receipts : Contributions $13,048 49 

Annuity 104 00 

Legacies 8,897 97 

Interest 360 53 

Home Missionary.... 29 70 

Literature 55 



1)22,441 24 



MAINE— $41.99. 

Received by J. L. Crosby, Treas.: 
West Brooksville 

Calais, First, by A. L. Clapp 

Rockland, by E. M. Stubb 



MAY, 1898 



Francestown, Dea. M. B. Fisher, by 
A. Downes 

Lebanon, by W. L. Carter 

Manchester, Franklin Street, by J. T. 
Carpenter 

Milford, Estate of C. B. Harris 

Orford, Rally, by Mrs. I. Willard. . . . 



49 19 

89 35 

5 2° 



NEW HAMPSHIRE - 
which legacy, $89.35. 



5173.74 ; of 



VERMONT— $1,658.53; ofwhich legacy, 
$753.06. 



66 



The Home Missionary 



July, ii 



Vermont Dom. Miss. Soc, by W. C. 

Tyler $33 20 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. R. P. 
Fairbanks, Treas. : 

Alburgh 6 00 

Barnet 6 00 

Barre, Ladies' Union 10 00 

Salary Fund : 

Barton Landing, Y. P. S. C. E. 5 00 
Bennington, S. S., $15; Y. P. S. 

C. E., $5 2000 

Burlington, First, $20 ; College 

Street, $14 34 00 

Clarendon, Y. P. S. C. E 1 50 

Derby 4 80 

Fairfax, Mrs. C. E. Beeman, $5; 

Mrs. E. I. Purmont, $2 7 00 

Glover, West 7 00 

Hardwick, East, $6 ; Y. P. S. C. 

E., $6.52 12 52 

Lyndon 5 00 

Newfane, Homeland Circle 5 00 

Northfield. by Mrs. M. Smith, $5; 

Y. P. S. C. E., $3.50 8 50 

Orwell 10 00 

Rochester, Y. P. S. C. E 1 ™ 

Rutland, West, $6 ; Y. P. S. C. E., 

S3 9 °° 

Salisbury, Y. P. S. C. E 5 00 

Saxton's River, Ladies' Benev. 

Soc 5 00 

St. Alban's .... 28 00 

St. Johnsbury, North Ch., $25 ; 

South, $18.73 ; East, Y. P. S. C. 

E., $2.01 45 74 

Swanton 1000 

Waitsfield 1000 

Waterbury 522 

Westminster West, Y. P. S. C. E. 8 00 

Woodstock 5 00 

Anonymous 5 00 

279 58 

Barre, by C. Marr 26 00 

Middlebury, by E. R. Robbins 500 00 

Milton, S. S., by G. N. Wood 5 33 

Royalton, Estate of Susan H. Jones, 

by J. R. Woods 753 06 

Springfield, by B. F. Aldrich 4136 

Williamstown, by G. Beckett 20 00 



MASSACHUSETTS — $9,527.78 ; of 
which legacies, $6,830.40. 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc, by Rev. E. 

B. Palmer, Treas. : 2,000 00 

By request of donors, of which for 
Salary Fund, $22.29 ; Alaskan 

work, $7 76 47 

Amherst, Legacy of Mrs. S. D. Rus- 
sell, by D. W. Palmer, Ex 500 00 

Boston, Estate of Sarah B. Hyde, by 

B. E. Bates, Ex 962 10 

W. A. Wilde, for Salary Fund 50 00 

C. F. Wyman, Treas., for discount 
on item of expenses, for Alaska 

mission 43 

W. G. Means 125 00 

Dedham, First, Y. P. S. C. E., Tvvo- 

cents-a-week Band 8 00 

First, Extra-cent-a-day Band 35 17 

Fairhaven. First, by Rev. W. H. 

Brodhead 40 40 

Fitchburg, Miss J. M. Gould, Silver 

Circle S 00 

Florence, by G. H. Ray 20 51 

Grafton, add'l, from A Friend 35 00 

Hatfield, by F. H. Bard well 49 00 

Haverhill, C. Coffin 470 

Massachusetts, A Friend 17 64 



New Bedford, North Ch., by J. W. 
Hervey, $51.63 ; Trinitarian, by 

J. C. Briggs, $39.13 $90 76 

North Brookfield, First, A Friend.... 5 00 

North Rochester, C. E. Soc, by Mrs. 

C. W. Wadhams 1 50 

North Woburn, by Dea. S. A. Thomp- 
son 15 63 

Orleans, by Rev. E. I. Rackett 14 00 

Palmer, Mrs. C. A. Puffer, by Rev. F. 

E. lenkins 5 00 

Sheffield, by Dr. A. T. Wakefield .... 4 00 

South Deerfield, Ch., $28 ; S. S., $6.02, 

by C. B. Tilton 34 02 

Spencer, Estate of John L. Bush, by 

H. P. Hovvland, Ex 4,868 30 

Springfield, Faith, by S. S. Pease 8 65 

Washington, by A. Stevens 20 00 

Westboro, M. L. Brown 5 00 

West Springfield, First, by A. H. 

Smith 14 50 

Worcester, Estate of Mrs. M. G. Moen, 

by Philip W. Moen, Ex 500 00 

Worcester, Adams Square, by F. W. 

White 12 00 



RHODE ISLAND-$29. 35 . 

Providence, Rev. N. W. Williams. 

Woonsocket, Globe Ch., by L. 

Taylor 



15 00 
14 35 



CONNECTICUT— $2,628.45: of which 
legacy, $180. 

Miss. Soc of Conn., by Rev. W. H. 
Moore 31817 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. W. W. 

Jacobs, Treas.: 
Bridgeport, North Ch., [W. B. Or- 
ganization, $60.20] ; by Miss C. 

Smith, for Salary Fund, $6.29.... 66 49 

For Salary Fund : 

East Haven, by Mrs. J. Bradley.. 29 25 

Essex, First, by Mrs. E. H. Mor- 
gan 2200 

Fairfield, by Mrs. F. H. Brewer 
[special, $5] ; for Salary Fund, 
$11.71 16 71 

Hartford, Miss Annie W. Moore. 5 00 

Higganum, by Miss K. E. Hunt- 
ington 23 13 

Milford, Plymouth Ch., by Mrs. 
K. S. Tibbals 10 co 

New Haven, Aux., by Mrs. J. M. 
Owen 5 00 

Newington, Ladies' Eunoean Soc, 
by Mrs. F. C. Latimer 1 00 

New Milford, W. H. M. U., by 
Miss M. B. Hine, to const. Mrs. 
F. A. Johnson a L. M 50 00 

Northfield, H. M. Aux., by Mrs. 
L. M. Peck 18 00 

North Guilford, Second, L. A. S., 
by Miss R. D. Chittenden, $3, 
of which for Salary Fund, $233. 71 293 91 

Norwalk, First, L. B. A., by Mrs. 
A. B. Hill 3 33 

Poquonock, Aux., offering by Mrs. 
F. M.Case 31 co 

Stafford Springs, by Mrs. J. Mc- 
Laughlin 1000 

Branford, H. S. Harrison 10 00 

Bridgeport, Second, by O. H. Rroth- 

well 130 80 

Colchester, L. T. Destin 2 00 

East Granby, by B. F. Case 5 00 

East Haddam, C. E. Soc, by J. I. 

Tracy 5 00 

Ekonk, by Rev. C. H. Kenny 3 50 



July, l! 



The Home Missionary 



6 7 



Ellington, Mr. and Mrs. C. Bradley.. $2 00 
Greens Farms, by G. P. Jennings ... 12 93 

Guilford, First, by E. W. Leete, to 

const. H. R. Brewer a L. M 50 00 

Hartford, Miss M. H. Perkins 200 00 

Huntington, by F. H. Wells 12 00 

Lakeville, Mrs. S. J. Pennock 2 00 

Middletown, South Ch., by G. S. 

Craig 46 29 

New Haven, Miss. Soc, of Yale Div. 
School, by C. L. Storrs, Jr., for 
Salary Fund 125 00 

United Ch., by C. E. P. Sanford. . . . 525 00 

S. S. of the Ch. of the Redeemer, 

by R. W. Chapman 10 00 

New London, First Ch. of Christ, by 

G. Whittlesey, $104.22 ; W. H. C, 

$300 40422 

Northfield, by J. P. Catlin 15 19 

Oakdale, Rev. G. H. Morss 2 00 

Putnam, Second, by E. F. Whitmore. 65 99 

Roxbury, by E. W. Preston 2 co 

South Manchester, C. E. Soc, Mrs. 

T. Simms, for Salary Fund 8 00 

Southport, Bal. of Legacy of Mrs. H. 

D. Gookin, by Hon. J. H. Perry and 

Mrs. M. G. Waterman, Exs 180 00 

Terryville, Friends 15 00 

West Winsted, Second, by J. Hinsdale, 

for Debt 182 54 



NEW YORK-$6,499.6 7 ; of which leg- 
acies, $4,883.67. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. J. J. 

Pearsall, Treas 179 17 

Brooklyn, Lewis Avenue Ch., Earn- 
est Workers, for Salary Fund, 

$10 ; Special, $10 20 00 

Plymouth Ch 100 00 

Central, L. B. S., for Salary Fund 206 85 

Clinton Avenue, L. B. S 100 00 

Buffalo, Plymouth Chapel, for Sal- 
ary Fund 7 59 

First, for Salary Fund 5 00 

Candor, L. M. Guild, for Salary 

Fund s 00 

Ithaca 2 31 



625 92 



Received by William Spalding, Treas. 
Woman's H. M. Union : 

Lake wood 

Syracuse, Good Will Soc 

Plymouth, Woman's Guild 

Albany, D. A. Thompson 

Ashville , 

Camden. 

Chenango Forks 

Clayton 

Crary's Mills, C. E. Soc 

Crown Point, S. S 

Danby, C. E. S., $5 ; Mis. Soc, $3.. 

Denmark 

East Ashf ord 

Eaton 

Griffin's Mills, S. S 

Groton 

Lakewood 

Linchlaen 

New York, Bedford Park 

Middletown, North St. Ch 

Northville, M. H. Fishbarn 

Phoenix 

Plainfield Center 

Prattham 

Rochester, South 

Rushville 

Schroon Lake 



8 


70 


10 


00 


4i 


00 


59 


70 


5 


00 


14 


95 


28 

5 


°3 
85 


3 


00 


3 


45 


9 
8 


70 
00 


10 


10 


3 
2 


10 

65 


2 


5° 


25 


OD 


6 


85 


5 
1 
8 


IO 
89 
OO 


2 


OO 


35 


OO 


5 


OO 


1 
18 


03 

OO 


1 


10 


13 


2 5 



Syracuse, Plymouth, $111.63 ; C. E. 

Soc, $10 $121 63 

Tannersville 5 00 

Volney , 10 00 

Washington Mills 20 00 

' Rev. E. Curtis n 00 



Received by William Spalding,Treas. : 

Brooklyn Hills 

Busti 

Canandaigua 

De Ruyter 

Elizabethtown 

Greene 

Lakeview 

North Evans 

Siloam, Rev. J. T. Griffith 



386 


18 


2 


00 


3 


00 


21 


02 


6 


04 


9 


5° 


13 


39 


1 


78 


2 


22 


1 


50 



60 45 



Albany, First, by M. I. Hutchings... 36 75 
Batavia, Estate of P. L. Tracy, by J. 

F. Lay, Trustee 23 62 

Brooklyn, Estate of Emeline C. Buck, 

by Daniel Barnes, Ex 4)831 00 

Clinton Ave. Ch., add'l, by J. Stike- 

man 25 00 

Willoughby Avenue Chapel, by J. 

Stikeman 16 00 

Y. P. S. C. E. of Beecher Memorial 

Ch., by Rev. D. B. Pratt 400 

Mrs. C. A. W. Cook 20 00 

A Friend 35 00 

Cambria, by Rev. D. T. Williams 8 50 

Friendship, by Rev. F. E. Dark 5 00 

Groton, T. T. Barrows. 10 00 

Hopkinton, by Rev. F. A. Hassold.. 31 00 

New Village, First, by J. B. Gould.. 10 00 
New York City, Pilgrim Ch., Y. P. S. 

C. E., by G. Arrowsmith 20 00 

Tremont Ch., by R. Turner 10 00 

X. Y. Z 1000 

A. Bourn 100 00 

Richmond Hill, by L. H. Baldwin 30 00 

Y. P. S. C. E., by Miss C. Johnson. 10 00 
Walton, First Ch.. $97.50 ; C. E. Soc, 

$5 ; by G. W. Fitch 102 50 

Willsborough, Estate of Mrs. S. A. 

Stower, by A. J. B. Ross 2905 



NEW JERSEY-$375. 4 6. 

Woman's H. M. Union of the N. J. 

Asso., Mrs. J. H. Denison, Treas. 97 00 

Cedar Grove, Rev. B. F.Bradford... 1900 

Newark, First, by A. F. Kynor 28 93 

Orange Valley, by A. B. Johnson 113 00 

Plainfield, by M. C. Van Arsdale 117 53 



PENNSYLVANIA-$ 4 o.86. 

Woman's Missionary Union, Mrs. T. 
W. Jones, Treas.: 
Lansford 

Arnot, Swedes, by Rev. C. J. Wide- 
berg 

Chandler's Valley, Swedish Free 
Evan. Ch., by Rev. C. J. Lundquist 

Lansford, Welsh Ch., by Rev. F. T. 
Evans 

Philadelphia, Kensington Ch., by 
Rev. N. N. Bormouse 

Scranton, Puritan Ch., by Rev. H. 
Peckover 

Spring Creek and West Spring Creek, 
by Rev. T. D. Henshaw 

Warren P. Bethleheim Second Ch., 
by Rev. J. A. Dahlgren 



2 


30 


I 


25 


5 


25 





00 


S 


04 


5 


OD 


2 


02 



68 



The Home Missionary 



July, i! 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA-$2 5 .oo. 

Woman's H. M. Union of the N. J. 

Asso.. Mrs. J. H. Denison,Treas. : 

Washington, Y. P. S. C. E. of the 

First 



GEORGIA— $2.00. 
Demorest, by Rev. W. O. Phillips. 



$25 00 



ALABAMA— $5.25. 

Fort Payne, Emanuel Ch., by Rev. J. 

J. Bunnell 

Verbena, Shady Grove Ch., by Rev. 

W. C. Culver 



FLORIDA— $210.65. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. W. D. 
Erown, Treas. : 
Ormond 

Received by Florida W. H. M. Union, 
Mrs. W. D. Brown, Treas. : 

Special for Ybor City Mission, 

Tampa : 
Daytona, Annual Meeting 

Cuban Cross, Gift of Cuban 
Woman 

Miss E.Wilson 

Orange City. Birthday Offering . . 

Pensacola Conference 

St. John's River Conference 

South Florida Conference 

East Coast Conference 

Daytona, Aux 

Interlachen, Aux 

Jacksonville, Aux 

Lake Helen, Aux 

Melbourne, Aux 

New Smyrna, Aux 

Ocoee, Aux 

Ormond, Aux 

Orange City, Aux 

Key West, Aux 

Mannfield, Aux 

Tavares, Aux 

Tampa. Aux 

Winter Park, Aux 

Daytona, Y. P. S. C. E 

Jacksonville, Y. P. S. C. E 

Jr. Soc 

New Smyrna, Y. P. S. C. E 

Lake Helen, Y. P. S. C. E 

Ormond. Y. P. S. C. E 

Pomona, Y. P. S. C. E 

Mr. and Mrs. Eliot, Y. P. S. C. E. 

Haines City, Jr. Soc 

Winter Park, Y. P. S. C. E 

Jr. Soc 

Orange Park 

Thonotosassa 

Tavares 

Bowling Green 

Avon Park 

Longwood 



Belleview, by Rev. T. H. Rouse 

Careyville. Westville, and Crestview, 

by Rev. P. G. Woodruff 

Potolo, Dothen, Dundee, and Ozark, 

Ala., by Rev. M. V. Marshall 

St. Petersburg, E. C. McPherson 

Tampa, by Rev. E. P. Herrick 



5 00 
25 



12 63 



s 


00 




75 


I 


( 10 


2 


40 


I 


;-' 


I 


55 


8 


5° 


2 


00 


5 


00 


5 °4 


6 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


So 


3 


16 


16 


49 


3 




9 


67 


2 


00 


2 


iO 


4 


00 


4 


00 




20 


8 


CO 


8 


00 


2 


50 


8 


00 


5 


01 ' 


4 


70 


6 


00 


3 


00 


i 


00 


3 


7^ 


4 


5« 


3 


00 


8 


00 




88 


'74 


52 


10 


00 


6 


10 


1 


26 


3 


00 


5 


77 



OKLAHOMA-5&5.50. 

Guthrie, Vittum Ch., by Rev. H. E. 
Pickle 

Perry, by Rev. W. H. Le Bar. ... .. 

Waukomis, by Rev. F. Foster , 

West Guthrie, by Rev. T. W. Spans- 
wick 



TEXAS— $1.50. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. E. 
Heflin, Treas. : 
Cleburne 

NEW MEXICO-$2 4 . 35 . 

Albuquerque, First, by M. E. Hod- 
gin 

Received by Rev. E. H. Ashmun : 

Cook's 

Deming 

Holbrook 



ARIZONA— $17.50. 
Nogales, by Rev. Josiah H. Heald... 



OHIO— $244.69. 

Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, D.D. : 

Ashland, Special for Ohio debt 

Bluescreek, by Mrs. Le Gaston.... 

Bristclville, by Rev. C. E. Knapp.. 

Cleveland, Union Ch. and S. S., by 

Rev. C. H. Lemmon 

Deacon Thomas Piwonka 

Denison Ave., by W. J. Gladden. 

East Greenville 

Fitchville, First, by Mrs. L. Palmer. 

Greenfield, by J. McLane 

Madison, Central, by A. S. Stratton. 
Oberlin, Second, by C. F. Beck- 

with 

Sullivan, by Rev. Geo. Hill 

Tallmadge, by J. W. Seward 

Toledo, Mrs. S. B. Beard, in full of 

Rev. S. B. Beard's special pledge. 



Ohio Woman's Home Missionary 

Union, by Mrs. George B. 

Brown, Treas.: 
Cincinnati, Walnut Hills, W. H. 

M. S., Dime Banks 

Cleveland, First, C. E 

Mt. Vernon. W. M. Soc 

Richfield, W. M. S 

Toledo, Wash. St.. W. M. U 

Birmingham, Miss Dean's S. S. 

Windham,' Y. P.' S. C. E. '.'.'.'.'.'. '.'.'. 



Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, 
Treasurer Cleveland Bohemian 
Board : 
Cleveland, First, S. S., by F. W. 

Anderson, Treas 

Euclid Ave., by J. Snow, Treas. . 



Ashtabula, by Rev. C. A. Widing. 

Aurora, by J. H. McKee 

Oberlin, N. E. Close 

Windham, First, by C. E. Smith.. 



f2 00 
1 50 



2 25 
2 10 
2 00 

6 35 



13 


00 


2 


00 


4 


00 


40 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


3 


21 


5 


00 


4 


75 


5 


23 


29 


94 


6 


50 




5° 


J 5 


00 



12 80 

3 °3 

7 00 
2 50 

12 CO 

I 00 
5 00 



II 


29 


25 


25 


36 


54 


2 


00 


5 


00 


3 


1 


15 


72 



July, 1898 



The Home Missionary 



69 



INDIANA-$ 9 s. 3 g. 

Received by Rev. E. D. Curtis : 

Anderson Hope Ch 

Macksville 



WISCONSIN— $5.00. 

Cumberland, First, by Rev. W. T. 

Ream 

Unity, Easton, and Waupaca, Scands., 

by Rev. C. J. Jensen 

IOWA— $1.70. 
Des Moines, C. Smith 

MINNESOTA— $126.80. 

Afton, by Rev. A. A. Davis 

Athens and Spencer Brook, Scar.ds., 
by Rev. A. P. Engstrom 

Brownton and Stewart, by Rev. J. W. 
Dan ford 

Cornish, by Rev. C. A. Ruddock 

Dexter and Taopi, by Rev. D. Donald- 
son 

Edgerton, First, by Rev. Pliny H. 
Fisk 

Lake Belt, C. E. Soc, by P. D. Worth- 
ley, for Alaska Mission 

Mantorville, by Rev.W. C. A. Wallar. 

Minneapolis, F. W. Lyman, special.. 
Scands., by Rev. J. F. Okerstein. . . 

Pelican Rapids, by Rev. E. P. Crane. 

St. Cloud, First, by W. T. Clark ..... 

Silver Lake, Bohemian Free Re- 
formed, by J. S. Jerabek 



$5 39 
2 00 



II 


25 


3 


25 


2 


00 


I 


00. 


2 


5° 


4 


00 


36 


00 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. A. H. 

Ball, Treas. : 

Elwood 

Hobart 

Indianapolis, People's Ch 

Union 

Marion 

Portland 

Terre Haute, First 

Cardonia and Perth, by Rev. C. F. 

Hill 

Dunkirk, Plymouth Ch., by Rev. A. 

O. Penniman 

East Chicago, by Rev. F. E. Bigelow. 



ILLINOIS— $211.10 ; of which legacy, 
$100. 

Chicago, H. S. De Velde 2 00 

Griggsville, Estate of E. Bazin, by 

T. Turnbull, Ex 100 00 

Princeton, Friends 325 

Rockford, Mrs. J. P. Warren 100 00 

Miss A. J. Powell 4 40 

Wyant, First, by Rev. R. K. Stetson, 

special 1 45 



MISSOURI-$25. 37 . 

Bevier, Welsh Ch., by W. E. Jones.. . 
Chillicothe, Union Ch., by Rev. J. P. 

Field 

Kansas City. Rev. A. K. Wray 

Noble, by Rev. W. D. Stevens 



16 66 
2 00 



4 00 

1 00 



5 °° 
1 °S 



4 5° 
3 25 



3 16 

5 °° 

13 °9 

50 00 

2 35 

15 00 

11 40 

11 00 



KANSAS— $119.02. 

Received by Rev. A. C. Hogbin, 
Treas.: 
Emporia ' $65 45 

Received by Rev. R. H. Harper : 

Buffalo Park 254 

Collyer 71 

Ford 6 87 

Macon 1 00 

Wallace 1 co 



Atwood, by Rev. J. J. A. T. Dixon... 
Hiawatha, First, by Rev. E. L. Hull. 
Junction City, First, by Rev. R. N. 

Williams 

Kinsley, by Rev. E. L. Hull 

Little River, by Rev. J. A. Henry. . . . 
Valencia and Plymouth, by Rev. C. 

E. Roberts 



NEBRASKA— $142.26. 

Received by C. C. Smith, Ass't Treas. 

Woman's H. M. Union 

Indian Creek, Y. P. S. C. E 

West Point, Ch., $5 ; S. S., $14 ; 
Ladies' Miss. Soc, $4 



Arborville, S. S., by F. N. Recknor.. 
Burwell, First, by Rev. E. Booth, Jr. 
Butte, Zion, German Ch., by Rev. J. 

Sattler 

Crete, L. P. Mathews 

David City, Woman's Miss. Soc. of 

the First, by Miss E. M. Turner. . .. 
Harbine, $2.26; Old Plymouth, $13.20; 

by Rev. A . L. Brown 

Lincoln, German Ch., by Rev. E. C. 

Osthoff 

Long Pine, First, by Rev. J. E. 

Storm 

McCook and Culbertson, German, 

by Rev. W. F. Vogt 

Naper, Christus, German Ch., by 

Rev. J. Sattler 

Nelson, German, $1 ; Liberty Creek, 

Si ; and C. E. Soc, $3, by Rev. P. 

Lich 

Sargent, by Rev. Chas. E. Howard.. 
Willowdale and Brunswick, by Rev. 

G. T. Noyce 

NORTH DAKOTA— $9.30. 

Dickinson, by Rev. U. G. Rich 

Forman, Havana, Rutland, and Cay- 
uga, by Rev. S. Williams 

Hillsboro. by Rev. D. T. Jenkins ... 

New Salem, St. Marcus, German Ch., 
by Rev. J. Sattler - 



SOUTH DAKOTA-$2 39 .44. 

Received by Rev. W. N. Thrall : 

Elk Point, Rev. C. R. Bruce 

Received by Rev. J. Sattler : 

Fairfax, Bethlehem Ch 

Parkston, Friedensfeld Ch., Sat- 

tler's Fund 

Zion Ch., Sattler's Fund 

Salem Ch., Sattler's Fund 

Tyndall, Ungenannt 



95 
2 00 
10 00 



29 


80 


2 


44 


23 


00 


55 


24 


2 


60 


6 


5° 


2 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


15 


46 


15 


00 




25 


10 


00 



3 25 
2 00 



50 


00 


7 


63 


4 


10 


7 
6 


3° 
00 


1 


oo 



26 03 



JO 



The Home Missionary 



July, ii 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. F. M. 
Wilcox, Treas. : 

Aberdeen 

Athol 

Canova 

Deadwood 

De Smet 

Elk Point 

Erwin. 

Firesteel 

Huron 

Lake Henry, $2 ; Y. P. S. C. E., 80c. 

Lead 

Mitchell, S. S 

Oahe 

Ree Heights 

Sante 

Vermillion, $S ; 3. S., $3 

Y. P. S. C. E 

Watertown, S. S 

Waubay, Jr. C. E 

Yankton 



Charles Mix Co., German Zoar Ch., 

by Rev. P. Bechtel 

Garretson, by Rev. H. G. Adams. . . . 
Hot Springs, First, by Rev. J. F>. 

Long 

Howard, by Rev. J. Gray 

Hudson, by Rev. 6. S. Evans 

Lakeport, by Rev. A. R. Larson 

Pioneer, $2 ; Beresford, $7.50, by Rev. 

H. W. Jamison 

Powell, $3.60; Myron, C. E. S., $1.20, 

by Rev. R. Jones 

Scotland, German, by Rev. M. E. 

Eversez 

Sioux Falls, German, by Rev. J. M. 

Preiss 



COLORADO-$i 4 5.i 5 . 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. R. C 
Valentine, Treas 

Boulder 

Crested Butte 

Denver, Plymouth, $12.70; Boule 
vard, $5.08 

Whitewater 



Crested Butte, by Rev. H. Sanderson 
Globeville, First German, by Rev. A. 

Trandt 

Julesburg, by Rev. F. E. Eckel 

Leadville, by Rev. Chas. A. Forbes.. 
Littleton, by Rev. C. H. Harger .... 
Manitou, First, by Rev. F. L. Hayes. 
Steamboat Springs, by Rev. L. Davis. 



WYOMING -$46.20. 

Woman's Missionary Union, Mrs. A. 
E. Kevan, Treas 

Cheyenne, by Rev. Warren N. Dun- 
ham 

Dayton, First, by Rev. B. H. Wood- 
ford 

Green River, by Rev. W. Dawson. . . 

Lusk and Manville, by Rev. J. S. Cal- 
houn 

Rock Springs, First, by Rev. J. H. 
Kevan 

Wheatland, Union Ch., by Rev. F. L. 
Sanborn 



t>2 50 

3 00 



11 76 
2 80 

6 40 
1 00 
1 00 



11 00 
4 00 

1 25 

1 00 

2 50 



73 95 



8 50 
5 °° 

15 °° 

2 25 
12 00 

3 65 

9 5° 

4 80 
27 76 

1 00 



63 


42 


3 


00 


12 


3° 


17 


78 


3 


5° 


100 





4 80 
I 25 

3 60 
10 00 

1 00 
20 00 

4 50 



MONTANA— $16.63. 

Received by Rev. W. S. Bel! : 

Logan 

Madison 

Plains 



Woman's Missionary Union, W. S. 
Bell, Treas.: 

Helena 

Missoula 



4 00 IDAHO-$25.85. 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. G. L. 
Cole, Treas. : 
Mountain Home 

Challis. First, by Rev. G. Foster 



CALIFORNIA— $156.50. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. M. M. 
Smith, Treas. : 

Sierra Madre 

Ventura 

Mrs. Sarah B- Ford 

Bakersfield, by Rev. E. R. Fuller. . . . 

Decoto, by Rev.E. D. Hale 

Fitchburg, by Rev. F. C. Krause 

Green Valley, by Rev. W. Rogers. . . . 
Los Angeles, Bethlehem Ch., by Rev. 

D. W. Bartlett 

Murphy, by Rev. M.J. Luark 

Nordhoff , by Rev. F. L. Pearse 

North Ontario, R. C. Williams and 

wife 

Pacific Grove, by Rev. O. W. Lucas . 

Palermo, by Rev. T. F. Rayon 

San Rafael, First, by Rev. W. H. 

Atkinson 

Spring Valley, by Rev. I. VV. Atherton 
Whittier, Plymouth Ch., by Rev. G. 

Willett 



OREGON-$ 4 8. 5 3. 

Received by Rev. C. F. Clapp : 

Woman's H. M. Union 

Forest Grove 

Beaverton and Tualatin, by Rev. G. 

A. Taggart 

Freewater, First and Ingles Chapel, 

by Rev. W. Hurlburt 

Portland, Sunny side Ch., by Rev. J. 

J. Staub 

Sherwood, by Rev. J. M. Barber 

Wilsonville. by Rev. A. Brady 



WASHINGTON- $75.25. 

Ahtanum, by Rev. L. W. Brintnall. . . 

Cathlamet, by Rev. C. W. Wells ■ 

Endicott, Alkali Flats, and Walla 

Walla, German, by Rev. J. Herbert. 
Fidalgo City, by Rev. E. D. Farns- 

worth 

Kirkland, First, by Rev. J. M.Brown. 

Leavenworth, by Rev. J. W. H. Lock- 
wood 



S 30 

33 
1 00 



J 63 



5 °° 
15 00 



10 00 

'5 85 



5 


00 


1 


5° 


25 


00 


3 1 


5° 


7 


00 


2 


5° 


'5 


00 


1 


00 


2 




3° 


00 


22 


00 


5 


00 


23 


35 


1 


00 


1 


1.5 


5 


00 



13 85 

2 15 

3 6 4 



2 50 
1 20 



7 03 



July, ii 



The Home Missionary 



7i 



Marysville, W. H. M. U., by Rev. R. 

Bushell 

Rosalia, by Rev. C. W. Bushnell 

Roy, by Rev. W. A. Arnold 

Seattle, Taylor Ch., by Rev.G. H. Lee 

First German, $5.55; Ballard, Second 
German, $3.50, by Rev. E. Grieb. 

Sprague, by Rev. O. S. Haines 

Yesler, by Rev, L. A. Smith 



5 So 

9 °S 
2 50 
11 00 



May Receipts: Contributions $10,165 z 8 

Annuity 2,03600 

Legacies 12,836 48 

Interest 508 92 

H. M 30 60 

Literature 1 30 



^5.578 58 



DONATIONS OF CLOTHING, ETC., 

Received and Reported at the Rooms of the Woman's Home Missionary Association for the 
year ending May 31, 1898. Mrs. Louise A. Kellogg, Secretary 



Allston, Aux., by Mrs. Sophia K. Park- 
hurst, box and barrel $448 80 

Amherst, Aux., by Mrs. Harriet M. 

Hunt, barrel 109 00 

Andover, Abbot Academy, by Miss 

Maria Merrill, barrel ." 15 00 

Seminary Ch., L. B. S., by Mrs. George 

T. Eaton, box and two barrels 125 00 

South Ch., L. C. S., by Miss J. B. 

Goldsmith, parcel and barrel 102 50 

West Ch., W. S. F. S., by Mrs. Peter 

D. Smith, two barrels 106 60 

Athol, Aux., by Mrs. E. A. Fuller, 

barrel 62 85 

Auburndale, Aux., by Mrs. Charlotte S. 

Cooley, seven barrels 611 21 

Y. W. M. S., by Mrs. Grace G. Little, 

two barrels 117 10 

Barre, W. H. M. S., by Miss Helen C. 

Knight, box and barrel 48 50 

Barrington, R. I., Social Workers, by 

Mrs. R. F. Col well, barrel 62 80 

Boston, Central Ch., Aux., by Mrs. J. 

E. Goldthwait, three barrels 243 82 

Hope Chapel, L. M. S., by Mrs. G. H. 

Flint, barrel 15 00 

Old South Ch., S. C, by Miss Abbie 

W. Covel, barrels 605 n 

Mrs. E. Smith and friends, two bar- 
rels 50 00 

Park St. Ch., by Mrs. E. Smith, barrel 75 00 

Union Ch., L. S. C, by Miss H. A. 

Woodbridge, barrel 118 57 

Bradford, Aux., by Mrs. Wm. K. Farrar, 

barrel 56 75 

Bee Hives, by Mrs. Charlotte M. F. 

Kingsbury, package 38 76 

East Parish, Fourth Ch., by Mrs. E. 

J . Bonette, barrel 37 66 

Bridgewater, L. S. S., by Miss Harriet 

M. Wilbar, box 90 50 

Brighton, Aux., by Mrs. A. M. New- 
hall, two barrels 191 32 

Brockton, Porter Ch., L. B. S., by Mrs. 

C. S. Pierce, barrel , 119 15 

Brookline, Harvard Ch., Aux., by Mrs. 

G. Proctor, barrels 1.000 83 

Leyden Ch., Aux., by Miss Harriet A. 
Fillebrown, barrel and package. . . . 198 38 
Cambridge, First Ch., Aux., by Mrs. 

Robert B. Hall, boxes and barrels.. 970 00 
First Ch., Shepard Guild, by Miss 

Martha T. Fiske, barrel 25 55 

North Ave. Ch., by Mrs. Carrie L. 

Boswell, barrel 59 45 

Cambridgeport, Prospect St. Ch., by 

Mrs. C. C. Nichols, barrel 125 00 

Wood Memorial Ch., by Mrs. I. W. 

Sneath, barrel 53 68 

Campello, L. S. C by Mrs. John W. 

Wentworth, barrel 70 00 

Chelmsford, L. B. S., by Miss Marcia 
H. Winn, barrel 4625 



Chelsea, Central Ch., National Dep't 
W. W., by Mrs. G. A. Matthews, 

box and barrel $55 00 

Clinton, L. B. S., by Mrs. E. L. Greene, 

barrel 70 00 

Cohasset, Aux., by Miss Ida B. Bates, 

barrel 75 00 

Concord, Aux., by Miss H. J. Hubbard, 

barrel 154 45 

Dalton, L. S. S., by Miss Clara L. 

Crane, three barrels 292 00 

L. S. S., by Mrs. J. B. Crane, bar- 
rel no 00 

Danvers, Maple St. Ch., Ladies, by 

Mrs. E. C. Ewing, barrel 57 90 

Dedham, Aux., by Mrs. A. T. Wright, 

box and barrel 105 24 

Dorchester, Pilgrim Ch., Aux., by Mrs. 

C. H. Crockett, barrel 130 00 

Second Ch., W. H. M. S., by Mrs. J. 
M. Phipps, box and three barrels . . 302 00 

Village Ch., L. H. M. S., by Mrs. F. 

C. Swan, box 183 08 

Enfield, W. M. S., by Mrs. G. C. Ewing, 

box 115 00 

Fall River, Fowler Ch., Ladies, by Mrs. 

Mary C. Easterbrook, barrel 64 00 

Falmouth, L. B. S., by Mrs. W.C. Davis, 

barrel 82 70 

Fitchburg, C. C. Church, Ladies, by 

C. Mackay, box 50 00 

Rollstone Ch., L. B. S., by Mrs. E. E. 

Taylor, box and barrel 93 04 

Florence, Ladies, by Miss Martha Whit- 
marsh, box 62 00 

Framingham, Plymouth Ch., Aux., by 

Mrs. Myra Davis, box 325 00 

Franklin, Ladies, by Miss Hattie A. 

Daniels, barrel 103 49 

Georgetown, First Ch., Sunbeams, by 

Mrs. E. J. Bonette, barrel 30 14 

Globe Village, Union E. F. Ch., L. B. 

S., by Mrs. R. S. Keith, two barrels... 77 50 

Gloucester, Trinity Ch., Aux., by Mrs. 

Reuben Brooks, barrel 106 96 

Great Barrington, Ladies, by Mrs. M. 

D. Sexton, check 75 00 

Greenfield, Second Ch., Aux., by Mrs. 

M. C. Walker, barrel 123 50 

Hatfield, L. B. S. and Real Folks, by 

Mrs. James Porter, bo i 165 00 

Haverhill, North Ch., Aux., by Mrs. 

Mary A. Le Bosquet, two barrels 272 38 

Hinsdale, L. B. S., by Mrs. C. J. Kit- 

tredge, box and two barrels 208 48 

Holliston, Ladies, by Mrs. u George B. 

Fiske, barrel 129 50 

Hopkinton, Aux., by Mrs. S. B. Crooks, 

barrel 105 00 

Housatonic, L. B. S., by Mrs. T. G. 

Ramsdell, barrel 63 74 

Hyde Park, W. H. M. U., by Miss E. E. 

Brooks, two barrels 125 03 



/-« 



The Home Missionary 



July, i! 



Jamaica Plain. L. S. C, by Mrs. Lucy 

J. Wood, two barrels $64 47 

Lee, L. B. S., by Mrs. Elizabeth R. 

May, two barrels 97 19 

Leicester, Aux., by Mrs. A. F. Palmer, 

two barrels '7772 

Lenox, by Miss Carrie C. Sedgwick, box 55 00 

Lincoln, L. H. M. S.. by Miss Alice M. 

Peirce, barrel 71 67 

Little Compton, R. L, L. S., by Mrs. 

Lizzie A. Wordell, barrel 52 00 

Lcngmeadow, First Ch., Ladies, by 

Mrs. Kate S. Gates, two barrels 76 93 

Lowell, Eliot Ch., Aux., by Mrs. Mary 

E. Coburn, box ico 00 

First Ch., L. B. S.,by Mrs. George E. 

Ball, barrel 66 31 

High St. Ch., H. M. S., by Mrs. Emma 

M. Hemingway, two barrels 122 25 

M. A., by Mrs. Emma J. Fuller, two 

barrels 141 01 

Lynn, First Ch., Aux., by Mrs. C. S. 

Bird, barrel S3 5° 

Maiden, Maplewood Ch.. Ladies, by 

Mrs. M. J. Crombie. barrel 27 05 

Manchester, Ladies, by Mrs. Anna S. 

Rust, barrel 20 00 

Marion, L. S.,by Miss Abbie S. Trevett. 

barrel 6554 

Marlboro, Aux., by Mrs. Sarah C. Cur- 
tis, box 69 79 

Marshfield, L. B. S.. by Mrs. Louisa 

Alden Sprague, barrel 61 48 

Melrose, Aux., by Mrs. G. W. Dew, 

barrel 1 20 00 

Melrose Highlands, Y. L. S., by Mrs. S. 

Vaitses 18 00 

Merrimac, W. H. M. S., by Miss Sallie 

G. Sargent, barrel 63 25 

Middleboro', Central Ch.. H. M. C, by 

Mrs. M. J. Belden. barrel 60 00 

Montague, L. B. S., by Miss M. A. 

Deane, barrel 57 64 

Newbury, First Ch.,Aux.. by Miss Addic 

M. B. Little, box 73 5° 

Newburyport, North Ch., P. M. C. by 

Miss S. E. Teele. barrel 80 00 

Prospect St. Ch., Aux., by Miss Abbie 
S. Edwards, two barrels 154 94 

Whitefield Ch.. T. M. C, by Mrs. 

Addie S. Reid. barrel 64 29 

Newton, Eliot Ch., L. S. S., by Miss 

Edith A. Gaffield. ten barrels 794 17 

Y. L. M.S., by Miss Grace Weston, 
two barrels 117 00 

Y. L. S., by Miss Caroline S. Eddy, 

barrel 8627 

Newton Center. L. B. S., by Mrs. George 

E. May, two barrels 204 12 

Newton Highlands, Aux., by Mrs. J. F. 

C. Hyde, barrel 103 64 

Newport, R. I., L. B. S., by Miss E. R. 

Hammett, box and two barrels 188 00 

North Adams, Aux., by Mrs. D. A. An- 
derson, barrels 393 od 

Northampton, Edwards Ch., by Mrs. A. 

F. Kneeland. three barrels 195 65 

North Brookfield, First Ch.. W. U., by- 
Mrs. F. P. Cutler, two barrels 1 14 62 

Northfield, Trin. Ch., by Miss Mary T. 

Button, barrel 35 14 

North Middleboro". L. C, by Mrs. N. 

W. Keith, barrel 26 65 

Willing Workers, by Miss Clara W. 

Eaton, barrel 66 95 

Norwood, Aux., by Miss M. A. Rhodes, 

barrel 66 50 

Orange, Aux., by Mrs. George W. Fry, 

barrel 75 60 

Oxford, by Mrs. Clara A. Fuller, barrel 64 00 

Palmer, King's Daughters, by Mrs. M. 

L. Robinson, barrel 45 5° 

Pawtucket. Aux.. by Mrs. Lyman B. 

Goff . box 80 00 



Paxton. Aux., by Mrs. Otis Cole, two 

barrels 

Peabody, Aux., by Mrs. Thos. M. Stimp- 

son, five barrels 

Pittsficld. First Ch.. Ladies, by Mrs. 

Marv B Davis, five barrels 

L. B. S., by Mrs. Mary L. Adam, box 

and two barrels 

Providence, R. I., Beneficent Ch., H. 
M. B., by Mrs. Arthur D. Greene, 

four barrels 

Y. P. S. C. E., by Miss E. W. 

Olney, box 

Central Ch., Aux., by Mrs. Harriet E. 

Stockwell, eight boxes 

Pilgrim Ch., L. S. C.by Mrs. A. W. 

Alexander, box 

.Plymouth Ch., L. U. S. C, by Mrs. C. 

A. Barber, barrel 

Union Ch., Aux.. by Sarah C. Knight, 

box 

Reading. L. S. C, by Mrs. Solon Ban- 
croft, three barrels 

Roxbury, Immanuel Ch.. Aux., by Mrs. 

S. A. tirackett 

Walnut Ave. Ch.. Aux., by Mrs. S. 

J. Bolster, barrel 

Salem, South Ch., L. B. A., by Miss S. 

S. Driver, two barrels 

Tabernacle Ch.. Aux.. by Mrs. David 

Choate, three barrels 

Sharon, L. S. S., by Miss Emma L. 

Pettee, barrel 

Sheffield, Ladies, by Mrs. L.W. Dye. box 
Sherbc rn, Ladies, by Miss Elizabeth F. 

Coolidsre, barrel 

Somerville. Broadway Ch., Ladies, by 

Miss M. S. Higgins, barrel 

Franklin St. Ch., Aux.. by Mrs. F. S. 

Hartshorn, two barrels 

Winter Hill Ch., W. M. S., by Mrs. 

Emma S. Hayes, barrel 

South Amherst, Ladies, by Mrs. G. H. 

Atkins, barrel 

Southboro'. Ladies, by Mrs. L. A. 

Crouch, barrel 

South Sudbury, Memorial Ch., M. C, 

by Mrs. H. H. Brown, barrel 

Spencer, L. C. S.. by Mrs. Fanny W. 

Hallett. four barrels 

Springfield. First Ch.. W. H. M. S.. by- 
Mrs. Henrietta J. Graves, five bar- 
rels 393 25 

HopeCh., L. B. S., by Mrs. E. W. 

Gantt, barrel 150 00 

Memorial Ch., Aux., by Mrs. B. F. 

Peirce, two barrels 516 58 

North Ch., L. B. S., by Mrs. Alice 

E. Rust, barrel 52 00 

South Ch.. W. H. M. A. S., by Mrs. 

Mary H. Mitchell, two barrels 323 00 

Stockbridge. Aux., by Mrs. C. P. War- 
ner, barrel 56 15 

Sutton, Aux., by Mrs. J. C. Hall 36 50 

Taunton, First Ch., Aux., by Mrs. G. 

H. Rhodes, barrel 90 16 

Ware, Ladies, by Miss Emma T. Eaton, 

barrel 103 93 

Warren, Aux., by Mrs. M. L. Hastings. 

barrel 89 65 

Watertown Phillips Ch., Aux., by 

Mrs. M. Fuller, two barrels 13900 

Westboro', L. S. C, by Mrs. F. E. 

Corey, barrel 181 06 

West Boxford, F. C. S.. by Miss Anna 

P. Park, barrel 58 28 

West Boylston, D. S., by Mrs. H. F. 

Daggett, barrel 43 97 

West Brookfield, D. S., by Miss Fnrriet 

N. Forbes, box 

Westerly. Ladies, by Miss Julia E. 

Smith, barrel 35 00 

Westfield. First Ch.. L. B. S., by Miss 

Lucy C. Smith, barrel 14395 



July, 1898 



The Home Missionary 



73 



Second Ch., L. B. S., by Mrs. Kate 

B. To wle, three barrels $25087 

West Medford, Aux., by Mrs. Sarah A. 

Kingsbury, two barrels 100 00 

West Newton, W. G., by Mrs. C. E. 

Braman, three barrels 217 91 

West Roxbury, L. B. S., by Miss Jessie 

C. Dennett, case 87 90 

Whitinsville, L. B. S, by Miss Lila S. 

Whitin, box and barrel 364 46 

Williamstown, Aux., by Miss Eleanor 

Ralston Duncan, two barrels 243 90 

Winchendon, Ladies, by Mrs. C C. 

Parker, box 180 10 

Winchester 

Woburn 

Wollaston, Aux., by Mrs. Mary F. 



Woonsocket, R. I., Globe Ch., Ladies, 

by Mrs. A. M. Paine, two barrels. $160 00 
Worcester, Belmont Ch., Aux., by Mrs. 

P. T. Chandler, barrel 41 43 

Bethany Ch., Ladies, by Mrs, J. A. 

Todd, barrel 5000 

Central Ch., Aux., by Mrs. Carrie G. 

Leland, barrel 12423 

W. A., by Miss Alice G. Merrill, 

barrel 81 00 

Old South Ch., Aux., by Miss Ella M. 

Sibley, three barrels 230 38 

Piedmont Ch., B. U., by Mrs. C. E. 

Warren, barrel 71 24 

Plymouth Ch., L. B. S., by Mrs. L. F. 
Putnam, box...,,,., 1487s 



$10,214 54 



AUXILIARY STATE RECEIPTS 

MASSACHUSETTS HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Receipts of the Massachusetts Home Missionary Society in March., 1898. Rev. Edwin 

B. Palmer, Treasurer 



Abington, by J. T. Richmond $9 50 

Agawam, by R. De Witt 17 47 

Andover, Mrs. John Richards 40 00 

Ashby, Orth., by C. F. Hayward 18 68 

Bank Balances, Feb. Int. on 8 20 

Boston, Bostonian, Thank-offering 2 00 

Dorchester, A Friend, " A " 25 00 

Two Friends 5 00 

" Our Country " 27 00 

R. M. A 5 00 

Roxbury, Wal. Ave. S. S., by Chas. 
T. Barry, for Rev. Jas. Hayes, Dan- 
ville, 111 27 47 

Union, by Wm. H. White 329 49 

Boxford, West, by Rev. C. L. Hubbard. 5 87 

Braintree, " K " 10 00 

Brimfield, First, by M. H. Corbin 24 20 

Brockton, First, by John T. Burke, to 

const. Rev. Alan B. Hudson a L M... 30 50 

Charlemont, by Rev. W. R. Joyslin .... 10 00 
Charlton, Y. P. S. C. E., by Jessie F. 

Wakefield 5 00 

Chesterfield, by Rev. H. L. Thygeson. . 3 10 
Chicago, 111., Discharge of note of Mrs. 

Matilda Knaub 1,530 00 

Chicopee (Falls), Second, by Chas. A. 

Taylor 32 65 

China, Tung Chau, A Friend, by Treas. 

A. B. C. F. M 1000 

Danvers, First, Y. P. S. C. E., by 

May P. Grover 3 00 

Easthampton, First, by W. H. Wright.. 51 54 

Easton, Evan., by H. Y. Mitchell 17 00 

Everett, Mystic Side, by E. S. Tracy.. . 12 70 
Framingham, South, Grace, by G. M. 

Amsden 86 00 

Georgetown, First, by Chas. Holmes. . . 12 54 
Hanson, First, Y. P. S. C. E., by Angus 

McLellan 1 25 

Hardwick, by Rev. H. Page 12 00 

Haverhill, Fourth, by Rev. Geo. F. 

Gleason 11 00 

French, by P. Rainaud 6 00 

Riverside, by Rev. Geo. L. Gleason. . 8 00 

Hawley, by Rev. J. A. Pogue 10 00 



Holland, Ladies' Home Miss. Society, 

by Mrs. J. G. Willis 

Hyde Park, First, by E. A. Runnells.. 

Kingston, Mrs. Mary H. Peckham 

Lawrence, Trinity, by Charles E. F. 

Lowell, High' St., by G. H.Candee. .... 

Pawtucket, by J. J. Colton, for local 
Armenian work, $10.00.* 
Lynnfield, Center, by Rev. Geo. E. 

Freeman 

Mansfield, Orth., by Rev. Jacob Ide 

Marion, by Dana M. Dustan 

S. S., by Susan A. Conro 

Marlboro, Mrs. Mary E. Jones 

Mrs. Lucy A. Patch 

Mass., A Friend, "M." 

Mattapoisett, Y. P. S. C. E., by Miss 

Flora Pierce 

Medfield, Second, by F. S. Wright 

Medford, West, by J. H. Gerrish 

Middleboro, Central, by E. S. Hatha- 
way 

S. S., by E. S. H 

First, Putnam Y. P. S. C. E., by Al- 
bert Deane 

Montague, Millers Falls, by Mrs. D. L. 

Cushman 

Newbury, First, by Edward Perkins 

Newton, Auburndale, A Friend 

Northbridge, Center, by Rev. J. H. 

Childs, of which $15 Taft thank- 
offering 

Otis, by Ralph H. Norton 

Palmer, Second, by D. L. Bodfish 

Princeton, by Rev. Chas. A. White 

Quincy, Atlantic, Memorial, by Frank 

Jenkins 

Reading, by Dean Peabody 

Rochester, East, by Geo. P. Morse 

Rowley. Ladies' Benev. Soc, by Nellie 

Y. P. S. C. E., by Alice Bishop '.'.'.'.'.'.. '. 

Salem, South, A Member 

Tabernacle, by C. R. Washburn 



m 75 
33 78 
22 50 



28 68 

19 36 

J7 39 
2 24 

20 CO 

70 
15 00 

5 °° 
10 32 

8 15 

79 42 

6 85 



4 00 

24 56 

1 5° 



25 

87 


7.5 
81 


9 

25 
8 


00 
00 
5° 


12 


00 


5 

TO 


00 
00 


77 


70 



Received and credited on special accounts. 



74 



The Home Missionary 



July, 



Sangers, by John E. Stocker, Taft thank- 
offering $14 00 

Somerville, Franklin St., by Geo. E. 

Dustin 2076 

South Hadley, First, by L. M. Gaylord. 15 00 
Springfield, French Church, by Prof. G. 

Michaud 5 co 

Hunt, Grace N., Estate of, by H. W. 

Bosworth, Ex 4, ^8 58 

Sturbridge, by Rev. A. Holbrook 33 75 

Sutton, by C. E. Hutchinson, of wh. 

$14 Taft thank-offering 24 18 

Wilkinsonville, Miss C. W. Hill 50 00 

Wakefield, by W. P. Preston 25 49 

Walpole, Second, by S. E. Bently 15 30 

Weston, by Rev. R. F. Gordon 14 co 

Weymouth, South, Old South, by Rev. 

H. C. Alvord 9 00 

Whitin, J. C, Fund, Income of 25 00 

Williamstown, Carter, Franklin, LL.D. 100 00 

Denison, Rev. John H 100 00 

Fernald, Prof. O, M 20 00 



Worcester, Old South, by Edward Je- 
rome, w. p. g. to const. Jas. B. Hart- 
ford, Everett Flagg, Mrs. Geo. W. 
Gault, and Mrs. Anna K. Murphy 

L. Ms. of C. H. M. S 

Plymouth. S. S., by R. S. Riley 

Woman's Home Miss. Association, by 
M. L. Woodberry, Asst. Treas.: 
Grant towards support of Mrs. E. N. 
Tillinghast, of the French-American 

College 

Boston. Hope Chapel, for Greek work 

Roxbury, Wal. Ave., Aux., Salary 

of Rev. S. Deakin 



Home Missionary. 



|!IIO OO 
15 OQ 



50 OO 
•"IO OO 



157 OO 



r,974 76 

3 3° 

'.978 06 



Received in April, il 



Abington, First, C. E. S., by J. T. Rich- 
mond 

Acton, Evan., S. S., by Rev. F. P. Wood 

Amherst, College, by L. H. Elwell 

Ashfield, by Mrs. Alma Hall, to const. 
Miss M. A. Eldridge a L. M. of C. 

H. M. S 

Auburn, by Rev. Chas. M. Pierce 

Bank Balances, Interest on 

Barnstable, Cotuit, Union, by John C. 

Fish 

Boston, A Friend 

Roylston, by G. E. S.Kinney, add'l. 

Dorchester, Second, A Friend 

Friends, by Rev. W. G. Puddc- 

foot 

Village, Ladies' Home Missionary- 
Society, by Mrs. Reuben Swan. 

S. S., by F. E. Harrington 

Roxbury, Eliot, by Frederic C. Rus- 
sell 

A Member 

Highland, by W. M. Russell 

Immanuel, by Francis J. Ward.... 

Brackett fund, Income of 

Bradford, Ward Hill, by H. P. AValdo.. 

Braintree, First, by A. B. Keith 

Ladies' Home Missionary Society, by 

Miss S. H. Thayer 

Brockton, Porter, by Chas. P. Holland. 
Brookline, Harvard, by Jas. H. Shap- 

leigh 

For Italian Mission, by J. H. Shap- 

leigh 

Cambndgeport, N. C 

Pilgrim, by N. H. Holbrook 

Chelsea, Central, by W. B. Denison 

C. E. S., by W. B. Denison, for Rev. 

E. D. Farnsvvorth, Wash 

First, by C. E. Bacon 

Third, by John Bell 

Concord. Trin.. by Thomas Todd 

Dracut. Central, by Rev. F. J. Kelley. . 
Fall River, Broadway, by G. Parkinson, 

Taft thank-offering 

Central, by R. B. Borden, of which 

890.57 is Mon. Con. Coll 

Fitchburg, Calvinistic, by Miss L A. 

Holden 

Rollstone, bv David Lowe 

C. E. S., by Wm. R. Rankin 

Foxboro, Bethany, in part, by Horace 
Carpenter 



fb 


77 


3 


00 


72 


57 


83 


1, 1 


J7 


00 


12 


11 


22 


66 


5 


00 



18 


00 


8 


45 


2i 


00 


5° 


( 


I42 


00 


298 38 


80 


00 


5 


45 


5 


91 


CO 


00 


63 46 


84 


54 


25 


36 


50 


1 


15 


90 


10 


5 8 


10 


00 


2 4 


59 


11 


77 


14 


1 1. 1 


6 


00 


5 


4i 


i 2 3 


57 


64 


11 


24 


5° 


12 


05 



5 OO 



Franklin, by J. Herbert Baker 

Frost, Rufus S., fund, Income of 

Gurney, R. C, fund, Income of 

Haile, S. W., fund, Income of 

Hale. E. J. M., fund. Income of 

Hawley. West, by C. C. Fuller 

Holbrook, Winthrop, by F. W. Blanch- 

ard, to const. Susan A. Whitcomb a 

L. M. of C. H. M. S 

Ipswich, First, S. S., by Miss A. L. 

Newman .... .' 

Lawrence, Armenians, by Rev. W. E. 

Wolcott, for local Arm. work, $15* 

Leicester, First, by David Bemis 

Leominster, North, by Miss Lucy E. 
Shedd 

C. E. S., by Miss L. E. Shedd 

Lowell, Armenians, for local Arm. work, 

by Rev. H. K. Santisican, $50.* 
Maiden, Maplewood, by Thomas Rush- 
ton, Jr 

C. E. S., by A. R. Potter 

Mansfield, Orth., C. E. S., by R. A. 

Kennedy 

Melrose, Orth., by C. C. Gcss 

Monterey, by Jessie A. Townser.d 

New Marlboro, Southfield, by H. W. 

Palmer 

Newton, Auburndale, by C. C. Burr 

(Center) First, by J. E. Rockwood... 

Eliot, of wh. $213.72 Special Easter 

Offering, by Geo. N. Putnam 

Member, Easter offering 

Northboro, A Member, by Rev. A. D. 

Smith 

Northbridge, Whitinsville, by Edward 
Whitin 

E.-c.-a-day Band, by Mrs. C E. Whitin 

Whitin, Wm. H., Est. of, by Edward 

Whitin 

North Brook-field. First, by H. F. Moore 
Pittsfield. First, by Frank W. Dutton. . 
Prescott. bv Rev. C. E. Houghton 

C. E. S., by Rev. C. E. Houghton.... 

Reading, by Dean Peabody 

Reed, Dwight, fund, Income of 

Rochester, North, by A. K. Small 

Rollins, fund, Income of 

Sharon, C. E. S.,by Nellie H. Derry... 

Sherborn, Pilgrim (Taft thank-offering 1, 

by L. Coolidge 

C. E. S.. by L. Coolidge 

S. S., Primary Dept., by L. Coolidge. 



24 
16 


27 
00 


40 
62 


5° 
SO 


55 


00 


9 


5° 



56 43 



22 


oo 


2 


OO 


12 


8,s 


'5 


42 


3 

-8 

"6 


72 
5° 
40 


4 
308 

'54 


00 
15 
04 


638 
50 


7^ 
00 


2 


00 


,600 
18 


5° 
90 


500 

38 

40 

2 

8 


00 
8 1 

00 
00 


25 
64 

5 
20 


00 
00 

CO 

00 


'5 


00 



* Received and credited on special accounts. 



July, 1898 



The Home Missionary 



75 



Shirley, Orth., by Rev. Joseph Torrey. $10 42 

Shrewsbury, by Henry Harlow 5 00 

Somerville, Winter Hill, by S. W. Un- 
derbill . 34 46 

Southbridge. Globe Village Evan. Free, 

by F. E. Randall 28 59 

Springfield, First, by Henry G. Camp. 143 6r 

Hope, by Jas. B. Keene 23 06 

Olivet, by Geo. B. Kilbon 28 60 

South, by H. K. Chapin 85 71 

Stoneham,by O. W. Richardson 19 60 

Taunton, Union, by Geo. W. Read 38 84 

Winslow, by Joseph H. Hastings 87 55 

Tolland, by Rev. S. B. Andrews....... 3 00 

Upton, Fletcher, Margaret A., Estate 
of, by W. W. Fletcher, Ex., to const. 
Mrs. R. A. Rogers of W. Medford 
and L. C. Fletcher of Whitinsville 

L. Ms. of C. H. M. S 100 00 

Wall fund. Income of 32 00 

Waltham, Trinitarian, by T. W. Tem- 
ple 27 09 

Ware, East, by D, W. Ainsworth 384 13 



Wellesley, by Geo. T. Hall $90 22 

Westport, Pacific Union, S. S., by J. C. 

Macomber 12 07 

Weymouth, Heights, - by Ruf us Bates. . 19 25 

Whitcomb, David, fund, Income of.... 142 50 

Whitin, J. C, fund, Income of 337 50 

Woburn, First, Special for Montvale 

Ch., by Cong'l Ch. Union 100 00 

Worcester, Piedmont, by Dr. A. W. 

Eldred 5000 

Plymouth, by F. W. Chase 291 53 

Union, by C. B. Greene 94 03 

Woman's Home Miss. Asso., by Miss 

M. L. Woodberry, Asst Treas : 

Grant to Mrs. Tillinghast, of French 
Am. College, $50.00 ; Boston, Rox- 
bury, Wal. Ave., Aux., for salary 
of Rev. S. Deakin, $47.00 g 7 00 



Home Missionary, 



$7,728 30 
3 7° 

$7,732 CO 



Received in May, 1 i 



Amesbury, Main St., by Chas. F. Hovey $14 64 

Amherst, South, by Rev. J. F. Gleason 10 24 
Andover, Free Christian, by Mrs. M. 

C. Cole, to const. John C. Angus a L. 

M. of C. H. M. S. (with $5 for Greek 

work) 70 00 

Auburn, Add'l, by Rev. C. M. Pierce.. 3 15 

Bank Balances, April Int. on 12 49 

Barnstable, West, by Rev. E. B. French 5 00 
Belmont, Waverly, Taft thank-offering, 

by W. R. Lamkin 17 03 

Berlin, by Rev. A. P. Pratt 8 36 

Billerica, North, Gould, Mrs. E. R 12 00 

Boston, Hall, Josephine S., Estate of, 

by A. W. Hooper, Ex 1,000 00 

Park St., by E. H. McGuire 27 00 

Braintree, First, S. S., by Charlotte 

Thomas 5 00 

South, by H. B. Whitman 20 00 

Brockton, " J." 25 00 

Brookfield Conference, Spring Session, 

by Rev. E. B. Blanchard 13 47 

Brookline, Belcher, Annie T 20 00 

Harvard, Ladies 1 Benev. Soc, by Miss 
A. L. Ricker, response to Rev. W. 
G. Puddefoot for general Western 

work 75 00 

Buckland, Life Member 5 00 

Essex, by Mrs. Mary C. Osgood 12 00 

Everett, First, by R. A. Rideout 42 00 

Foxboro, by Horace Carpenter 22 92 

Framingham, Saxonville, Edwards, 

Mission Band, by A. E. Dawson 10 00 

Great Barrington, Housatonic, by H. 

H.B.Turner 58 50 

Hanson, by Abbie J. Clark 5 56 

Haverhill, Center, by Daniel Hackett.. 59 50 

Holyoke, First, by J. H. Wylie, Jr 18 74 

Second, by C. J. Humeston 72 81 

Hubbardston, by Lucy H. Grimes 7 00 

Hyde Park, First, by E. A. Runnells. . . 31 13 

Sunday-school, by F. D. Freeman. . . 22 47 

Lawrence, White, Samuel 50 00 

Ludlow, Union, by A. H. Halford n 56 

Lynnfield, South, by Rev. Geo. E. Free- 
man 10 00 

Maiden, " S. M. S." 5 00 

Marion, John Pitcher Annuity, by P. 

B. Hadley 45 85 

Mass. "Old Glory" ,,, 5100 



Medford, West, by J. H. Gerrish $23 00 

Milton, First Evan., by Arthur H. 

Tucker 49 88 

Newburyport, Prospect St., by A. H. 

Wells 1439 

Newton, Auburndale, by C. C. Burr.. .. 5 00 

Peru, Sunday-school, by Jessie Barlow. 6 09 

Petersham, C. E. Soc, by Bessie B. 

Dawes 2 65 

Plympton, by Edmund Perkins 6 70 

Quincy, Wollaston, by E. L. Robbins. . 69 10 

Reed, Dwight fund, Income 40 00 

Somerville, Highland, by B. F. Alien.. . 5 41 

Sutton, First, C. E. Soc, by Mrs. I. W. 

Putnam, for Aiaskan work 2 00 

Upton, by B. C. Wood n 83 

West Newbury, First, by H. M. Good- 
rich 637 

Weymouth, North, Pilgrim, C. E. Soc, 

by S. G. Rockwood 2 50 

Whitcomb, David, fund, Income 275 00 

Williamsburg, by H. W. Hill 52 00 

Winchester, First, by H. A. Wheeler... 250 00 
D. N. Skillings annuity, by W. D. 

Middleton 100 00 

" Maps" 50 

Worcester, Estabrook, Rebekah B., Es- 
tate of, by G. Henry Whitcomb, Ex. 1,422 76 
Hope, S. S.. Prim. Dept., by Mrs. E. 

G. Hall, for Alaskan work 5 00 

Piedmont, A Member, by Dr. A. W. 

Eldred 1 00 

South Conference, by A. Armsby. ... 26 24 

Wrentham, First, by Miss S. M. Gerould 25 00 

Woman's Home Missionary Asso., by 
Miss M. L. Woodberry, Asst. Treas.: 
Boston, Rox., Wal. Ave., Aux., toward 

salary of Rev. S. Deakin 22 oo 

Somerville, Broadway, Aux., for Ital- 
ian work, Boston 10 00 

Grant to Mrs. Tillinghast, of the Fr.- 
Am. College 50 00 



82 00 



Home Missionary. 



$4,363 84 
S 10 

$4,368 94 



76 



The Home Missionary 



July, 1898 



THE MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF CONNECTICUT 



Receipts of the Missionary Society of Connecticut in March, 

Jacobs, Treasurer 



1898. 



Ward W, 



Ashford, First, by Nelson Hammond.. $7 00 
Brooklyn, First, Church, S. S., and Y. 

P. S. C. E., by M. W. Crosby 1600 

For C. H. M. S 30 co 

Chaplin, by Frank C. Lummis 1600 

Colchester, First, by Edward F. Strong, 

forC. H. M. S 11 70 

Westchester, by E. E. Carrier, for 

C. H. M. S 3 91 

East Canaan, see North Canaan. 

East Haddam, First, by E. W. Chaffee 2 51 

ForC. H. M. S 8 75 

East Hartland, see Hartland. 
Glastonbury, So. Glastonbury, Ch. and 

S. S., by H. D. Hale 7 27 

Greenwich, Stanwich, by L. M. Close. 13 10 

Hartford, Park, by Willis E. Smith.... 31 50 

Glenwood, by R. W. Williamson 5 13 

Zion Swedish, by Rev. L. W. A. 

Bjorkman 5 37 

Hartland, East Hartland, by Rev. W. 

E.B.Moore 11 00 

Lyme, First, by Rev. E. F. Burr 13 31 

A Friend 500 

Middlcbury, by Robt. M. Fenn 18 00 

Middletown, First, by E. P. Augur — 33 94 

'• In Memoriam ' 40 00 

Naugatuck, by Miss Ellen bpencer 100 00 

Nora) Canaan, East Canaan, by A. B. 

Garfield 2 70 

Norwich, First. Dwight Avery 6 50 

Y. P. S. C. E., by Lewis A. Hyde. . 6 22 

Swedish, by Rev. A. Abrahamson. ... 2 05 



Plainfield, Wauregan, by Rev. S. H. 
Fellows, to const. Mr. F. T. Johnson 

a L. M $7500 

Plymouth, Terryville, Friends 11 co 

Somers, Somersville, by H. L. James... 8 25 

ForC. H. M. S 7 15 

Somersville, see Somers. 

South Glastonbury, see Glastonbury. 

Stanwich, see Greenwich. 

Stratford, by C. C. Wells 32 00 

Terryville, see Plymouth. 

Thompson, by J. W. Dike 15 00 

For C. H. M. S 17 40 

Trumbull, by Rev. W. F. White 15 5 q 

Y. P. S. C. E.,by Mrs. O. B. Burton.. 5 00 

Waterbury, First, by Lester M. Camp, 

forC. H. M.S 52 01 

Wauregan, see Plainfield. 
Westchester, see Colchester. 
W. C. H. M. U. of Conn., Mrs. Geo. 
Follett, Sec, East Hartford, First, 

by E. C. Geer, Treas 25 71 

Hartford, First, special gift to Rev. 
S. M. Andrews, of Millington, 
Conn., by Mrs. S. M. Hotchkiss, 
Treas 15 co 

$676 "7 

BOXES 

Hartford. Asylum Hill, "Mission Band," 
box, $33.50, for Conn. 



Received in April, 1S98 



Bridgeport, Second, A Friend, for C. 
H. M. S $2500 

Bristol, bv L. G. Merick 25 00 

Brookfield, by C. E. Vroman, for C. H. 
M. S 38 69 

Canterbury, First, Estate of Emblem 
L. Williams, by L. B. Morgan, Trus- 
tee 11 14 

East Haddam, Millington, by Nellie F. 
Swan 300 

Glastonbury, South Glastonbury. Ch. 
and S. S, by H. D. Hale 991 

Madison, North Madison, by Joel M. 
Hill 13 5° 

Middlebury, by Rev. W. F. Avery 5 00 

New London, Second, Estate of J. N. 
Harris, 1-3 of 25-48 of income of trust 
fund 1,041 84 



Norwich, Taftville, by Geo. N. Bear- 
don $21 00 

Plainfield, First, by M. J. Kingsley 4 24 

Plymouth. Terryville, by Geo. C. Clark 30 52 

Prospect, by Rev. Wm. H. Phipps 10 00 

Sharon, First, by R. E. Goodwin 26 40 

Ellsworth, by C. C. Dean • 9 25 

Southington, Plantsville, by E. P. 

Hotchkiss 4775 

Thomaston, First, by H. A. Welton. ... 12 23 

ForC.H. M. S „ 9 13 

Tolland, by E. S. Agard 18 65 

Torrington, First, S. S., by Bennett 

H. Tompkin 7 73 

Voluntown, Ekonk, Rev. John Elder- 
kin, personal 8 00 



$i>377 93 



Received in May, li 



Branford, by L. J. Nichols, $15.21 ; for 
C. H.M.S., $1521 $30 42 

Chaplin, by Frank C. Lummis, for C. H. 
M. S., with prev. conts. to const. Ma- 
bel S. Lincoln, of Chaplin, a L. M . . . . 27 00 

Chatham, Cobalt. " Thank Offering," 
by Rev. J. W. Moulton 5 00 

Cheshire, by F. N. Hall 5 00 

Colchester, Y. P. S. C. E., by Annie M. 
Smith , 3 00 



Coventry, South Coventry, by J. S. 
Morgan $19 48 

East Windsor, First, by E. G. Mor- 
ton 25 00 

Grisvvold, Jewett City, by A. G. Brew- 
ster, Jr 17 3° 

Hartford Park, by Willis E. Smith, for 
C. H. M. S 36 56 

Hartland, West Hartland, by A. A. 
Newton 3 00 



July, 1898 



The Home Missionary 



11 



Killingly, Danielson, by Charles Phil- 
lips, for C. H. M. S $xo 10 

Milford, First, C. T. Merwin, personal. 10 00 

Naugatuck, by Miss Ellen Spencer, for 
C. H. M. S ... 15000 

New London, First, by George Whit- 
tlesey 35 l8 

Old Saybrook, by Robert Chapman, 
$8.68 ; for C. H. M. S., $8.69 17 37 

Orange, West Haven, by Rev. N. J. 

Squires 26 00 

Y. P. S. C. E 2 00 

Sharon, Ellsworth, by Rev. G. F. Goode- 
nough, for C. H. M. S. 8 00 

Thomaston, First, by H. A. Welton 6 63 

Vernon, Rockville, by H.L.James 158 47 

Watertown, by Geo, N. Griswold 34 00 



Westport, Greens Farms, by George 
P. Jennings 

Wethersfield, by S. F. Willard 

Wilton, by Thomas F. Gilbert, for C. 
H.M.S ' 

W. C. H. M. U. of Conn., Mrs. George 
Follett, Sec: Hartford, Park, Mis- 
sionary Aid Soc, by Mrs. T. W. Rus- 
sell, Sec 



$13 2 5 
40 00 



$697 76 



[Corrections : In receipts for Dec, 1897, from 
Broad Brook, " S. T. Adams' 1 should read, S. B. 
Adams. In receipts for Jan., 1898, Kensington, 
"by S. M. Coles" should read, "by S. M. 
Cowles,"] 



RHODE ISLAND HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Receipts of the Rhode Island Home Missionary Society from January 1 to March 31, 1 i 
Joseph William Rice, Treasurer 



Chepachet, Ch 

Kingston, Ch 

Little Compton, United Ch. 

Newport, United Ch 

Pawtucket, Cong. Ch 

Providence, Beneficent Ch. 

Pilgrim Ch 

Y. P. S. C. E 



$100 Union Ch $88509 

200 s - s 509 2 

4 6 2n 036 01 

87 53 

44 96 1,170 16 

82 19 Slatersville, S. S 28 55 

134 13 Y.P.S.C.E 286 

2 83 31 4* 

136 96 Stnithfield, Mission Ch 5 00 

Interest 72 50 



Plymouth Ch. 



15 00 



$1,460 85 



ILLINOIS HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Receipts of the Illinois Home Missionary Society in Febntaiy, 1898. AARON B. 

Mead, Treasurer 



Albion, First $18 00 

Chesterfield 8 90 

Chicago, First 32 77 

South, W. H. M. Union 47 90 

Pilgrim 56 00 

Covenant, Intermediate, Y. P. S. C. E. 1 00 

Crystal Lake 3 00 

Decatur 21 65 

De Kalb, Swedish 4 36 

Dongola 4 50 

Fairfield, Center 6 56 

Fall Creek 50 00 

Forrest, Y. P. S. C. E 26 71 

Harvard, Samuel Richardson 19 00 

Harvey 27 03 

La Grange ... 2 00 

La Harpe, Miss Lucy S. Maynard 5 00 

Lee Center n 18 

Mill Creek 2 50 

Moline, Second 11 28 

Oak Park, First 112 21 

Ontario 9 70 

Plainfield 29 00 

Princeton, Miss Ella Craig 1 00 

Roberts 6 84 

Saunemin, Mrs. Knowlton 1 00 

Shaw 11 06 



Sheffield $13125 

South Danville, Rev. James Hayes 2 50 

Spring Valley, First 25 00 

Sterling 912 

Woodburn 815 

. 706 17 
Woman's Home Missionary Union : 

Chicago, New England 25 50 

Union Park 50 00 

Oak Park, First 51 00 

Oneida 193 

Payson 1 00 

Pittsfield, Lottie Kelley Society 1000 

Rockford, First 8 00 

Rollo 10 00 

Seward, First 5 45 

Toulon 4 05 

166 93 

Mrs. J. L. and Miss N. E. Slocum 200 00 

Rev. J. D. McCord 3 00 

W. H. Scott 1 00 

Cash ,, 6078 

$1, 137 88 



The Home Missionary 



July, 1898 



Received i>i March, 1898 



Amboy , $25 00 

Aurora, First 5° 57 

New England (Y. P. S. C. E., $311.... 125 00 

Austin, Swedish 4 10 

Bunker Hill 28 81 

Canton, A. W. Dewey 1 oo 

Carpentersville, Rev. H. M. Herrick. .. 3 00 

Chicago, First 234 97 

New England 15 00 

Leavitt Street 10 00 

Lincoln Park (Y. P. S. C. E, $2) 52 60 

Union Park 1000 

South (Ladies' Society, $3) 132 24 

MiHard Avenue 24 10 

Pilgrim 82 30 

Englewood, North 5 00 

Central Park (S. S. $7.50; Y. P. S. C. 

E„ $3.50) 37 75 

Douglas Park (Jun. and Sen. Y. P. S. 

1 C. E., 84) 8 25 

South Chicago 10 00 

Chillicothe 19 05 

Creston 13 39 

Dallas 4 15 

Danway 2 50 

De Kalb (S. S., $5) 3859 

De Pue 700 

East Grove 5 00 

Elgin, Prospect Street 5 00 

Evanston, Asbury Avenue 674 

Fall Creek 50 oo 

Galesburg. Central 50 00 

East Main Street 4 09 

Knox Street 3 5c 

Geneseo 14 60 

Godfrey 32 40 

Grossdale (Y. P. S. C. E., $2.50) 6 00 

Half Day, Rev. S. H. Gray 5 00 

Hampton 468 

Harvey 75 

Hennepin, S. S 3 25 

Highland 12 00 

Illini 500 

Joliet, Welsh, Rev. D. J. Davies 2 00 

Kangley (S. S., $4.66) 8 00 

Kewanee, H. T. Lay 10 00 

La Moille 18 00 

La Salle 6 53 

Lyonsville 10 64 

Malta 14 50 

Melville 3 60 

Melvin 4 00 

Mendon. Mrs. Benton 15 00 

Morgan Park (Y. P. S. C. E., §3.401... 9 40 

Morton Park 1 20 

Neponset 25 00 

North Aurora 5 00 

Oak Park, First 15 00 

Second 27 95 

Pana 10 co 

Paxton 130 00 

Payson 19 33 

Poplar Grove 9 00 

Princeton 11 00 

Providence 10 00 



Riley 

Rockford, First (S. S., $10) 

Roscoe 

Roseville 

Sandoval 

Seward. First 

Second 

Shabbona 

Spring Valley, Rev. A. Billour 

Stark, Y. P. S. C. E 

Stillman Valley 

Sycamore 

Thawville.. 

Victoria (Y. P. S. C. E., $1.90) 

Walton 

Wataga 

Waverly 

Western Springs 

Wheaton, Rev. j. D. Wyckoff 

Winnebago(S. S., $5; Y. P. S. C. E., 85) 

Wyoming 

Yorkville 

Woman's Home Missionary Union : 

Algonquin 

Aurora, First 

Bunker Hill 

Chicago, New England 

Lincoln Park 

Ravenswood 

Auburn Park 

De Kalb 

Dundee 

Elmwood 

Emington 

Evanston, First 

Gal va 

Griggsville, Cree Missionary Soc 

Huntley 

La Harpe 

Mattoon 

Moline, Second 

Neponset 

Oak Park, First 

Payson 

Pittsfield, Second Sen. Soc 

Rockford, Second 

Sheffield 

Spring Valley, First 

Sycamore 

Tonica 

Winnebago 



Cash 

Mr. and Mrs. Kilner 

W. S. Kiscadden 

Cash, for 20th anniversary. 

Prof. Risberg 

Mrs. Cooley 

Rev. C. F. Van Auken 

Rev. John Wilcox 

Mrs. Julia A. Slafter 



$13 48 
117 11 
12 00 
11 00 



13 00 
37 86 

5 00 
5 00 
15 00 

155 00 

4 05 
17 40 

5 00 

8 10 

9 01 
12 00 
10 00 

19 36 
9 75 

15 80 

3 00 
25 35 
10 00 

8 00 
7 25 

20 00 
10 00 
12 00 

3 25 
5 00 

4 00 
28 50 
39 56 

19 00 
1 00 

5 °o 

9 30 
3 00 

20 00 
5 00 

50 

7 50 
75 69 
12 65 
10 00 
72 16 

8 00 
5 °° 

429 71 

72 30 
15 00 

5 °° 
75 00 

5 °° 
10 00 
25 00 

5 °° 

5 00 

$2,669 03 



MICHIGAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Receipts of the Michigan Home Missionary Society in March, 1898. Rev. John P. 

Sanderson, Treasurer 



Allenville 

Baroda 

Bedford 

Bellaire, Rev. E. M. Corey. 



$8 00 Big Rapids. First $3 50 

1 50 Township 3 00 

780 Bradley 1270 

10 00 Breckenridge, Y. P, S. C. E 2 00 



July, 1898 



The Home Missionary 



79 



Bridgman $2 00 

Calumet, Y. P. S. C. E 20 00 

Carmel 6 00 

Central Lake 1 50 

Y. P. S. C. E 2 50 

Chassell 5 00 

Cheboygan . 5 00 

Clio 15 30 

Cooper 11 17 

Copemish 2 15 

Y. P. S. C. E., Jr 50 

G. H. Marzolf 500 

Covert 24 30 

Crystal 410 

Detroit, First 100 00 

Fort Street 16 00 

S. S 8 50 

Y. P. S. C. E 5 00 

Mt. Hope 4000 

Canfield Avenue 5 00 

Samaritan Hall 10 00 

Edmore 1 45 

Ellsworth , 6 00 

Freeport, Y. P. S. C. E 3 40 

Gaylord 20 55 

Grand Rapids, East 3 00 

Barker Memorial 10 00 

Hancock 112 31 

Helena 278 

Jackson, Plym. S. S 4 75 

Y. P. S. C. E 6 57 

Kalamazoo, S. S 10 18 

Kalkaska 444 

Kendall 4 00 

Lansing, Plymouth 15 co 

Nashville 6 55 

New Baltimore 3 50 

Northport 25 00 

Y. P. S. C. E 4 00 

Olivet 47 91 

Omena 3 60 

Ovid 21 46 

Sen. Y. P. S. C. E 500 

Intermed. Y. P. S. C. E 1 25 

Jun. Y. P. S. C. E 2 50 

S. S 3 62 

Port Huron, 25th Street 10 00 

Prattville : 50 

Rockford 19 80 

S. S 4 9° 

Y. P. S. C. E 5 30 

Rondo 600 

St. John's 25 57 

St. Joseph, S. S 265 

Sandstone 75 

Sherman 9 10 

Solon 3 00 

Thompsonville 3 60 

Three Oaks 66 77 

Union City 132 84 

Y. P.S.C. E 15 00 

S. S 10 00 

Vestaburg 5 00 

Watervliet 25 00 

Way land 13 36 

Wheatland 10 25 

Whittaker, Mrs. L. A. H. Childs 20 00 

Williamston 15 70 

Sale of parsonage at Atwood, and rent. 308 94 
W. H. M. U., by Mrs. E. F. Grabill, 

Treas 672 75 



FOR THE DEBT 

Alba 

Almont, Y. P. S. C. E 

Bellaire, Y. P. S. C. E 

Ceresco, Rev. W. D. King 

Charlevoix 

Clinton 

Clio, Y. P. S. C. E 

Columbus, Rev. W. I. Hunt 



2,055 I2 



2 00 
10 00 

10 00 

15 CO 
5 00 
5 00 



Copemish, G. H. Marzolf. . , 

Dorr, Y. P. S. C. E 

Eastlake, S. S 

Eastman ville 

East Paris „. 

Greenville, Mrs. E. Middleton, by W. 

H. M. U 

Hartland 

Hilliards, S. S 

Hopkins, S. L. Ingerson 

Hudson, Y. P. S. C. E 

Hudson ville 

Jr. Y. P.S.C. E 

Y. P. Mission 

Kalkaska. 

Lake Linden, Y. P. S. C. E 

Lamont, Ladies' Soc 

Lansing, Pilgrim S. S 

Leland, Mr. and Mrs. John Porter 

Leonidas, S. S 

Manistee, R. G. Peters 

Memphis, W. M. S 

Michigan 

Northport, S. S 

Y. P. S. C. E 

Onondaga, S. S 

Ovid 

Rondo, Y. P. S. C. E. 

Sandstone 

Saranac, S. S 

South Haven 

South Jefferson, Y. P. S. C. E 

Stanton, J. W. S. Pierson 

Vienna, Rev. S. Vaughan 

Watervliet 

Wolverine 

S.S 

MEMORIAL FUND 

Dexter, Dea. Dennis Warner, in mem- 
ory of Prof. Joseph Estabrook 

Olivet, Ch., in memory of " Father 

Shipherd " 

Prof. J. L. Daniels, in memory of 

Prof. Estabrook 

Edwin Ely, in memory of Israel N. 
and Emily B. Ely 

Miss Margaret Thompson, in memory 
of Rev. O. C. Thompson 



Receipts of Woman's Home Missionary 
Union in March, 1898, by Mrs. E. 
F. Grabill, Treas.: 



Alpena, W. H. M. S., of "Farmer 
Memorial Fund " 

Ann Arbor, W. H. M. S 

Baroda, W. M. S 

Benton Harbor, W. M. S 

Benzonia, W. H. M. S 

Bronson, W. H. M. S 

Clinton, W. M. S 

Covert, W. M. S 

Detroit, First, W. A 

Fort Street, L. A. S 

Dundee, W. H. M. S 

Frankfort, W. H. M. S 

Grand Blanc, W. M. S 

Grand Rapids, South. W. M. S 

Park,W. H. M. S 

Grass Lake, W. H. M. S 

Greenville, W. H. M. S .'. 

Highland Station, W. M. S 

Hudson, W. M. S 

Kendall, W. H. M. S 

Lamont, W. M. S 

Lansing, Plymouth, L. S 

Lawrence, W. H. M. S 

Leslie, First, W. M. S 



$5 00 
1 00 

5 o° 
1 30 
5 00 

10 00 

5 °° 

1 72 

2 00 

6 00 

2 75 
1 00 
1 25 

3 °° 

11 00 
10 00 

3 °3 
5 00 
1 00 

50 00 

4 46 
50 00 

5 00 

1 00 

2 00 
20 00 

3 21 
25 

1 5° 
10 00 

1 00 

2 00 
5 00 

15 00 
5 00 
2 47 



50 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


20 


00 


10 


00 


414 94 



25 00 
27 00 

5 00 
12 00 

7 66 
7 20 

10 00 

11 00 
60 00 

10 00 

^9 73 
9 10 
1 60 

6 00 
60 00 

11 5° 

4 10 
9 00 

5 50 
14 33 

1 00 

6 00 
S 75 

29 75 



So 



The Home Missionary 



July, 1 890 



Litchfield, L. M. S 


$9 75 


Ludington. W. H. M. S. . . 


43 69 


Michigan Center, L. A. S 


5 45 


Morenci, W. M . S 


8 00 


Muskegon, Jackson Street, W. M. S.. 


2 00 


Grand Avenue, W. M. S 




Napoleon, Member of the Church. . . . 


8 25 


North Adams, W. M. S 


14 00 


North Leoni, W. M. S 


S 00 


Olivet, L. B. S 


40 00 




4 00 


Onekama. W. H. M. S 


5 °° 


Owosso, W. M. U., of which $1 is 






25 60 


Pontiac, W. M. S 


6 00 


Prattville, W. M. S 


10 CO 


Red Jacket, W. M. S 


11 25 


Rochester, W. M. S 


5 °° 




60 00 


Shelby, C. L. A. S 


10 00 


Somerset Center, W. M. S 


5 °° 


Union City, W. H. M. U 


24 80 


Vermontville, W. H. M. S 


9 37 


Victor, W. M. S 


3 10 



West Adrian. W. M. S. 
Whittaker, W. H M. S 
Ypsilanti, W. H. M. S.. 



YOUNG PEOPLES FIND 

Bronson. Y. P. S. C. E 

Charlotte. Helping Hand Miss. Band 

Chelsea, Y. P. S. C. E 

Grand Rapids, March Band of S. S. . . 

Laingsburg, Y. P. S. C. E 

Jun. Y. P. S. C. E 

Muskegon, First, Y. P. S. C. E 

North Adams, Y. P. S. C. E 

Somerset, Y. P. S. C. E 

Vermontville, Y. P. S. C. E 

Whittaker, Children's Miss. Band 

Ypsilanti, Y. L. M, S 



5 00 
3 28 



689 76 



5 


00 


2 


00 


20 


00 


6 


[< . 


3 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


5 


76 


4 


95 


1 


00 


'5 


00 


$71 


81 



$761 57 



Received in April, 1898 



Alamo $8 55 

Alba 2 1 00 

Algansee. 5 37 

Allendale 5 00 

Almont 59 88 

Y. P. S. C. E 4 95 

Alpine and Walker 1050 

Ann Arbor 17 87 

Armada 38 50 

Atlanta 2 60 

Augusta 13 00 

Bancroft 5 00 

Bangor, First 2 00 

Bass River 1 80 

Bay Mills 12 75 

Belding. $1.30; S. S., $1.00 ; Y. P. S. 

C. E., $3.00 5 30 

Belf ord 11 50 

Benzonia, $98.38 ; Y. P. S. C. E., $5.00. 103 38 

Big Prairie 5 00 

Big Rapids, First 19 00 

Township 6 00 

Big Rock 2 00 

Cadillac 69 37 

Cannon 10 00 

Carsonville 85 

Cedar Springs 16 00 

Central Lake u 50 

Charlevoix, $29.28; S. S., $3.91 ; Jr. C. 

E., $1.00 34 19 

Charlotte 32 90 

Chase 825 

Chassell, Y. P. S. C. E 3 70 

Cheboygan 13 68 

Chesterfield 10 60 

Chippewa Lake, $1.60; D. N. Snod- 

grass, $6.00. 7 60 

Clarksville 8 65 

Coral 16 29 

Corinth 7 50 

Crystal 601 

Custer 11 10 

Deep River 4 n 

Detroit, First, S. S 20 24 

Woodward Ave 217 21 

Brewster 26 10 

Canfield Ave 60 

Dexter, $10.30 ; S. S., $2.87 ; Y. P. S. 

C. E., $1.70 14 87 

Dorr 14 00 

Dowagiac 8 00 

Durand 6 44 

East Gilead 12 03 



East Nelson $4 00 

East Paris 625 

Eastport. $8.co ; S. S.. Si. 00 9 00 

Eaton Rapids, $10 ; Y. PS. C. E.. $5.. 15 00 

Edmore 11 00 

Ellsworth 400 

Essexville. $14.80 ; Mrs. J. B. Dawson, 

70c; Y. P. S. C. E, $1.30 16 80 

Evven 2 00 

Excelsior 4 50 

Fisher's Station 5 00 

Flat Rock 2 25 

Flint, S. S 1 78 

Fredonia 8 28 

Freeland 100 

Fruitport, S. S 1 50 

Galesburg, $16.76 ; Y. P. S. C. E., 

$3.50 2026 

Garden 3 00 

Gaylord 17 66 

Gladstone, S. S 635 

Grand Junction 5 00 

Grand Rapids. First. $300 ; Smith 
Mem.. $9: Plymouth. $19.55; Y. P. 

S. C. E, $3.45 332 00 

East 360 

Grand ville 4 78 

Greenville 16725 

Helena 1 60 

Highland Station 5 72 

Homestead 12 60 

Honor, $6.96 ; S. S., $2.50 9 46 

Imlay City 2600 

Irving 9 50 

Jackson, Plym. Y. P. S. C. E., $5.08 ; 

Jr. Y. P. S. C. E.,$ 5 .oo; S. S., $553; 

Perrine Y. P. S. C. E.,$2 17 61 

Jefferson 1 43 

Johnstown and Barry 10 00 

Kalamazoo 64 41 

Kalamo, $5 ; S. S., $1.90 6 90 

Kalkaska "39 

Lacey 5 00 

Laingsburg 8 66 

Lake Odessa 5 50 

Lakevie w 25 00 

Lansing, Plymouth 12 00 

Leroy 925 

Leslie, First, $7.45 ; Second, $10 17 45 

Litchfield, Y. P. S. C. E 1000 

Lowell 15 20 

Mancelona 26 32 

Manistee 41 49 



July, ii 



The Home Missionary 



Michigan Center, $12.50; Y. P. S.C. E., 

50c $13 00 

Middleville 32 31 

Minden City 1 00 

Morenci 21 20 

Muskegon, First S3 57 

Grand Avenue 2 65 

Jackson Street 2 72 

New Baltimore, Y. P. S. C. E 2 50 

New Haven n 00 

North Leoni, $7.29 ; Y. P. S. C. E., $2.50 9 79 

Old Mission 20 00 

Olivet 135° 

Otsego, $6.85 ; S. S., $1.63 ; Y. P. S. C. 

E., $1.50 9 98 

Owosso 26 67 

Oxford 23 00 

Perry, $14.17 ;' Y. P. S. C. E., $2.00 ; Jr. 

Y. P. S. C. E., $1.00 17 17 

Pinckney 7 50 

Pittsford 10 00 

Port Huron, First 293 68 

Ross Memorial 28 00 

Portland 17 81 

S. S 199 

Y. P. S. C. E 2 23 

Port Sanilac 1 50 

Potterville 5 00 

Prattville 8 50 

Ransom 10 10 

Rapid River 217 

Reed City 19 15 

Richmond 2985 

Rochester 5 00 

Rockwood 1 50 

Romeo 41 19 

Roscommon 685 

Saginaw 140 00 

St. Clair, $38 ; Y. P. S. C. E., $10 ; Jr. 

Y. P. S. C. E., $10 58 00 

St. Joseph 46 00 

Saranac 12 00 

Saugatuck 5 50 

Sault Ste. Marie 2900 

Sidney 1 65 

Standish 6 50 

Sugar Island, $8.25 ; S. S., $2 10 25 

Traverse City 25 00 

Vermontville 35 45 

Vicksburg 10 50 

Victor 20 57 

Vienna n 35 

Wacousta 4 00 

West Branch 321 

White Cloud 10 00 

Wolverine 34 5° 

Wyandotte, $15.22 : Y. P. S. C. E. $5.. 20 22 
Ypsilanti, $75.50 : Y. P. S. C. E., $15 ; 

Jr. Y. P. S. C. E., $1.00 91 50 

A Friend 10 00 

Rent of Atwood parsonage 4 00 

Interest on Permanent Funds 129 45 

W. H. M. U., by Mrs. E. F. Grabill, Tr. 855 39 

4,293 61 

FOR THE DEBT 



Addison, S. S., $2; Miss Grace Snyder, 

$1 

Alamo 

Alba 

Allendale, S. S 

Alpine Center, S. S 

Ann Arbor 

Armada 

Athens, S. S., $1; Rev. H. A. Decker, $5 

Atlanta, S. S 

Augusta, $10; Y. P. S. C. E., $1 

Bancroft, S. S 

Bangor, West, S. S , 

Bass River, S. S 

Bay City, $1.98; W. H. M. U., $5.50. . . . 
Bay Mills, S. S 



3 00 
5 °° 
10 50 
2 00 



5 °° 

6 00 



11 00 
3 °° 

5° 
7 48 
1 25 



Belding $500 

Bellaire 325 

Benton Harbor, L. M.S., per W.H.M.U. 4 00 

Bethel, S. S ,- 1 00 

Bradley, $1; S. S., 87c 1 87 

Breckenridge, S. S 2 44 

Bridgeport 7 00 

Butternut. . . 5 00 

Cadillac 600 

Calumet, $10 ; Y, P. S. C. E., $25 35 00 

Carmel, S. S 1 87 

Carson City, S. S 1 00 

Central Lake, $5; S. S., $1.50 6 50 

Ceresco, W. M. S„ by W. H. M. U 4 00 

Charlevoix, Y. P. S. C. E 3 50 

Charlotte B. Smits 5 co 

Chassell, S. S 5 06 

Chelsea, $43; Jr. C. E., $5 48 00 

Chesterfield, S. S 310 

Clarksville, S. S 2 00 

Clinton, S. S., $7 ; W. S. Kimball, $50.. 57 00 

Columbus 5 00 

Constantine, S. S 2 23 

Cooper 4 50 

Copemish, S. S 85 

Covert, L. M. S., by W. H. M. U., $3; 
A Friend, W. H. M. U., $2; Rev. J. 

P. Barrett, $2 700 

Crystal, $2.75 ; Rev. N. L. Otis, $1 3 75 

Custer, S. S., $2.25; Y. P. S. C. E., $2. . 4 25 

Detroit, First 550 00 

Woodward Ave 200 00 

People's 437 

Fort St., S. S 5 00 

Mt. Hope, S. S 3 50 

Brewster, S. S 767 

Boulevard 641 

Miss M., by W. H. M. U 2 00 

Dorr, Ladies' Soc, by W. H. M. U., $5 ; 

D. V. Goodspeed, $10 15 00 

Dundee, Y. P. S. C. E., $3; Ladies' 

Miss. Soc, $2 500 

Durand, $5 ; S. S., $2.11 711 

East Fulton, S. S 1 00 

East Gilead 1 00 

East Newton, S. S 1 10 

Eastport 6 50 

Eaton Rapids, Y. P. S. C. E 5 00 

Ellsworth, $1; S. S., $1.50 2 50 

Essexville 3 07 

Flat Rock, S. S 2 10 

Flint 18 22 

Frankfort, S. S 1 80 

Freeport 3 73 

Fruitport 1 75 

Galesburg, S. S 5 00 

Garden 2 00 

Gaylord 30 00 

Grand Blanc, by W. H. M. U., $i.6o; S. 

S., $3-15 4 75 

Grand Haven, S. S 3 03 

Grand Junction, S. S 1 00 

Grand Ledge, S. S., $4-65; Prof- E. J. 

Quackenbush. $1 5 65 

Grand Rapids, First 157 50 

S. S 10 00 

Mrs. A. B. Judd 2500 

J. B. Martin 5 00 

South, S. S 3 25 

Grape 5 00 

Grass Lake 9 00 

Hamburg, S. S 1 67 

Hancock, S. S 33 61 

Harrison, $2.50; W. M. S., $1; Y. P. S. 

C. E., $1; S. S.. $1 5 50 

Hart, W. M.S., by W. H. M. U 8 00 

Helena, 84c. ; S. S., $2.55 3 39 

Highland Station 3 88 

Hopkins, First 5 00 

Hopkins Station, Anonymous 1 25 

Hudson, $101.01 : S. S., $2.80 103 81 

Hudsonville, W. A. Briggs 5 00 

Iron ton, S. S 1 30 

Jackson, First 97 46 



82 



The Home Missionary 



July, 



Kalamazoo 

W. M. S.,by W. H. M. U 

Kalkaska 

Kendall 

Kinderhook 

Lacey , S. S 

Lacota, S. S 

Laingsburg 

Lake Ann, $1.36; S. S., 30c 

Lake Linden, S. S 

Lake Odessa, Y. P. S. C. E., $1.60; S. 

S.,$s 

Lamont, Y. P. S. C. E., $5 ; S. S., $5... 
Lansing, Plymouth, $88.50 ; Y. P. S. 

C.E.,$3 

Leroy 

Lewiston 

Linden, S. S 

Manistee, Y. P. S. C. E 

Maple City 

Mattawan, S. S 

Mattison, S. S 

Merrill 

Metamora, S. S 

Michigan Center, S. S 

Middleville, Y. P. S. C. E 

Millbrook, $1.75 ; S. S., 40c 

Milieu's, S. S 

Minden City, S. S 

Morenci, S. S 

Muskegon, First, $40; Grand Ave., $1.76 
Nashville, $2.50; S. S., $2-5°; Mrs.Brice, 

for A. T. Waterman, $5 

New Baltimore, 75 cts.; S. S., $3.25 ; Y. 

P. S. C. E., $2.50 

Nunica, $1.25 ; S. S., $1.17 

Oakwood 

Old Mission, S. S 

Olivet, Mrs. C. H. Stow, by W. H. M. U. 

Omena 

Omena, S. S 

Onondaga, $6; S. S., $1.52 

Perry 

Pine Grove, S. S 

Pontiac, S. S 

Port Sanilac, S. S 

Rapid River 

Red Jacket, S. S 

Richmond, $2.50; S. S., $1.20 

Rodney 

Roscommon. I. W. Bell 

Rosedale. S. S 

Royal Oak, $2.30; S. S.. $1 

St. Clair, $10; W. M. S., $15.50; Y. P. S. 

C. E.,$s 

St. Joseph. S. S 

Salem, First, S. S 

Sandstone 

Shelby, S. S 

Sheridan, Y. P. S. C. E., $1.50; Jr. C. 

E., $2 

Sherman. S. S 

Solon Church and S. S 

Somerset, S. S 

South Boston. S. S 

South Haven, Y. P. S. C. E., by W. H. 

M. U 

South Lake Linden, $4.35; S. S., $7.25. 

Stand ish 

Sugar Island, Mother McKinney 

Superior, S. S 

Thompsonville, S. S 

Three Oaks, S. S 

Travers City 

Union City. $24 : Y. P. S. C. E., $3. . . . 

Vanderbilt, S. S 

Vernon, S. S 

Vestaburg 

Victor 

Wayland, $2.17 ; S. S., $1.32 

Wheatland 

White Cloud 

Whitehall, $5.66 ; S. S., $2.16; Y. P. S. 

C.E.,$ 4 .o 3 



M 25 

25 00 

2 00 

6 00 

2 37 

1 20 

2 60 
8 69 
1 66 

4 00 

6 60 
10 00 

91 50 

7 33 
1 5° 
1 26 

10 00 

5 00 

3 15 
87 

4 00 



5 


00 


2 


15 
Sg 




33 


3 
41 


77 
76 


10 


00 


6 


50 


2 


42 


7 


2 5 


2 


74 


4 


00 


5 


30 




70 


7 


52 


5 


00 


2 


00 


8 


30 


1 


75 
65 


15 


39 


3 

1 


70 
60 


1 


00 


1 


06 


3 


3° 


3° 
tg 


5° 
98 



3 


SO 


1 


70 


5 





3 

1 


5" 
68 


5 
n 


00 
60 


5 


00 


5 


00 


1 


°S 


3 


00 


*S 


CO 


7 


50 


27 


00 


2 


40 


7 


17 




95 
98 


3 


49 


12 


22 


5 


00 



W'hittaker, $4.50 ; S. S., 60c 

Ypsilanti, S4 ; S. S., $3.06 

North Central Association 

Southern Association 

A Friend 

A Friend 

Collection at Annual Meeting 



MEMORIAL FUND 

Alpena, W. M. S., by the W. H. M. U., 
in memory of Miss Julia F. Farwell .. 
Ann Arbor, Mrs. J. W. Bradshaw, in 
memory of Mrs. Mary B. Blood, for 
many years wife of a home mission- 
ary in Kansas 

W. M. S., by W. H. M. U., in memory 

of Mrs. J. R. Miner 

Bay City, in memory of Rev. W. W. 

Lyle 

Bridgeport, Conn., Mrs. Jennie R. Bird, 

in memory of Rev. C. W. Bird 

Charlotte, Church, in memory of Rev. 

C. W. Mallory 

S. S., in memory of F. S. Belcher 

Mrs. F. S. Belcher, in memory of F. 

S. Belcher 

Y. P. S. C. E., in memory of Miss 
Dora S. Hart 

Wm. H. Reynolds, in memory of Her- 
bert N. Reynolds 

Herbert Reynolds, in memory of Mrs. 

Kate E. Reynolds 

Chelsea, Thomas S. Sears, in memory of 

Dr. Thomas Sears 

Clinton, Church, in memory of Dea. A. 

P. Halladay 

Grand Rapids, First, Mis. J. Morgan 
Smith, in memory of Rev. J. Morgan 
Smith 

Mrs. Emma Bingham Winegar, in 
memory of Dr. David and Mrs. Mary 
Smith Bingham 

Mrs. Ann Smith, in memory of Thomas 
Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Ferris and children, 
in memory of Dea. William Hal- 
dane 

Mrs. Allen Durfee, in memory of her 
husband 

Women's Missionary Societies, in 
memory of Mrs. William Miller .... 

Mrs. A. B. Judd, in memory of Mary 
A. Plumley 

Smith Memorial, in memory of Rev. 

H. A. Mclntyre 

Greenville, Mrs. H. Hamper's S. S. 
Class, in memory of their former 
teacher, Mrs. Susan M. Savage 

Salem Workers' Union, in memory of 
Mrs. S. C. Woodruff 

Jr. Y. P. S. C. E., in memory of Rev. 
Charles Spooner 

Y. P. S. C. E., in memory of Rev. 
James L. Patton 

Mrs. C. C. Ellsworth's Bible Class, in 

memory of J. M. Fuller 

Hancock, S. S., in memory of Dr. J. M. 
Rhodes 

In memory of Rev. E. R. Stiles 

In memory of Rev. Mr. Hollister 

In memory of Miss Christian Thomas 

In memory of Rev. B. S. Taylor 

Hopkins Station, D. B. Kidder, in mem- 
ory of Rev. J. S. Kidder 

S. S., in memory of Boyd H., son of 

D. B. Kidder 

Rev. F. W. Bush, in memorv of F. E. 

and CM. Bush ' 

Hudson, Church, in memory of Rev. T. 
G. Colton 

Jackson, Mrs. L. M. Kassick, in mem- 
ory of Latham Kassick 



7 06 
6 46 

8 78 
5 00 

20 00 
46 99 



10 


CO 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


s 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 



10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 



12 50 
IO 67 
16 56 

25 97 
10 00 

10 00 

IO OQ 

5 00 

IO 00 
IO 00 



fuly, 189^ 



The Home Missionary 



83 



S. S., in memory of Rev. G. L. Foster $10 00 
S. S., in memory of Rev. J. W. Hough 10 00 
Plymouth, Mrs. G. R. Foster, in mem- 
ory of Mrs. Laura Backman 10 00 

Laingsburg, Mrs. Whitney's S. S. Class, 
by W. H. M. U., in memory of Miss 

Emily Tillitson 2 00 

Lansing, Plymouth, Rev. William Ew- 
ing and family, in memory of Rev. 

W. H. Allworth 10 00 

Mrs. Clara P. Hopkins, in memory of 

her father, Nathan D. Potter 10 00 

Pilgrim, Rev. Ernest Bourner Allen, 

in memory of George Ladd Allen 

and Mrs. Harriet Bourner Allen. ... 20 00 

Litchfield, W. M. S., by W. H. M. U., in 

memory of Mrs. Pamelia Johnston 

Smith 10 00 

Ludington, W. M. S., by W. H. M. U., 

in memory of Rev. I. W. McKeever.. 10 00 
Memphis, Church, in memory of Rev. 
W. P. Russell and Rev. W. H. All- 
worth 11 40 

Olivet, George N. Ellis, in memory of 

Mrs. Achsah M. Ellis 10 00 

Rev. James A. Blaisdell, in memory of 

Prof. J. J. Blaisdell 10 00 

Rev. Henry Marsh, in memory of Mrs. 

Eliza Bordwell '. 10 00 

Owosso, W. M. S., by W. H. M. U., in 
honor of "Auntie Marshall," an hon- 
orary member, who recently celebrated 

her 90th birthday 10 00 

Pontiac, L. M. S., by W. H. M. U., in 
honor of " Aunty Gilmore," an hon- 
orary member, on her 88th birthday. . 13 00 
Port Huron, First, Stephen Moore and 
family, in memory of Mrs. Eliza 

Moore 100 00 

Y. P. S. C. E., in memory of Rev. A. 

Hastings Ross 10 00 

Portland, Church, in memory of Rev. C. 

W. Bird 10 00 

Potterville, George and Sarah A. John- 
son, in memory of their daughter, 

Mrs. Genevieve Johnson Teman 10 00 

Rochester, Church, in memory of Rev. 

Isaac W. Ruggles 10 00 

Saginaw, W. M. S., by W. H. M. U., in 

memory of Mrs. Eugene Wilber. ... 10 00 

A Friend, in memory of Mrs. Eugene 

Wilber 20 00 

St. Clair, Mark Hopkins, in memory of 

Mrs. S. F. Hopkins 100 00 

Mrs. H. S. Dale and George Smith, in 

memory of Mrs. Eugene Smith 10 00 

South Boston, Church, in memory of 

Mrs. Amelia Coller 10 00 

South Lake Linden, W. H. M. S.,by W. 
H. M. U., in memory of Dea. Joseph 

Jenkin 15 00 

Three Oaks, W. M. S., by W. H. M. U., 

in memory of Mrs. C. C. Warren 10 00 

Union City, Mrs. Julia Hobart Willard, 

in memory of Rev. L. S. Hobart 10 00 

Vicksburg, Mrs. L. A. Van Antwerp, in 
memory of Dea. F. Sprague, Augusta 10 00 



Williamston, Church, in memory of Dea. 

N. C. Branch 

Woman's Home Missionary Union, in 

memory of Mrs. Emaline A. House.. . 

Total of Mem. Fund 



Receipts of the W. H. M. U, of Michi- 
gan, for Home Missions, in April, 
1898, by Mrs. E. F. Grabill, Treas.: 



SENIOR FUND 

Bay City, W. A 

Benzonia, W. H. M. S 

Ceresco, W. M. S., for the debt 

Charlotte, L. B. & M. S 

Detroit, Woodward Ave., W. U 

Dorr, W. H. M. S., for the debt 

Grand Rapids, Park, W. H. M. U. . . . 

Second, W. M. S 

Plymouth, W. M. S 

Greenville, W. H. M. S 

Jackson, First, W. H. M. S. 

Kalamazoo, W. H. M. U., for the debt 

Lake Odessa, W. H. M. S 

Maple City, W. M. S 

Muskegon, W. M. S 

Pinckney, L. A. S 

Portland, W. M. S. and other ladies of 

the church 

Reed City. W. M. S 

Saginaw, W. S 

St. John's, W. A 

Salem, First, W. H. M. S 

Tipton, W. H. &F. M. S.. 

Victor, W. H. M. S 

Wyandotte, W. M. S 

Ypsilanti, W. H. M. S 

Interest on Notes 



YOUNG PEOPLES FUND 



E.. 



Cooper, Y. W. M. S 

Grass Lake, Y. P. S. C. E. 

Greenville, Sr., Y. P. S. C. 

Jun. Mission Band 

Cong. S. S 

Kinderhook, S. S., " Easter Offering " 

Laingsburg, Mrs.Whitney'sS. S. Class, 
in memory of their classmate, Miss 
Evelyn Tillotson, for the debt 

Pontiac, Y. L. M. S., in honor of 
Auntie Gilmore, an honorary mem- 
ber, on her 88th birthday, for the 
debt 

South Haven, Y. P. S. C. E., for the 
debt ,.., 



6 


i.S 


4 


75 


4 


00 


25 


00 


37 


5° 


5 


00 


10 


00 


16 


00 


2 


00 


S 


50 


22 


7i 


25 


00 


4 


5° 


6 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


9 


52 


9 


55 


90 


00 


7 25 


2 


00 


10 


00 


1 


70 


20 


00 


8 


47 


75 


00 



7 00 
5 co 
5 00 
1 40 
20 co 
1 25 




Received in May 



Alpine Center" 

Clarksville 

Detroit, First 

East Fulton 

Sandstone, $5.50 ; Y. P. S. C. E., $1.50. . 

West Adrian 

Wheatland, A. W. Douglas 

W. H. M. U., by Mrs. E. F. Grabill, Tr. 



$7 40 FOR THE DEBT 
I 92 

250 00 Ann Arbor, $27; Mrs. J. W. Bradshaw, 

270 $10 $3700 

7 00 Athens, H. A. Deeker 5 00 

15 00 Augusta 10 00 

5 00 Bay City 10 00 

20 00 Bridgeport 7 00 

Calumet 10 00 

S309 02 Chelsea 1 00 



8 4 



The Home Missionary 



July, 1898 



Covert, J. P. Barrett $2 00 

Crystal, N. L. Otis 1 00 

Detroit, First 675 00 

Dorr, D. V. Goodspeed 10 00 

Eastport 2 00 

Freeport 373 

Gaylord 5 00 

Grand Rapids, First, $222.50; Smith 

Memorial, $10 232 50 

Hopkins Station, Rev. F. W. Bush 5 co 

Hudson 1 n 01 

Hudson ville, W. A. Briggs 500 

Kalamazoo. First 28 25 

Laingsburg 1 00 

Lansing, Plymouth 3 00 



Nashville, Mrs. M. R. Brice $5 00 

Onondaga 6 00 

St. Clair, Mark Hopkins. $100; C. F. 

Moore, $10; Mrs. H. S. Dale and Geo. 

Smith, $10 120 00 

Saginaw 20 00 

Sandstone 5 00 

Collection at Grand Rapids 46 99 

A Friend 5 oj 

A Friend 20 00 

Mrs. J. R. Bird, Bridgeport, Conn 10 00 

W. H. M. U., by Mrs. E. F. Grabill, Tr. 81 00 



$1,483 48 



WOMAN'S STATE HOME MISSIONARY 
ORGANIZATIONS 



OFFICERS 



1. NEW HAMPSHIRE 

FEMALE CENT INSTITUTION 

Organized August, 1804 

and 

HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized June, 1890 

President, Mrs. Cyrus Sargeant. Plymouth. 
Secretary^ Mrs. M. W. Nims, 16 Rumlord St., 

Concord. 
Treasurer, Miss Annie A. McFarland, 196 No. 

Main St., Concord. 

2. MINNESOTA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized September, 1872 

President, Miss Catherine W. Nichols. 230 E. 9th 

St.. St. Paul. 
Secretary, Mrs. A. P. Lyon, 910 Sixth Ave., S., 

Minneapolis. 
Treasurer, Mrs. M. W. Skinner, Northfield. 



5. MAINE 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY AUXILIARY 

Organized June, 1880 

President, Mrs. Katherine B. Lewis. So. Berwick. 

Secretary, Mrs. Gertrude H. Denio, 168 Ham- 
mond St., Bangor. 

Treasurer, Mrs. Rose M. Crosby, 64 Grove St., 
Bangor. 



6. MICHIGAN 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1881 

President, Mrs. I. P. Powell, 76 Jefferson Ave., 

Grand Rapids. 
Secretary, Mrs. E. N. Thorne, 212 So. Union St., 

Grand Rapids. 
Treasurer, Mrs. E. F. Grabill, Greenville. 



3. ALABAMA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized March, 1877 

Reorganized April, 1889 

President. Mrs. G. W. Andrews, Talladega. 
Secretary , Mrs. J. S. Jackson. Montgomery. 
Treasurer, Mrs. E. C. Silsby, Talladega. 

4. MASSACHUSETTS AND RHODE 
ISLAND * 
WTJMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY ASSOCIA- 
TION 
Organized February, 1880 

President, Mrs. C. L. Goodell. 32 Congregational 
House. Boston. 

Secretary, Mrs. Louise A. Kellogg, 32 Congrega- 
tional House. Boston. 

Treasurer, Miss Annie C. Bridgman, 32 Congre- 
gational House, Boston. 

* While the W. H. M. A. appears in the above 
Island, it has certain auxiliaries elsewhere. 



7. KANSAS 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1881 

President, Mrs. F. J. Storrs, Topeka. 
Secretary, Mrs. M. H. Jaquith, 1157 Fillmore St., 

Topeka. 
Treasurer, Mrs. F. A. Wilkinson, Ottawa. 



8. OHIO - 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized May, 1882 

President, Mrs C. W. Carroll, 48 Brookfield St., 

Cleveland. 
Secretary, Mrs. J. W. Moore, 515 The Ellington, 

Cleveland. 
Treasurer, Mrs. George B. Brown, 21 16 Warren 
St., Toledo. 

list as a State body for Massachusetts and Rhode 



July, li 



The Home Missionary 



85 



9. NEW YORK 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1883 



15. CONNECTICUT 

"WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized January, 18S5 



President, Mrs. Wm. Kincaid, 483 Greene Ave., President, Miss Ellen R. Camp, 9 Camp St., New- 
Brooklyn. Britain. 

Secretary, Mrs. Wm. Spalding, 511 Orange St., Secretary, Mrs. C. T. Millard, 36 Lewis St., 

Syracuse. Hartford. 

Treasurer, Mrs. J. J. Pearsall, 153 Decatur St., Treasurer, Mrs. W. W. Jacobs, 530 Farmington 

Brooklyn. Ave., Hartford. 



10. WISCONSIN 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1883 

President, Mrs. E. G. Updike, Madison. 
Secretary, Mrs. A. O. Wright, Madison. 
Treaszirer, Mrs. L. E. Smith, Madison. 



11. NORTH DAKOTA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized November, 1883 

President, Mrs. N. M. Lander, Wahpeton. 
Secretary, Mrs. Silas Daggett, Harwood. 
Treasurer, Mrs. J. M. Fisher, Fargo. 



12. OREGON 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized July, 1884 

President, Mrs. F. Eggert, The Hill, Portland. 
Cor. Sec, Mrs. D. D. Clarke, 447 E. 12th St., No. 

Portland. 
Treasurer, Mrs. C. F. Clapp, Forest Grove. 



13. WASHINGTON 

Including Northern Idaho 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized July, 1884 

Reorganized June, 1889 

President, Mrs. A. Judson Bailey, 1614 Second 

Ave., Seattle. 
Secretary, Mrs. W. C. Wheeler, 424 South K St., 

Tacoma. 
Treasurer, Mrs. W. D. Wood, Holyoke Block, 

Seattle. 



16. MISSOURI 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1885 

President, Mrs. Henry Hopkins, 916 Holmes St. 

Kansas City. 
Secretary, Mrs. L. F. Doane, 3319 East Ninth St. 

Kansas City. 
Treasurer, Mrs. K. L. Mills, 1526 Wabash Ave. 

Kansas City. 



17. ILLINOIS 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1885 

President, Mrs. Isaac Claflin, Lombard. 
Secretary, Mrs. A. O. Whitcomb, 463 Irving Ave.. 

Chicago. 
Treasurer, Mrs. L. A. Field, Wilmette. 



18. IOWA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized June, 1886 

President, Mrs. L. F. Berry. Ottumwa. 
Secretary, Mrs. H. H. Robbins. Grinnell. 
Treasurer, Miss Belle L. Bentley, W. Grand Ave., 
Des Moines. 



19. CALIFORNIA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Organized October, 1887 

President, Mrs. E. S. Williams, Saratoga. 

Secretary, Mrs. F. B. Perkins, 546 24th St., Oak- 
land. 

Treasurer, Mrs. J. M. Haven, 1329 Harrison St., 
Oakland. 



14. SOUTH DAKOTA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized September, 1884 

President, Mrs. C. E. Corry, Columbia. 
Secretary, Mrs. K. M. Jenney, Huron. 
Treasurer, Mrs. F. M. Wilcox, Huron. 



20. NEBRASKA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized November, 1887 

President. Mrs. D. B. Perry, Crete. 
Secretary, Mrs. H. Bross. 2904 Q St., Lincoln. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Charlotte C. Hall, 1318 C St. 
Lincoln, 



86 



The Home Missionary 



July, 1898 



31. FLORIDA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized February, 1888 

President, Mrs. S. F. Gale. Jacksonville. 
Secretary, Mrs. J. H. Phillips, Melbourne. 
Treasurer, Mrs. W. D. Brown, Interlachen. 



27. GEORGIA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized November, 1888 

President, Mrs. H. B. Wey, 253 Forest Ave., 
Atlanta. 

Secretary, Mrs. H. A. Kellam, 176 Ivy St., At- 
lanta. 

Treasurer, — 



22. INDIANA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1888 

President, Mrs. W. A. Bell, 223 Broadway, In- 
dianapolis. 
Secretary, Mrs. D. F. Coe, Elkhart. 
Treasurer, Mrs. A. H. Ball, Anderson. 



28. MISSISSIPPI 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized April, 1889 

President, Mrs. C. L. Harris, 1421 31st Ave., Me- 
ridian. 

Secretary. 

Treasurer, Mrs. L. H. Turner, 3112 12th St., Me- 
ridian. 



23. SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized May, 1888 

President, Mrs. Warren F. Day, 949 So. Hill St., 

Los Angeles. 
Secretary, Mrs. Kate G. Robertson. Mentone. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Mary M. Smith, Public Library, 

Riverside. 



24. VERMONT 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized June, 1888 

President, Mrs. W. J, Van Patten, 386 Pearl St., 

Burlington. 
Secretary, Mrs. M. K. Paine, Windsor. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Rebecca P. Fairbanks, St. Johns 

bury. 



25. COLORADO 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1888 

Hon. Pres., Mrs. J. W. Pickett, Whitewater. 
President, Mrs. E. R. Drake, 2739 Lafayette St. 

Denver. 
Secretary, Mrs. Addison Blanchard, 309 31st Ave. 

Denver. 
Treasurer, Mrs. B. C. Valentine, Highlands. 



26. WYOMING 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1888 

Reorganized December, 1892 

President. Mrs. F. W. Powelson. Cheyenne. 
Secretary, Mrs. W. L. Whipple. Cheyenne. 
Treasurer, Mrs. J. M. Brown. Wheatland. 



29. LOUISIANA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized April, 1889 

President. Mrs. L. St. J. Hitchcock, 2436 Canal St., 

New Orleans. 
Secretary, Mrs. Matilda Cabrere, 2419 Conti St., 

New Orleans. 
Treasurer, Miss Mary L. Rogers, 2436 Canal St., 

New Orleans. 



30. ARKANSAS, KENTUCKY, AND TEN- 
NESSEE 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION OF THE 
CENTRAL SOUTH ASSOCIATION 

Organized April, 1889 

President, Mrs. Ella S. Moore, Box 8, Fisk Uni- 
versity, Nashville. Tenn. 

Secretary, Miss Mary L. Corpier, Florence. Ala. 

Treasurer, Mrs. J. E. Moreland, 216 N. McNairy 
St., Nashville, Tenn. 



31. NORTH CAROLINA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1889 

President, Mrs. S. S. Sevier, McLeansville. 
Secretary ) 

and -Miss A. E. Farrington, Oaks. 
Treasurer, ) 



32. TEXAS 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized March, 1890 

President, Mrs. J. M. Wendelkin, Dallas. 
Secretary, Mrs. Luther Rees. Paris. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Eunice Heflin, Sherman. 



July, 1898 



The Home Missionary 



33. MONTANA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1890 

President, Mrs. V. F. Clark, Livingston. 
Secretary, Mrs. H. J. Miller, Livingston. 
Treasurer, Mrs. W. S. Bell, 410 Dearborn Ave., 
Helena. 



38. INDIAN TERRITORY 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized April, 1892 

President, 

Secretary, Miss Louise Graper. Vinita. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Raymond, Vinita. 



34. PENNSYLVANIA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized June, 1890 

President, Mrs. J. S. Utpon, Ridgway. 

Secretary, Mrs. C. F. Chamberlain, Cambridge- 
bro. 

Treasicrer, Mrs. T. W. Jones, 511 Woodland Ter- 
race, Philadelphia. 



39. NEVADA 



WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1892 

President, Mrs. L. J. Flint, Reno. 
Secretary, Miss Margaret N. Magill, Reno. 
Treasurer , Miss Mary Clow, Reno. 



35. OKLAHOMA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1890 

President, Mrs. W. M. Wellman, Darlington. 
Secretary, Mrs. Joel Harper, Oklahoma City. 
Treasurer, Mrs. A. B. Hammer, Oklahoma City. 



36. NEW JERSEY 

Including District of Columbia, Maryland, 
and Virginia 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION OF 
THE NEW JERSEY ASSOCIATION 

Organized March, 1891 

President, Mrs. A. H. Bradford, Montclair. 
Secretary-, Mrs. F. J. Goodwin, Glen Ridge. 
Treasurer, Mrs. J. H. Denison, 150 Belleville Ave., 
Newark. 



37. UTAH 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1891 

Reorganized December, 1892 

President, Mrs. W. S. Hawkes, T35 Sixth East 

Street, Salt Lake City. 
Secretary, Mrs. L. E. Hall, 78 East First North 

Street, Salt Lake City. 
Treasurer, Mrs. J. D. Nutting, Third North and 

Quince Streets, Salt Lake City. 



40. NEW MEXICO 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized November, 1892 

President, Mrs. E. H. Ashmun, Albuquerque. 
Secretary, Mrs. F. A. Burlingame, Albuquerque. 
Treasurer, Mrs. M. McClaskey, Albuquerque. 



41. BLACK HILLS, SO. DAKOTA 

BLACK HILLS WOMAN'S MISSIONARY 
UNION 

Organized October, 1893 

President, Mrs. J. B. Gossage, Rapid City, Black 

Hills, South Dakota. 
Secretary, Mrs. C. H. Brown, Rapid City, Black 

Hills, South Dakota. 
Treasurer, Mrs. S. Cushman, Deadwood, Black 

Hills, South Dakota. 



42. IDAHO 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1895 

President, Mrs. R. B. Wright, Boise. 
Secretary, Mrs. C. E. Mason, Challis. 
Treasurer, Mrs. G. L. Cole, Mountain Home. 



88 The Home Missionary July, 1S98 



SECRETARIES OF YOUNG PEOPLES WORK 

Minnesota Miss Carrie S. Pond, 60S Canada St., St. Paul. 

Mass. and R. I Miss Bertha M. Shepard, 32 Congregational House, Boston. 

Michigan Mrs. B. F. Aldrich, Ypsilanti. 

Kansas Miss Harriet Broad, Topeka. 

Ohio Mrs. W. S. Sperry, Mt. Vernon. 

New York Mrs. Ceo. R. Haines, 97S Delaware Ave., Buffalo. 

North Dakota Mrs. E. S. Shaw, Cooperstown. 

Oregon Mrs. W. D. Palmer, 546 Third St., Portland. 

WASHING i ON Mrs. W. C. Davie, 423 North N St., Tacoma. 

South Dakota... Mrs. Grace Burleigh, Mitchell. 

Illinois Mrs. J. T. Blanchard, 232 Walnut St., Aurora. 

Missouri Mrs. A. K. Wray, 2220 E. Eighth St., Kansas City. 

Iowa M iss 1 ,ucy A. Mitchell, Charles City. 

California Miss Caroline A. Potter, 600 Seventeenth St., Oakland. 

Nebraska Mrs. J. X. I iyder, 1520 U St., Lincoln. 

Southern California.. . .Miss I'hebe Mayhew, 4 Barnard Park, Los Angeles. 

Vermont Mrs. C. L. Smith, 159 Pine St., Burlington, 

MONTANA Mrs. E. E. Esslestyn, Red Lodge. 



SECRETARIES OF CHILDREN'S WORK 

MINNESOTA Mrs. W. B. Northrup, 2724 Pleasant Ave., Minneapolis. 

MICHIGAN Mrs. Henry Marsh, Olivet. 

Kansas Mrs. R. B. Guild, Topeka. 

Ohio Mrs. (lias. II. Small, Hudson. 

North Dakota., Miss Grace Maile, Fargo. 

Sol in Dakota Miss Emily N. Perrin, Armour. 

Illinois Mrs. Thornton Ware, 4201 Ellis Ave., Chicago. 

Nebraska Mrs. H. D. Neely, 4371 Hamilton St., Omaha. 

Southern California. . . .Miss Emily M. Peck, 920 W. Eighth St., Los Angeles. 



Congregational Home Missionary Society 

Field Secretaries 

Rev. W. G. Puddefoot, South Framingham, Mass. 

Rev. C. W. Shelton, Norwalk, Conn. \ 

Superintendents 

Rev. Moritz E. Eversz, D.D., German Department, 153 La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 

Rev. S. V. S. Fisher, Scandinavian Department, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Rev. Henry A. Schauffler, D.D., Slavic Department, Cleveland, Ohi«. 

lev. Edw. D. Curtis, D.D Indianapolis, Ind. Rev. W. H. Thrall Huron, S. Dak. 

lev. S. F. Gale Jacksonville, Fla. Rev. John L. Maile Fargo, N. Dak. 

lev. J. H. Mouley ' Minneapolis, Minn. Rev. H. Sanderson Denver, Col. 

lev. Alfred K. VVray Kansas City, Mo. Rev. W. S. Hawkes Salt Lake City, Utah. 

lev. L. P. Broad Topeka, Kan. Rev. J. K. Harrison San Francisco, Cal. 

lev. E. H. Ashmun Albuquerque, N. M. Rev. James T. Ford Los Angeles, Cal. 

iev. A. Judson Bailey Seattle, Wash. Rev. C. F. Clapp Forest Grove, Ore. 

iev. Homer W. Carter, D.D Beloit, Wis. t> „ rp w T '„•' t-n r, J 511 Woodland Terrace, 

■> a a t>,„.,k, j Black Hills and Wyoming. *ev. 1. w. Jones, 1J..U. ... - ( Philadelphia, Pa. 

iev. A. A. bROWN...-j«H ot SpringSi South Dakota . Rev- w. S. Bell Helena, Mon. 

iev. Harmon Bross, D.D Lincoln, Neb. Rev. S. C. McDaniel Atlanta, Ga. 

iev. S.F. Gale (Acting Supt. Ala.), Jacksonville, Fla. Rev. J. Homer Parker Kingfisher, Okl. 

Secretaries and Treasurers 

of the Auxiliaries 

iev. David P. Hatch, Secretary Maine Missionary Society Bangor, Me. 

foHN L. Crosby, Esq., Treasurer " " " Bangor, Me. 

iev. A. T. Hillman, Secretary , New Hampshire Home Miss. Society Concord, N. H. 

Ion. Lyman D. Stevens, Treasurer " " " " " .. ..Concord, N. H. 

iev. Charles H. Merrill, Secretary Vermont Domestic " " St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

Vm. C. Tyler, Treasurer " " " " ... .St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

iev. Joshua Coit, Secretary Massachusetts Home " " . . .. | 9 Cong'l House, 

iev. Edwin B. Palmer, Treasurer " " " " .... j" Boston, Mass. 

iev. Alexander McGregor, Secretary Rhode Island " " " . . . . Pawtucket, R. I. 

OS. Wm. Rice, Esq., Treasurer " " " " .... Providence, R. I. 

iev. William H. Moore, Secretary Missionary Society of Connecticut Hartford, Conn. 

Vard W. Jacobs. Esq., Treasurer " " " Hartford, Conn. 

iev. Ethan Curtis, Secretary. New York Home Miss. Society Syracuse, N. Y. 

Villiam Spalding, Treasurer " " " " '. Syracuse, N. Y. 

iev. J. G. Fraser, D.D., Secretary Ohio " " " Cleveland, Ohio. 

iev. J. G. Fraser, D.D. , Treasurer " " " ". Cleveland, Ohio. 

iev. James Tompkins, D.D., Secretary Illinois " J 153 La Salle St., 

V.ARON B. Mead, Esq., Treasurer " ' I Chicago, 111. 

iev. Homer W. Carter, D.D. , Secretary Wisconsin " " " Beloit, Wis. 

§ M. Blackm an, Esq., Treasurer , " " " " Whitewater, Wis. 

iev. T. O. Douglass, D.D. , Secretary ...Iowa " " " Grinnell, Iowa. 

i. H. Merrill, Esq., Treasurer " " " " Ues Moines, Iowa. 

iev. William H. Warren, D.D., Secretary.. Michigan " " " Lansing, Mich. 

lev. John P. Sanderson, Treasurer " ..';-" " " Lansing, Mich. 

Jeo. H. Morgan, Secretary Cong. City Miss. Society St. Louis, Mo. 

iev. A. K. Wray, Superintendent " " " " Kansas City, Mo. 

Lewis E. Snow, Treasurer " " " " St. Louis, Mo. 

Communications 

relating to general business of the Society may be addressed to either of the Secretaries for Correspondence. 
Communications relating to the Editorial Department of The Home Missionary, or of the Home Missionary 
iection of Congregational Work, may be addressed to Rev. Alex. H. Clapp, D.D.. Correspondence of the 
Woman's Department may be addressed to Mrs. H. S. Caswell, Congregational Rooms, Mew York. 

Donations and Subscriptions 

in Drafts, Checks, Registered Letters, or Post-Office Orders may be addressed to Wm. B. Howland, 
Treasurer, Fourth Avenue and Twenty-second Street, New York. 

A PAYMENT OF $50 CONSTITUTES A LIFE MEMBER 

Form of a Bequest 

I bequeath to my executors the sum of dollars, in trust, to pay over the same, 

in months after my decease, to the person who, when the same is payable, shall act as lreasurer 

of the Congregational Home Missionary Society, formed in the City of New York, in the year eighteen hundred 
and twenty-six, to be applied to the charitable use and purposes of said Society, and under its direction. 



Congregational Home Missionary Society 

Fourth Ave. and 220! St., New York 



Major-General Oliver O. Howard 

President 

Secretaries for Correspoiidcnce 
Rev. Joseph B. Clark, D.D. 

Rev. Washington Choate, D.D. 

Rev. ALEXANDER H. Clapp, D.D., Editorial Secretary 

Mr. WILLIAM B. HOWLAND, Treasurer 

Excczitive Committee 

Wm. Ives Washburn, Esq., Chairman 
Asa A. Spear, Esq., Recording Secretary 
Mr. Joseph Wm. Rice 
Rev. Charles H. Richards, D.D. 
Mr. George P. Stockwell 
Rev. John D. Kingsbury, D.D. 
Mr. George W. Hebard 
• John H. Perry, Esq. 
Rev. Thomas B. McLeod, D.D. 
Mr. John F. Anderson, Jr. 
David A. Thompson, Esq. 
Mr. Wm. H. Wanamaker 
Rev. Charles M. Lamson, D.D. 
Rev. Charles A. Savage 



Press of J. J. Little & Co., Astor Place, New York 



The 



I^ome Missionary 



6 st 



October, 1 898 



Vol. LXXI. No. 2 



New York 
Congregational Home Missionary Society 

Congregational Rooms, Fourth Ave. and 22d St. 

Entered at the Post-Office at New York, N. Y., as Second-Class [Mail] Matter 






Contents for October, 1898 



, PAGE 

One Hundred Years of Home Mis- 
sions 89 

Her Old Home Revisited 97 

Some of My Experiences in Mor- 

mondom 100 

Sacred Money 107 

Foundation Work in Home Mis- 
sions 109 

Nineteenth Century Missionary 

Giving 112 

One of the Rough Places 113 



PAGE 

Yeast 115 

National Prosperity 115 

Later from Alaska 116 

Aunt Judy's Work for Home Mis- 
sions 117 

If God's People Only Knew 122 

Notes by the Way: About the Box 123 

Appointments and Receipts 126 

Woman's State Organizations. . . . 148 
Young People's and Children's 

Work 152 



The Home Missionary 



Is published quarterly, at thirty cents a year, postage paid. It is sent without charge, on 
request, to be made annually, to Life Members ; Missionaries of the Society and its Aux- 
iliaries ; Ministers securing a yearly collection for it in their congregations ; also to individu- 
als, associations, or congregations, one copy for a year for every ten dollars collected and paid 
over to the Society or an Auxiliary. Suitable names should accompany the payment. 
Pastors are earnestly requested to serve Home Missions by promoting the use of this journal 
and "Congregational Work" at the Monthly Concert and among their people. 

Immediate notice of discontinuance or change of post-office address should be given. 



The Home Missionary 

Vol. LXXI OCTOBER, 1S98 No. 2 

ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF HOME MISSIONS 

AN ADDRESS AT THE SOCIETY'S SEVENTY-SECOND ANNIVER- 
SARY—BEING THE ONE-HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE 
FOUNDING OF' THE MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF CONNECTICUT 

By Leonard Woolsey Bacon 




E are met, this week, on a one-hundredth anniversary ; and we do 
well to remember it. Last October, there was another great 
missionary meeting on a memorable one-hundred-and-fiftieth 
anniversary, and no one seems to have thought of it. The American 
Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions met at New Haven on the 
one-hundred-and-fiftieth anniversary of the death of David Brainerd at 
Northampton. Perhaps in view of the relation of David Brainerd to New 
Haven it was prudent to avoid the subject. And yet the death of that 
young man was an epoch from which to date the history of modern 
missions to the heathen. That precious corn of wheat was committed to 
the earth with tears ; and to-day the fruit of it is waving like Lebanon 
in every land under the whole heaven. 

There is a notable point of likeness between that missionary move- 
ment of one hundred and fifty years ago and this of a half-century later 
which we celebrate to-day, in that each of them was the offspring of 
a great religious re^ ival. It was one of the proofs of a divine presence 
and power in " The Great Awakening " in the first half of the eighteenth 
century, among many things that were distinctly undivine, that through 
all the land, from Georgia to New Hampshire, there came forth from it 
an earnest effort to present the gospel to the most needy and ignorant 
classes within reach — the negroes and the Indians. Those were the days 
not only of the Brainerds, but of Edwards and Kirkland and of Wheelock 
and Samson Occum and the school for Indian preachers, and of many 
an unremembered pastor gathering the Christianized Indians into many 
a parish church. 



90 The Home Missionary October, 1898 

As the eighteenth century drew near its close, the American church 
was lying in that almost fatal lethargy into which it had sunk after the 
war of Independence. The spiritual quickening which roused and 
restored it might fitly be called The Greater Awakening. Coming 
" without observation " about the year 1793, ^ reached the utmost corners 
of the land, and " there was nothing hid from the heat thereof." But 
nowhere was it more deeply and benignly felt than in Connecticut. It 
was there that young Edward Dorr Griffin, standing at the door of his 
country parsonage in New Hartford and looking abroad with his mind's 
eye, " numbered fifty or sixty congregations laid down in one field of 
divine wonders." The invariable consequence followed. A fervid zeal 
for mission service was kindled in all hearts. The mission work, indeed, 
had never ceased. There is no break in the bright and apostolic suc- 
cession of our missionaries. In " the new settlements," first in Vermont 
and then in the Mohawk valley, the adventurous families of the pioneers 
had been sought out in their scattered cabins by pastors of the home 
churches temporarily released from their parishes for this work. Not less 
than ten pastors in a single year were detailed to this service by the 
General Association of Connecticut, and among them some of the most 
honored of all the clergy of the State. But now the work is expanding, 
and the willing heart for the work is uttering itself, and presently there 
will be seen, feebly germinating, at first, at different points, but by and 
by striking deep root and spreading wide, the beginning of that organi- 
zation of the church for aggressive warfare on the kingdom of Satan, 
which is the distinguishing feature of the church history of the nineteenth 
century. The course of church history runs parallel, in this respect, to 
the economic history of the same period. What the Limited Liability 
corporation (and this too, I am told, is of Connecticut origin) has done in 
changing economic conditions the world over, the missionary or charitable 
society has done for the moral world. It has constituted a democracy of 
charity, admitting those of low estate to partnership in magnificent enter- 
prises. Simultaneously with the tendency to organization arose the new 
exigency for it. The "new settlements" were no longer confined to 
regions within a few days' horseback ride, so that they could be served 
by the itinerant visits of pastors on furlough. And the Indian frontier, 
with its horrors and perils, and its charms to the spirit of a Christian 
chivalry delighting to suffer hardship and peril in doing the work of Jesus 
Christ, was to be found no longer in the valley of the Housatonic or the 
back counties of New Jersey ; so that one who would carry the glad 
tidings to those to whom Christ had not been named, must seek them in 
a distant wilderness, not counting on return. 

Of the missionary societies that came to birth at this conjuncture the 
Missionary Society of Connecticut was not the earliest. That honor be- 



October, 1898 The Home Missionary 91 

longs to a society instituted the year before in the city of New York. 
The Connecticut Society was only one of several tributaries which a little 
more than a quarter of a century later were to flow 'together in the broad 
current of the American Home Missionary Society. It had a twofold 
object : " To Christianize the heathen in North America, and to support 
and promote Christian knowledge in the new settlements within the 
United States." Whether the founders knew it or not, there were at that 
very time under a divine vocation and training the two men who were 
destined for their first missionaries in both services. 

One of them was a young man, yet not very young, in whom there 
had been growing an apostolic longing to carry the word of Christ to 
those who had never heard it. His name was David Bacon. I have some- 
times wondered whether at his birthplace, Woodstock, Conn., the local 
traditions of John Eliot may not have had somewhat to do with turning 
his childish mind toward this noble aim. Certainly the story of David 
Brainerd entered deeply into his religious experience, as it did, about the 
same time, into that of Henry Martyn. One of the earliest acts of the 
Society was to engage this young man, whom they describe as " a dis- 
creet man, animated by the love of God and of souls, of a good common 
education, who can be had for a moderate compensation," and send him 
on an exploring expedition " among the Indian tribes south and west of 
Lake Erie, to learn their feelings with regard to Christianity, and, so far 
as he has opportunity, to teach them its doctrines and duties." 

On the 8th of August, 1800, afoot and alone, with no luggage but 
what he could carry on his back, and with the promise of wages at one 
hundred and ten cents a day, he fared forth into the wilderness. After 
four months of roaming among the wild tribes of the Northwest Territory, 
he returned to Hartford glowing with generous hopefulness. " I have 
everything," he reported, "to support and animate me. I think the most 
sanguine have never dreamed of such an encouraging prospect. Surely 
the fields are already white to harvest." He was recommissioned and 
ordained to the work, and in the midst of that winter, in the first year of 
the new century, he set out once more for the scene, as he hoped, of his 
life's work among the savages, taking with him in his sleigh, and walking 
beside her horse after the snow failed, his bride of seventeen years, the 
saintly Alice Parks. 

The story of that mission, so nobly begun, so hopefully prosecuted, so 
untimely frustrated, is not to be told here. It is too long ; it is too sor- 
rowful ; withal it is too little honorable to the good men who sent out 
their missionary into the wilderness, and then, with an overflowing in- 
come, suddenly abandoned him, on the inaccessible island of Mackinaw, 
to starve with his wife and little children. 

But he did not starve. Coasting along the shore of Lake Erie in an 



92 The Home Missionary October, 1898 

open canoe, he arrived, sick and penniless, at the little hamlet of Cleve- 
land, in the autumn of 1804, and leaving his children and their sick 
mother to the charity of Christian people at Hudson, once more afoot 
and alone, as when he first set out, glowing with hope, for the wilderness, 
but now faint and emaciated and burdened with a great sorrow, broke 
his way through the winter's snows and floods, and arrived at Hartford 
in midwinter to receive a tardy vindication from the Missionary Society, 
and to be reinstated in its service, now as a Home Missionary in the 
Western Reserve. Here he was associated as true yoke-fellow with the 
man who only three months after his first departure had followed him 
westward, had once visited him in his solitary work in Michigan, and who 
was now in the midst of those tireless labors that claim for him the title 
of The Apostle of the Western Reserve — Joseph Badger. 

That was a heroic age. A frontier and pioneer age is always heroic. 
The men and women are here to-day who represent the regions that 
are now in the heroic period of their history, whose deeds of toil and 
daring and endurance are to furnish material to the poets and story- 
tellers of later generations. And among the pioneers the supremely 
heroic figures are the forerunners of the church, the voices crying in the 
wilderness, "Prepare ye the way of the Lord." And of these no nobler 
type, for the supreme unselfishness of the man, the unconscious grandeur 
of his self-sacrifice, need be looked for than Joseph Badger. He was 
amusingly incapable of realizing how noble he was. That is a common 
way with heroes. One has to read between the rough lines of his journal to 
discover the apostolic dignity of the writer. What he did and suffered but 
did not care to publish, ought to be written for him to the glory of God's 
grace and to inspire the zeal of other generations. Compared with the 
ample literature of foreign missions, how meager is our list of home mis- 
sionary biography ! It is a wrong to the church to leave this record un- 
written. I want to lay it on the conscience of the man who can write it 
as it ought to be written, to leave it unwritten no longer. The pen which 
has charmed the country with its portraiture of the Homespun Heroes of 
the Tennessee mountains owes a filial duty to the Pioneer Missionaries of 
the Western Reserve. 

I am here to commemorate the Connecticut Missionary Society ; but 
not to eulogize it. The inspiration of it was divine ; the support it re- 
ceived was generous ; the men it sent forth were saints and heroes ; the 
administration of it was incompetent, unjust, cruel, and mean. As it had 
starved out David Bacon and his little family from their poor hut among 
the Ojibwas of Mackinaw, so now it starved out Joseph Badger from its 
service, and drove him across the line of Pennsylvania to find a more 
generous support and a more intelligent direction from the Western Mis- 
sionary Society at Pittsburg. It had succumbed under the besetting 



October, 1898 The Home Missionary 93 

temptation of religious institutions — to regard itself as an end, instead of a 
means to an end. It famished its missionaries ; it frustrated their hope- 
ful work ; but it took good care of the Society, and covered a thrifty bal- 
ance into the treasury every year. The moral of the story is this : Beware 
of that high-churchism from which no sect is exempt, and which consists 
in paying respect to the forms, accidents and mechanics of religious 
service, instead of the essence of it. Among Congregationalists it takes 
the form of exorbitant respect for their machinery. " They sacrifice unto 
their net, and burn incense unto their drag." 

While Joseph Badger was preparing with sorrowful reluctance to 
renounce the service of the Connecticut Society, his colleague was pon- 
dering a great thought. In his missionary wanderings for seven years he 
had seen how population came dribbling in from New England, without 
organization or method. Badger's journal shows how it was scattered 
through this region, as sheep having no shepherd — in Cleveland two fam- 
ilies, in Euclid one family, in Mentor four, in Painesville two. The 
thought that possessed the mind of David Bacon was that of Organized 
Emigration. The world does not seem to have been ripe for it then ; 
but it was the same thought which, fifty years later, at the most perilous 
crisis in all our history, working in the unconquerable mind of Eli Thayer, 
backed by the churches of the North, created a great State in a single 
lustrum, blocked the extension of slavery, and saved the continent for 
freedom. In his solitary journeys through the woods from cabin to cabin, 
the prophetic soul of the missionary had seen visions as of a New Jerusa- 
lem descending out of heaven, builded four-square. He thought, What 
if the new Connecticut could be settled, as the Old Connecticut had been, 
by organized colonies bringing with them the church, the ministry, the 
school, the framework of society and polity. With a generous imprudence 
he attempted to make this bright vision a reality. He sought out a town- 
ship of unoccupied land in the Reserve ; he entered into contract with 
the proprietors of it ; and he searched Connecticut as with candles for 
men like that " citizen of Zion " that " walketh uprightly, and worketh 
righteousness, and speaketh the truth in his heart." How wise, not for 
himself but for others, were these plans of his, the noble town of Tall- 
madge, and the streams of influence that have flowed from it to make glad 
the city of God, are this day witness. Not all his dreams came true. 
Where he noted on his rude survey the site for church, and academy, 
and neighborhood schoolhouse, and mill, these institutions rose visibly 
from their foundations. One goodly hill he had marked and set apart 
for the college that should be the Yale or Harvard of the rising State. 
But it was not given to him, though he pleaded and toiled for it, to see 
the fulfillment of this cherished enterprise. It waited till after his time, 
and was then planted, not at Tallmadge but at Hudson, scene of his ear- 



94 The Home Missionary October, 1898 

lier labors ; whence transplanted to this great city, it has outgrown all 
recollections of its first father, and has come to noble stature, and parted 
into widespreading and fruitful branches, under the new names of Adel- 
bert College and Western Reserve University. 

Another of his dreams unrealized was the hope that, by the good hand 
of God upon him, there might be, at last, in the fair town which he had 
consecrated with his prayers, a home for himself, in which, with the wife 
and children who had been sharers of his toil, his poverty and his suffer- 
ings, he might grow old in seeing the happy fruit of it all. But. this was 
not to be. In the midst of his hopeful beginnings, the baleful act of 
Jefferson's embargo and the coming on of the war smote the commerce 
of New England with paralysis, and for the time wrecked his work. In 
the year 181 2, twelve years from the time when he went forth with eager 
hope into the wilderness, he brought back his family to Hartford, a hope- 
less bankrupt, and an old man at forty years. How through his few 
remaining years he toiled to support his family, always in work that should 
be helpful to the kingdom of God, need not here be told. Presently, long 
waited for, the hour of his departure came. He gathered at his bedside 
his wife, even yet a young woman, and his seven children, the eldest of 
them a boy of fifteen, and commended them to the God of the fatherless 
and the widow ; and when he had done this, he fell asleep. And good 
men made lamentation over him ; and prudent people asked, To what 
purpose is this waste ? 

I do not apologize for these details, which I know are more interest- 
ing to me than they can possibly be to any one else. I am invited here, 
not because I have any qualification for speaking adequately of those im- 
mense changes that one hundred years have made, and which are 
expressed in figures (so far as figures can be used to indicate them) which 
baffle the imagination like the dimensions of astronomy. I am here 
simply as the shadow of a name, and I am not sorry to go on with the 
story along that narrow line of personal connection on which you expect 
to hear from me. 

The fifteen-year-old boy that stood, in 181 7, by the deathbed of his 
broken-hearted missionary father, was not repelled, by all he had seen and 
shared of privation and suffering and unrewarded toil, from following 
in the same career. Only eight years later, he seemed about to real- 
ize the long-cherished desire of his heart, when he received ordination as 
a missionary, expecting to go to the frontier and take up his dead 
father's work where it had been laid down. But that very day there 
came, unwelcome, a missive from New Haven that indicated to him that 
his service to the evangelization of America was to be at the base of 
operations, and not in the field. It was in the second year of his pastor- 
ate that the American Home Missionary Society was formed at New 



October, 1898 The Home Missionary 95 

York ; and three years after that, close beside him in Yale Seminary, a 
young man from David Bacon's missionary church in Hudson, Julian M. 
Sturtevant, name ever to be cherished in love and' honor, and Theron 
Baldwin and others like-minded, seven in all, pledged themselves in 
mutual vows to the service of Home Missions and Christian Education 
in the State of Illinois. This was "The Illinois Band," and the organ- 
izing of it, antecedent and exemplar as it was of the Iowa Band and the 
Washington Band, marks an epoch in the history of our work. But the 
heroic record of these who went to the front must not obscure the honor 
due to those whose hearts were in the work, but who heroically stayed at 
home. I am proud to quote from a letter that came to me from Presi- 
dent Sturtevant in January, 1882 : " Neither you nor any one else now 
living will ever know how much I am indebted to your father. In going 
very far out upon the frontier, as I did in the beginning of my ministry, 
I put myself very much in the condition of the man who digs at the bot- 
tom of a well. He is greatly dependent on those who stand at the wind- 
lass at the top. Your father never forgot the man at the bottom of the 
well." 

Now take a swift backward glance at the process of evolution through 
which the home missionary work has thus far come. Beginning with 
the visits of pastors detailed from the home churches for brief itineran- 
cies in the new settlements, it arrived, about a hundred years ago, at the 
necessity of employing men whose lives were to be devoted to the work 
of the missionary. It was a short and rapid step from this point to the 
policy of locating the missionary, as soon as the case would admit ; so 
that the work almost ceased to be in the strict sense a missionary work, 
and grew to be predominantly a parish-aid work, by which the church 
or group of churches was aided in supporting its pastor. The next 
stage was the nationalizing, not of the work, for that was always as 
broad in its scope as the continually widening domain of the nation, but 
of the agency for the work, by the constituting of the American Home 
Missionary Society, in 1826. I certainly must not omit, in this chronol- 
ogy of epochs, the starting of the Illinois Band, in 1829. And now we 
come, in 1846, to the development of the great supplement to the 
Society's constitution. It is safe to say that the original constitution 
(which was no worse than others of that society-building period) was as 
foolish a scheme as was ever devised by wise and good men. It was a 
plan to make the administration of a national society responsible only to 
a local mass-meeting. It worked very well indeed, so long as it was fair 
weather and plain sailing. But presently the gentle breezes of the 
slavery agitation began to blow, and they fell into a place where two 
seas met. Then were searchings of heart and tremblings as for the ark 
of God. And at length the convulsed and laboring mountain brought 



96 The Home Missionary October, 1898 

forth the American Missionary Association, and all was peace again. It 
was no ridiculous birth. This mouse helped gnaw the meshes of the net 
and set the lion free. And it added to the constitution of the American 
Home Missionary Society this invaluable unwritten provision : If anyone 
is dissatisfied with the working of this society, he shall have full and 
entire liberty to start another society that shall suit him better. And 
from that time forth, thanks to this liberty, and thanks to an administra- 
tion unsurpassed for wisdom and fidelity, no one has wanted to start 
another society. 

I cannot put a hundred years into thirty minutes. Others must speak 
of the successive expansions of the work incident to the amazing expan- 
sions of the field, until at this hour we are facing the portentous question 
whether the field of our Home Missions is to be extended to the Carib- 
bean and the China Seas. I merely mention the organization of the 
Women's Department of the Society, in 1882 ; and how memorable a date 
is this, we have had the opportunity to learn this morning. I come-down 
almost to this very time, to the year 1893, the date of changing the name 
of the Society. An inauspicious date indeed this would be, if it meant — 
what it may easily seem to mean — the losing of the Society's identity, of 
its noble history, of its generous, unpartisan and catholic policy. It brings 
to mind my dear old friend and parishioner, John Henry Stickney, who 
was so sturdy and staunch a Congregationalist that quite unconsciously 
he was really a good deal of a Presbyterian. He wanted the name 
changed, and was willing to give $150,000 — in his will — for his whim. 
And perhaps he gave all it was worth — perhaps. I am quite sure that it 
was the desire of my old friend's heart that the change might carry with 
it all it could seem to anyone to mean, when the great old name was 
changed for the comparatively small and narrow one. The Society had 
never been sectarian enough to suit him. In fact, it had never been 
sectarian at all ; neither was it unsectarian, nor yet intersectarian, but 
simply Christian. So it had been from the beginning, and from before 
the beginning. The first contributions to the Connecticut Society included 
those from two Episcopalian churches and one Baptist church. The 
earlier New York Society gathered funds and sent out missionaries with- 
out regard to sect, only making sure of good men and good money. And 
so it was with this Society, a quarter-century later. It was not a con- 
federation of sects. It was simply an association of patriotic Christian 
men, intent on the preaching of the gospel and the planting of the church 
throughout their native land. It was the American Home Missionary 
Society. Some of its supporters withdrew in order to devote themselves 
to distinctly sectarian enterprises — Episcopalians, Dutchmen, Presby- 
terians, first one "school" and then the other;; but it was the American 
Home Missionary Society still. And yet in one respect it was always 



October, 1898 The Home Missionary 97 

Congregationalist ; this fundamental, distinguishing principle of Con- 
gregationalism was always practically recognized in it — the great Con- 
gregational principle that a church has a divine, inalienable right to be 
Methodist or Episcopalian or Presbyterian, if it chooses. 

No man can despoil us of the glory of the past. And if ever the time 
shall come, which God forbid, when this Society, ceasing from its ancient 
catholic and apostolic policy, shall become unworthy of the noble name 
which once it bore, and be converted into the mere propaganda of a sect, 
then it will be time to apply to the legislature of New York for yet 
another change of name, and write it Ichabod, 



HER OLD HOME REVISITED 

By a Lady Church Planter 

Here I am at L again ! I came up here a week ago on Saturday 

and spent the Sabbath, just because one of the dear young girls of the 
place, dying with consumption, had expressed a wish to see me. Now I 
have come again, this time in answer to the expressed wish of the family 
that I conduct the funeral services of this dear girl. It was her own wish, 
too. She had been gradually failing until she "took her bed" months 
ago. And now, on last Thursday, the end came. Just as the sun was 
sinking in the west her spirit passed from this earth to the true and 
abounding Life beyond ! A very large concourse of friends gathered for 
the funeral services yesterday afternoon, after the train came in from the 
east. You know how everybody from near and from far goes to a funeral 
in the country. Everybody knows everybody else, and every house has 
buried its "blessed dead " and has felt the need at some time or other of 
neighborly sympathy. 

There, in the crowded rooms at the house where everybody stood up — 
and where there were children, and babes in their mothers' arms, as well 
as young people and " grown-up" people of all creeds and nationalities — 
sweet songs were sung and a prayer was offered. Then the funeral pro- 
cession was formed and wended its way to the little church. All walked, 
and the coffin was borne by six young men, the chosen of the community. 
Nice, manly-looking young men they were ; some of them just growing 
into a promising manhood from their Christian homes here. Oh, I tell 
you, the little church here has been a refining influence, as well as a "sav- 
ing institution." 

As the long procession wended its way slowly through the streets of 
the town (which had on its busiest market-day an air of Sabbath stillness) 



98 The Home Missionary October, 1898 

the bell of the little missionary church was tolled. There, while the house 
was crowded with sympathetic listeners (as you saw it crowded beyond its 
seating capacity on the day of its dedication), the services proceeded. A 
song, a reading of that story of Martha and Mary and the raising of their 
brother Lazarus from the grave by the weeping sympathizing Christ who 
loved them all and disliked the formality of a "burial service" ; another 
song, a talk, and a prayer, and the service was concluded. 

Then a very touching ceremony took place. The children of the 
Sunday-school, who, all through the services, had stood still in the little 
anteroom, marched softly in and with gentle and awed looks deposited 
each a tiny bouquet of flowers upon the coffin, arranging them in careful, 
child-like fashion, and taking a last loving look at the dear one who had 
been for two years their beloved Sunday-school superintendent and who 
had trained them so patiently and lovingly for the beautiful "Children's 
Day " exercises (the very crowning feature of the year to them). Oh, the 
children knew her well. Others took their last look, and then their dear 
friend, "asleep in Jesus," in that last long sleep, was carried out into the 
country to the beautiful grove where dear little " Robbie " was laid. There 
followed the sorrowing friends to this burial spot, four miles away, thirty- 
three teams, as one told me, so universally beloved was our dear one, 
and so sincerely mourned by all. The weather was mild and favorable ; 
the roads were good ; and we all felt so thankful for such a day for 
such an occasion. There is no cemetery near this place, so since little 
Robbie was buried there, other friends and residents had asked permission 
to carry their dead to this place — " God's acre "—until there are as many 
as a dozen graves there now. I think it is intended now that a tract of 
land be set off for cemetery purposes soon. It is a beautiful spot on high 
ground, overlooking a delightful stretch of rolling prairie country. The 
dear children all summer long in their happy play, from the beginning of 
spring and the coming of the earliest flowers to the end of summer, have 
their own " decoration days," and keep these graves covered with flowers. 
It seems to me it is a most attractive and iovely spot in which to be laid, 
in that quiet grove on the little hilltop, away from the rush and turmoil of 
things. To find one's resting place where dear, sweet children play and 
the birds sing all day long is a pleasant thought. 

It seems strange to think that for the last two weeks on Sabbath I 
have stood again in that dear church to officiate as heretofore when home 
missionary pastor.- I found an unexpectedly cordial welcome from all. 
There are many improvements in the town, which has grown in the five 
years since I left it. They have added several stores and other buildings ; 
some nice people have moved in, and the atmosphere of the town seems 
changed. As I have intimated already, one can perceive that all those 
refining influences that are set to work, "like leaven," by the planting of 



October, 1898 The Home Missionary 99 

the church and the prevailing of the Word have been transforming the 
town. It is very quiet on Sundays, although the business has quadrupled. 
There is now only one saloon, where before there were eight. Great 
peace and harmony prevail where once were dreadful discord and hate. 

There are lovely young people there now. The children have grown 
up to attractive young-ladyhood and promising young-manhood. There 
is a host of bright, pretty children coming along. The congregations and 
Sunday-school are increased. The Christian Endeavor Society is taking 
a strong hold, and oh, how anxious it makes one feel to have things go on 
at the best possible gait for the good of those dear young people. I 
found myself feeling over-anxious to push things ! I am afraid I feel like 
that wicked man who tried to "steady the ark." 

The first Sabbath I went up there they planned that I should attend a 
"missionary tea" at a private house. The man of that house says, " If 
you want any conceivable thing done here you must submit it to the Mis- 
sionary Society. It is the ruling force in this town ! " 

The church building greatly needs paint on the outside. I think the 
paint put on the building in the first place was very poor. They will try 
to paint, but there are not many to give money and it may take some time 
for them to accomplish the matter. I noticed that the Endeavor Society 
needs some new Endeavor song books. Those you sent are thoroughly 
worn out with use. The red books ["Laudes Domini"] hold out well. 
Should you know of any way to get to these young people a set of No. 5 
or No. 6, I know they would appreciate the favor. ' I could see it was a 
great need for the success of the meetings. Two dozen books would go 
a great way. I hope you can get a little encouragement from these items 
about this place as something in the way of results from the efforts of the 
Home Missionary Society. There is encouragement in the thought that 
home missionary work was undertaken in this town. My thought about 
its expediency was often shaken ; but I can now see how much that little 
church has done for the town already. I cannot see all that it has done, 
but what I do see gives one a feeling of genuine encouragement. 

P. S. — I find in reading this over that I did not tell you of the trium- 
phant death of our dear one. She was "not afraid to die," she said in 
reply to her grandmother's inquiry. She had "talked with Jesus," and 
he would bear her over the dark river. She had visions of beautiful 
things, saw angels, and heard the very music of the heavenly home so 
"bright and fair." 

A year ago, in the absence of any minister to officiate, she had been 
wrapped warmly and went to this same burial place, to offer prayer over 
the grave of a man who had died in town. She was very modest and 
quiet, but was ready for every good word and work. — S. F. W. 

South Dakota. 



ioo The Home Missionary October, 1898 

SOME OF MY EXPERIENCES IN MORMONDOM 

By Rev. D. L. Leonard, D.D., Oberlin, Ohio 

As any one can easily see, a task such as mine compelled me to take 
frequent journeys throughout the extensive area given me for supervision. 
I must know what it contained and the ways of its inhabitants. For 
much of the time the works of nature spread out before me were exceed- 
ingly attractive to the eye, and rose often to what was majestic and 
sublime. A taste for geology lent new interest to the mountains and 
canons, while an instinct which I never could quite understand impelled 
me, whenever possible, to climb to the top of every loftiest summit to see 
what there was over beyond, as well as to descend to the bottom of the 
deepest mines. And as for Mormonism and the Mormons, the history, 
the creed, the practice, my continual feeling was : " Woe is me if I do not 
search this portentous matter through and through." So I assayed to 
read everything for and against, in books and papers. My questions 
were innumerable, and I was present, as far as possible, in all manner of 
their public assemblies. 

In my travels to and fro in Utah I was usually compelled to tabernacle 
with the "saints." Nor did I ever receive other than respectful and con- 
siderate treatment. Not seldom, too, I found shelter in the houses of the 
church dignities, who could not bid me God speed, and heartily wished 
me outside the Territory, but yet for a money consideration were more 
than willing to furnish me food and lodging. One of my first adventures 
fell out in a hotel kept by a doughty and very zealous elder, who, after 
feeding me in excellent style, before sending me to my pillow undertook 
to convert me from the error of my ways. The common conviction among 
these queer religionists seemed to be that if only they could get the 
benighted Gentile to listen to their story, it must be that in spite of him- 
self he would embrace the Latter-day faith. Nor do they ever hesitate to 
give a reason for the faith that is in them. Well, before leaving the 
supper table he began with his arguments and allegations, nor could he 
persuade himself to cease until midnight was near. The conclusion was 
that salvation was not obtainable by any human soul except through bap- 
tism (immersion) administered by a Mormon elder, authorized by Joseph 
Smith. With that furnishing, the most devilish was vastly better off than 
the most saintly in its absence ! A number of times I tarried for a night 
in one of the houses of a six-wived bishop, which was presided over by 
the first wife. He owned an entire square, and his various homes were 
located upon the different sides, the central space being territory common 
to all— fighting ground sometimes, I had reason to fear. Being possessed 



October, 1898 The Home Missionary 101 

of such embarrassment of riches in the shape of dwelling places, the poor 
man, having no system in the matter, was evidently at his wits' end to 
decide where to take this and that meal. To prove 'that he was a saint of 
high standing it is sufficient to state, in addition, that his children by actual 
count aggregated fifty-two (forty-seven being still in the land of the liv- 
ing), his grandchildren one hundred and forty-seven, and his great-grand- 
children fourteen. I passed a Sunday once in St. George, far south in the 
Territory, almost upon the Arizona line, and not far from the scene of the 
most shocking Mountain Meadow massacre, in the hostelry owned and 
kept by Apostle Erastus Snow, one of the magnates of the realm. Upon 
politics, history, agriculture, and various other themes we could converse 
pleasantly and with profit, for he was a man of large experience and had 
traveled extensively. But when it came to religion I could find absolutely 
nothing on which we agreed, or which we held in common. He seemed 
to be an altogether different person, of a different intellectual make, em- 
ploying different faculties, reaching his conclusions by a process wholly 
different. Here he was haughty, domineering, dogmatic, and touchy in 
the extreme. One of my last experiences was connected with a Mormon 
woman, the first wife of a Salt Lake polygamist who had fled the country 
to escape the officers of the law, leaving her in charge of his property. I 
had rented some rooms, and called to make my last payment before my 
departure for the East. As I arose to go she asked me to tarry a little, 
and deep emotion was apparent. Then she began by speaking quite flat- 
teringly of my entire walk and conversation since the day when we first 
met. But while I wondered what all these appreciative words might sig- 
nify, she turned to the statement that such uprightness of character and 
such uniform excellence of spirit made the mystery all the more profound 
that I could ever have written such and so many dreadful slanders in the 
Eastern papers against the Utah saints. It seemed as though I must 
have known I was penning falsehoods, etc., etc. Had I ever investigated 
by talking with the leaders ? In self-defense I set forth how painstaking 
and unwearied I had been for six long years in seeking the truth, and pro- 
tested that I had never penned a word which I did not believe was in 
accord with the well-established facts in the case. At this her whole man- 
ner changed, her face was flushed and her eyes were all aglow, while her 
words became deliberate and solemn : " Mr. Leonard, I feel compelled to 
give you my testimony before you go. I speak not what I merely believe 
because I have read it, or because the church rulers have so declared, but 
I verily know, because the Spirit of God has revealed the truth to my soul. 
I testify that this is the church and kingdom of God, that Joseph Smith 
and Brigham Young were prophets of God, that the Book of Mormon is a 
revelation from God, that this kingdom will everywhere prevail, and all its 
enemies will perish. Mr. Leonard, I shall meet you in the day of judg- 



102 The Home Missionary October, 1898 

ment, and you will have to answer for the way you treat this testimony." 
After this exciting passage, which continued some five minutes, she drew 
a long breath, as if the desire and conviction of months had now found 
relief, and said : " Mr. Leonard, you don't know how much better I feel," 
and we parted. As illustrating another phase of Mormon womanhood, 
quite often I visited at a home whose founders were of sturdy Yankee 
stock, and which for years was childless. When polygamy was set up, this 
couple were fairly badgered into accepting both the theory and the prac- 
tice. In a spirit truly submissive and childlike they talked over the best 
mode of procedure ; with entire unity of sentiment they selected the can- 
didates for the second, third and fourth places in the affections of the 
husband, and agreed that the wife should make the announcement to them, 
do whatever "courting" might be necessary, and, in short, make all the 
arrangements for the triple wedding. When in later years children were 
multiplied in the house she called herself their stepmother, and being a 
schoolma'am became their instructor in the rudiments of knowledge. But 
alas ! this multiple marriage did not prove to be "celestial " in its results. 
For one " wife," by the bedlam which ensued, was driven to the bad; 
another retired in disgust from the scene of strife, while to all concerned 
were left only lives blighted and full of bitterness. 

Mormon schools were unique, and at most points highly original. The 
schoolhouse and the meeting-house were commonly the same building^ 
and the themes presented and the spiritual atmosphere diffused on Sunday 
were but slightly modified during the week. As compared with the pupils, 
the teachers for the most part were but ignoramuses of a larger growth. 
Free schools were rare exceptions, the children of the poor were excluded 
by their poverty, and a year's instruction was included within the limits 
of from two to five months. The "saints" had no fear of "religion" in 
their schools. The day's work was closed as well as begun with prayer, 
offered in the one form in which all are drilled from infancy, and which is 
always heard on all manner of occasions, even at the opening and ending 
of the dance. I once visited a school, and as the hour came for dismission 
all who were willing to pray were asked to raise their hands. From the 
score or two who responded a girl of ten was selected, who rattled off the 
regulation petition. As in China, studying aloud is held in high esteem, 
and the general aim seems to be to reduce good order to a minimum. In 
another school two large spelling classes were on the floor at once, with 
two teachers lifting up their voices to make themselves heard, and each 
class strenuously endeavoring to spell louder than the other. On this oc- 
casion the three trustees were present in their official capacity, rude rep- 
resentatives of the priesthood whose rank for scholastic attainments would 
be hard by the primary class. When the proper time arrived these elders 
were called upon to give instruction and encouragement to the company 



October, 1898 The Home Missionary 103 

of ingenuous youths there assembled. But, instead, they turned to me and 
asked the Gentile stranger to speak, which I proceeded briefly and mod- 
estly to do, urging the children to regularity, promptness, obedience and 
studiousness. Seldom have I ever made so profound an impression. 
When the turn came for the trustees to shed what light they had, they 
were evidently overcome by the learning and eloquence which had just 
preceded. At least all they did was to endorse my every statement with 
warmest words, and in phrases almost identical, and to solemnly adjure 
the boys and girls not to fail to remember and practice my precepts, since 
this would be well for them both in this life and in that to come. Finally 
each one, as he had so often done when speaking in meeting, his voice 
running the full length of the downward slide, closed with these words : 
"And that you may do this is my prayer in the name of Jesus Christ. 
Amen." 

A peculiar flavor was certain to pervade all Mormon gatherings for 
worship. The spirit of reverence and devotion was conspicuous only by 
its absence ; one could not be at all certain that much attention would be 
bestowed upon things religious, nor must he be disappointed if what was 
said was commonplace always, and often shaded off into the ridiculous 
and vulgar. One Sunday evening I visited the Twelfth Ward meeting- 
house in Salt Lake, the bishop, as usual, being in charge. When he came 
to the notices, he called attention to the fact that with his counsellors he 
had completed arrangements for a series of dancing parties, to be held 
during the weeks to come. Upon one point he desired to make a state- 
ment. Some of the brethren thought that only cotillions should be tol- 
erated. But no such nonsense would be countenanced in the Twelfth 
Ward. A proper proportion of waltzes would be introduced into the pro- 
gramme. If anybody objects to this, " I'll bet a gill of buttermilk that it is 
a man or woman who in former years went it blind on waltzes, and having 
indulged in round dances to satiety is now unwilling that the young folks 
should have any fun. We won't have any such nonsense in the Twelfth 
Ward." And up went his hands to pronounce the benediction, the audi- 
ence taking their departure in fine spirits. Though the offenses of Mor- 
monism against righteousness, reason, and even decency are so many and 
so heinous, perhaps at no point are its derelictions more lamentable than 
in connection with the celebration of the sacrament of the Lord's Supper. 
Taking the hint from the Campbellites, the ordinance is of weekly occur- 
rence, and, including the Sunday-school, the elements may be partaken of 
twice or thrice in a day. The " Prophet " gave his followers permission 
to substitute water for wine, and seldom is the juice of the grape resorted 
to. Whosoever will may freely partake, be he babe or octogenarian, saint 
or sinner. In hot weather it often occurs that the cups are passed back 
to be refilled for those who would improve this opportunity to quench 



104 The Home Missionary October, 1898 

their thirst. Several barrels of water may stand at convenient points as a 
source of supply, and the entire quantity is "blessed " by a form of prayer 
provided. I have seen the distributors perform their parts in their shirt- 
sleeves and barefooted, while in Sunday-school young boys are chosen to 
pass the bread and water to their companions. And meantime all along 
a succession of elders are called on to occupy the time by speaking upon 
politics, agriculture, business in general, anything that happens to be up- 
permost in their minds. Each one begins by asking an " interest in your 
faith and prayers," and then proceeds to " speak as the Spirit gives him 
utterance." Verily the works of the " Spirit " are sometimes fearful and 
wonderful in the Great Salt Lake Basin. 

Once I found myself at Shoshone station, in southern Idaho, with time 
at my command extending from daylight to the next midnight. I had 
never seen the Shoshone Falls of the Snake, and this was my life oppor- 
tunity. There was no public conveyance, and to hire a carriage would 
cost a small fortune, so that plainly the trip must be made on horseback. 
Inquiring, it came out that the only beast available was a pink-eyed and 
spotted bronco. I set forth with somewhat of fear and trembling, since 
the distance to be traversed was some sixty miles, and in this particular 
line of business I was entirely out of practice. The way was over the 
lava beds, with not a drop of water, not a house, not an inhabitant save 
jack-rabbits and rattlesnakes. It soon came out that the walking pace of 
my animal was so mortal slow that it must be wholly dismissed from 
the programme, while his trot was much too rough and violent for flesh and 
blood long to endure. Nothing remained but a dead run, and this in- 
dulged in all day long would end the career of both horse and rider. But 
worst of all, this semi-savage brute was found grievously addicted to a 
fashion of stopping suddenly when going at the top of his speed, without 
giving the least warning to the passenger on board, with results to the 
latter not pleasant to contemplate. Being destitute of spur and whip, my 
only resort was to a rope halter fortunately large and long. In this I 
tied divers knots, set him going at his best, and at every slightest intima- 
tion of a halt proposed on his part, up went my arm with threatening 
gesture which sent him forward again with accelerated speed. Before my 
destination was reached, so often had he threatened to throw me over his 
head and so often had I protested by brandishing those knots, it seemed 
as though my arm would break. Of the cataract I will only say that it is 
quite dwarfed by its environment, being at the bottom of a chasm a 
thousand feet deep, rent in the lava, with sides as good as perpendicular, 
and near a mile in width. The day was devoted to rambling up and down, 
and to resting in preparation for the return journey. About dusk I 
started ; a sickly old moon lent a modicum of cheer ; the experiences of 
the forenoon with the bronco were repeated to the utmost of endurance ; 



October, 1898 The Home Missionary 105 

for the last few miles I much preferred walking to riding ; I took my 
train, badly shaken up and in a condition of general physical demoraliza- 
tion, and for several days most enjoyed a posture ekher wholly upright 
or else wholly prone. But ever since I have rejoiced to think I was per- 
mitted to pay a visit to Shoshone. 

One summer, four of us felt at liberty to seek a few days ! rest from the 
warfare with Mormonism by a sail upon Salt Lake. Finding an indifferent 
boat at Hooper, we made first for Fremont's Island, where we passed the 
night upon the sand under the open sky. The next day gave us a fine 
taste of water travel, the wind being contrary and too violent. But Prom- 
ontory Point was made, a dismal dinner was enjoyed, and towards night, 
the tempest passing by, we headed for Carrington Island, due southwest, 
and distance twenty miles over the deepest portion of the lake. It was 
exciting to seek a landing in the darkness on an unknown shore, with the 
breakers beating all about us, but all the more we appreciated our repose 
under the shelter of the rabbit brush. Expeditions to several other islands 
occupied the next two days. To two in particular we gave close atten- 
tion, Egg and Hat, because they were the breeding place for gulls, 
blue herons, and white pelicans innumerable, and one of the party had 
designs upon some scores of dozens of eggs. How full of novelties were 
those days. There were the birds in numbers infinite, their eggs every- 
where covering the sand and rocks, their deafening noises above and 
about, their manceuvers, and the multitude of carcassess of the young 
which had perished from exposure. The mysterious lake, also, its moun- 
tain islands and the absolute desert lying hard by to the west. And the 
entire stretch of the mighty Wahsatch Range, four hundred miles in 
length, ever under our eyes, with its morning and noontide and evening 
glory. Our trip homeward was by way of Antelope Island. The last 
breeze died away, and to reach it we must pull our heavy boat under a 
blazing sun. We had found that our water cask had too recently con- 
tained vinegar, so that our supply was steadily waxing towards the unpot- 
able, but now it gave out altogether. But we lived to reach a landing 
place and found water which was just endurable. The day following we 
were on the whole glad to find ourselves once more upon the mainland 
and escaped from the realm of the brine. 

I had one experience in the mountains which may be briefly referred 
to. A brother in the ministry was owner of a span of ponies and a light 
wagon, and with these to aid us we concluded to take a trip to the head 
of Bear River, among the loftiest summits of Uintas and something like 
a hundred and fifty miles to the east of Salt Lake City. The second day 
found us up as far as wheels could penetrate, and a few miles further it 
became too rough for horses. Here we left all the incumbrances and set 
out for a day's climb, not in the least imagining a longer separation from 



106 The Home Missionary October, 1898 

food and shelter. Up a thousand feet of canon wall we tugged to a 
plateau, back of which was a second similar ascent. This, too, we easily 
mastered. And now, behold, off six miles or more and some thousands 
of feet above, was La Motte Peak, the very highest point between the 
Rockies and the Wahsatch. Should we return without planting our feet 
upon the topmost cliff? It was not to be thought of for a moment, 
though the day was already far spent, and it was time for us to set out 
upon our descent. On we pushed, crossing acres of snowbanks (though 
it was September), along a narrow crest and with tremendous canons 
yawning on either side. At length with no little strain we reached our 
goal. One glance was ample payment for all it cost and was yet to cost. 
In ancient days this was the scene of glacial action for magnitude seldom 
equalled elsewhere in the area of the United States. On one side are the 
various headstreams of the Bear which flow to the north. To the south- 
west are the sources of the Provo, which also make their way into Salt 
Lake. And then to the southeast, into the Colorado, flows the Duchesne 
Fork. For each one of these river sources the ice had ground and 
scooped out canons in the solid rock to a depth approaching a mile, and 
about as wide. All which was under our very eyes, while a hundred 
miles to the west towered the Wahsatch, a hundred and fifty miles to the 
northeast the Wind River Range was in full view ; so pure was the air, 
our vision easily swept over large portions of three Territories, and an 
area not much less than that of Ohio. But the sun was alarmingly near 
to its setting. In an evil hour it was decided to return not by the way 
we came, but to make a descent at once into one of the canons of the 
Bear and follow it to the horses. It was almost dark when, exhausted, we 
had reached the bottom, and, ah, the piles of rocks we clambered over 
and the terrible tangle of fallen trees through which we forced our way. 
Next followed three tremendous showers, such as mountains can produce. 
By this time darkness was upon us which could be felt. Progress was 
impossible, we had no matches, no food, scant clothing, and were soaked 
to the skin. But here we must pass the night. By the sense of feeling 
and by great good fortune, a dry spot was found under a huge tree which 
had fallen, and into our nests we crawled. My companion was half dead 
with exhaustion, and his stock of courage ran so low that he feared he 
should never see wife and child again, and proposed to kill his great 
shaggy dog with club, rope, or knife, and skin him and use his hide for 
cover to keep himself from freezing. We were badly chilled, but several 
times we arose and went through some gymnastic exercises, and slept 
fairly well, so utterly fagged out were we. At length the morning 
dawned; on our way to the wagon we found a fair breakfast of raspberries, 
by nine o'clock had feasted on coffee and speckled trout, and came out as 
good as new. 



October, 1898 The Home Missionary 107 

SACRED MONEY 

By Rev. R. T. Cross 

Let us take Nebraska as a representative of the Western States. She 
receives this year about $14,000 of home missionary money and herself 
raises less than one-third of that amount. Year before last she received 
about $17,000, or about $54 for every week-day in the year. This money 
came in part from the following sources : Maine gave $453, New Hamp- 
shire $783, Vermont $533, Massachusetts $5,185 (God bless the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts!), Connecticut $2,314, Rhode Island $196. 
Thus New England (God bless her !) gave $9,467, or more than one-half 
of the whole. New York gave $1,555, Ohio $261, Delaware (the only 
State then without a Congregational church) twenty-two cents, Maryland 
$1,653 (Stickney legacy for the most part), Georgia and Arizona, each $7, 
Texas $5, Arkansas and New Mexico, each one dollar, Oklahoma $9, 
Kansas $104, Colorado $40, California $300, etc., etc. Nebraska herself 
gave $59. Of course she gave several thousands for Home Missions, but 
we are dividing now on the principle of " each for all and all for each." 
Nearly one-third of the whole amount, or $5,190, came from legacies. It 
came from living hearts, but was taken from the outstretched hands of the 
dead. 

The whole amount stands for many sacrifices. Much of it was tithe 
money. Many pennies, nickels, and dimes helped to swell the amount. 
It was preceded, attended, and followed by many prayers. If the record 
of each gift could be traced back to the hands and heart of each giver a 
unique book could be made out of all the records. 

It is sacred money. If it were all coming in the express car on one 
train and robbers should "hold up " that train, those robbers, if they had 
any proper sense of the fitness of things, would no more touch that money 
than they would tear the wedding ring from the bride's finger in the Pull- 
man car, or strip the silver plate from the coffin in the baggage car. 

And so we, if we have a proper sense of the fitness of things, will be 
very careful not to waste or pervert that money. Rather we will strive to 
make it go just as far as possible in securing the results intended by the 
givers, and by their trustee, the National Society. 

And who are we ? Three classes at least of those on the field. 

First, the State board. Its members meet monthly and pass upon the 
applications from the churches. It is their duty to study carefully the 
whole field, and, so far as they can, each particular field, to take all facts 
into consideration, and conscientiously to make that money, of which 
they are intermediary trustees, go as far as possible. 

They naturally feel friendly towards new and promising enterprises, 



108 The Home Missionary October, 1898 

towards churches that have been unfortunate, those that have made good 
benevolent contributions, and those that make heroic efforts to pay off 
debts, to build, or to become self-supporting. Towards old churches 
that settle down at their ease and assume that they can keep on getting 
just so much from the Society until Gabriel's trump sounds, they ought 
to feel somewhat as a hen does towards her chickens when they are 
several months old. They ought to see that the money allotted to them 
goes as far as possible in making spiritual muscle and fiber in the Congre- 
gational work of their State. They should have no partiality for, or pre- 
judice against, any man, church, or section. They should be economical 
in their traveling expenses, and practically unanimous in their action. 
They will surely be criticised, and they should have good reasons for all 
their acts, though they may not always make those reasons public. The 
churches after electing them must trust them to do the right thing. 

What is true of them is also true of the superintendent and of the 
committees that indorse applications, just so far as they are in a position 
to help decide how much aid any church shall receive. 

Second, the aided churches. These should ask for help as a last resort 
and should not regard what they can probably receive as the piece de resis- 
tance of the pastor's salary. It is not a debt due the churches from the 
donors, the National Society, or the State board. It is a gift for which 
the donors should be thanked. When once promised, it is a debt due the 
pastor, but to the church it is a gift. Thanks can be returned by church 
resolutions, especially when the church reaches self-support, but a better 
way of giving thanks is by taking good collections for Home Missions. 

In order to make the money go as far as possible, aided churches 
should be willing to be " yoked " with neighboring churches when the 
superintendent and the board think it best. They should have somewhat 
of that unselfish spirit towards other weak churches that the wounded 
soldier on the battle-field had when he said : " Doctor, help that other 
man first, he needs your help more than I do." 

Nor should aided churches be too particular about having " smart " 
ministers. There are ministers — God bless them ! — who say to the super- 
intendent : " Send me to the hardest field you have, the one that nobody 
else wants, and by the help of God I will try to make something out of 
it." We all admire such men and they are always in demand. Why 
should not churches have the same spirit, and say to the superintendent : 
" Send us such a preacher as you have at hand, if only he be sound in the 
faith, pure in his life, and unselfish in his spirit. We will take him, stand by 
him, and pray him into a successful minister." If the superintendent 
should receive such a request he would feel that the advance agent of a 
church millennium was at his door, and that his baggage was due on the 
next train. High honor awaits the church that makes such a request, and 



loctober, 1898 The Home Missionary 109 

the minister who will acknowledge himself least of all his brethren. If 
an aided church is granted less than it asks for, it should rustle around 
and raise that amount in some way, and not let it come out of the pastor's 
already too small salary. 

Third, the home missionary pastors. They, too, are partners in this 
triple alliance whose object is to secure the largest results from the least 
money. Their labors must justify the expenditure of all this sacred money. 
They should try to do more than simply hold a field. They should labor 
for an increase in one way or another, or in all ways, an increase of church 
members, of the Sunday-school, of the congregation, of gifts, or of spirit- 
uality. They should do real missionary work, reaching out to the regions 
beyond and around, to the unreached and the unsaved, according to the 
terms of their commission. That commission should be read often and care- 
fully. 

Eastern givers expect the Home Missionaries to evangelize the new 
communities and to build up the waste places. They should set self-sup- 
port before themselves and their people as a goal to be reached as soon as 
possible. Let them, too, have the spirit of the soldier who cried : " Help 
that other man first." Many brave and self-denying Home Missionaries 
and their wives have made the sacred money go much further when they 
have offered to get along on less so that needier fields might be helped. 

It is a blessed feeling that one has when he gets out of debt, and to 
pastor and people it is a blessed experience to become independent of 
home missionary help. Let them sing the doxology loud and long when 
they do it. And it will be a good day when whole States that were once 
wholly missionary ground come to self-support. God speed the day ! 
Let us also speed it. 

* 

FOUNDATION WORK IN HOME MISSIONS 

Bv Mrs. Joseph Ward, Yankton, S. D. 

While Rev. W. B. D. Gray was superintendent of the Sunday-School 
and Publishing Society's work in South Dakota and North Wyoming, he 
sent one of his missionaries on a prospecting tour into Buffalo County, to 
plan for the planting of Sunday-schools and churches, should they be 
needed. Upon his return the missionary reported : " No Sunday-schools, 
no preaching stations, no resident nor visiting minister of any denomina- 
tion." In short, the call seemed so urgent that the two immediately 
returned together and began work. 

Arriving at the end of the railroad, they hired a team, and driving over 
the prairies fifty miles further, late at night arrived at the little settlement 



iio The Home Missionary October, i8< 

• 

which had been chosen as the Buffalo County seat. Finding an aban- 
doned house on the outskirts, sometimes used for school purposes, they 
took possession of it, and the next day visited from house to house far out 
upon the wide prairie, telling the people that a preaching service would 
be held there that same evening. The people hailed the news with de- 
light, and came flocking in from their homes, eight, ten, and twelve miles 
distant, filling the house, which they lighted by hanging up their smoky 
lanterns all about the walls of the rooms. Mr. Gray addressed them, and 
at the close of his remarks asked them if they did not want to have a 
Sunday-school organized where they could meet to study the Bible to- 
gether. 

For this they were unanimous ; a school was organized that very night, 
and the missionary returned at intervals to look after the work. Soon the 
building was too small for the purpose ; it was inconvenient otherwise ; 
so the people moved to build a church, all contributing what they could. 
They could not give much in ready money, but they gave liberally in hard 
work, and the use of their teams for hauling the lumber and building 
material from the railway station. While they worked with their hands so 
willingly, the Spirit of God was working on the hearts of the people, and 
one after another they consecrated their lives to him, and a church was 
organized. When the building was nearly completed, the superintendent 
was asked to come and dedicate the house of worship. So, at the close 
of the meetings of the General Association of Congregational Churches 
that fall, Mr. Gray and his missionary, with the home missionary super- 
intendent of church work and the pastor of the Yankton church, started off 
for Buffalo County. At a little hamlet, sixteen miles from where they left 
the railroad, they stopped for the night. Engaging a room that was 
vacant, the brethren held a religious service at which six persons signified 
their intention to live the Christian life. The next morning was the Sab- 
bath. It was cloudy and dark, but the superintendent and his brother 
ministers started early and drove to their destination, some thirty-five 
miles distant. When they arrived at the church, the people were gather- 
ing for the service from near and far. As on the former occasion, they 
came from eight to sixteen miles away, and one family had traveled 
twenty-six miles in order to be present at so notable a service ! They 
brought their lunch baskets and piled them in the rear of the church. 
The building was not yet seated, so chairs were brought in ; but most of 
the seats were improvised for the occasion out of boards, and others were 
taken in from their wagons. 

The usual preliminary dedication exercises consumed the forenoon. 
Lunch was served in the church at noon, the same boards doing duty as 
tables. In the afternoon came the sermon and addresses. At a late hour 
the superintendent arose to close the meeting, when, over in the further 



October, 1898 The Home Missionary in 

corner of the room, a man jumped to his feet and, holding up his hand, 
asked, "You hain't all preached out yit, be you ?" And, pointing with a 
long bony forefinger to one of the brethren, added, " That man hain't 
preached yit ! " The superintendent, turning to the minister singled out 

in this pointed fashion, said : " How is it, brother , are you preached 

out yet?" In reply the minister came forward, announced a text and 
preached a sermon. The interest deepens ; an after-meeting is held, and 
sixteen persons come forward for prayers and announce their decision to 
live as Christians. 

It appears that from this place the people — happy in what they had 
received for themselves and their children — -had reached out the helping 
hand and organized a Sunday-school, with the help of the missionary, at 
an out- station ten miles distant. So, by previous arrangement, on Mon- 
day morning the superintendents and their associates went over to the 
out-station to organize a church. As on the Sabbath, the ministers had a 
full day here, and the great joy of breaking the Bread of Life to hungry 
people. It was late in the afternoon before the services came to a close, 
and the superintendent felt that he must urge the people to their homes. 
They were reluctant to go ; but it would soon be dark, and almost all had 
many miles to go over the trackless prairies. There was their stock to 
feed, etc. It had surely been a long day for the ministers and they were 
weary, if the people were not ; so, bidding them " good-by," the minis- 
ters drove off to the little cabin, three miles away, where they were to be 
entertained for the night. 

Their kind hostess, who had been at the meetings all day, hastened to 
prepare the evening meal for her " distinguished home missionary guests," 
and with what disinterested and generous Christian hospitality does this 
good woman minister to these tired workmen in the service of her Lord ! 

While they sat at the table — it was then nearly nine o'clock — there came 
a sudden knock at the door, startling all in the house, and a man appeared, 
one of those who had started for his home, after the services in the store- 
building, where the church had just been organized. Catching sight of 
Mr. Gray through the open door, he began breathlessly : " Mr. Gray, we 
could not go home. We have made an appointment for a preaching ser- 
vice in the schoolhouse three miles from here. You'll have an audience, 
too. There's some as hasn't heard you to-day, and we'll be there, too. 
We've sent the boys out on broncos to tell the people that there'll be 
preaching to-night !" And the man was gone as rapidly as he had come. 

It was a particularly dark night, and every one who knows anything 
about a prairie country knows how easy it is for the most experienced 
traveler to get lost under such circumstances. The man had given minute 
directions about finding and keeping the trail ; but could they find the 
way to that lone schoolhouse was the question. Devoted to the Master's 



112 The Home Missionary October, 1898 

service as these his home missionary servants were, they could not be in- 
different to such a cry for the Bread and the Water of Life, of which if a 
man eat and drink he shall hunger and thirst nevermore. And oh, the 
privilege of ministering In His Name to these "perishing" ones. 

The ministers set out for the schoolhouse indicated, following direc- 
tions with great care, until, finally, after much groping, a light in the dis- 
tance is sighted to which they direct their course. It proves to be a 
beacon light and guide to the place of service. Entering, they find the 
room so crowded that the ministers who preach are not able to make a 
gesture. The people hang upon the preacher's words and listen as if for 
their lives. 

At the close of the meeting, several " heads of families " arose for 
prayers, and declared their purpose to live hereafter the lives of Christian 
men and women. 

Now, what did these consecrated Home Missionaries care if they were 
worn and weary in body after the day's work was finally ended ? Or that 
it was well into the morning hou^s before they reached the little prairie 
cabin where they had been so hospitably received, and laid themselves 
down to sleep ? Neither did they care, if, in receiving from their host and 
hostess "the best that the house could afford," some of them had only 
the hard, bare floor for a resting-place for the night. Did they not re- 
member that Christ " had not where to lay his head ; " that "the disci- 
ple is not above his Master, nor the servant above his Lord ; " that " it is 
enough for the disciple that he be as his Master, and the servant as his 
Lord " ? 

* 
NINETEENTH CENTURY MISSIONARY GIVING 

A business friend of ours, who through the years of a long and active 
business life has been daily familiar with large figures, in the secular use 
of which he is an expert, has given no little time also to the study of 
large figures measuring the Christian missionary operations — particularly 
of the Bible and Tract societies of both hemispheres — in which he takes 
the warmest interest. In a recent call, reminding us that the London 
Religious Tract Society was formed in 1799, the British and Foreign 
Bible Society in 1804, the American Bible Society in 18 16, and the Ameri- 
can Tract Society in 1825, he catechized us as to our ideas of the outlay 
of those combined institutions within the century now drawing to its close. 

Our guesses, wide of the mark, drew from him figures of undoubted 
correctness, and of a magnitude so vast that we presume they will astonish 
most readers whose attention has not been specially called to them. We 



October, 1898 The Home Missionary 113 

hope, also, that they will cheer the hearts of many desponding ones, wont 
to feel that all the Christian effort of the world has done but little to 
change its moral aspect, and that there is small encouragement to per- 
severe in this line of effort for bringing the world to Christ. 

Our careful friend's figures show that since 1804 the Bible societies of 
the world have issued 275,000,000 copies of the Bible, New Testament, 
and portions — not less than nine-tenths of the work being done by the 
British and American Bible Societies. 

If to these issues of the societies we add the copies of the Bible issued 
by private publishers and by the Anglo-American revisers (together esti- 
mated at 25,000,000 copies), the vast total is 300,000,000 copies — enough 
to supply one copy to every family on the globe. It also appears that 
the two tract societies above named have, within the century, issued re- 
ligious matter in sufficient quantity to give a small volume to every person 
in the world. 

The expenditures of all the Bible societies of the world, within the 
century, have amounted to fully $100,000,000. Add to this the expendi- 
tures of the two tract societies named, and there is shown a total of $160,- 
000,000 spent in Bible and tract work alone within the century. The 
American Bible Society last year issued 1,362,273 copies of the Bible, and 
the British and Foreign Society issued 4,387,152 copies — a total of 5,749,- 
425 copies, an average of more than 18,368 copies for each working day 
in the year. 

The figures show that the United States and Great Britain have spent, 
through their great missionary organizations, more than $1, 000,000, 000 
during the century. Our own country alone spends an average of $14,- 
000,000 a year in home and foreign missionary work — " not including 
the amounts spent in State, city, and private mission work, which- would 
increase the total enormously." 

Had our good friend, also, the gift of prophecy, to foresee and foretell 
the outlay of these and other instrumentalities for Christian missions in 
all their forms for the coming century — should that outlay keep pace 
with the expected growth of the Christian nations through that century — 
with what a vast array of figures might he quicken the faith and uplift the 
hearts of Christ's believing ones ! 



ONE OF THE ROUGH PLACES 

Our work here is truly a self-sacrificing one. In the first place we 
have a conglomeration of inhabitants from every class of people all over 
the country, and one place, be it cabin, or dugout, or board shanty, may 



U4 The Home Missionary October, 1898 

be inhabited by a refined Christian lady from " the States," and the very 
next by a gang of horse-thieves or it may be a den of infamy. It was 

only this spring that brother B and his lovely Christian wife and six 

children, as beautiful as any father could desire, came just within a hair's 
breadth of being poisoned by one of a band of outlaws, a near neighbor, 
who put quicksilver in the well that supplied the family. All that saved 

their lives was the fact that Mr. B 's sixteen-year-old boy had been so 

kind to a young son of one of the band of thieves that he came and told 
of the plot, and Mr. B had them all arrested. He could prove noth- 
ing, nor bring them to justice, for the judge was the father of two of the 

gang. Friends of the gang lay in wait for Mr. B 's son and the boy who 

had informed. They found them at church eight miles from home and 
ran their horses all that way to catch and hang them ; but God watched 
over the poor boys and brought them home, white and trembling, but safe. 

This brother B and his family are members of our church here. 

He is a grand Christian man, and the saloon men warned him to leave this 
place. The people East have been so kind to me that > wanted them to 
know what true heroes the pew has here as well as the pulpit. 

While Mr. Parker, the evangelist, was here with his tent he seemed 
very greatly troubled about his wife in Oklahoma City, and two young 
daughters. The country was flooded, the railroad was washed out, and 
no letters could come or go. As soon as he could he sent a letter to her 
with three dollars in it (all he had in the world), and back came the answer 
that she was glad he was safe and that the letter found her with only 
twenty cents left, and her home wholly surrounded by water, so that she 
had to send for Rev. Mr. Harper to come and help to put the furniture 
and carpets upstairs, for the water was coming into their parlor. Thus 
they lived for three long weeks. She is a dear, brave Christian. I think 
I can imagine how she felt as she looked on that last twenty cents and 
wondered where to put it, for I was in the same strait last Saturday, only 
I had forty cents left. I have told you in another letter that I had spent 
over half my quarterly allowance [only $19.75 per quarter] in boarding 
the workers at the camp meeting and buying gasoline, and corn for the 
teams. I had managed to get along until Saturday ; then there was oil 
to be bought for the church services. After buying some meal and a 
little bacon I saw I would have no money left for oil, so I sent the can over 

to brother B and told him to please buy some, as I could not do it. 

Then he knew I must be out of money and he sent me two dollars, although 
he has hard work to live. So we did not have to live on the meal over 
the Sabbath, for I was much afraid of it in hot weather. The thermome- 
ter is up over 100 degrees now every day, and I feared most for my baby. 
Milk is like so much poison to all of us now, and we like it so well, but 
cannot use it. Many of the people here seem just determined to starve 



October, 1898 The Home Missionary 115 

out every minister in the place. Brother B heard from one of the 

wealthy business men the other day this sneering remark : " I never saw 
such a place as this for starved-out preachers." It. did hurt our brother 

B badly, but it will hurt the one that made it far worse. Truly this 

is one of the highways of sin, where if we get the people into the kingdom 
of God we shall have, as Christ told us, to " compel them to come in," but 
I feel willing to endure hardness as a good soldier of Jesus Christ. My 
dear people do all they can, but are not able to do anything till fall, when 
cotton-picking time comes, and money is more plentiful. I have had only 
four dollars from them altogether yet, and I expect the Lord will have to 
feed us as he did Elijah for a month or two. He is able, and I shall trust 
him. 

Our class is doing nicely and growing in grace daily, and we had four- 
teen out to prayer-meeting Tuesday night. I thank God for the sound 
of abundance of rain in the spiritual church everywhere. — Oklahoma. 



YEAST 

I am a Western woman and much interested in the " Fifth Wheel," 
published in The Home Missionary for July. I believe that all this edu- 
cation and experience of our women may be utilized in carrying on the 
work in its changed form. 

I would use it as our women use yeast in making bread. I always 
prepare a bowl of yeast the afternoon before baking day, and when it is 
light I put it into the larger vessel in which I mix my dough. 

It may be that our separate woman's organization is ready to be 
poured into the church, and used of God to leaven the whole lump with 
missionary zeal. 

In this matter of " yeast," there is one significant condition to be 
noted : When it is light, I believe that the end of that long afternoon 
before baking-day has come, and that the leaven is ready to be poured 
into — what ? Is the larger vessel ready ? God only knows. 

My faith is boundless as to the possibilities of woman when she really 
determines on a course of action. The " yeast " will be lively, and the 
larger vessel would better be sure of itself or the contents may run over. 
Who shall be the mixer ? — Kansas, 



National Prosperity. — The righteous men of a nation are its strength. The 
Christian conscience is a nation's strongest element of power. Dr. Humphrey answered 
truly the Frenchman's inquiry after the cause of our nation's prosperity : " It is because 
our people largely believe and practice the Ten Commandments." — The Advance. 



116 The Home Missionary October, 1898 

LATER FROM ALASKA 

By Superintendent Loyal L. Wirt 

I believe I can sympathize not a little with General Augusti, when 
his communication with Madrid was cut off and he was thrown back en- 
tirely upon his own judgment. It is now two months since I have heard 
from you. I know these have been vacation days, so I have solaced 
myself with hope and fed our good people with promises. 

In pursuing my original plan to bring Douglas as early as possible to 
self-support before sending for reinforcements, I am moving as slowly 
and carefully as, under the circumstances, is consistent with what we have 
gathered and possessing ourselves of what more is legitimately ours. 

Juneau is rapidly growing in population and importance. Some ten or 
twelve stores and business blocks are now building, besides many dwellings, 
and others are to go up shortly. The new gold discovery near Lake Tagish, 
only 100 miles from here, is bringing thousands of men into that region. 
Juneau will become their base of supplies and largely their winter quarters. 

Douglas must have a church home, and there are only a few months 
more in which the weather will permit building. If the people there 
needed not to look out for salary for a few months they would not mind 
being taxed for funds for a church. Last Sunday a business committee 
was appointed, and this week, with their help, I am in quest of a lot. 

The attendance at both Sunday-school and Christian Endeavor Society 
has increased in Douglas since getting into the new Odd Fellows Hall. 

None are more glad that the war is over than are the inhabitants of 
Alaska, for now, they think, the newspapers will give the new gold fields 
the prominence they deserve. I am profoundly impressed with the great 
future which is surely before Alaska, and especially southeastern Alaska, 
where advantages of climate and transportation, coupled with the inex- 
haustible veins of gold-bearing quartz, and now with placers of great 
richness, combine to give conditions which cannot fail to attract thou- 
sands of settlers and millions of invested capital. 

Later. — Since writing you last I have been in active search for a lot, 
as a first step toward a church house in Douglas. This, I am glad to re- 
port, has not been without promise of success. Almost all the ground on 
Douglas Island is held under "mineral patents"; hence there is little or 
no land for sale. My first efforts were all disappointing; even the friendly 
Treadwell Company could not break its rule to sell or lease. There re- 
mained a narrow strip of land in the most desirable locality, for which I 
could find no owner or claimant. Finally, after diligent search, I came 
upon one director of the company owning the property, which is also held 
as a " quartz location." 



October, 1898 The Home Missionary 117 

The gentleman knew of my work and received me very kindly. He 
offered to let me select any site I might desire for a nominal rental of 
one dollar a month, the lease to remain in force indefinitely, or until the 
land should be needed for the operations of the company. The claim 
has been prospected, and the ledge does not run anywhere near the place 
where the church should be built. But if this is not satisfactory, the 
director offers to do better than that, namely, to write to the other direc- 
tors, who are scattered widely, and get their consent to the gift of a 
"surface deed," that is, a deed for the surface of the ground, reserving 
the right to "drift" underneath, should future developments show that 
there is mineral there. This is as good as our business committee want, 
and is, indeed, much better than most expected. 

The women of our Douglas congregation have organized what they 
call a "Ladies' League," and they have offered to undertake the. respon- 
sibility of looking after the monthly sum necessary to pay the board of a 
resident minister, should one be given them. 

We had very encouraging congregations there last Sunday. I ven- 
tured to outline briefly a plan of work upon which I hope this church will 
enter. The suggestions, embodying a reading-room, evening classes, town 
charities, evangelical work, etc., were received with apparent interest. 

A small matter, but one which adds to Mrs. Wirt's contentment, if 
not to her opportunities for service " In His Name," is the warm place 
which has been accorded her in our "good society." It is interesting to 
note the cosmopolitan character of the ladies, twenty or thirty of them, 
who are working together like sisters in preparing for an entertainment 
to be given in the Opera House this week, the proceeds of which are to 
pay for the new pews we put into Congregational Hall a few weeks ago. 
Congregationalists, Presbyterians, Methodists, Episcopalians, Lutherans, 
Swedes, Jews, and proselytes of the gate, all are of one accord in this. 
A saloon and restaurant keeper's wife has offered to make all the ice- 
cream. There is many a soul here who cannot speak in meeting, yet 
who longs for an opportunity to show her love for our Lord and for his 
church. There are alabaster boxes of precious ointment yet to be broken 
on his blessed feet. 



AUNT JUDY'S WORK FOR HOME MISSIONS 

By Minnie E. Kenney 

A day in February, albeit the blue sky with banks of fleecy clouds, 
and the soft, mild air would better have suited an April day. A weather- 
beaten cabin, stained by age in mellow tints of grey and brown, with a 
moss-covered roof, standing on the border of a North Carolina pine for- 



1 1 8 The Home Missionary October, 1898 

est, whose spicy breath made the air odorous, and strewed the ground 
with a slippery carpet of dried, brown needles. 

Aunt Judy sat by the little many-paned window knitting industriously, 
now and then casting a watchful glance at an old hen with a brood of tiny 
chicks, who was rejoicing in her temporary emancipation from the wood- 
house, where she was usually confined, as the result of her imprudence in 
hatching out her family at such an unseasonable time. Far in the dis- 
tance Aunt Judy could hear the shriek of the locomotive as the express 
came thundering along on its southward way ; she knew it must be nearly 
three o'clock, for in default of a clock she divided up the day by various 
incidents which usually occurred at about the same hour. To-day some- 
thing must have happened, for just as the train was nearly opposite Aunt 
Judy's cabin the rumble and roar ceased, the fleecy cloud of steam became 
stationary instead of rushing on, and as the old woman looked out from 
her doorway she saw that the panting, palpitating engine had come to a 
sudden stand-still, and that a long row of heads were thrust from open 
windows, as the passengers sought to ascertain the cause of the detention. 

Aunt Judy went placidly back to her knitting when she found that 
the train was likely to be detained some time, and she was so absorbed in 
her own thoughts that she had quite forgotten the detention when she 
saw a couple leisurely sauntering down the road who were evidently 
passengers upon the belated train. 

They had determined to take a short walk among the pine trees when 
they found that they would be detained for an hour at least, and as this 
journey was one of those trips where the travelers were oblivious of the 
presence of anyone else in the world save each other, they walked past 
the tiny weather-beaten house without seeing the face that peered from 
the window. The snowy cloud-wreaths grew dark, and before the stran- 
gers emerged again from the shadow of the forest, a dark bank of threat- 
ening clouds was already beginning to discharge its contents. Full of 
hospitable intention, Aunt Judy stirred up the smoldering embers of the 
open fireplace, and throwing on a knot of light wood and a fresh log, 
kindled the fire into a cheerful blaze. Then she went to the door and 
looked down the road. The large drops were falling thicker and faster 
as the two figures came in sight, walking rapidly. 

" Won't you come in till the shower's over ? " asked Aunt Judy, as 
soon as they came within earshot. " You ain't got no umbrella, and the 
lady'll get her dress wet." 

There was a moment's irresolution, a glance at the dainty, pearl- 
colored traveling dress, and the long stretch yet intervening before the 
train could be reached, and then the invitation was cordially accepted, 
and in a few moments the strangers were seated beside the blazing fire, 
which sent out a grateful warmth. 



October, 1898 The Home Missionary 119 

Aunt Judy did not attempt to entertain her visitors ; she went back to 
her seat at the window and her knitting, and they talked together in low 
voices as they watched the dancing flames. The shower settled into a 
heavy down-pour of rain, and at last the gentleman suggested that he should 
return to the train for waterproof and umbrella, so that his wife might 
reach the cars without being wet through. Just as he was about to start 
there was a shrill whistle from the engine, and the train moved off, leav- 
ing the two passengers thus left behind gazing at each other in dismay. 

" What will we do ? " was the exclamation. 

" You'll just have to stay with me to-night," answered Aunt Judy, 
"and in the morning my nephew's going to drive over to the station, and 
I'll stop him 'as he goes past so he can take you over ; then you can get 
the morning train. I know this ain't much of a place to stay," she added, 
as she interpreted the expression of dismay upon the lady's face, " but 
you'll be heartily welcome, and you couldn't be more than that nowhere." 

Aunt Judy bade her unexpected guests to make themselves at home, and 
putting up her knitting on the high old-fashioned mantel-shelf over the 
fireplace, she went out into the tiny kitchen and began to prepare supper. 

It was very little she had to offer her guests, and she was so stiff and 
lame from the rheumatism which crippled her, that she could only hobble 
about very slowly ; so the task of preparing even this simple meal was no 
slight one. 

When they gathered about the table with its miscellaneous assortment 
of dishes, for Aunt Judy's cupboard had but a limited supply, the dim 
eyes brightened as she saw the strangers reverently bow their heads for a 
moment. They were no longer strangers to her, since they owned the 
same Lord and Master to whom she had given her heart long years ago, 
and she was glad that she had had a chance to bid them welcome. 

Suddenly an odor of burning woolen came through the open door from 
the adjoining room, and Aunt Judy rose from her seat with an expression 
of consternation on her face, and went as quickly as she could to find out 
the cause. 

Such a sorrowful cry escaped her that her guests followed her to find 
the old woman holding the nearly completed mitten upon which she had 
been at work in her hand, while tears trickled down her wrinkled cheeks 
as she looked at the hole which had been burned in it, and which could 
scarcely be repaired. 

I wish I could describe that mitten to you. Surely it must have been 
shaped after some pattern that Aunt Judy herself devised. Large and 
uncouth in its proportions, with straggling, unshapely fingers, and a long, 
close wrist knitted in alternate little squares of black and white yarn, it 
was but a poor thing to mourn over with tears, and that was, perhaps, the 
unspoken thought in the minds of her guests. 



120 The Home Missionary October, 1898 

" Don't feel so badly over it," said the lady gently. " You can knit 
another, can't you ? " 

" Yes, but I'll have to wait so long for the yarn," mourned Aunt 
Judy. " You see it's this way. There was a lady here once, five years 
ago, on her way to go out West as a missionary, and she was staying over 
night at my niece's ; so I heard her talk about the place where she was 
going to, and how they needed churches to take care of the young men 
that went out there, to keep them from feeling neglected like, and going 
wrong. I had a boy once, he died while he was only a little baby in arms, 
but I know how a mother feels, and I could feel for those whose boys had 
to go out West, and be in the midst of all sorts of wickedness, with nothing 
to keep them in the ways they were brought up in. The lady, she wanted 
us to have a missionary society here, and send on money, but they all felt 
too poor. We can't even support preaching round here, so of course 
they didn't feel like they could send money away ; but I was so stirred 
up thinking of my own boy, so safe in heaven, and these other boys, just 
as dear to their mothers' hearts as my baby was to me, that I told her I'd 
send a dollar to her every year, if that would be a help. How I should 
get it was what troubled me considerable, for I'm so crippled up with rheu- 
matism I can't do much work, and some days I can hardly manage to get 
about the house. One of my nephews he gave me this little house to live 
in when I couldn't do for myself no more, and the others bring me what I 
need to eat, but of course I can't ask them to give me money, for they're 
hard pressed themselves. If it wasn't for these mittens I couldn't make 
out to have my missionary money nohow. But the men like my mittens ; 
they say they never wear out, and they're handy to work in on account of 
their having fingers ; so down at the store they give me yarn enough to 
knit a pair for myself every time I knit a pair for them. Then I can sell 
the mittens for fifty cents, for that's just what they ask for them at the 
store. If only my fingers weren't so stiff and lame I cculd do right well, 
but some days I can't knit at all, and other days I can only work right 
slow, so it generally takes me nigh onto three months to knit a pair." 

" And do you mean to say that you spend three months in knitting, just to 
get the material to make one pair of mittens for yourself ? " asked her guest. 

Aunt Judy nodded. 

" Yes, so that's what makes me feel so bad about this mitten getting 
burned. I s'pose I put it too near the edge of the shelf, and the ball 
rolled off and dragged the mitten with it. I had just about done this 
pair, and Seth Low is waiting for them, so I could have had the money 
to send next week ; but now I'll have to wait till I knit a pair before I 
can get some more yarn to finish off this one, and it seems so long to 
wait." The tears began to trickle- down the furrowed channels again, as 
Aunt Judy laid the mitten back on the shelf with a sigh. 



October, 1898 The Home Missionary 121 

" Miss Judy," and the rough misshapen hands were clasped warmly in 
the soft, slender fingers that had done so little of the work which had been 
the lot of the older woman. " I don't know how to thank you for teach- 
ing me what a missionary spirit is. Here I have flattered myself that I 
was a great worker, and doing all that could possibly be expected of me, 
because I generally attend our missionary meetings, do a little sewing 
when we are going to send off a box, and give a dollar a year, which 
doesn't cost me one bit of self-denial or work. Miss Judy, won't you let 
me have these mittens just as they are, and I will take them home with 
me, and show them to our ladies when I hear them saying that they can't 
possibly afford to give anything to Home Missions? Yes, you must let me 
have them," as Aunt Judy made a gesture of dissent. " They will be 
missionary workers, so I know you will let them go, when they will teach 
lessons of self-denial, and love for the missionary cause." 

Reluctantly Aunt Judy yielded, for in her perfect humility she could 
not realize that the simple story of her mittens could be of any use, but 
she steadfastly refused to accept a cent beyond the half-dollar that was 
her usual price. 

They went back to the table at last, and as the guests saw how little 
of what they had been accustomed to consider as necessities was placed 
before them, though Aunt Judy had done her best, they realized still more 
the generosity that sent the dollar away which might have added so much 
to the comfortless life. 

Not a cent would Aunt Judy take in return for her hospitality, but her 
guests comforted themselves for her refusal by sending her a box contain- 
ing many a comfort to brighten the lonely, self-denying life. 

The mittens did their work. They were handed to the minister of the 
prosperous city church, and their story told to him. Soon afterward he 
preached a sermon upon Home Missions, and shall I tell you what he took 
for a text ? " She hath done what she could," illustrated by those homely, 
ill-shaped mittens, with the hole defacing one of them. 

They did their work well. Who of those people surrounded by all the 
comforts and oftentimes the luxuries of life, could resist giving to the 
cause for which the poor, dependent old woman labored and denied her- 
self so nobly? Those mittens warmed cold hearts to love and missionary 
zeal, and Aunt Judy's glistening tears were turned into shining gold and 
silver. 

Aunt Judy's trembling hands work no longer for the cause she loved. 
Their life work is over, and they are folded in quiet rest, while the sweet- 
breathed pines wave over her grave, and whisper of the fragrant memory 
of self-denial which she left behind her. 

But is her missionary work done ? Must it stop in the church which 
awoke to a sense of its duty, at the sight of that work done by the loving 



122 The Home Missionary October, 1898 

hands of one who, poor in this world's goods, sought to give as freely as! 
she had received of the Savior's love ? 

Nay, it must not stop here. Surely the recital of her self-sacrifice 
shall stir some other heart so that she, being dead, shall yet speak, and 
call others to the work. — The Congregationalist. 



IF GOD'o PEOPLE ONLY KNEW 

By Rev. D. B. Gray, Portland, Oregon 

Another quarter has gone swiftly, happily, encouragingly as to the 
promise of results ; people hungering for more preaching than one man 
can possibly give them ; services for young people in three different sta- 
tions, with eager inquiring attention and harvests seeming ready to be 
gathered. Oh, why are the laborers so few ? I feel it in my bones that 
if there were only two or three good wise men to help me for the next 
three months, a rich harvest of souls would be gathered. At a station 
which I could visit only once every month or two I found so much inter- 
est, such a crowd of eager listeners, that I said to myself after each ser- 
vice : Oh, what a pity that they could not have a sermon every Sunday 
evening ! And, sure enough, a beloved brother, temporarilv out of a 
field for want of missionary support, came along and said, " For the pres- 
ent, I'll go every Sunday." He has been going for a month or two, and 
his heart so warmed toward those young people that if there were any 
earthly way of support he would continue, for he believes that showers of 
blessing would fall. But now he must find a field, as his means are ex- 
hausted. What shall we do for more men, or rather for means to support 
them ? for then men could be found for these fields white to the harvest. 

Words on paper seem so cold compared with what we could make the 
givers to your Society see if we could take them over the fields. Suppose 
I had a wealthy, warm-hearted, soul loving Christian man to take with 
me on trips to three or four places within a radius of fifteen miles— ideal 
missionary ground, where are scores of young people, the most of them 
in non-Christian homes— some parents skeptical, some indifferent, some 
glad of any influence that may benefit the children, but not interested 
enough to help in supporting the Gospel. Yet these young people, if not 
early reached and saved, will soon be swelling the ranks of the ungodly, 
skeptical, perhaps criminal. Suppose, too, we could show this friend 
what had already been done in some of these neighborhoods, even with 
the insufficient means at command : how the moral tone had been ele- 
vated, how when the occasional services first begun there was disorder 
and noise outside, whispering and laughing inside, where now there is 



:j October, 1898 The Home Missionary 123 

order, interested attention, with evidence that the Word is taking effect ; 
where the day most looked forward to is the Sabbath when the minister 
will come. Suppose he Could have a talk with that school principal 
who, converted from skepticism, carries the little church and Sunday- 
school so much on his heart — he and one other being the only ones able 
to give, and they but very little. Suppose we could take him round 
among many of the poor families, where the father has not had work for 
long, is battling to keep the wolf from the door, with children as bright 
and promising as can be found anywhere. Suppose we show him others 
with small fruit farms, who in ordinary times would be able and willing 
to do something for the church, but with one year of partial crop and low 
prices, and now another year of total failure of crops, and the home mort- 
gaged, with doubt if it can be saved, and yet, because of this poverty and 
these reverses, the people all the more accessible to the minister, the 
church, and the Gospel. Suppose we could let him see for himself these 
and a thousand other things as they are — would I have any doubt about 
his saying, " Put me down for the support of three or four missionaries 
right in this region "? And if he were a very wealthy man, and I were 
to tell him this is only a sample of crying needs and of what could be 
done, from twenty-five to fifty places which Superintendent Clapp could 
tell him of in this State alone — would I have any doubt that he would 
say, " Put me down for all the missionaries needed ; for " (now looking 
out upon the mountains, valleys, towns, cities, mines, and immense re- 
sources of this country) "though I see the State has been a little slow in. 
some things, yet I see it is to be one of the grandest in the Union, and it 
must be held for Christ and an intelligent Christianity." 

i 

NOTES BY THE WAY 

Bv Mrs. H. M. Union 

About the Box 

Dear Mrs. Union : You ask me to tell you what I think about the 
missionary box. We came to Oklahoma seven years ago to labor as Home 
Missionaries. Here began our first experience with the missionary box. 
Our church had not learned much of the grace of giving, and as a con- 
sequence we had but little from the field. Our first box was from Buffalo, 
New York, and what a grand one it was ! It was long, wide, and high, 
and packed with such a variety of things for our comfort ! We could 
readily see that those whose hands prepared it were deeply interested in 
our welfare. They loved the cause, and acted as if they were partners 



124 The Home Missionary October, 1898 

with us. I don't know how much self-denial is put into this work. I've 
often wondered, as I have looked at some pretty articles for our daughters, 
and quite up to date, if some dear girl had parted with things she greatly- 
prized for the sake of another's enjoyment. When there has been a good, 
new dress for each of us, or a good suit of clothes for my husband, I can't 
think they have always come without effort. Perhaps there is much more 
sacrifice here than we generally imagine. Again we are told that certain 
garments belonged to "a dear mother who had fallen asleep in Jesus." 
It must have caused some heart pangs to part with these precious things 
and send them to strangers. There seems to cling about some of these 
mementos a sacred, hallowed feeling, as if the spirit of the wearer still 
lingered near the dropped mantle ; or a dear old lady still remaining on 
time's shore and loath to give up aiding in the work she is so interested 
in, had pieced and put together a quilt so tastefully ! So many love 
stitches have been worked in that it serves a double purpose : it keeps the 
cold wind out and our hearts warm as well. Then there come choice 
packages so carefully wrapped and addressed to each member of the 
family. With mingled feelings of curiosity and delight we open our 
treasures. Father and mother look at each other and smile, and in their 
hearts thank God for such friends, while the younger members of the 
family are more boisterous over their findings. 

It is a jolly time, 1 assure you, when the missionary box is being un- 
packed. We have often wished the dear ones that prepared the treat 
could be unobserved watchers, to hear the exclamations of delight as this 
or that garment was tried on and pronounced a fit. And we have said so 
often, " It is just what we were needing," or " Little extra things that one 
could get along without, but they're so pleasant to have." The usual 
salary of the ordinary Home Missionary will admit of very few of these 
" extras." Another of our choice gifts is good books. How we prize our 
splendid copy of " Glimpses of Fifty Years," especially so now that the 
gifted author has truly found " how beautiful it is to be with God ; " or our 
work, " Moses, the Servant of God," by that prince of religious writers, 
F. B. Meyer ; or, again, our volume entitled,. " Prevailing Prayer." 
These, with other choice works, found their way to our home and hearts 
by the way of the missionary box. 

Another rich blessing that flows from this fruitful source is the help 
we can be to needy deserving ones in our parish. We are always watch- 
ful to help those who will make use of it to get out to church and Sun- 
day-school. How many of God's dear children I have thus been enabled 
to tide over difficult places and get a child's wardrobe completed. Some- 
times there are five or six children, where there are some missing articles 
that the anxious mother with all her planning has failed to supply. I have 
in mind one such family in our church. There were five children. The 



October, 1898 The Home Missionary 125 

father had died some months before, then a sister dying left three orphans. 
Another father and mother, believing it to be their work, opened their 
hearts and home and took the little ones to rear." It has been a real 
pleasure to help this godly father and mother out of our missionary box. 
And it has been a refreshing sight to see this little flock come marching 
into Sunday-school bright and smiling, enabled to be so comfortable be- 
cause others had helped us so that we could help them. I think, though, I 
have most appreciated the privilege of replenishing the wardrobe of some 
poor Christian girl who found it difficult to so dress herself as to look like 
other girls. I have enjoyed being used of the Master to make good his word, 
" Seek ye first the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these 
things shall be added unto you." We look into the matter and as far as 
possible supply their wants, and the more of cheerful self-denial exercised 
on our part the greater has been our blessing. It has given us a key to 
unlock some hearts for the entrance of the King of kings. 

From our experience in giving, in connection with our Home and 
Foreign Missionary Societies, I am convinced that there comes a real joy 
into the hearts and lives of those who so faithfully prepare our home mis- 
sionary barrels ; and that their interest awakened by hearing directly from 
the field, adds much to their zeal and encouragement to continue this line 
of labor in the Lord's vineyard. That the articles sent are a great help 
many of our workers in Oklahoma would gladly testify. How much com- 
fort has so been brought into many places and so many lives ! With a 
diminishing salary for the last few years, the home missionary box has filled 
an important place. We often say we could not get along — that is, we 
could not feel presentable — without the help which comes from this source. 

But let me return to the box from Buffalo that I spoke of. There was 
connected with its entrance to our home such a wonderful consciousness of 
the Holy Spirit's presence, that I vividly remember it as if God himself came 
also; as if each article had been prepared and packed with much prayer. 
We learned afterward, through a friend, that the lady who was chiefly in- 
strumental in preparing the box was a woman full of faith and the Holy 
Spirit, and that she had specially asked his blessing to descend upon us. 
I have been conscious of this same prayer for the divine presence in con- 
nection with other missionary gifts. It makes these gifts doubly precious. 

Dearly beloved, I have a growing impression that our God is seeking 
to have us hunger for the revealings of his power in us, and then through 
us to help others. " Blessed are they that do hunger and thirst, for they 
shall be filled." " He that believeth on me, from his inner being shall flow 
rivers of living water." This spake he of the spirit which they who be- 
lieve on him shall receive. May God abundantly bless the toilers for us 
in our Eastern churches, rewarding them richly ! 

A Home Missionary Wife. 



I ! 



126 



The Home Missionary 



October, ii 



APPOINTMENTS 



JUNE, ii 



Not in commission last year 



Ball, Joseph W., Minneha and Chapel Hill, Okla. 

Bauer, Philip E., Bremen, Ind. 

Earl, James, Granite Falls and Bel view. Minn. 

Eshelman, J. T., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Faulk, Joseph, Lincoln Co., Okla. 

Fox, Paul, Cleveland, Ohio 

King, James S., Waycross, Ga. 

Kovac. Andrew, Braddock and Vicinity. Penn. 

Lindholm, L. T., Michigan City, Ind. 

Mason, John R., Andrews. Ind. 

Moya, Jesus M., Lo; Ranchosde Atrisco, N. Mex. 

Palmer, Oscar A , Springfield, Mo. 

Phillips, Charles H., Jamestown, No. Dak. 

Pickles, F. M., Tacoma and Atkinson, Wash. 

Remele, William A., Olympia, Wash. 

Shull, Gilbert L., Lafayette. Colo. 

Smith, Abner C, Starkville, Colo. 

Spangler, George B., Mineisvilleand Camp Creek, 

Neb. 
Staub, Rudolph, Mink and New Era, Ore. 
Steedley, David F., Surrency, Ga. 
Watry, Francis, Alturas. No. Cal. 
Wood, Edwin A., Garvin and Custer, Minn. 



Re-com m issioned 

Allen. Frank TL, Albuquerque. New Mex. 

Atkinson. William H., San Rafael, No. Cal. 

Bartlett, Dana W.. Los Angeles, So. Cal. 

Bassett, Franklin H., New Brighton. Minn. 

Bsadenkoff, Thomas M., Baltimore, Md. 

Birlew, Gordon E., San Rafael, New Mex. 

Blackburn, John F., Fort Valley, Ga. 

Rolin, Nelson J., Upsala, Minn. 

Brown, George E., Wheeler. So. Dak. 

Chapin, C. H., New Paynesville, Minn. 

Chatfield. George A., Rico, Colo. 

Chevis, Ernest C., Audubon and Lake Park, Minn. 

Childs, Edward P., Ashland, Ore. 

Clark, Orville C, Missoula, Mori. 

Cochran, Albert B., Etna, No. Cal. 

Compton. Herbert E., Fessenden, No. Dak. 

Cooke, W. H., Fresno and Oleander, No. Cal. 

Cookman, Isaac, Hennessey. Okla. 

Corbin. Oliver L., Douglas, Wyo. 

Cudd, Wayman C Walnut, La. 

Dada, Edward P., Columbia City, Wash. 

Davies, William C , Minersville, Penn. 

Davis. Lemuel, Steamboat Springs, Colo. 

Day, William C, Rocklin, No. Cal. 

Dessup. John J., Munson and Winburne, Penn. 

Dickerson, Charles H, Newark, N. J. 

Dodd, Arthur C, National City, So. Cal. 

Donovan. David, Madison. Minn. 

Drake, Ulysses S , Salem, Ore. 

Edwards, Jonathan. Spokane. Wash. 

Embree, J. H , Brookville, Kan. 

Engstrom, Alfred P., Athens and Spencer Brook, 

Minn. 
Evans, John G., Vandling, Penn. 
Eveland, Samuel, Ainsworth, Neb. 
Fish. Pliny B., Ree Heights. So. Dak. 
Fleming, Moses G., Amandaville, Ga. 
Forbes, Charles A., Leadville. Colo. 
Foster, Frank, St. Louis, Mo. 
Frame, Ezra E., Fort Wayne, Ind. 
Frazee. John H., Knoxville, Tenn. 
Gregory, Herbert, Spanaway, Wash. 
Grinnell, Eugene I., Ipswich. So. Dak, 
Halsall. Evan, Pingree, No. Dak. 
Ham, Richard K., Sunnyside, Cal. 



Harper, Joel, Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Heinzelman, Henry W., Michigan City, Ind. 
Hewlett, Benjamin F., Rialto and Bloomington, 

So. Cal. 
Hood, E. Lyman. Lorin, No. Cal. 
Home, Gideon, Walker's Chapel, Ga. 
Howell, John D., Downs, Okla. 
Hubbard. William B., Webster, So. Dak. 
Hughes, Rowland. Black Diamond, Wash. 
Ives, Joseph B., Paradise, Cal. 
Jamison, Henry W., Beresford, So. Dak. 
Jasper, Gustavus A., River Island, No. Cal. 
Jelinek, John, Braddock, Penn. 
Johnson, Alfred K., Rosedale, So. Cal. 
Jones, Hugh W., Meckling, So. Dak. 
Jones, John D., Medical Lake, Wash. 
Jones, Richard. Myron and Cresbard, So. Dak. 
Jones, Thomas R., Pittsburg, South Side, Penn. 
Kevan, James H., Rock Springs, Wyo. 
Kimball, Jeremiah, Aitkin, Mich. 
Kindred, George, Tolt, Wash. 
Kirtland. Charles C, Sebastopol, No. Cal. 
Koch, Johannes, Portland, Ore. 
Lee, George H., Seattle, Wash. 
Legler, Jacob. Fresno, Cal. 
Leufstedt, Gustaf W., East Orange, N.J. 
Lockwood, John W., Leavenworth, Wash. 
Logan, B. F., Amity, Mo. 
Loomis, Eli R... South Bend. Wash. 
Luck, Charles W., Weiser, Idaho. 
Lundquist, Carl J.. Chandler's Valley, Penn. 
Lyle, Andrew J., Strickland, Ga. 
McCallie, Thomas S., Chattanooga, Tenn. 
McConaughv, Frank, Clayton and Loon Lake, 

Wash. 
McKay, Thomas, Plymouth, Penn. 
McQuarrie, Neil P., Niagara, No. Dak. 
McQuarrie, Neil P., Michigan City, No. Dak. 
Martin, Edwin, Erwin, So. Dak. 
Mason, Charles E., Mountain Home, Idaho. 
Mason, Horace C, Pullman, Wash. 
Merrill, W. H., Kensington, Kan. 
Milligan, John A., Porterville, No. Cal. 
Moats, John W., Pawnee, Okla. 
Moore, William N., Great Falls, Mon. 
Mole, Henry W., Christopher. Wash. 
Morris, Maurice B., Dayton, Wash. 
Nash, Fred W., Indian Valley, Idaho. 
Nash, James H., Lovejoy, Ga. 
Nelson, Gustave, Port Angeles, Wash. 
Nelson, Nels I., Falun, Wis. 
Newton. Howell E., Braswell. Ga. 
Norton, Milton J., Grandin. Mo. 
O'Brien, James P., St. Louis, Mo. 
Oehler, F. H., New Richland. Minn. 
Olds, Alphonzo R., Eureka. Wash. 
Palmer. Burton M., Sunnyside, Cal. 
Paradise, Euchre, Welsh, La. 
Pearse, Franklin F.. Nordhoff, So. Cal. 
Pearson, John L., Alpine, Dehesa and Flinn Val 

ley, Cal. 
Penniman, Andrew O . Dunkirk, Ind. 
Peterson, Hans, Washburn. Wis. 
Pittinger, Samuel J., Monterey. Pa. 
Prior, Isaac R , Columbia. So. Dak. 
Ray. George W., Cripple Creek, Colo. 
Read, James L., El Reno, Okla. 
Reynolds, Laureston. Redfield, So. Dak. 
Rives, Charles J., Vittum and Burwick, Okla. 
Roberts, Clarence E., Valencia and Plymouth 

Rock, Kan. 
Roberts, Owen W., New Rockford. No. Dak. 
Rogers, Alfred H., Kansas City, Mo. 
Saunders, Eben E , Dwight and Antelope, No. Dak. 
Saunders, Eben E., Oberon, No. Dak. 



October, 1898 



The Home Missionary 



127 



Scoville, Edgar E., Chillicothe, Ohio. 

Seccombe, Charles, Springfield, So. Dak. 

Shaw, Edwin S., Cooperstown, No. Dak. 

Shepherd, Alexander, Fruita, Colo. 

Shockley, Albert D.. Belle Fourche, So. Dak. 

Smith, Howard N.. San Luis Obispo, So. Cal. 

Smith, L. Adams, Yesler, Wash. 

Smith, William R., Badger and Hetland, So. Dak. 

Spittell, Jabez, Worthing, So. Dak. 

Staver, Daniel, Gaston, Ore. 

Stevens, Julius, Bryant, So. Dak. 



Stevens, William D., Noble, Mo. 

Turner, Benjamin R., Independence, Okla. 

Vogt, William F., McCook, Neb. 

Wallace, Louis, Sierra Valley, No. Cal. 

Walton, James A., Burdetle and Beulah, So. 

Dak. 
Weage, Arthur D., Villa Park, So. Cal. 
Watt, James, Dawson, Minn. 
Whittlesey, C. T., Weston, Ore. 
Wilcox, Charles E., Biwabik, Minn. 
Winchester, Benjamin S., Snohomish, Wash. 



JULY, 1898 



Not in commission last year 

Atkinson, George E., Tekoa, Wash. 

Bayley, Dwight S , North Denver, Colo. 

Buechshaw, James J., Cottonwood, Ala. 

Burkett, C. E., Milton, Fla. 

Dean, Frank W., Red Cloud, Neb. 

Gay, William M., Pomona, Fla. 

Hargett, Henry L., Gate City, Ala. 

Harwell, J. H., Siloam Springs, Ark. 

Hawkes, George B , Indian Valley and School 
District, Idaho. 

Hildebrandt, Fred., Friend and Turkey Creek, 
Neb. 

Jenney, E. W., Bowdle, So. Dak. 

Jordan, W. T., Trinidad, Colo. 

Klopp, John J., Stanton, Neb. 

McClain, John E., Anthony, Kan. 

McKay, Henry T., Millville, Ala. 

Martin, Carl R., Fargo, No. Dak. 

Martini, Fritz W.. Little Ferry, N. J. 

Meske, F. L. V., Ortonville, Minn. 

Milstead, Charles A., Clanton, Ala. 

Newton, Henry, Blackwood, Echo, and Wicks- 
burg, Ala. 

Painter, Haray M., Pataha City, Wash. 

Rice, Franklin M., Milner, Ala. 

Sabol, John, Vanderbilt, Penn. 

Scott, A. J., Kenwood, No. Cal. 

Smith, Abner C, Provo, Utah. 

Squire, Abraham L., Strang and Shickley, Neb. 

Street, Walter B., Anderson. Ind. 

Tatum, Christopher C, Medford, Okla. 

Thompson, R. M., Rogers and Bethel Mission, 
Ark. 

Re-commissioned 

Adams, James R., Creede, Colo. 

Belt, S. D., El Paso de Robles, So. Cal. 

Biggers, Lorenzo J., Opelika, Ala. 

Billings, Charles S., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Blanks, James L., Wheatland, Wyo. 

Bolton, James, Cocoanut Grove and Miami, Fla. 

Bosworth, William A., Wichita. Kan. 

Bradford, Benjamin T., Cedar Grove, N. J. 

Branan, Seborn R., Art and Asbury, Ala. 

Brown, William D., Interlachen, Fla. 

Brown, William J., Glenwood, Minn. 

Brue, James, Long Straw, La. 

Burkett, C. E., River Falls and Wallace, Ala. 

Busby, Joseph L., Clanton, Ala. 

Buttram, Elijah A., Potolo and Wausau, Fla. 

Cady, William J., West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Calhoun, John S., Lusk and Manville, Wyo. 

Campbell, Charles, Sanford, Fla. 

Cartledge, Henry, New Smyrna, Fla. 

Champlin, Oliver P., Antelope, No. Dak. 

Childs, Lucas S., Seward, Okla. 

Clarke, Almon T., Shelby. Ala. 

Conard, W. J., Hubbard Co., Minn. 

Comin, John, Chamberlain, So. Dak. 

Conry, Henry W.. Pond Creek, Okla. 

Cumbus, George W., Columbus, Ga. 

Davis, A. A., Lakeland, Minn. 



Dawson, William E., Blaine, Wash. 

Dobbs, James M., Floy, Lebanon, and Tenbroeck, 
Ala. 

Donaldson, Levi J., Tavares and Ocoee, Fla. 

Dreisbach, Charles H., Lebanon and Springs, 
So. Dak. 

Drew, James B., South Park, Minn. 

Dungan, George, Otis, Colo. 

Dunham, Warren A., Cheyenne, Wyo. 

Evans, William L.. Plymouth, Penn. 

Farnsworth, E. D., Fidalgo City and Rosario, 
Wash. 

Foster, Jesse D., Rohnerville and Hydesville, 
No. Cal. 

Frazer, Charles W., Key West, Fla. 

Gibson, Nelson H., Catalpa and Clio, Ala. 

Gilmore, William C, Valley Springs, So. Dak. 

Gipson, J. M., Spring Bluff, Jackson Gap and 
Meadow, Ala. 

Gordon, William, Scotia, Rio Dell, and Pepper- 
wood, No. Cal. 

Gridley, Albert L., Kidder, Mo. 

Haines, Oliver S., West Ferndale, Wash. 

Hand, La Roy S., Omaha. Neb. 

Helms, George L., Lake Henry. So. Dak. 

Herrick. E. P., Tampa, Fla. 

Hull, Ellsworth L., Garfield, Kan. 

Iorns, Benjamin, Fertile, Minn. 

Jeffries, John, Norfolk, Neb. 

Johnson, Ansel E., Antioch, No. Cal. 

Lewis, John, Detroit, Mich. 

Loveless, E. J., Arbacoochee, Cherry, and Ox- 
ford. Ala. 

Lyman, Henrietta C, Ft. Pierre, So. Dak. 

McKinney, Samuel T., St. Louis, Mo. 

McReynolds, S. J., Camp Russell, Okla. 

Marshall, Martin V., Dothen, Dundee, Echo, and 
Watsford, Ala. 

Mercer, Henry W., Long Beach. Wash. 

Menzi, Ernest U., Howard and Vilas, So. Dak. 

Miller, Louis, Hurobo, Fla. 

Minnis, Thomas W., Grand Meadow, Minn. 

Mobbs, Horatio M., Chewelah and Springdale, 
Wash. 

Moore, Mr. W. H.. Hibbing, Minn. 

Morse, Edgar L., Park Falls and Butternut, No. 
Wis. 

Noble, Mason, Lake Helen. Fla. 

Oswalt, William M.. Chulafinne, Ala. 

Pease, Frank W., Ravenna. Neb. 

Pharr, Theodore A., Milligan, Fla. 

Pharr, Theodore A., Hilton and Rose Hill, Ala. 

Pope, Joseph, Columbus and Laurel, Mon. 

Reese, Thomas P., Canova, So. Dak. 

Reitinger. Philip, Silver Lake, Minn. 

Roberts, Robert E., Coal Bluff and Caseyville, 
Ind. 

Rogers. S. J., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Rowe, George W., Hayleyville, Ala. 

Sage, C. J., Avoca, Neb. 

Schaerer, John. Muskegon, Mich. 

Sheldon, Charles F.,Tecumseh. Okla. 

Siler, William J., Center View, Okla. 

Simmons, Daniel A., Crestview, Holley, and Lau- 
rel Hill, Fla. 

Single, John, Butte, Neb. 



i2; 



The Home Missionary 



October, ti 



Smith, Rev. Mrs. Esther, Perham, Minn. 

Stewart, John L , Henderson. Ala. 

Swartout, Edgar P . Gann Valley, Duncan, and 

Pleasant Valley, So Dak. 
Thomas, C. M., Crested Butte, Colo. 
Totusek, Vincent. Cleveland. Ohio. 
Townsend. Stephen ].. Haines City, Fla. 
Trchka, Charles J.. St. Paul. Minn. 
Updyke, Stephen G., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Wadsworth, George, Spencer, Neb. 
Weatherby, Seaborn, Perote, Ala. 



Wells. Archibald C, Good Hope, Kent and Tal- 

lassee, Ala. 
Wells, Charles W., Cathlamet, Wash. 
White, Isaac J., Halton and Volina, Ala. 
Williams, Mark W., Bruce and Apollonia, No. 

Wis. 
Wiswell. Thomas C. Seattle, Wash. 
Woodruff, Paul G., Caryville and Westville. Fla. 
Wright, Turner, Ashland and Millerville, Ala. 
Wurrschmidt, Christian W., Hastings and Inland, 

Neb. 



AUGUST, 1898 



Not in commission last year 

Anderson, John. Winfred, So. Dak. 

Burwell, Jesse, Kingfisher, Okla. 

Donat, Joseph, Cleveland, Ohio. 

James. Bartlett B.. Monterey, Penn. 

Marshall, William C, Ozark. Ala. 

Nilstead, Charles A., Kingston, Ala. 

Niehaus, H., Blumenthal, St. Johannes and Is- 
rael's, So. Dak. 

Owens, Edmund, Almira, Grandview, and Bculah, 
Wash. 

Radford, Mrs. Katherine W.. Custer, So. Dak. 

Reese, John B., Lakeport, So Dak. 

Suffa, Andrew. Wolbach, Neb. 

Varina, Vaclar. St. Louis. Mo. 

Waits, George W. C, Lamar, Ala. 

Webb. Hugh P., Coalville and Echo Mission. 
Utah. 

Zumstein, W. C, Hayes Co., Neb. 



Re-commissioned 

Adams, Clinton B., Philadelphia. Penn. 

Bishop, Albert W.. Parsons, Kan. 

Brintnall, Lorenzo W., Ahtanum Valley. Wash. 

Bunnell, John J., Fort Payne. Ala. 

Burhans, Frank D., Salina, Kan. 

Bushell, Jonas, Eagle Harbor, Wash. 

Bushell, Richard, Marysville, Wash. 



Butler, Jesse C, Central and Kid, Ala. 

Culver. W. C, Verbena. Ala. 

Davis, Wilson S., Rossburg, Wash. 

Dick, Jeremiah M., Hubbard, Ore. 

Egerland, Franz, Crete, Neb. 

Foster. Guy. Challis, Idaho. 

Foust. Joseph D., Hanceville and Tidmore, Ala. 

Gibson, John, Washburn, Wis. 

Hill, Charlie. Lightwood, Ala. 

Hill, Thomas H., Aurora, So. Dak. 

Huntley, Sanford F., Wessington Springs, So. 

Dak. 
Jackson, Preston B., Sprague, Wash. 
Lewis, Thomas G., Col vi lie. Wash. 
Lyman. Elias F., Waubay, So. Dak. 
MacNeill, Samuel M., Tomahawk, Wis. 
Neuenschwander, Daniel, Hoffnungsvoll, Eigen- 

heim, Einheits, and Fessenden, No. Dak. 
Nutting, John D., Salt Lake City, Utah. 
Perrin, David J., Armour, So. Dak. 
Phillips, William O., Demorest, Ga. 
Richardson, Charles A., Oneida, Kan. 
Smith. A. C, Provo, Utah. 
Smith, Green N., Baxley, Ga. 
Taggart, Charles E.. Elk Point, So. Dak. 
Ticknor, Owen E.. Wilcox, Neb. 
Vaughan, George W., Edwardsville and Oxford, 

Ala. 
Vaughan, Lewis, Caledonia, No. Dak. 
Watkins, Joseph V., Smith's Chapel, Ala. 
Whitby. Henry J.. Emporia, Kan. 
Woodruff. P. G., Bonifay, Fla. 
Wright, Reuben B., Boise, Idaho. 



RECEIPTS 



For account of receipts by State Auxiliary Societies, see pages 140 to 148 



JUNE, 1898 



MAINE -S102. 32. 

Alfred, by J. M. Akers 

Bath, Winter Street Ch., by F. H. Low 

Konnebunk, Y. P. S. C. E,byMissG. 

Lockwood, for Alaska 



NEW HAMPSHIRE $36.99. 

Goffstown, by D . Grant 

Lyme, Mrs C. E. Gordon s class in 

S S.,by W. L. Balch 

Manchester. Franklin St., by J. T. 

Carpenter 

Mason, by C. H. Wheeler 



2 CO 

7 47 



Merrimack. Y. P. S. C. E. of the First, 

by Rev. S. Rose 

Pelham, A Friend 



VERMONT— $2,795.54: of which legacy, 

$2,458.75. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. R. P. 
Fairbanks, Treas., of which $50 for 

Salary Fund 

Berlin 

Burlington, First 

Cabot 

Fairlee, Ladies 



86 91 
4 00 
50 00 

8 co 

9 00 



October, i! 



The Home Missionary 



120, 



l>IO 


OO 


■; 


OO 


ii 


Bo 


ti 


64 


ii 


12 


ii 


OO 


25 


OO 


6 


OO 


■ 25 


OO 


5 


CO 


. 5 


00 


5 


00 


24 


00 


2 


00 



Newbury 

Pittsford, by Mrs. Boardman 

Salisbury 

Sheldon 

Springfield 

St. Albans 

St. Johnsbury, South Ch., A Friend 

Underhill, Homeland Circle 

Windsor, Mrs. A. Butler 

For Salary Fund : 

Barre, Y. P. S. C. E 

Barton, V. P. S. C. E 

Berkshire, East, Y. P. S.C. E 

Burlington, College Street 

Y. P. S. C. E 



3*5 48 

Barton, Y. P. S. C. E., by M. A. Brown 2 16 

Londonderry, by Mrs. E. Abbott 2 00 

North Bennington, Mrs. S.D. Jennings 15 00 
Springfield, Estate of Frederick Parks, 

by ft. W. Thompson, Adm 2,458 75 

Weybridge, Y. P. S. C. E., by Miss J. 

MacMurtry 2 15 



MASSACHUSETTS — $5,341.07; of 
which legacies, $4,149.83. 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc, by Rev. E. B. 
Palmer, Treas. : 
By request of donors, of which for 
Salary Fund, $100: for Alaska Mis- 
sion, $32.92 46100 

Amherst, M. I. Ward 2 00 

Boston, Estate of Rev. E. K. Alden, 

D.D., by E. K. Alden, Ex 85500 

Trust Fund, Estate of Luther Farn- 
ham 1,900 00 

W. A. Wilde, for Salary Fund 50 00 

Braintree, Legacy of Mrs. E. C. 

Arnold, by Eben Denton, Ex 50 00 

Charlestown, First, by G. Baleo 30 co 

East Longmeadow, First, by A. G. 

Crane 8 14 

Enfield, by L. D. Potter 35 00 

Feeding Hills, by Miss J. A. Bailey.. 13 00 

Haverhill, North Ch., by E. G. 

Frothingham 105 15 

Friends 10 00 

Lowell, Estate of Mrs. F. H. Hobson, 

by C. W. Clark 249 19 

Estate of Lucinda R. Parker, by 

Thomas Weston ig 00 

Melrose Highlands, by C. A. Coombs 42 24 

Millis, Miss E. Phillips 500 

Monson, by E. F. Morris 25 20 

Natick, First, by W. L. Coolidge 50 00 

Newbury port, Estate of Sophia A. 

Badger, by D. C. Rogers, Ex. 227 75 

Newtonville, Mrs. G. W. Auryansen, 

by Rev. C. W. Shelton 10 21 

Northampton, from the Estate of 

Numan Clark 50 00 

Dorcas Society of the First, by Mrs. 
J. E. Clarke, Treas., for Salary 
Fund 56 25 

Edwards Ch., by G. L. Metcalf 105 49 

Pittsfield, M. A. Bissell 3 00 

Randolph, Miss A. W. Turner 100 00 

South Egremont, by A. M. Smith 7 56 

South Hadley, Estate of Maria B. 

Gridley, by L. T. Tiffany 1,6889 

Sunderland, S. S., to const. W. F. 

Campbell a L. M., by A. T. Monta- 
gue 50 CO 

Wellesley, A Friend 20 00 

Worcester, Estate of Harriet W. 

Damon, by Samuel Jennison, Ex. 1,000 00 

Mrs. J. E. Sanford 2 00 



RHODE ISLAND— $37.16. 

Bristol, First, by P. Skinner, Jr $27 16 

Kingston, Y. P. Sr C. E., by J. W. 
Rice, for Alaska 10 co 



CONNECTICUT-$i3,756. 7 o ; of which 
legacy, $10,600. 

Miss. Soc. of Conn., by Rev. W. H. 
Moore. 'i437 69 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. W. W. 
Jacobs, Treas. : 

For Salary Fund 125 00 

New Britain, South Ch., Mrs. T. B. 

House 2500 

. Broad Brook, L. S. S., by Mrs. Car- 
los Bradley 3 50 

Hartford, First, Jr. Aux., by Mrs. 
M.W.Jacobs 7500 

228 50 

Burnside, A Friend 400 00 

Fairfield, Y. P. S. C.E.,by B. Betts,for 

the debt 10 00 

Hartford, Warburton Chapel S. S., by 

E. F. Mix 21 02 

Theol . Sem . , by P. L. Curtiss 32 70 

Fourth of July offering 300 

Harwinton, First. by Rev. W. Hedges. 7 96 

Huntington, by F. H. Wells 6 50 

Lebanon, by J. R. Maxwell 30 75 

Meriden, First, by H. M. Billard, to 
const. J. D. Eggleston, E. W. Smith 

and W. G. Warnock L. Ms 181 52 

Milford, First, by W. L. Merwin 25 32 

Plymouth, by A . A. Baldwin 26 70 

New Haven, Humphrey Street Ch., by 

E. E. Mix 114 53 

S. S. of the Humphrey Street Ch., by 

F. H. Brigham 40 84 

New Hartford, North Ch., by F. B. 

Jones 16 28 

New London, Mrs. W. H. C 25 00 

New Milford, First, by C. H. Ncble. . 50 co 
Norwich, Broadway Ch., by F. J. Lea- 
vens 1 ,000 co 

Young People's Union of the Broad- 
way Ch., by E. G. Brewster 12 50 

Portland, First, by H. Hilby 33 75 

Salisbury, Woman's Board of Home 

Missions, by Mrs. A. B. Robbins. 10 co 

" Arnica " 2 00 

Southington, by J. F. Pratt, special.. 11 50 

Talcottville, S. S., $5 ; Y. P. S. C. E., 

$5, by M. H. Talcott, for Alaska... 10 co 

Unionville, Woman's Miss. Soc, by 

Mrs. F. A. Chamberlain 13 50 

West Hartford, Estate of Miss Maria 

Whitman, by M. A. Andrews, Adm. 10,000 00 
Westport, Saugatuck S. S., by H. C. 

Woodworth 5 14 

NEW YORK— $1,447.87 ; of which lega- 
cies, $295. 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. 
Pearsall, Treas : 
For Salary Fund : 

Homer 

Sherburne 



J- J- 



35 00 
Briar Cliff Manor, by Rev. A. MacColl 30 50 

Brooklyn, Central Ch., by O. P. Ed- 

gerton 751 15 

Puritan Ch., add'l, by H. A. W. 

Goll 58 06 

Board of Deacons of Plymouth Ch., 
by F. Jordan 35 00 



130 



The Home Missionary 



October, 1898 



M. L. R., for Alaska $20 00 

E. D. Ford 75 00 

C. A. Clark, special 3 00 

Massena, by Rev. A. H.Winn 1618 

New York City, C. L. Smich 30 00 

North Lawrence, Miss A. Williams 5 00 
Perry Center, Estate of Mrs. S. C. 

Alton, by L. A. Haywood and Mrs. 

M. J. Sheldon, Exs 4S °° 

Poughkeepsie, First, by E. E. Deyo. 89 28 
South Granville, First, by Rev. W. R. 

Curtis 1 00 

Syracuse, Estate of Peter Burns, by 

Exs 25000 

Union Center, by A. L. Van Wagenen 3 00 



NEW JERSEY— $740.03. 

Woman's H. M. Union of the N. J. 

Asso., Mrs. J. H. Denison, Treas. : 

East Orange, First Ch. Woman's 

Soc. for Christian work 28 55 

Glen Ridge, by N. G. Ballom 196 16 

Jersey City, Waverley Ch., by Rev. J 

C. Emery 7 17 

Montclair, bal. of coll., by J. D. 

Hedgeman 213 45 

Orange Valley, miss. con. coll., by 
Rev. C. A. Savage 3 00 

Plainfield, bal. of coll., by M. C. Van 
Arsdale 35 00 

Westheld, Ch. of Christ, by J. R. Con- 
nolly 25670 

PENNSYLVANIA— $266.67. 

Woman's Missionary Union, Penn., 
Mrs. T. W. Jones, Treas.: 

Riceville 5 00 

West Spring Creek 5 00 

W. M. S., Braddock 2 90 

12 90 

Horatio, by T. Y. Evans 3 00 

Kane, Ch., $16; S. S., $20, by W. H. 

Davis 36 00 

Mt. Carmel, First, by Rev. R N. 

Harris 10 77 

Pennsylvania. " Cash " 200 00 

Tamaqua, A Friend 4 00 

MARYLAND -$6.00. 
Frostburg, by Rev. G. W. Moore. ... 6 00 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA-$ 5 o.oo. 
Washington, R. Dunning 

GEORGIA -$6.00. 

Rarnesville, by Rev. S. C. McDaniel. 
Lovejoy, by Rev. W. F. Brewer 

LOUISIANA— $4.03. 

Long Straw and Union, by Rev. J. 

Brue 

New Orleans, University Ch., by G. 

L. Dewey 



FLORIDA— $35.53. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. W. D. 
Brown, Treas. : 
Mt. Dora 

Jacksonville, by A.J. Wakefield 

Tampa, by Rev. E. P. Herrick 



5 00 
1 00 



45 
3 58 



TEXAS-$ 5 .oo. 
Denison, by Rev. J. S. Murphy. 

OKLAHOMA— $5.00. 



New Kirk, Y. P. S. C. E., by Rev. T. 
H. Harper 



NEW MEXICO-$ii. 5 5. 

Received by Rev. E. H. Ashmun: 

White Oaks 

Gallup, by Rev. P. A. Simpkin... 

ARIZONA— $8.00. 

Received by Rev. E. H. Ashmun: 

Jerome 

Seligman ... 



TENNESSEE-$2i. 4 o. 
Memphis, Strangers Ch., by C. E.Coe 



OHIO-$2i 4 .i4. 

Cincinnati, Y. P. S. C. E. of the Law- 
rence Street Welsh Ch., by Arthur 

Williams, for Alaska 

Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, D.D.: 
Aurora, add'l, by Rev. J. H. McKee 
Canal Dover, Welsh Union Ch., by 

J. B. Rees 

Ceredo, West Va., by Rev. G. 

Gadsby 

Chester, S. H. Bassett 

Cleveland, Hugh Ave., by E. C. 

Parsons 

Cleveland, Swedish, by Rev. D. 

Marcellus 

Marietta, First, by A. D. Follett.. 
Marietta Conference, by Rev. J. Ed- 
wards, D. D 

Nebo, by Rev. J. F. Davis 

Wauseon, by I. L. Gray 

Willoughby. Rev. S. C. Dickinson.. 
Brookfield, West, Special for debt.. 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. G. B. 

Brown. Treas.: 
Cleveland, Archwood Ave., Y. P. S. 
C. E. Salary Fund 

Euclid Ave. T. W. M 

Bethlehem, H. M. S 

Bethlehem, Y. P. S. C. E 

Hough Ave., W. M. S 

Dayton, W. M. S 

Elyria, First. W. M. S 

Gomer, W. M. S 

Mansfield, First. W. M. S. (for an. 

meeting collection) 

Medina. W. M. S. (Salary Fund)... 
Twinsburg,W. M. S. (Salary Fund). 



INDIANA-$ 9 5.oi. 

Received by Rev. E. D. Curtis: 
Angola, Ch.. $8.51; Y. P. S. C. E., 
$5.00; Jr. S. C. E., $1.50 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. A. H. 

Ball, Treas 

Indianapolis, Mayflower Ch 

Ridgeville, by Rev. G. Hindley.... 



15 01 



October, i! 



The Home Missionary 



131 



ILLINOIS -Legacy, $253.47. 

Buda, Estate of J. F. Hyde, by H. T. 
Lay, Trustee $253 47 

MISSOURI ,-$102.91. 

Kansas City, First, by E. S. Bigelow. 91 90 
Ivanhoe Park Ch., by Rev. L. War- 
ren 2 50 

St. Louis, Mem. Ch., by Rev. F. Fos- 
ter 6 01 

Willow Springs, by Rev. M.W.Woods 2 50 

MICHIGAN-$ 7 .oo. 
Detroit, by Rev. A. Huelster 7 00 

WISCONSIN— $55.85. 

Bloomer, First, by Rev. W. H. Atche- 
son 32 85 

Clear Lake, Swedish, by Rev. J. Pet- 
terson 1 50 

Clintonville, Scands., by Rev. A. Lar- 
son 4 00 

Milwaukee, C. E. Soc, by Rev. J. 
Jelinek 2 50 

Prentice, by Rev. A. Chambers 15 00 



IOWA— $11.30. 

Avoca, German, by Rev. J. Morach . . 
College Springs, First, by W. N. Dow 
Lansing Ridge, German, by Rev. A. 

Kern 

Plymouth, Mary D. Allen 

MINNESOTA— $50.99. 

Audubon and Lake Park, by Rev. E 

C. Chevis 

Burtrum and Grey Eagle, by Rev. W. 

E. Griffith 

Detroit, by Rev. G. Michael 

Lamberton, by Rev. E. E. Rogers . . . 
Mcintosh, First, by Miss M. Darling. 
Minneapolis, First Scand. Evan., by 

Rev. C. B. Bjuge 

New Duluth, G. W. Keyes 

St. Paul, People's German, by Rev. 

W. Oehler 

Stillwater, Grace Ch., by Rev. J. H. 

Albert 

West Duluth and Aitkin, by Rev. J. 

Kimball 

Winona, Second, by Rev. H. H. Stut- 

son 

.KANSAS-$52.gr. 

Received by Rev. A.C. Hogbin,Treas. : 

s.i ..Dover... 

, . ■ Emporia, Jr. C. E 

Newton 

North Topeka, Ladies' Miss. Soc... 

Overbrook 

Ridgeway 

Russell, One Cent Club 

Village Creek 

Western Park. . 

Mary E. Smedley 

Eleanor, F. Tangeman 

Wakefield, A Friend 



NEBRASKA— $162.84. 

Received by Rev. M. E. Everfz : 

Lincoln, by Rev-. E. C. Osthoff $15 00 

Stockham, $2.06: Sutton. $9.16; Mr. 
S., $5.00, by Rev. G. Essig 16 22 

31 22 
Received by C. C. Smith, Ass'tTreas.: 

Franklin, H. Piatt. 500 

Indianola 33 45 

Omaha, Asso 13 00 

First 40 01 

Rev. E. P. Quincy 10 00 

102 36 

Avoca, by Rev. C. J. Sage 6 80 

Crawford, by Rev. H. V. Rominger.. 15 95 
Doniphan, West Hamilton and Hast- 
ings, by Rev. R. M. Travers 20 ci 

Ft. Calhoun, by Rev. C. A. Arnold... 1 50 

177 84 
Correction of error reported in May, 
by E. C. Orthoff 15 00 

162 84 

NORTH DAKOTA-$ 2 ,o2 5 .58 ; of 
which legacy, $2,000. 

Received by Rev. J. L. Maile : 

Amenia 13 25 

Fargo, First 10 44 

Gardner, Miss Annie J. Hunter 3 00 

Harvey 2 89 

3 00 29 58 

6 00 Buxton, from Estate of James P. 

Gould, by A. Sargent, Ex 2,000 00 

2 00 
3° 

SOUTH DAKOTA-$i85.2i. 

Received by Rev. W. H. Thrall : 

Academy ... 5 25 

Vermillion 60 00 

2 Q7 Yankton 23 70 

Friends 40 00 

1 00 

1 63 128 95 
27 08 Academy and La Roche, by Rev. L. 

i rl E. Cam field 3 25 

Beresford, by E. W. Jenney 4 75 

2 00 Canton, by Rev. R. M. Coate 7 55 

2 co Chamberlain, by Rev. J. Comin , 15 00 

Columbia, by Rev. I. R. Prior 6 05 

2 r Elk Point, by Rev. C. E. Taggart 9 80 

Gann Valley, Duncan, and Pleasant 

5 00 Valley, by Rev. E. P. Swartout 5 56 

Lebanon, by Rev. C. H. Dreisbach... 4 30 

3 6 ° 

2 °^ COLORADO -$52.39. 

Received by Rev. H. Sanderson : 

Arkansas Valley Asso 215 

Creede and Bachelor, by Rev. J. R. 
Adams 3 75 

1 83 Denver, North Ch., by Rev. A. D. 

200 Blakeslee 1 ("5 

5 00 Flagler, First, by Rev. C. W. Smith. 9 00 

3 00 Longmont, First, by E. White 13 84 

2 50 Ctis, by Rev. G. Dunaan 10 00 

2 00 Whitewater, Union Ch., by Rev. O. 

245 T.Robinson 1200 

63 
2 50 
2 00 MONTANA— $9.75. 

23 91 Received by Rev. W. S. Bell : 

500 Aldridge, $1.85 ; Chico. 55 cts. and 

24 00 Horr, 60 cts 3 00 



132 



The Home Missionary 



October, ii 



Big Timber, by Rev. E. D. Bost- 
wick 

Columbus and Laurel,- by Rev. J. 
Pope 

IDAHO-S15.30. 

Genesee, by Rev. W. C. Fowler 

Hope, by Rev. V. W. Roth 

Mountain Home, First, by Rev. C. E. 
Mason 



S3 75 
3 00 



7 00 
1 25 



Received by Rev. M. E. Eversz : 

Mink, by Rev. R. Staub 

Portland, by Rev. J. Koch 



$10 00 
5 00 



Clackamas, on account of legacy of 
Samuel Shepard, by A. Mather and 
D. B. Gray, Exs 562 50 

Weston, Rev. C. T. Whittlesey 12 50 



CALIFORNIA-$34.to. 

Received by Rev. J. T. Ford : 

Redlands, Terrace Ch 

Vernon, add'l 

Bakersfield, Y. P. S. C. E., by R. S. 

Hale, for Alaska 

Beckwith. $3 65 ; Sierra Valley, $6.35, 

by Rev. L. Wallace 

Byron, by Rev. D. Goodsell 

Compton, First, by Rev. S. H.Wheeler 



OREGON-$ s 

$562.50. 



3.50 ; of which legacy. 



Received by Rev. C. F. Clapp : 

Willard 

Woman's N. M. Union of Ore. 



50 40 
1 10 



2 50 
27 10 



3 5° 
5 00 



8 50 



WASHINGTON-$ 37 .2o. 

Endicott, German, by Rev. J. M. 

Preiss 10 50 

Everett, First Ch., by Rev. R. B. 

Hassel 13 10 

Hillhurst, by H. Gregory 1 70 

Kalama, First, by Rev. A. R Johnson 90 
Ritzville, C. E. Soc, by L. Kennedy, 

fcr Alaska 1000 

Uniontown, by Rev. W. C. Fowler... 1 00 

Collection at Woman's Annual Meet- 
ing, Cleveland, Ohio, June 8, 1898.. 113 24 

June Receipts: Contributions 91099 00 

Annuity 3000 

Legacies 'o^zg 55 

Interest 448 80 

Trust Fund 1,90000 

Home Missionary. . . 925 

Literature 431 

$31,210 91 



JULY, ii 



MAINE— $4.44. 

Kennebunk Beach, H. D. Foster $1 00 

Skowhegan, Island Avenue, by G. N. 

Page 1 44 

South Bridgton, by T. B. Knapp 2 00 



NEW HAMPSHIRE-$i,335.i 3 ; of 
which legacies, $700.00. 

N. H. H. M. Soc, Hon. L. D. Stevens, 
Treas 156 87 

F. C. I. and H. M. Union of N. H., 
Miss A. A. McFarland, Treas. : 

Bristol, Ladies' Miss. Soc 7 00 

Concord, Silver Circle of the First... 13 00 

A Friend in the First Ch 50 00 

Silver Circle of the South 15 70 

Hopkinton. Cent Union 50 00 

Lebanon. Cent Union 26 81 

Plymouth, Y. P. S. C. E., for Salary 

Fund 5 00 

Sanbornton. Worn. Miss. Soc 6 50 

West Concord, Cent Union, for Sal- 
ary Fund 30 00 

Undesignated Funds 130 00 

334 01 

Dover, Legacy of Mrs. A. A. Kelsey, 
by A. J. Kelsey, Ex 500 00 

North Hampton, From the late E. 

Gove 126 75 

Mrs. A. Gove, by F R. Drake 10 00 

Peterboro. bv C. S. Pieise 7 50 

Tamworth, Estate of Faxon Gannett, 
by J. D. Hidden, Ex 200 00 



VERMONT— $475.88 ; of which legacy, 

$300.00. 

Vermont Dom. Miss. Soc, by W. C. 

Tyler, Treas $31 00 

Bellows Falls, C. E. Soc. by A. T. 

Leonard 10 00 

Burlington. College Street Ch., by G. 

G. Benedict 44 00 

Greensboro, C. L. Guild 500 

Manchester, S. G. Cone 45 00 

By C. K. Bucklin 2755 

Morrisville, First, by A. B. Munson.. 13 33 
Springfield, Estate of Frederick Parks, 

by A. M. Albee 30000 



MASSACHUSETTS-^, 319. 66 ; leg- 
acies, $24,702.24. 

Barre. by L. F. Clark 646 

Boston, W. A. Wilde, for Salary Fund. 25 00 

Conway, Estate of Sarah C. Forbes, 

by S. D. Conant 137 50 

Deerfield, A Friend 10 00 

Dracut, First, by C. L. Hodge 2 00 

Dorchester, Second, by E. Tolman... 181 39 
Enfield, Est. of Elizabeth Forbes, by 

W. B. Kimball, Ex 744 74 

Foxboro, Mary N. Phelps, to const. 

Miss L. Hitchcock a L. M 50 00 

Gilbertville, Young People's Mission 

Circle, by J. Gray, special 33 36 

Latfield, Estate of S. H. Dickinson, 

by D. W. Wells and R. M. Woods, 

E.XS : 23.75OOO 

Housatonic, Western Berkshire C. E. 
Union, by Mrs. J. L. Bartlett 7 50 



October, li 



The Home Missionary 



133 



Indian Orchard, Evangelical, by W. 

Nield '. . $1600 

Leominster, Ortho. Ch., Woodbury 

Fund, by A. O. Wilder, Treas , . 1^0 o:> 

Ludlow Center, Ladies' H. M. Soc, 

by I. T. Jones 1000 

Mansfield, Y. P. S. C. E., by C. T. 

Fitts 9 co 

Pittsfield, First Ch. of Christ, by F. 

W. Dutton 25 00 

Saxon ville, Edwards Ch., by Miss S. 

H. Goldthwaite 25 00 

Springfield, Estate of Levi Graves, 

by D. W. Wells, Trustee 70 00 

South, by H. K. Chapin 85 71 

Wilbraham, A Friend 10 00 

Worcester, Plymouth Ch., by F. W. 

Chase 1 00 



CONNECTICUT-$3,4o 9 .6 7 ; of which 
legacies, $1,832.21. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. W. W. 
Jacobs, Treas. : 
For Salary Fund : 
Hartford, First Ch., Primary Dept. 
of S. S., by Mrs. C. A, Jewell . . 5 00 

Ansonia, Y. P. S. C. E., by E. M. 

Bristol, for Alaska 10 00 

Bloomfield , by F. C. Bidwell 5 86 

Bridgeport, S. S. of the Second, by G. 

T. Hatheway 25 00 

Bristol, First, by L. G. Merick 75 00 

Cheshire, by F. N. Hall 1550 

Chester, by Rev. A. Hall n 75 

Collinsville, by J. S. Heath 23 00 

Derby, First, by L. Hubbell 18 70 

Fairfield, Estate of Rev. L. Pennell, 

by A. C. Bradley, Adm 590 14 

By E. Osborn 166 50 

Groton, by M. M. Baker 17 42 

Hadlyme, R. E. Hungerford 10 00 

Meriden, A Friend 5 co 

Mystic, Boys and Girls' H. M. Army 

of S. S., by Rev. C. W. Shelton .... 10 19 
New Haven, Ch. of the Redeemer, by 

W. E. Rowlands 174 74 

Ladies' H. M. Soc. of First Ch. of 
Christ, by Miss M. E. Mersick, for 

Salary Fund 250 00 

Newington, by E. W. Atwood 51 33 

New London, Estate of J. N. Harris, 
by Robert Coit, H. R. Bond and 
M. S. Harris, Exs 1,041 67 

First Ch. of Christ, by G. Whittlesey 46 63 

Jr. Soc. of the First, by Miss L. H. 

Allyn, special 500 

North Branford, Luther Chedsey 

Fund , by C. Page 8 o3 

Northfield, Y. P. S. C. E., by Mrs. E. 

A. Hopkins, for Alaska 5 00 

North Stonington, by W. B. Cary 105 27 

Putnam, by J. S. Dingwell 10 00 

Salisbury, by J. R Harrison 9 gi 

Cong, class, by T. F. Dexter 4 85 

'■ Arnica" 2 00 

Southington, S. S. of the First, by E. 

N . Walklev, for Salary Fund 18 99 

South Manchester, by C. E. House... 90 82 

South Norwalk, by O. Beard 175 00 

Stonington, Second, by Rev. W. C. 

Stilus 3° 75 

Suffield, Estate of Susan A. King, by 

Mrs. H. D. Bartlett, Adm 100 40 

Tolland. C. E. Soc, by Mrs. E. S. 

Agard 10 00 

Washington, First bv C. B Nettleton 95 oa 

Westchester, by E. E Carrier 5 70 

West Cornwall. D. L Smith and family 50 00 
West Hartford. First Ch. of Christ, 

by E. S. Elmer . 2847 



NEW YORK-$ 3 , 3 24.8i ; of which leg- 
acy, $3,000. 

Received by W. Spalding, Treas. : 

Bristol Center. ..' $10 20 

Canandaigua 79 89 

Center Lisle 275 

Henrietta 5 C o 

Homer 4000 

Lebanon 1 66 

Lisle ... 4 25 

Wilmington 3 00 



146 75 
Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. J. J. 
Pearsall, Treas. : 
Clifton Springs, A. G. W., for work 
in Oklahoma 5 00 

Brooklyn, Bushwick Avenue, by T. A. 

Cotton 26 25 

Beecher Memorial, by Rev. D. B. 

Pratt 14 57 

Buffalo, Mrs. T. M. Jefferson's S. S. 
class of Plymouth Ch., by Mrs. T. 

M. Jefferson, special 200 

Camroden, Miss. Soc, by M. Thomas 8 00 

Churchville, by A. D. Stone 10 00 

Maine, First, by S. C. Carman 14 74 

Morristown, by J. More 2 50 

Mt. Sinai, mon.con., by S. J. Hopkins 10 00 

Napoli, Estate of A. G. Whittemore, 

by B. F. Congdon, Ex 3,000 00 

New York City, O. W. Coe 50 00 

E. M. Orton 300 

Northville. by J. B. Downs 12 00 

Saratoga, Y. P. S. C. E., by Mrs. W. 

O. Wark. special 5 00 

Wadhams Mills, Ch., $11.50; Y. P. S. 
C. E., $3.50, by Rev. E. F. Ab- 
bott • 15 00 



NEW JERSEY-$ S o6.8 4 . 

East Orange, " K " 100 00 

Jersey City, Waverly Ch., by Rev. J. 

C.Emery 500 

Mt. Clair, Swedish, by Rev. C. G. Ell- 

strom 225 

Newark, Bellville Avenue, by G. B. D. 

Reeve 85 02 

Plainfield, bal. of coll., by M. Van Ars- 

dale 39 57 

Upper Montclair, Chris. Union, by G. 

N. Bostwick 275 co 



PENNSYLVANIA- $90.50. 

Woman's H. M. Union of the N. J. 

Asso.. Mrs. J. H. Deni-on. Treas : 

Philadelphia, for Salary Fund 

Audenried, Welsh S. S.,by E. Hughes 

East Smithfield, bv O. B. Kellogg 

Philadelphia, Park, by T. D. Querns. 
Plymouth, Elm Ch.. by Rev.T.McKay 
Rcnovo. Swedish Ch , by Rev. B. O. 

Johnson 

Ridgway, Swedish, by S. A. Newburg 
Scranton, Y. P. S. C. E. of the Ply- 
mouth Ch., by J. T. Jones 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA— $65.00. 

Woman's H. M. Union of the N. J. 

Asso., Mrs. T. H. Denison, Treas.: 

Washington, First, for Salary Fund 

Washington, First Ch., Ladies' Miss. 
Soc, Mrs. J. H. Denison, Treas., by 
Rev. E. P. Herrick 



3 


00 


8 


IS 


16 


79 


2 


75 


3 


5° 


2 


90 



134 



The Home Missionary 



October, ii 



MARYLAND- $500.00. 
Maryland, A Friend . . 



NORTH CAROLINA— $3.00. 



Dudley, by R. B. Johns 

Kernerville, Miss L. M. Harmon. 



GEORGIA— S400. 

Fort Valley, by Rev. J. F. Blackburne 
North Rome, by Rev. J. W. Gilliam.. 



ALABAMA-$ 3 . 5 o. 

Clanton, by Rev. C. A. Milstead 

Good Hope, Texas Union Ch., Kent, 
Mt. Olive Ch., Tallassee, and Tal- 
lassee, Liberty Ch., by Rev. A. C. 
Wells 



LOUISIANA-$io.oo. 

Lake Charles, First, by Rev. B. C. 
Mills 



FLORIDA 



4- 1 



Belleair, by Rev. E. P. Herrick 

Crestview, by Rev. D. A. Simmons.. . 
Eden, $3.40; Melbourne, $21.15. by 

Rev. E. W. Butler 

Hames City, Rev. S. J. Townsend 

Key West, First, by Rev. C. W. 

Frazer 

Pomona, Pilgrim Ch., by Rev. W. M. 

Gay 

West Palm Beach, by Rev. W.J. Cady 



TEXAS-$iq.2i. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. Green, 

Treas. : 
Dallas, First 



OKLAHOMA— $16.20. 

Woman's Missionary Union, Mrs. A. 
B. Hammer, Treas 



North Enid, First, by Rev. A. N. 

Leffingsvell 

Perkins, by Rev. F. H . Smith 

Soldier Creek, by Rev. H. B Brown. . 
Waynoka, by Rev. J. W. McWilliams 



NEW MEXICO-$2. 5 5. 
Cook's Peak, by Rev. E. H. Ashmun 



ARIZONA— $ioc.oo. 
Arizona, A Friend. 

OHIO-$i 35 .43. 



Berea, First, by S. L. Root 

Cincinnati, Vine Street Ch., by W. C. 

Walton 

Cleveland, Cyril Chapel, by Rev. J. 
Musil 



2 35 
2 50 



24 55 
3 I2 



■5 5° 
10 00 



5 94 
3 76 
1 00 

1 5° 



7 60 



East Madison Avenue, by P. J. 

Twiggs 

Gomer, Welsh Ch., by W. R. Price, to 

const. T. G. Humphreys a L. M 

Oberlin, M. A. Keep 

Rock Creek, by Miss M. T. Barker. . . 



INDIANA— $17.50. 
Andrews, by Rev. J. R. Mason. 



Fairmount, First, bv Rev. C. A. Riley 

Fort Wayne, South Ch., by Rev. E. E. 

Frame 



ILLINOIS— $ioS. 00; of which legacy, 
$100.00. 
Received by Rev. M. E. Eversz: 

Fall Creek 

Carpentersville, Legacy of Anna S. 
Allison, by Miss Flora Wilber, Ex. 



MISSOURI— $16.41. 

Amity, by Rev. B. F. Logan 

Kidder, by Rev. A. L. Gridley 

St. Joseph, Swedish Ch., by Rev. A. 

Svvanstrom 

Springfield, German Ch., by Rev. J. 

F. Graf 



WISCONSIN- $57.25. 

Falun, Swedish Ch., by Rev. N. I. 

Nelson 

Glenwood, Swedish Ch., by Rev. O. 

Ohlson 

Peshtigo, by Mrs. G. Baikie 

Washburn , by Rev. J . Gibson 



MINNESOTA-$ 3 o2.52. 

Received by Rev. J. H. Morley: 

Belgrade 

Cable 

Crookston, $5.04; S. S., $1.78. . . 

Cottage Grove 

Carlos S. S 

Excelsior 

Garvin 

Hawley 

Madison 

Mankato 

Medford. 

Minneapolis, Pilgrim, $15.57; S. S., 

$655 

Morris 

New Pavnesville, C. E , f 3; S. S., $3 

Northfield 

Park Rapids 

Rochester 

St. Paul, Olivet S. S , f 5 eg; C. E., 

$1 03 

Plymouth 

Sleepv Eye 

Sauk Rapids, $8.95: S.S.. $2 

Salem 

Sauk Center 

Wabasha, $15.61; S. S . $2-30 

Worthington, $7.31; S. S., $5.18 

Zumbrota 



Dawson, by Rev. J. Watt 

Hasty, Clearwater and Pilgrim Chs., 

by Rev. J. L. Jones 

Minneapolis. Bethany Ch., by Rev. S. 

G. Updyke 



&14 08 

69 25 

30 00 

3 5° 



1 25 

5 50 



3 00 
6 66 



4 25 
2 50 



1 75 
32 50 
22 50 



7 


*5 


4 


84 


6 


82 


2 


00 


I 


00 


10 


25 


2 


13 


5 


20 


5 


60 


11 


05 


5 


00 


32 


12 


12 


71 


6 


CO 


23 


51 


4 


25 


28 


10 


6 


72 


37 


11 


12 


25 


10 


95 


S 


00 


6 


00 


18 


bo 


12 


49 


17 


64 


a 14 


02 


5 


bo 


1 


00 



October, 1898 



The Home Missionary 



!35 



KANSAS-$s8.oo. 

Received by Rev. A. C. Hogbin, Treas. 

Emporia 

Eureka 

Severy 

Brookville, by Rev. J. H. Embree 

Emporia, Second, by Rev. H. J. 

Whitby 

Fredonia, by Rev. H. C. Shoemaker. 

Goodland, First, by Rev. T. Gray 

Kiowa, by Rev. L. P. Broad 

Longton, by Rev. O. Umsted 



NEBRASKA-$ 95 .S3. 

Carroll, Welsh Ch., by Rev. S. Jones. 

Crete, by H. Doane 

Friend and Turkey Creek, German 

Chs., by Rev. F. Hildebrandt 

Germantown, German Ch., by Rev. 

F. Woth 

Inland, German Ch., by Rev. C. W. 

Wuerrschmidt 

Lincoln, by Rev. E. C. Osthoff 

Swedish Emmanuel Ch., by Rev. J. 

Johnson 

Ogalalla, First, by Rev. F. S. Perry. 
Palisade, German, by W. C. Zumstein 

Eureka, by Rev. J. H. Beitel 



NORTH DAKOTA-S26.20. 

Received by Rev. J. L. Maile : 

Fargo, First, Ladies' Soc , 

Getchells, Ladies' Soc 

Harwood, Ladies 1 Soc 

Received by Rev. M. E. Eversz : 
Kulm 

Pingrec, S. S , by T. Price 



SOUTH DAKOTA— $43.45. 

Aberdeen, Plymouth Ch., by Rev. T. 

J. Dent . 

Mrs. J. Stowell, by Rev. W. H. 

Thrall 

De Smet, by Rev. T. G. Langdale. . 
Mission Hill, by Rev. D. B NichoL.. 

Mitchell, by Rev. B. W. Burleigh 

Osceola, bv Rev. W. H. Thrall 

Ree Heights, by Rev. P. B. Fisk. . . . 

Spearfish, by Rev. J. A. Becker 

Wakondo. bv Rev. T. M. Bates 

Webster, by'Rev. W. B. Hubbard ... 
Wheeler, by Rev. G. E. Brown 



COLORADO— $147.20. 

Received bv Rev. H. Sanderson : 
Crested Butte, J. H. Block 

Woman's H. M. Union, Miss B. C. 

Valentine, Treas 

Denver, Boulevard 

Highlandlake 

Pueblo, Pilgrim 



$5 8 S 
10 00 

4 °5 

19 90 

5 °° 

10 00 

2 25 
5 75 
10 00 

5 10 



1 60 
47 11 



T 


2S 


6 


5° 


2 


00 


18 


IS 


3 


42 


S 


00 



5 00 
3 °° 
1 00 



Globeville, First German Ch., by Rev. 

A. Trandt 

Idaho Springs, S. M. Wolcott 

Montrose, Union Ch., by Rev. W. A. 

Hutchinson 

Rico, People's Ch., Y. P. S. C. E., by 

Rev. G. A. Chatfield . . 



MONTANA-$ 4 . 5 o. 

Woman's Missionary Union, Mrs. W. 
S. Bell, Treas. : 
Castle, Children's Miss. Band 



Plains, by Rev. W. S. Bell. 



UTAH-$n. 4 o. 

Salt Lake City, Plymouth, by Rev. J. 
D. Nutting 



CALIFORNIA-S 



•35- 



Woman's H. M. Union, Southern Cali- 
fornia, Mrs. M. M. Smith, Treas.: 
Claremont, S. S.,for Salary Fund.. 

Riverside 

Santa Ana, for Salary Fund 

Fresno, German Ch., by Rev. J. Leg- 
ler 

Rocklin, by Rev. W. C. Day 

San Diego, Second Ch., and La Mesa, 
First, by Rev. T. R. Earl 

Tipton, by Rev. E. Waller 



OREGON— $27.63. 

Eugene, First, by Rev. R. C. Brooks. 
Hillsboro, by J. M. Gates 



2 00 
2 50 



5 


75 


10 


00 


8 


00 


23 


75 


4 


?5 


2 


35 


5 


00 


3 


00 



25 00 

2 63 



z 00 WASHINGTON-$ 54 .5o. 

1 90 Eureka, First, by Rev. A. R. Olds 4 75 

jo 00 Leavenworth, S5. co ; Peshastin, $1.00, 

6 00 by Rev. J. W. H. Lockwood 6 00 

7 60 Marysville, First, by Rev. R. Bushell. 5 00 
70 Olympia, First, by Rev. W. A. Rem- 

1 00 ele 1000 

250 Roy. by Rev. W. A. Arnold .. 700 

S 25 Seattle, Taylor Ch., by Rev. G. H. 

S 00 Lee 2 50 

2 50 Snohomish, First, by Rev. B. S. Win- 

chester 625 

Tacoma, Swedish Christian Mission, 

by Rev. A. J. Bailey 4 00 

Tolt, by Rev. G. Kindred . . . 2 co 
Washougal and Mt. Pleasant, by Rev. 

G. Baker 7 co 

i 10 

July Receipts : Contributions f 5i768 23 

8435 " Legacies 30,63445 

1075 Interest 2,52905 

440 Home Missionary . 5 20 

50 Literature 20 

100 00 $3 8 '937 13 



i 3 6 



The Home Missionary 



October, i! 



AUGUST, 189S 



MAINE-$2 3 6.5o. 

Auburn, Mrs. L. J. Little, by G. T. 

Little $200 00 

Lewiston, Pine St. Ch., by A. L. Tern- 

pleton 19 50 

Southport, Mrs. M. F. W. Abbott 17 00 

NEW HAMPSHIRE— $230.00; of which 
legacy, $150.00. 

F. C. I., and H. M. Union of N. H., 

Miss A. A. McFarland, Treas. ... 50 co 

Concord, Silver Circle, South Ch... 25 00 



Henniker, Legacy of Sophia Stiles, by 

W. A. Howlett, Ex 

Manchester, Mrs. H. P. Huse 

VERMONT-$ 5 i 73. 

Vermont Domestic Miss. Soc. W. C. 

Tyler, Treas 

Lunenburg, by Rev. E. T. Blackmer. 
Norwich, A Friend 



150 00 
5 00 



46 78 
3 25 
1 70 



Colchester, Legacy of Mrs. C. B. Mc- 

Call, by E. M. Day, Adm $200 00 

Easton, Ch., by S. B. Turney 14 50 

Guilford, First, by E. W. Leete..... . 50 00 

Higganum, by C- J. Gladwin 23 00 

Huntington, by F. H. Wells 10 00 

New Preston, E. C. Williams 1 00 

Norfolk, by S. A. Selden 82 17 

Northford, by W. Maltby 20 00 

Y. P. S. C. E., by M. N. Munson, 

for Alaska 1000 

North Woodbury, North Ch., by G. F. 

Morris 26 76 

Orange, by S. D. Woodruff 13 00 

Poquonock, S. S., by J. H. Ramsey, 

special 5 00 

Ridgefield. Legacy of Mrs. Delia Bene- 
dict, by Mr. Hoyt, Ex so 00 

Salisbury, A Friend 2 00 

By J. R. Harrison 95 27 

Simsbury, First, by N. J. Holcomb... :g 90 

Southington, by J. F. Pratt 47 34 

West Avon, Mrs. O. Thompson 70 

West Hartland, Ch., by J. Wilcox. ... 6 00 
Windsor. Y. P. S. C. E. of the First, 

by M. H. Barber, for Alaska 5 00 

Winsted, F. B.Pickett 500 



MASSACHUSETTS — $5,944.93 ; of 
which legacy, $950.00. 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc, by Rev. E. B. 

Palmer, Treas 4,000 00 

By request of donors, of which 
$30.67 for Alaska 284 51 

Woman's H. M. A., Miss A. C. Bridg- 
man, Treas., for Salary Fund 109 14 

Boston, L. T. B 200 00 

W. A. Wilde, for Salary Fund 25 00 

Union Ch., to const. John Porteous 

a L. M 50 00 

Braintree, Silver Circle, by Miss C. F. 

Keith 5 00 

Chesterfield, by Rev. H. E. Thygeson. 6 21 

Greenfield. Mrs. M. K.Tyler , 12 00 

Hatfield, Estate of Samuel H. Dickin- 
son, by D. W. Wells. R M. Woods, 
and F. H. Bardwell, Trustees.... 950 00 

By F. H. Bardwell 53 50 

Holyoke. First, by J. H. Wylie, Jr.... 28 86 

Indian Orchard, Evan. Ch., add'l, by 

W. Nield 2 00 

Ludlow Center. First, by H. E. Miller. 5 64 

Milton, Y. P. S. C. E. of the First, by 

W. I. Fairbank 500 

North Brookfield, "A Lover of Mis- 
sion Work." 503 

North Chelmsford, Rev. J. B. Cook 

and wife 2 00 

Pittsfield. Harriet S. Strong 30 00 

Readville, Blue Hill Evan. Soc, by S. 

T. Elliott 9 24 

Sheffield, by Dr. A. T. Wakefield 9 64 

Springfield, Memorial Ch., by H. W. 

Bowman 47 19 

Webster, First, by E. L. Spaulding... 100 co 
Worcester, Miss M. G. Whitcomb, 
special 5 00 

CONNECTICUT— $1,302.59; of which 
legacies, £650.00. 

Miss. Soc. of Conn., by Rev. W. H. 

Moore 

Bristol. Legacy of S. E. Root, by E. 

E. Newell, Ex ^oo 00 



NEW YORK-$i 7 i.o8. 

Received by Wm. Spalding, Treas. : 

Granville, Welsh 10 co 

Moriah 7 72 

New York City, Mt. Hope, by Rev. 

H . M . Brown 20 00 

Parkville 575 

Savannah 10 co 

Syracuse, Rev. E. N. Packard 6 00 

Woodville 1330 

72 77 

Aquebogue, by G. L. Wells 5 80 

Brooklyn, Willoughby Avenue S. S., 

by G. R. Beard 10 00 

F. Condit 5 00 

S. L. Bush 1 00 

East Bloomfield, by F. Munson 18 30 

Jamestown, First, by F. R. Moody.. 13 00 

Mount Sinai, by S. H. Miller 17 07 

Orient Point, A Life Member 10 00 

Potsdam, Mrs. M. C. Daggett 70 

Warsaw, by Miss M. M. Barber 17 44 



NEW JERSEY— $35.00. 

Woman's H. M. Union of the N. J. 

Asso., Mrs. J. H. Denison, Treas.: 

Orange Valley. J. S. C. E., for 

Salary Fund, for Alaska 

East Orange, Swedish Free Ch., by 

O. H. Bowen 

Summit, Augustus F. Libby 



214 95 



PENNSYLVANIA-$ 3 o.i 9 . 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. W. H. 
Ciift, Treas.: 
Kane 

Arnot, Swedish Ch., by Rev. C. J. 

Wideberg 

Chandler's Valley, Free Evan. Scand. 

Ch., by Rev. C. J. Lundquist 

Harford, by E. E. Jones 

Le Raysville, by Mrs. H. C. Lyon.... 
Warren, Scand. Bethel Ch., by Rev. 

J. A. Dahlgren 



5 00 

25 00 



1 25 

13 67 
7 00 



October, l« 



The Home Missionary 



137 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA-$ s .oo. 

Washington, Y. P. S. C. E. of the 

Fifth, by N. L. Tade, for Alaska. . . 



GEORGIA— $10.00. 

Columbus, by Rev. G. W. Cumbus. . . 

Duluth, by Rev. W. F. Brewer 

Hendrick'by Rev. W. H. Graham.,.. 



f 5 00 



37 
5 40 



2 50 
1 75 



ALABAMA— $6.02. 

Edwardsville, Salem Ch ,and Oxford, 
Union Grove Ch., by Rev. G. W. 
Vaughan 

Millville, Oak Hill Ch , by Rev. H. T. 
McKay 

Shelby, by Mrs. S. A. Clark , . ... . 



LOUISIANA— $2.52. 

Hammond, M. L. Rogers, for Woman's 
Missionary Soc 



FLORIDA- $34.07. 

Received by Rev. S. F. Gale, Supt.: 
Key West, Extra-cent a day Band, 
$17.82 ; Self-Denial Box, $9.00 ; 

Mrs. E. F. Roberts, S2.00 

Cottondale, County Line Ch., by 

Rev. S. B. Judah 

Moss Bluff and Panasoffkee, by Rev. 

E. D. Luter 

Tampa, by Rev. E. P. Herrick ; . 



TEXAS— $11.50. 

Paris, Ladies' Soc. First Ch., by Rev. 

Y. P. S. C.E.' of the First,' by Rev. 
L. Rees, for Alaska 

OKLAHOMA— $10.50. 

Carney, by Rev. W. Lumpkin 

Okarche, by Rev. R. B. Foster 

Pond' Creek, Union Ch., by Rev. H. 

W. Conry 

Waukomis, by Rev. F. Foster .... 

ARIZONA— $4.86. 
Jerome, by Rev. E. H. Ashnum 

TENNESSEE— $20.00. 



Knoxville, Pilgrim Ch., by Rev. J. H. 

Frazee 10 00 

Nashville. Union Ch., Fisk University, 

by H. H. Wright 10 00 



OHIO-$6oi. S 8. 

Received by Rev. J. G. Frazer, D.D.: 
July : 

Brecksville. by C. J. Dillow $15 C8 

Cleveland, Euclid Ave , by J. Snow, 

Treas 28 12 

Plymouth, by S. H. Stetson, Treas. 12 00 
Franklin Ave., by Mrs. C. West- 
gate 10 74 

Lakeview,by Mrs. E. S. BarstOw. 4 00 



2 50 

3 So 



3 °° 

1 5° 



Edinburg, by Rev. S. R. Dole 

Glenroy, by E. Michael 

Hudson, by Miss E. E. Metcalf, Tr 
Medina, EI. L. Loomis, by B. G 

Mattson, in full to const. Mrs. E 

S. Loomis and P. O. C lark. L Ms 
Springfield, Lagonda Ave., by Rev 

W. H. Baker 

Troy, by J. W. Fox, Treas 

Twinsburg, by O. O. Kelsey 

Windham. Mrs. N. B. Conant, by 

Rev. C. E. Dickinson, D.D. 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. G. B. 

Brown, Treas.: 
July: 

Akron, Washington St., W. H. ?., 

Salary Fund 

Andover, W. H. S 

Fredericksburg, W. H. S 

Geneva, W. H. S 

Marietta, Jun. C. E 

Oberlin, Second. Jun. C. E. .. 
Sandusky, W. M. U... ... .. 

Springfield. First, W. M. S. . 

First, C. E..... 

Toledo, First, Mrs. J. B. Niles's 

Dime Bank. .......'. 



Received by Rev. J. G. Frazer, D.D., 

Sec. and Treas.: 
August : 
Ashtabula, Swedish, by Rev. C. A. 

Widing 

Bluescreek, by Mrs. L. Gaston ..... 
Cleveland, Pilgrim, by H. C. Holt 

Treas . 

Grace, by Rev. D. C. McNair. . ... 
Grafton, by Miss L. Cordrey. . . . '. .7, 

Mantua, Friends 

Nelson, by Rev. Emily C. Wood^ 

ruff.. , 

Oberlin, First, by A. M. Lo\ eland 

Treas 

Second, G. C. Beckwith 

Rockport, by Rev. C. W. Rice. . . . . 
•Weymouth, by Rev. L. W. MaLn .. 



Ohio Woman's H. M. Union, by Mrs. 
G. B. Brown. Treas.: 

Berea, Salary Fund 

Elyria. First, Salary Fund 

North Amherst. Salary Fund '. 

Painesville, Jun.C. E.. Salary Fund. 

Tallmadge ;.. 

West Williamsfield 



Received by Rev. J. G. Frazer, Treas. 

Cleveland Bohemian Ecard : 
June : 

Ohio Woman's H. M. Union, by 
Mrs. G. B. Brown : 

Unionville, S. S 

Vermillion, Y. P: S. C. E. 

July: 

Cleveland, Euclid Ave., by J. Snow, 

Treas 

Plymouth, by S. H. Stilson, Trers. 
Ohio H. M. Union, by Mrs. G. B. 
Brown. Treas. : 

Cleveland, First. W. H. M. S 

Lakeview. L. A 

Fairport, C. E 

August : 
Cleveland, Pilgrim, by H. C. Holt, 
Treas 





5° 


9 


5° 


100 


00 


8 


40 
10 


•22 


00 


2 


00 



5 


00 


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00 


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00 


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2 


00 


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82 


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22 


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68 


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50 



140 oS 



25 


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I 


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5 00 
2 50 



II 


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■I 38. .46 



138 



The Home Missionary 



October, ii 



Brownhelm, S. S. Birthday Offering, 

by F. L Perry 

Oberlin, Mrs. E. B. Clarke 



Valencia and Plymouth Rock, by Rev. 

C. E. Roberts 

Wabaunsee, Y. P. S. C. E , by J. F. 

Conrow 



MISSOURI-$i 3 .is. 

Chillicothe, Union Ch., by Rev. J. P. 

Field 

Kansas City, Olivet Ch., by Rev. R. 

C. Walton 

Maplewood, Covenant Ch., by Rev. 

T. T. Holway 

MICHIGAN-$ 2 .oo. 
Noble, Mrs. H. Bogardus 



WISCONSrN-$i 3 .99. 

Ashland, add'l, by D. L Wiggins.... 

Fifield, by Rev. J. D. Whitelaw 

Medford, No. Wis , by Rev. J. D. 

Whitelaw 

Unity, Easton and Waupaca, Scand . 

by Rev. C.J. Jensen 



IOWA -$n. 4 o. 

Dubuque, " Spes.'' First Ch., by W. 

C. Chamberlain 

Oakland, by W. VV. McRoy 



MINNESOTA-S21.35. 

Athens and Spencer Brook, Scands., 
by Rev. A. P. Engstrom 

Benson, Pilgrim Ch., by Rev. J. L. 
Nott 

Burtrum, Rev. W. E. Griffith 

Chowen, by Rev. Alice R Palmer... 

Edgerton, First, by Rev. P. H. Fisk. 

St. Paul, People's German Ch., by 
Rev. W. Oehler 

Upsala, Swedish, by Rev. N. J. Bolin 



KANSAS-$6i.4i. 

Received by Rev. A. C. Hogbin, 
Treas : 

Barker's 

Dunlap 

Great Bend 

Western Park 

White City 



Less Expenses, 



Received by Rev. R. H. Harper, Ass't. 
Treas.: 

Atwood 

Buffalo Park 

Collyer 

Macon 

Wallace 

Herndon, German, $1.00 ; Logan, Ger- 
man, $1.00, by Rev. C. Richert 

Hiawatha, for Salary of Rev. E. L. 
Hull, by Mrs G. Amann 

Ottawa, S S.. by F. A. Waddle 

Topeka, First, add'l, by H. C. Bow- 
man 



NEBRASKA-$ 5 o.o 7 . 

j £,. Receivedby C. C. Smith, Ass't. Treas.: 

Genoa 

00 Nascot 

Omaha. Plymouth 

650 P>ckren 

Wavcrly 

Beaver Creek, $2.00; Edgar, J2.10; 

Superior. $1.50, German Chs., by 

2 00 & ev p Llch 

Bloomfield, by A. Ballantyne 

Lincoln, E. C. Osthoff 

Wahoo, S. S., by F. J. Snyder 

1 74 NORTH DAKOTA-$i3.i2. 

5 00 Antelope, by Rev. O. P. Champlin 

Fort Berthold, Rev. C. L. Hall 



SOUTH DAKOTA-$ 47 .i 3 . 

Woman's H. M Union, Mrs. F. M. 
Wilcox. Treas. Academy, Jr. C. E. 
Willow Lakes 

Aurora, by Rev. T. H. Hill 

Centerville, by Rev. H. Menke. 

Columbia, by Rev. I. R. Prior 

Frankfort, by Rev. D. R. Tomlin.... 

Howard, Rev. John Gray 

Redfield, Rev. D. R. Tomlin 

Waubay, Ch. of Christ, by Rev. E. F. 

Lyman 

Worthing, by Rev. J. Spittell ,. . 



5 00 

6 40 



1 15 

3 9° 

2 00 

3 5° 
2 30 

6 50 



10 go 
OS 

16 85 



6 00 

1 65 

2 26 



7 


6s 


6 60 


3 


86 


3 


50 


7 


75 


29 


36 


•5 


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8 


21 


3 


50 


4 


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1 


00 


2 


25 


3 


25 


3 


00 


2 


00 


5 


38 


11 


50 


1 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


6 


00 



COLORADO-$2 3 .oo. 

Elyria, Pilgrim Ch., by Rev. W. 

Davis 

Harmon, Union Ch., by Rev. H. M. 

Skeels 

Otis, by Rev. G. Dungan 

Red Cliff, by Rev. C. A. Forbes 

MONTANA— $1.97. 
Logan, by Rev. W. S. Bell 

IDAHO— $2.50. 

Woman's Missionary Union, Mrs. G. 
L. Cole, Treas. : 
Pocatello 

CALIFORNIA— $62.76. 

Woman's H. M. Union Southern Cali- 
fornia, Mrs. M. M. Smith. Treas.: 
Pasadena, Y. M. M. Soc. of the First 
Ch., for Salary Fund 

Highlands, by Rev. J. T. Ford 

National City, by Rev. A. C. Dodd... 

Niles. Rev. J. C. Holbrook 

Ontario, add'l. by Rev. A. E. Tracy.. 

Palermo, by Rev. T. F. Rayon 

San Diego. Mrs. E. E. Wigpin 

San Rafael, First, by Rev. W. H. At- 
kinson 



5 oo 

3 00 
5 00 



10 


00 


2 


00 


16 66 


10 


00 


2 


00 


i> 


00 


12 


60 



October, 1898 



The Home Missionary 



139 



OREGON— $16.60. 

Received by Ore. Home Miss. Soc, I. 

A. Macrum, Treas.: 
Portland, First, by C. L. Foy, Treas. 
Condon, First, by Rev. W. H. Burr 
Freewater and Ingles Chapel, by 

Rev. W. Hurlburt 

Willsburg, by Rev. G. A. Rockwood 

WASHINGTON-$i 5 .2 5 . 

Ahtanum, by Rev. L. W. Brintnall... 
Endicott, Alkali Hats and Walla 

Walla, German Chs., by Rev. J. 

Hergert 



is °° 
2. 60 



4 00 

5 00 



Edison, First, by Rev. E. D. Farns- 
worth $3 00 

Riverside, $2.27; Snohomish, $1.73, by 
Rev. M. Eells 4 O o 

Yesler, First, by Rey. L. A. Smith 2 co 

Atlantic Trust Co., Dividends 2,220 00 

August Receipts : Contributions $7,314 67 

Legacies 3,970 00 

Interest 42Q 75 

Home Missionary.. 30 66 

Literature 55 

$".745 <\3 



DONATIONS OF CLOTHING, ETC. 



Anderson, Ind., Ladies of Hope Ch., by 
Mrs. E. R. Cheney, two barrels and 
cash $105 00 

Amherst, N. H., Marguerite Circle of 
The King's Daughters, by Mrs. Lucy 
A. Wilkins, box ; 45 00 

Baltimore, Md., H. M. Section of Wo- 
man's Asso. of First Ch., by Mrs. 
Levi H. Smith, box 80 00 

Barre, Vt., W. M. S., by Emma H. La 
Point, box 37 98 

Bennington, Vt., Second Ch., by Julia 

A. White, box 14422 

Bridgewater, N. Y., Aux. of W. H. M. 
U.. by Mrs. D. S. Wood, box and 
freight 71 67 

Bristol, Conn., H M. Aux. of First Ch., 
by Mrs. Anne E. North, barrel and 
half-barrel 100 10 

Brooklyn, N. Y., Ladies' League of 
Bush wick Ave. Ch., by Mrs. F. W. 

Caskey, barrel no 00 

Friends in Clinton Ave. Ch., by Mrs. 

M. A. Munson, package. 
Ladies of Lewis Ave. Ch., by Mrs. 

Wm. Simpson, package 15 00 

South Ch., by Mrs. T. M. Towl, box. 117 69 
L. B. S. of Tompkins Ave. Ch., by 
Sarah M. Higgins, three barrels and 
check 242 82 

Chester, Ohio, L. M. S., by Mrs. Lucy 
Kilby , barrel 24 02 

Cleburne. Tex., Ladies, by Mrs. C. W. 
Mertz, barrel. 

Concord, N. H., Ladies of First Ch., by 

M. F. Gibson, box and cash 127 43 

Y. L. M. S. of South Ch., by Mrs. 
Geo. H. Moses, box and twopackages 28 50 

Conway, N. H., Ladies, by Mrs. A. S. 

Burrill, box and barrel 40 00 

Coventry, Vt., W. H. M. U. Aux., by 
Mrs. S. Nye, box 18 46 

Dallas. Tex., Ladies' Miss, and Aid Soc, 
by Mrs. D. Hinckeley, box 2950 

Dorset. Vt., by Mrs. W. S. Walker, box 22 50 

East Hampton, Conn.. King's Daugh- 
ters, by Miss Marie Cone, box . . 25 00 

Elyria, O., Ladies, by Miss C E. Cran- 
dall, box 219 77 

Fitchburg, Mass., Y. P. S. C. E. of C. C. 
Church, by F. A. Andrews, two boxes. 

Glen Ridge. N. J., W. H. M. S., by S. A. 

Bellau, box gi 63 

Hartford, Conn., Pearl St. Ch., by Clara 

S. Lee. box and barrel 214 45 

Ladies' H. M. S. of First Ch., by 

Miss M. H. Adams, box and barrel. 130 00 
Ladies' Sew. Soc. of South Ch., by 
Mrs. J. D. Candee, three barrels, 
package and cash 264 34 



L. A. S. of Windsor Ave. C.i., by Annie 

L. McRonald, box and barrel $89 n 

Lakeville, Conn., Ladies' Sew Soc, by 

Mrs. Geo. B. Burrall, barrel and half- 
barrel 114 76 

Litchfield, Conn., L. H. M. S., by Mrs. 

F. E. Coit, box 107 23 

Middletown, Conn., Ladies, by Mrs. A. 

R. Crittenden, barrel 69 26 

Monroe, Conn., Christian Endeavor Soc , 

by Mrs. A. R. Lutz, barrel. 
Montclair, N. J., Mrs. Samuel Holmes, 

by Mrs. E. H. Beckwith, box and cash 5 00 

New Britain, Conn., Willing Workers' 

Miss. Circle of First Ch. of Christ, 

box 47 00 

Newbury, Vt., Mrs. A. E. Keyes, box. 
New Haven, Conn., L. A. S. of Ch. of 

the Redeemer, barrel gi co 

Ladies' Aid Soc. of United Ch., by 

Sarah W. Foote, box 162 46 

New London, Conn., Ladies' Guild of 

Second Ch , by Emeline C. Smith, 

barrel and cash 75 00 

Newport. R. I., S. S. of United Ch., by 

H. F. Brown, box. 
New York City, Ladies of Broadway 

Tabernacle Ch., by Mrs. W. S. Sea- 
mans, nine trunks, two boxes and cash 1,247 49 
North Fairfield, O., by Anna Ccoke, 

barrel : . . 33 00 

North Haven, Conn., L. B. S , by Mary 

W. Eliot, box 8827 

Norwalk, Conn., L. B. S., by Mits E. W. 

Brown, barrel 50 co 

Orange, N. J.. Orange Valley Ch , by 

Mrs. A. L. Russell, two boxes 301 37 

Penacook, N. H., by M. Annie Fiske, 

barrel 42 co 

Plymouth, Conn., by Ellen S. Langdon, 

barrel 84 55 

Portland, Me., Ladies' Miss. Sew. Circle 

of State St. Ch , by Miss Harriet N. 

Hobson, one bale no 76 

Rochester, N. Y., C. E. Soc of South 

Ch.,by Mrs. Herbert L. Teller, barrel do 75 

Rodman, N. Y., by Mrs. Emma Cooley, 

barrel :....' 5487 

Roxbury, Conn., Y. P. S. C. E.,by Mrs. 

J. W. Minor, barrel 6000 

St. Albans, Vt., First Ch., by Mrs. H. 

C. Allen, box 146 67 

St. Louis, Mo., L. A. S. of First Ch., by 

Nettie M. Chittenden, barrel 45 00 

Ladies' Asso. of-Pilgrim Ch., by Miss 
M. V. Osburn. carpet. 
Salisbury. Conn.. Sewing Soc, by Mrs. 

Jennie R. Hubbard, barrel 75 00 

Saratoga Springs, N. Y., Mrs. E. B. 

Ripley, barrel and cash .". no oo 



140 



The Home Missionary 



October, 1898 



Sjmers, Conn.. L. A. S., by Mrs. E. L. 

Hurlburt, barrel $4500 

Sound Beach. Conn.. Y. P. S. C. E., by 

Lettie Ford, barrel 8 50 

South Glastonbury, Conn., Miss. Soc, 

by Mrs. Geo. H. Hale, box 59 54 

Springfield, O., Ladies, by Miss C. R. 

Carter, barrel and cash 62 03 

Stratford, Conn., H. M. S., by Mrs. R. 

W. Bunnell, box no 00 

Taftville, Conn.. L. B. S., Junior and 

Senior C. E. Soc. and S. S.,by Mrs. 

Wm. Carr, box 214 00 

Terryville, Conn., L. B. S., by Mrs. M. 

H. Scott, box and freight 91 66 

Upper Montclair, N. J., Mrs. J. M. 
Phillips, box. 

Ladies, by Mrs. J. M. Phillips, box... 24 00 



Washington, Conn., Homeland Circle, 

by Mrs. W. A. Watts, box $25 co 

Waterbury, Vt., Ladies' Aux. for Home 
and Foreign Work, and Friends, 
two boxes and freight 8875 

Woman's Benev. Soc. of Second Ch., 

by Mrs. J. M. Burrall, box 123 01 

Wells. Me., Second Ch., by Mrs. W. H. 

Teel, box and cash 41 00 

West Hartford, Conn., First Ch., by 

Mrs W. H. Hall, barrel 6177 

Wethersfield, Conn., by Mrs. Augusta 

M. Smith, barrel 8200 

Windsor Locks, Conn., Ladies, by Mrs. 

C. H. Coye, barrel 4800 



$6,657 89 



AUXILIARY STATE RECEIPTS 
MAINE MISSIONARY SOCIETY 



Receipts of the Maine Missionary Society from February 1 to May 2, 1S98. John L. 

Crosby, Treasurer 



Auburn, High St. Ch., by J. F. At- 

wood $4500 

Bangor, First, by W. P. Hubbard 105 35 

Central S. S., by R.J. Sawyer 2111 

Bath, Central, by J. C. Ledyard 80 08 

Brewer, First, by Geo. A. Snow 23 35 

Brooksville, by Rev. Chas. Whittier... 7 34 

Brunswick, First, by R. H. Stanwood.. 54 96 

Bucksport, Elm St., by Edw. Swazey.. 50 00 

Camden. First, by H.J. Hemingway.. 20 00 
Cape Elizabeth. Y. P. S. C. E., by Miss 

Elizabeth Tobey 1 00 

Castine, David Dunbar, legacy, add I, 

by Geo. M. Warren 100 00 

Center Lebanon, by Avery E. Lambert 8 75 

Cranberry Isles, by Rev. Chas. Whittier 5 08 

Farmington, Miss C. N. Bixby 2 00 

Fort Fairfield, by Rev. G. B. Hescock. 10 00 

Freeport, First, by Rev. E. C. Brown.. 10 <x> 
Gorham, Mrs. Damaris Libby. legacy, 

add 1, by John A. Waterman :ooo 

Ch. and Soc, by J. S. Leavitt, Jr 6 oS 

Gray, by Rev. E. M. Cousins 2 70 

Hallowell. Mrs. Mary Fifield (add'l), 

legacy, by J. S. Fifield, Ex 34 56 

Harrison, by Rev. A. G. Fitz 3 45 

Jonesport, by Rev. Chas. Whittier 33 59 

Limerick, by Rev. J. A. Waterworth. . . 5 45 
Litchfield Corner, by Rev. Jas. Rich- 
mond 7 50 

Milford, by Rev. Chas. Whittier 2 72 

Monroe, by Rev. Chas. Whittier 3 77 

Morrisville (Vt.*, Mrs. Levi Hardy, 

legacy, by H . R. Munson 5000 

New Gloucester, by Rev. H. G Mank, 
$40 of which to const. Rev. Herbert 
G. Mank and Mrs. Georgianna W. 

Mank L. Ms 61 40 

North Bridgton, by Rev. A. G. Fitz 5 00 



North Ellsworth, by Rev. Chas. Whit- 
tier $2 71 

Orono, by Miss Annie S. Lunt 2 34 

Princeton, by Georgia E. McCurdy... 3 31 

Y. P. S. C. E., by Miss L. Cain 2 50 

Phippsburg, by F. S. Bowker 7 60 

Portland, Reform School, J. Henry Dow 5 00 

St. Lawrence Ch., Wm. L. Blake 10 00 

Second Parish, Y. P. S. C. E., by 

Lyman A. Cousens 8 00 

Red Beach, by Rev. H. W. Conley n 00 

Sanford, by Ellen M. Emery 5 00 

Searsport, a Friend 5 00 

Sebago Lake, by Mrs. N. E. Sawyer. . . 4 00 

Skowhegan, by Geo. N. Page 25 50 

South Paris, Unknown 10 00 

First, by F. A. Shutleff 1200 

Springfield, Mass., legacy from Mr. 

John C. Beals, by J. S Beals, Ex 100 00 

Temple, Rev. J. R Wilson 10 00 

Veazie, by Mrs. Mary A. Lufkin 15 00 

Waltham, Mass., Mrs. R. Baker 3 00 

Warren, Second, by Rev. E. R. Sterns. 6 00 

Waterville, First, by A. M Kennison.. 24 07 

Wells, Second, by Dea. John Goodwin. 5 00 
West Brooksville, by Mrs. Geo. H. 

Tapley 2 50 

Westbrook, by H. P. Murch 29 29 

Whiting, by Mrs. C. A. Chase 4 oj 

Woodford. Mrs. Mary A. Baxter, by 

Dea. J. H. Clark 25 00 

York Corner, Second, by J. H. Moody. 10 00 

Woman's Maine Miss. Aux 21665 

Coupons, Dividends, etc 433 72 

$1-778 43 

Previously acknowledged 4,ti8 83 

Total from Sept. 15, 1897, to date $5,897 31 



Receipts from May 2 to July 31, 1898 



Auburn, Hierh St.. by James F. Atwood $41 78 

Bangor, Hammond St., by E. F. Rich.. 125 00 

Belfast, First, by A. A Stoddard 50 00 

Benton, by Rev. T. P. Williams 3 60 



Bingham, by Mrs Calvin Colby $10 00 

Blanchard. by A. D. Sturtevant 6 50 

Boothbay Harbor, by S. S. Lewis 10 00 

Brewer, First, by G. A. Snow 14 25 



October, 1898 



The Home Missionary 



141 



Brookville, by Miss Ella Burdett $12 48 

Brownville, by Rev. W. C. Curtis 12 co 

Cape Elizabeth, South Soc, by Mrs. G. 

E. Cushman 500 

Carritunk, by Mrs. W. D. Moore 5 co 

Cornish, by Margie C. Marr 9 36 

Cumberland Center, by Rev. F. W. 

Davis 12 00 

Cumberland Mills, Warren, by James 

Graham 107 78 

Deering, Free, by Rev. T. M. Davies. . 12 00 

East Baldwin, by Rev. G. S. Wilder... 2 50 

Fast Sumner, by Rev. P. E. Miller 10 00 

Eliot, First, by F. P. Hodgdon 11 19 

S. S., by F. P. Hodgdon 313 

Ellsworth, by John H. Brimmer 14 19 

Falmouth. First, by E. F. Robinson.... 8 00 

Farmington, First, by J. P. Thwing ... 34 82 

Garland, by Lizzie M. Rideout 5 40 

Hallowell, Mrs. Mary Fifield (additional 

legacy), by J. S. Fifield, Ex 31 55 

Hampden, by Mrs. Kate R. Whitmore. 3 50 

Hiram, by W. P. Hume 3 89 

Limington, by Rev. C. S. Wilder 20 00 

Madison, by Frank Dinsmore 17 00 

Marshfield, by Mrs. Jennie Lyon 2 00 

Minot Center, Y. P. S. C. E., by Miss 

L. E. Washburn 2 00 

Monroe, by Rev. Charles Whittier 2 90 

Newcastle, by Joel P. Huston 17 00 

New Gloucester, Mr. Nelson Valentine, 

to const. Elizabeth C. Curtis and Katie 

F. Curtis, of North Harts well, Harold 
F. Dinsmore and Ruth E. Dinsmore, 
of Turner, and Rachel C. Dinsmore, 

of Auburn, L. M. S 100 00 

New Sweden, by Rev. O. P. Fogelin. . . 4 00 

Norridgewock, by Charles E. Warren. . 12 35 

Orland, by Charlotte S. Buck 9 00 

Patten, by D. Scribner 6 76 

Penobscot Conference, by J. S. Ellis. . . 15 co 
Phippsburg (Basin), by Miss Ella Bur- 
dett 1 65 

Pittston, by E. A. Lapham 8 56 

Portland, Williston, by A. S. Burbank. . 40 75 

West, by B. C. Fuller 20 co 

A Friend 10 00 

Presque Isle, in part for L. M., by Rev. 

C. Harbutt. 7 00 

Princeton, Y. P. S. C. E., by Miss Laura 

Caine 2 50 



Richmond, by Rev. E. H. Newcomb... $13 17 

Sebago, by W. P. Hume 5 26 

Sherman Mills, Washburn Memorial, by 

Rev. I. C. Bumpus 5 40 

Y. P. S. C. E., by Rev. I. C. Bumpus. 1 25 
South Bridgton, Ch. and S. S., which, 

with previous gifts, const. Rev. W. 

B. Hague a L. M., by T. B. Knapp . . 6 00 
South Freeporc, by the Rev. Arthur 

Smith 35 00 

Standish, Miss Esther Sargent (legacy), 

by Mrs. Mary E. Dudley 100 00 

Stillwater, A Friend, by Rev. D. P. 

Hatch 1 00 

Washington Conference, by Rev. George 

H.Woodward 10 21 

Wells, Barak Maxwell, Esq., legacy, by 

A. A. Maxwell, Ex 500 00 

West Auburn, by A. D. Chandler 11 00 

West Brooksville, for C. H. M. Soc 1 78 

By Rev. J. S. Richards 3 50 

Winslow, by Rev. T. P. Williams 11 00 

Wilson's Mills, people, by Mrs. John 

Olsen 585 

Woodford's, by J. H. Clark 53 60 

York Conference, by Rev. R. C. Drisko 12 37 

Woman's Maine Missionary Auxiliary. 780 36 

Dividends, etc 663 15 

$3,083 29 
Previously acknowledged 5,897 31 

Total from Sept. 15, 1897, to date $8,980 60 

A comparison of the receipts above stated with 
those of the corresponding period of the previous 
year shows the following reduction : 

From churches and individuals $803 78 

Woman's Auxiliary 322 01 

Legacies 4,587 45 

Total reduction $5i7i3 24 

This failure in receipts (aside from legacies), 
however accounted for by the stringency of af- 
fairs, is depressing, and with the fact that an in- 
debtedness of $5,000 has been created during the 
year, threatens serious reduction in the work of 
the Society, which cannot honestly continue to 
contract liabilities for which its supporters do 
not provide the means. 



VERMONT DOMESTIC MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Receipts of the Vermont Doi?iestic Missionary Society front April 20 to May 20, 1S98. 
Wm. C. Tyler, Treasurer 



Arlington, E 

Barre ... '. 

First Intermediate Y. P. S. C. E. 

Bellows Falls 

Bradford 

Cabot 

For C. H. M. S 

Dummerston 

Enosburgh 

Georgia 

Guildhall 

Hartland 

Hinesburgh 

Irasburgh 

Jeffersonville 

Y. P. S. C. E.,.forC. H. M.S... 

Mclndoes, C. L. Duncan 

Newbury, W 

Norwich 



$400 Ripton 

20 78 Rochester 

9 00 Rutland Center, Swedish Church 

43 70 Saxton's River 

1559 Sheldon 

8 61 Rev. Wm. J. Watt „.. 

14 70 Shoreham '.... 

15 50 Stowe... 

4 67 Vermont, A Friend 

5 39 Victory, Rev. George A. Appleton 

6 00 Waterbury, for C. H. M. S 

20 00 Weston 

3 80 Worcester 

23 32 Mrs Sophia L. Hobart, to const. Rev. 

5 00 W. Vater, L. M 

300 Whiting 

5 00 W. H. M U.... 

i 46 Vermont Missionary 

J 3 43 



$2 75 
r 3 35 

4 75 
12 00 

8 7 2 

5 °° 

10 50 

30 00 
IOO 00 

15 00 
15 50 

11 00 
15 00 



425 50 

8 95 



$931 23 



142 



The Home Missionary 



October, 1898 



Receipts from May 20 to June 20, 1S9S 



Albany 

Y. PS. C. E 

Alburgh Springs 

Ascutneyville. Mrs. Newton Gage. 

Mrs. Geo. Fitch 

Berlin 

Bridport 

Brattleboro, Swedish Church 

Braintree, E., and Brookfield, W.. 

Barre, East 

Burke, for women evangelists 

Corinth, East 

Cornwall, E. R. Robbins 

Calais, East 

Craftsbury, East 

Castleton 

Danby 

Eden 

Fairfield 

East 

Church Relief Society 

Franklin 

Fairlee, West 

Ferrisburgh 

Gaysville 

Glover. West 

Hardwick 

Halifax 

Hubbardton 

Island Pond 

Y. P. S. C. E 

Jamaica 

Lyndon ville 

Londonderry 

Milton 

Northfield 



tfo 50 
1 50 

11 50 
5 00 

1 00 
ir 24 
it) 60 

2 65 
11 00 
14 14 
16 25 

'3 75 
500 00 
8 31 
8 50 
4 03 
8 00 
4 57 



5 oo 

2 50 

11 00 

1 75 

12 45 
10 00 
21 00 

5 10 

3 °° 

2 50 
12 00 

1 00 

2D OO 

5 6 7 

3 co 

4 87 
'5 51 



Pittsfield 

Ladies' Society 

Quechee 

Roxbury 

Rutland, West, " C..E." 

Rutland, F. A. Morse •. 

G.J.Adams 

Strafford 

Rev. Henry Cummings and wife. 

Sherburne 

St. Johnsbury Center 

St. Johnsbury, South Church , 

Warren, from women evangelists. . 

Vershire 

Interest from invested funds 

Vermont Missionary 



12 W. H. M. U. 



$8 35 

5 °° 
15 50 

1 03 

3 °° 

i 00 

1 00 

15 00 

25 co 

8 00 

11 00 

104 6g 

20 00 

14 co 

93 12 

6 07 



Receipts from June 10 to June 20 

Anniversary collection 

Franklin County Conference 

Lamoille Conference 

Milton 

Norwich, Rev. N. K. Nichols 

Pawlet. C. H. M. S 

Rutland 

Tunbridge 

Wells River 

Westminster 

Interest from invested funds 



5i,io8 


40 


312 


29 




$47 


24 


3 


20 


1 


00 


3 


,,, . 


10 


CO 


4 


30 


5° 


00 


3 


00 


15 


71 


4 


85 


41 


25 



S183 55 



Receipts from June 20 to July 20, i8gS 



Barton Landing 

Barre. East 

Bradford, Mass., Mrs. E. J. Bonnette. 
Braintree, East, and Brookfield, West. 

Brattleboro 

West 

ForC.H.M.S 

Burke, for women evangelists 

Colchester „ 

Dorset 

Fairlee, West, S. S 

Highgate 



1 44 

1 00 

5 53 

102 11 

14 07 

11 25 

4 57 

9 10 

12 37 
> 75 
1 5° 



King's Daughters 

Island Pond, Elizabeth Steele. 

Marlboro 

Newbury 

Orange 

Peacham, for C. H. M.S 

Royaltc >n 

Vermont Missionary 

W. H. M. U 

Interest 



8 05 

2 60 

1 55 

3 1 23 

8 00 

9 82 
7 5° 

35 co 



£289 06 



Receipts from July 20 to August 20, 1S9S 



Berkshire, East 

Brookfield. East 

Burlington, College Street 

Clarendon 

Charleston. West 

Cornwall. Mrs. Martha Bond 

Middletown Springs, to const. 

Dyar Leffingwell a L. M 

Montgomery Center 

Post Mills 

Sunday-school 



Mrs. 



$17 82 
6 42 



32 25 
1 75 
1 77 
5 5° 



Pownal, North 

Randolph, West..:. . . 

Royalton. South 

Weybridge 

Windham 

Bank's Fund 

Vermont Missionary. 
Interest 



$7 


5° 


'5 95 


14 


00 


4 


38 


8 


00 


2 


08 


3 


80 


116 


75 



MASSACHUSETTS HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 



Receipts of the Massachusetts Home Missionary Society in June, 1S98. Rev. Edwin B. 

Palmer, Treasurer 

A Friend 

Amherst. North, by E. H. Dickinson. 
South, by Rev. J. F. Glcason 



£2 00 Andover, South. by John Alden. towards 
25 00 salary of Rev. R. B. Wright, Boise 
715 City, Idaho $10000 



October, i< 



The Home Missionary 



14. 



Athol, Evan., C. E. Soc, by Alice C. 

Lawton, for Alaska $22 50 

Bank Balance, May Interest on n 45 

Billerica, Orth., by J. F. Bruce 15 00 

Boston, Cong. Ch. Union, Special, for 

Montvale Church, by C. E. Kelsey. 83 00 

Mt. Vernon, by Sanford Keith 31 58 

Roxbury, West, South Evan., by Mrs. 

C. H. Botsford 10484 

Boxford, by Rev. E. L. Bradford 32 53 

West, by Rev. C. L. Hubbard 5 35 

Brockton, First, add'l, by J. T. Hurke.. 3 50 

Brookline, Harvard, by James H. Shap- 

leigh 82 61 

Harvard, by Jas. H. Shapleigh, for 

Italian Mission. 24 78 

Cambridge, First, by Geo. S. Saunders 

(of which $100 for C. H. M. S.) 20000 

Sunday-school, by Henry T. Burrage 20 87 
Easton, " Golden Link" by Lulie Sher- 
man 14 00 

Fitchburg, Rollstone, by David Lowe.. 24 41 

Gardner, by D. H. Rand 50 00 

Greenfield, First, by Rev. Corey H. 

Watson 10 00 

Second, by Miss Lucy A. Sparhawk. . 84 98 

Hale, E. J. M. fund, Income of 43 97 

Holyoke, Second, by J. N. Hubbard, to 

const.- Mrs. A. Alvord a L. M. of C. 

H. M. S 54 06 

Hopkinton, First, by Frank E. Hulen.. 156 80 
Ipswich, South, by Rev. T. F. Waters. 70 00 

Leicester, Murdock, Joseph, Est. of, by 

J. O. Murdock, Ex . . 500 00 

Lenox, by E. C. Carter (add'l) 1 00 

Leominster, Orth., by A. O. Wilder. ... 72 23 

Lowell, A Friend, to const. Ethel W. 

Whitcomb a L. M. of C. H. M. S. . 50 00 

Eliot, by James Howard 5 00 

Eliot, by James Howard. Special for 
local Armenian Work. $15.83.* 

John St., by William Morey 38 10 

Maiden, Maplewood, S. S., by A. D. 

Crombie 7 20 

Maynard, by W. H. Gutteridge 200 00 

Medford, West, by Rev. J. Coit 500 

Melrose, Orth., by C. C. Goss 40 14 

Methuen, by J. Emerson, Special for 

Greek Work, $7.15.* 



Millbury, First, by Carolyn C. Waters. $17 68 
Newton (Center), First, by J. E. Rock- 
wood 137 gi 

North Andover, by Frank W. Frisbie.. 27 co 

Northboro, by Miss A. A. Adams 24 85 

Oxford, First -. 5 00 

Pittsfield, South, by F. E. Peirson 26 61 

Plainfield, by Rev. Geo. C. Bliss 8 01 

Plympton, C. E. Soc, by Annie S. 

Churchill 3 00 

Randolph, First, by W. H. Leavitt 123 10 

Reading, by Dean Peabody 25 00 

Rochester, First, by Geo. B. Haskell... 16 75 
Salem, Tabernacle, C. E. Soc, by C. R. 

Washburn, for Alaskan Missy 10 42 

Sangers, Cliftondale, by H. A. Hay- 
wood 20 32 

Sharon, by D. W. Pettee 20 02 

Southbridge, GlobeVillage, Evan. Free, 

by F. E. Randall 15 72 

South Hadley Falls, by A. N. Chapin .. 20 25 
Springfield, Oiivet, by Geo. B. Kilbon, 

w. p. g. to const. Cora B. Johnson a 

L. M. of C. H. M. S 31 27 

Tcwnsend, Orth., by J. W. Eastman.. . 9 32 

Wakefield, by W. P. Preston 24 25 

Watertown, Phillips, by Moses Fuller.. 81 40 

Wellesley, Hills, by L, V. N. Peck 13 00 

West Boylston, First, by E. B. Rice 6 25 

Westfield, Second, by R. L. Scott 42 03 

Westford, Union, by Daniel Atwood 13 25 

Union, C. E. Soc, by Daniel Atwood 6 75 
West Newbury, Second, C. E. Soc, by 

Emily A. Bailey 6 00 

West Tisbury, by U. E. Mayhew 12 48 

Whitcomb, David, Fund, Income of.... 150 00 

Worcester, Pilgrim, by F. L. Stetson... 183 01 

Union, by C. B. Greene 178 68 

Woman's Home Missionary Association, 
by Miss M. L. Woodbury, Asst. 
Treas. : 

Special Grant for Salary of Mrs. El- 
d ridge of the French American Col- 
lege 200 00 



Home Missionary , 



,657-78 

Co 



$3,658 38 



Received in July, ii 



Amherst, North, C. E. Society, by Miss 

M. E. Harrington 

South (add'l), by Rev. J. F. Gleason. 

Bank Balances, June Interest • 

Barnstable, West, by Rev. E. B. French 

Bernardston, by H. L. Crowell 

Brockton, Campello, Souths Sunday- 
school , by C. H. Williams 

Brookfield. Blanchard, Mrs. C. P 

Brookline, Harvard, by Jos. H. Shap- 
leigh, for Italian Mission 

Buckland, by Ella M. Trow, to const. 
Rev. E. A. Robinson a L. M. of C. 
H. M. S 

Charlemont, East. by Miss Angie Ballard 

Chelmsford, Central, by Chas. J. Soder- 
burg 

Chicopee, Firsty by Rev. C. G. Burn- 
ham 

Clinton, First German, by Geo. Schwab 

Concord, Thompson, Charles,by Thomas 
Todd 

Dedham, First, by Geo. W. Humphrey. 

Fall River, Broadway, by Graham 
Parkinson 

Fitchburg, Calvinistic, A Member, by 
Lulie A. Holden 

Framingham, Plymouth, by John H. 
TemDie ■ 



$6 54 
1 00 
6 63 
5 oo 
9 CO 



5 27 

25 03 



59 85 



60 


00 


H 


10 


20 


46 


28 


00 


12 


48 


io 


00 


59 


io 


6 


75 


5° 


CO 


45 


00 



Frost, Rufas S., fund. Income of 

Georgetown, Memorial, by Henry Hil- 
liard 

Gloucester, Trinity, by Joseph O. Proc- 
tor 

Great Barrington, First, by Clarence R. 
Sabin 

Hadley, First, by Agnes Ay res 

Hardwick, Gilbertsville, by A. H. Rich- 
ardson . 

Haverhill, Wash., S. S. Class No. 4, by 
Henry A. Poore 

Hudson, by A. T. Knight 

C. E. Society, by A. T. Knight 

Ipswick, Linebrook, by J. H. Tenney. . 

Jessup, C. A ., fund, Income of 

Kingston, Mayflower, by Mrs. M. H. 
Peckham 

Lawrence. Armenian Residents, by 
Rev. W. E. Wolcott, for local Arm. 
work. $40.* 

Littleton. Orth.. by J. W. Thacher 

Lowell, Pawtucket, by John J. Cotton.. 

Lunenburg, Evan., by E. S. Francis . . . 

Marblehead, First, by Nathan P. San- 
born 

Marshfield Hills. Men's Class in S. S., 
by Miss A. L. Sherman 

Medway Village, by Walter R. Adams 



$30 00 

13 92 

50 00 

39 78 
23 10 

136 06 

10 00 

10 68 

5 00 

17 82 

150 00 



8 79 

20 00 

6 40 



4 97 
25 00 



* Received and credited on special accounts. 



H4 



The Home Missionary 



October, 1898 



Melrose. Orth., by C. C. Goss, for 

French work $13 00 

Methuen, 1> irst. by Jacob Emerson 17 30 

Montague. Miller's Falls, by Mrs. D. L. 

Cushman 4 00 

Middleboro, First, by E. W. Fessenden. 85 00 

Millis, by A. H. Wheelock 1700 

New Hampshire, K. M. Soc , for ser- 
vices of Rev. H. K. Santikian in N. H. 
$77.00.* 

Newton, Center, " C." 5 00 

Eliot, by Geo. N. Putnam 185 co 

Northampton, First, by J. H. Seaver... 230 27 
Northbridge, Wnitinsville. E.-C.-a-Day 

Band, by Mrs. C. E. Whitin 1866 

Norwood, First, by Edson D Smith... 50 92 

Parkhurst. E. C fund. Income of 15 03 

Peabody, West, by F. K. Mclntire 5 87 

Pittsfield, First, by Frank W. Dalton . 40 00 

Reed, Dwight. fund. Income of 152 50 

Richmond, C. E. Society, by C. H. 

Derr 10 90 

Salem. Crombie St., by Frank A. Brown 91 53 
So'u'.h, by Rev. J. F. Brodie, for local 
Armenian work, S10.* 

Shrewsbury, by Henry Harlow 7 00 

Somerville. East, Howard, Mrs. Henry 10 00 

South Hadley, First, by L. M. Gaylord. 10 00 

Southwick, by F. M. Arnold g 00 

Upton, First, by B. C. Wood 6 69 



Uxbridge, First Evan., by W. R. John- 
son $26 og 

Waltham, Swede Evan., by G. Isaacson 8 50 

Trinitarian, by T. W. Temple 21 80 

Westporl, Pac. Union, S. S., by J. C. 

Macomber 1032 

West Springfield, Park St., by Samuel 

Smith 29 21 

Weymouth, Pilgrim, by S. E. Rockwood 11 00 

Whitin, J. C, fund, Income of 12000 

Winchester Highlands, Bethany Chapel 

S. S., by A. S. F. Kirby 5 00 

'■ P. E. M." 10 00 

Woburn, First, Ladies' Char, and Read- 
ing Soc, by Mrs. J. Jameson, to const. 

Mrs. Ambrose Bancroft a L. M 30 00 

Worcester, Old South, First C. E. Soc, 
by Mrs. F. B. Cobb, of which $10 

for Alaskan work 20 00 

Park, by Miss L. A. Giddings 18 00 

Piedmont, by A. W. Eldred 55 20 

Pilgrim (add'l), by F. L. Stetson 10 00 

Plymouth, by F. W. Chase 86 10 

Ladies' H. M. Soc, by Mrs. Ruth P. 
Beaman, w. p. g. to const. Mrs. 
A. H. Henry a L. M. of C. H. M.S. 3133 



Home Missionary. 



$2,608 95 
S 81 

$2,614 7° 



Received in August, i£( 



Ayer, First, by Mrs. M. L. Kingsbury. 

Bank Balances, July, Interest on 

Blandford, Second, by Mrs. F. M. Bliss 

Boston, Jam. Plain. Swett, Sam. W., 
Est. of, by Edward M. Brewer, Ex., 
final payment, $745. t 
Roxbury, West, South Evan., by Mrs. 

C. H. Botsford, add'l 

X 

Braintree. First, by A. B. Keith 

Cambridge, First, by Geo. S. Saunders. 

Cambridgeporl, Pilgrim, by N. H. Hol- 
brook 

Canton, Morse, Hon. Elijah A.. Est. of, 
by Mrs. Felicia V. and Abner Morse, 
Exs 

Chester, Center, by Rev. E. C. Haynes. 

Chicopee, First, S. School, by C. G. 
Chapin 

Claremont, Cal., Cook, S. M 

Concord, Trin., by Thomas Todd 

Danvers, Maple St., by C. G. Mears. to 
const. Julius Peale, William T. Put- 
nam, and Miss Lizzie Fernald L. Ms. 

c. h. m.s.:..; 

Easthampton, Moore, Mrs. Julia S., Est. 

of, by Joseph W. Wilson, Ex. .:. 

Everett. Courtland St., by A..T. Finch. 
Fitchburg, Rollstone, by David Lowe.. 

Gardner. First, by D. H. Rand 

Great Barrington, First, C. E. Soc, by 

Ellen M. Pixley 

Groveland. N. A. Burbank 

Hadley, First, C. E. Soc, by Agnes 

Ayers . . . J . . . , , ; . 

Hanover, Second, C. E. Soc, by Fannie 

W. Stetson 

Hinsdale, by M. M. Wentworth 

Holbrook, Winthrop, by F. W. Blan- 

chard : . .' 

Hubbardston, Russell, Mrs. I. J., by 

Rev. M. H. Hitchcock 



5 29 
4 72 



7 93 
415 45 



14 66 



5,oco 00 
5 51 

3 IQ 
25 co 
15 28 



3 Si 


1 


10 


00 


8 


SO 


34 


96 


2 


70 


12 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


9 


00 


8 


52 


5 


00 



Hyde Park, Clarendon Hills, by John 

Holden $ 10 00 

Lakeville Precinct, Ch., $17.00; S. S., 

$6 00, by T. P. Paul 2300 

Lawrence, Trinity, Prim. Dept. of S. S., 

by Mrs. E. Gould, for Alaska 

Ludlow Center, First, by H. E. Miller. 

Maiden, A Friend . .. 

Newburyport, Belleville, by Rev. A. W. 
H itchcock 

North, by J. B. Creasey 

Petersham, Orth.. by C. W. Gates 

Plympton, Hartshorne, Rev. V. J 

Reading, by Dean Peabody 

Revere, First, by F. I. Weston, for Rev. 

G. H. Adalian 

Rochester, North, by G. H. Randall... 
Rockport, First, by Z. A. Appleton (of 

which $5.00 from Z. A. A.) 

Shrewsbury, by Henry Harlow 

Sterling, C. E. Soc, by Mabel L. Kings- 
bury 

Sunderland, by W. L. Hubbard 

Swampscott, by Rev. D. E. Burtner... 

West Boylston. by E. Braman Rice 

West Stockbridge, Village, by Rev. W. 

W. Curtis... 

Westwood, Islington. Clark, Mrs. J. T., 

by Rev. W. F. Bickford 

Williamsburg, bv Henry W. Hill. ...... 

Winchester, First, Ind. Gift, by H. A. 

Wheeler 282 

Worcester, Damon, Harriot W.. Est cf, 

by S. Jennison and W. S Barton, Exs. 1,500 00 
Wrentham, First, by S. M. Gerould 15 00 



10 


si 


6 


O) 


I CiO 


00 


244 


10 


7 


00 


1.3 


°5 


IS 


00 


26 


00 


3 


50 


to 


00 


M 


80 


IS 


00 


10 


00 


88 


00 


25 


00 


17 


50 


25 


00 


3 


CO 


10 


00 



Home Missionary. 



$8,354 83 
1 20 

$8,356 03 



* Received and credited on special accounts. 

t Received and credited on Swett Evangelistic account. 



October, 1898 



The Home Missionary 



145 



THE MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF CONNECTICUT 



Receipts of the Missionary Society of Connecticut in June; 1S9S. Ward W. 
Jacobs, Treasurer 



Colebrook, by J. M. Grant 

Darien, by Alfred Morehouse 

Durham , by Henry H . Ne wton 

East Haven, Foxon, by Rev. Charles 

Page 

Ellington,by H. L. James,for C. H. M. S. 
Essex, Swedish, by Rev. C. G. Young- 

gren 

Franklin, Rev. H. E. Hart 

Hartford Park, by Willis E. Smith, for 
C. H. M. S 

Pearl Street, by William A. Willard. . 
ForC. H. M. S 

Weth. Ave., by Henry S. Forbes 

Windsor Ave., by Henry H. Pease, 

forC. H. M.S 

Lebanon, Exeter, by Charles C. Loomis, 

for C. H. M. S 

Litchfield, Milton, by Rev. W. E. Page. 
Meriden Center, by Wilbur F. Smith... 

Middleton, First, by E. P. Augur 

New Haven, Plymouth, by Samuel 
Lloyd 

Redeemer, by William E. Rowland... 

Ridgefield, First, by John F. Holmes, 

for C. H. M.S 



Xio 


00 


22 


78 


22 


00 


6 


00 


IO7 


00 


2' 


07 


2 


00 


4 1 


54 


42 


27 


5* 


12 


32 


89 



1,146 02 



27 00 
39 9 6 



Ridgebury, by Samuel A. Coe, for C. 

H. M. S 

Salisbury, by Rev. John C. Goddard... . . 
Saybrook, Deep River, Swedish, by Rev. 

C. G. Younggren 

Stafford, West Stafford, by Rev. J. A. 

Solandt 

Somers, Somersville, by H. L. James, 

forC. H. M. S 

Y. P. S. C. E., for C. H. M.S 

Torrington, Third, by Frank M. Wheeler 
Vernon, by H. L. James, for C. H. M.S. 

Winchester, First, by E. B. Bronson 

Windsor, First, by S. H. Barber ..... 
Woodstock, First, by Henry T. Childs.. 
W. C. H. M. U. of Conn., by Miss 

George Follett, Sec... :.. 

Meriden, First, L. B. S., by Miss M. 
J. Benham 



M. S. C, State Work......... 

Cong. Home Missionary Soc. 



$14 


00 


29 


40 


2 


20 


8 


00 


6 


27 


J 3 25 

69 08 

5 68 

23 60 


43 
6 


50 
00 


59 


29 


10 


00 


£i*947 


33 


$524 85 
1,422 48 



$!.947 .33 



Received in July, 1898 



Berlin. Kensington, by Rev. Wm. B. 

Tuthill 

Bridgeport, First, by R. E. Wheeler... 

Second, by O. H. Broth well 

Canton, Collinsville, by J. S. Heath 

East Windsor, Broad Brook, by S. B. 
Adams 

ForC. H. M.S 

Essex, Second, by S. J. Tiley.. 

Goshen. S. S.. by Frank J. Seaton 

Granby, First, by M. C. Hayes 

Hartford, First, by T. C. Welles..... . 

ForC. H. M. S ::.... 

Hartford, Talcott St., by A. I. Plato. . . 
Killingly, Danielson, by Chas. Phelps.. 

For C. H. M. S 

Lyme, Grassy Hill, by J. Ely Beebe 

Middletown, First, byE. P. Augur 

New Haven, Emanuel, by John Larson . 



%*1 
72 

43 


00 
88 
60 


5° 


00 


5 


65 


5 
31 
11 


40 
69 
82 


10 


00 


222 

166 


72 

49 


-4 
41 
43 


5° 
36 
06 


23 


00 


16 
11 


09 
67 



New London, First, by George Whit- 

tlsey 

Second, Estate of J. N. Harris, income 

from trust fund 

New Milford, First, by C. H. Noble.... 
Orange, West Haven, by Rev. S. J. 

Bryant 

Stafford, Staffordville, by Rev. H. M. 

Vaill 

Torrington, French, by Albert Widmer 
Washington, Swedish, by Rev. L. G. 

Borg 

West Hartford, by Miss E. S. Elmer . . . 

Windsor Locks, by C. A. Porter 

Woodstock, East Woodstock, by J. M. 

Paine 

North Woodstock, by Esther E. 
Bishop 



Received in August, 1898 



Ashford, Westford, by Miss E. L. 

Whiton 

Canaan, First, by Rev. C. W. Hanna* 
for C.H. M. S 

Falls Village, by Rev. C. W. Hanna, 
for C. H. M.S 

Y. P. S. C. E., for C.H. M.S.... 

Canton Center, by William G. Hallock. 
Chatham, Cobalt, by Rev. J. W. Moul- 

ton 

Glastonbury, First, A Friend, for C. H. 
M. S : 

So. Glastonbury, by H. D. Hale 

Greenfield, by O. H. Meeker, to const. 

W. Sanford Jennings, of Greenfield 

Hill. aLM 

Litchfield, First, by Clara B. Kenney.. . 
Middletown, First, by E. P. Augur..'.. 
New Canaan, First, by H. B. Rogers... 
New Fairfield, by George M. Nevihs. . . 
Norwalk, East Norwalk, Swedish, by 

Gustaf Woiman 



4 66 
6 00 



IOO 


00 


7 


63 


71 


59 


79 


5° 


14 


S° 


60 


32 


4 


92 



Old Saybrook, by Robert Chapman. '. . . 

ForC. H. M. S 

Plymouth, First, by Arthur Beardsley. 
Pomfret. Abington, by Rev. E. B. Pike. 
Salem, by Rev. Calvin Barber McLean. 

Friends .'. ....... 

All to const. Rev. Calvin Barber Mc- 
Lean, of Salem, a L. M. 

Southington, by J. F. Pratt. "." 

South Windsor, Wapping, by William 

A. Howe 

Thomaston, First, by H. A : Welton... 
Weston, Georgetown, Swedish, by Rev. 

A. A. Nordlund: 

Windham, First, by William Swrft. .... 
Woodbridge. First, by B. E. Thomas.. 
Woodstock, First, by Henry T. Child . . 



Hartford, Asylum Hill, Mission Band, 
box 



1,041 

89 


67 
50 


42 


04 


3 
4 


00 
do 


4 
15 
52 


14 
71 
53 


31 


86 


26 


19 



$2,116 70 



$4 85 
4 84 

20 00 
7 00 

20 00 

30 00 



19 07 
29 89 

3 00 

. 71 68 

31 30 

12 00 

$643 94 



$45 °o 



146 



The Home Missionary 



October, ii 



ILLINOIS HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Receipts of the Illinois Home Missionary Society in April, May, and June, 1S98. 
Aaron B. Mead, Treasurer 



Abingdon $61 34 

Miss Emma Harris 16 00 

77 34 

Amboy 7 od 

Anna n 00 

Aurora, First, Y. P. S. C. E 500 

Beecher 631 

Cambridge 7 00 

Centralia 500 

Chicago, First (S. S., $8.69! 4 o 63 

Leavitt Street, A Friend 10 00 

Union Park 81 19 

Ravenswood 31 81 

Bowman ville 20 38 

Christ, German 5 00 

Pilgrim, Y. P. S. C. E '250 

Englewood. North 2500 

Covenant (S. S., $22) 48 25 

Forestville. Mrs. M. M. Wilson 3 00 

Bethlehem 6 07 

South Chicago, First (S. S., $5 ; Y. P. 

S. C. E., $5) 15 00 

Bethel 1500 

Crawford, Jr. Y. P. S. C. E 2 50 

Sedgwick St 1 00 

Creal Springs 241 

Dan vers 12 00 

De Kalb, Swedish 5 00 

De Long 5 00 

Dover, S. S 5 00 

Dwight, S. S 5 00 

East St. Louis 6 00 

Elgin, First 6145 

Evanston, First 62 91 

Farmington,, George W. Little 25 co 

Galesburg, Knox Street 21 50 

Geneva 25 14 

Granville 24 n 

Gray's Lake 16 62 

Greenville, Southeast Prairie, Y. P. S. 

CE 9 38 

Griggsville, Mrs. A. E. McWilliams. . . . 5 00 

Half Day 3 00 

Harvard, Robert C. Uecke 3 00 

Havana 248 

Hennepin 350 

Hinsdale 14244 

Jacksonville 34 45 

Lacon (S. S.. $5 : Y. P. S. C. E.. $5) 2001 

La Grange (Jr. Y. P. S. C. E., $5) 8 50 

Lyndon 2 75 

Malta, F. H. Brundage. Jr 5 00 

Marseilles 13000 

Marshall 635 

Mattoon 16 00 

May wood (Y. P. S. C. E., $5 ; Jr. Y. P. 

S. C. E., $1) 50 o3 

Mazon , . . 3 3° 

Melvin 5 25 

Milburn 22 co 

Moline 53 33 

Morris 8 50 

Mound City 39 55 

Naperville, R. H . Dickinson 5 00 

New Grand Chain 3 26 

Norris City 5 37 

Oak Park, First Ave., Branch Y. P. S. 

C. E 3 00 

Austin Park, Y. P. S. C. E 200 

Oak Lawn 3 50 

Olmsted 1 48 

Oneida, Ch. and S. S 19 96 



Ottawa 

Payson, Y. P. S. C. E 

Peoria, Union 

Pittsfield 

Plainfield, Mrs. A. E. Hagan. 
Plymouth 



$33 77 



Princeton 

" Friends " 

Mrs. S. C. Clapp. 



Prophetstown, Y. P. S. C. E., $4 ; Rev. 

D. A. Alden, $1 

Quincy 

Rio 

Rock Falls 

Rollo 

Sandwich, Y. P. S. C E 

Seward (Winnebago County) 

Shabbona, S. S 

Shaw 

Somonauk 

South Danville ( Ladies' Soc, $2) 

Springfield, Hope 

Stark, S. S 

Sterling, Jr End . Soc 

Summer Hill 

Sycamore, Y. P. S. C E 

Vienna 

Wayne 

Wheaton, First 

Winnebago 

Woodburn, Y. P. S. C. E 



Woman's Home Missionary Union 

Abingdon 

Aurora , New England 

Canton 

Chebanse 

Chicago, New EnglanJ 

Lincoln Park , 

Union Park 

Millard Avenue 

Covenant 

Douglas Park 

Elgin, First 

Elmhurst 

Evanston, First 

Geneseo 

Harvey 

Jacksonville 

Joy Prairie 

Oak Park, First 

Second 

Ottawa 

Paxton 

Payson 

Plymouth 

Prophetstown 

Rockford, Second 

Rollo 

Somonauk 

Sterling 

Stillman Valley 

Wheaton, First 



Mr. H. A. Bent 

Mr. and Mrs. Slocum 

H. W. Vrooman 

Rev. W. A. Nichols .. 



20 


00 


7 


CO 


10 


00 


5 


22 


33 


oS 


5 


00 


■os 


00 



148 08 



5 


00 


«SS 


74 


14 


00 


2 


00 


11 


3° 


14 


00 


25 


00 


8 


09 


5 


00 


9 


IS 


8 


so 


3 


88 


3 


35 


1 


50 


4 


32 


10 


00 


7 


85 


10 


00 


15 


04 


2 


M 


7 


50 


3 


00 


18 


00 


25 


25 


S 


00 


16 


5° 


16 


25 


10 


00 


9 


00 


11 


12 


1 


00 


10 


00 


19 


85 


2 


3° 


20 


3° 


16 


00 


10 


00 


19 


45 


22 


75 


27 


25 


9 


0-. 


16 


20 


S 


00 


3 


00 


5 


00 


50 


77 


5 


00 


2 


00 


10 


00 


16 


00 


5 


00 


390 05 


5 


00 


25 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 



October, ii 



The Home Missionary 



H7 



Rev. Henry Willard 

Miss Annie M. Welles 

Mr. E. C. Hagar 

Rev. H. C. Scotford 

Rev:. John Milton Williams. 



$ 25 00 A Friend 

10 00 Sale of Greenville church property. . . 

25 00 Estate of J. W. Dieterich, Galesburg. 
1 00 



$75 


00 


i35 


00 


339 


12 



$3,038 28 



MICHIGAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Receipts of the Michigan Home Missionary Society in June, July, and August, \l 
Rev. John P. Sanderson, Treasurer 



Breckenridge $4 00 

Cannon, Y. P. S. C. E. . 5 00 

S.'S 500 

Carsonville 4 00 

Cedar Springs 100 

Central Lake 1 31 

Charlotte 15 00 

Clinton, Y. P. S. C. E 1600 

Cooper, Jr. Y. P. S. C. E 2 00 

Custer 700 

Detroit, First 150 00 

Woodward Ave 51 52 

Dundee 315 

East Paris 6 00 

Eaton Rapids 50 00 

Ensign 50 

Farwell 5 00 

Helena ". 2 70 

Kalamazoo, First, S. S 5 00 

Lake Odessa 2 50 

Maple City, Jr. Y. P. S. C. E 50 

Millbrook 2 50 

Millett 500 

Nahma. 1 71 

Onekama 340 

Pleasanton : 19 82 

Rapid River 231 

Romeo 100 

Solon 3 20 

Stanton, T. N. Stevens. 25 00 

Wheatland 635 

A Friend ; 70 00 

Interest 5° 73 

W. H. M. U., by Mrs. E. F. Grabill. ... 200 00 



$728 70 

FOR THE DEBT 

Ada, Rev. T. W. Spanswick $250 

Almont 10 00 

Armada, Rev. J . H . Ashby 5 00 

Cedar Springs 5 00 

Chelsea 10 00 

Rev. Thos. Holmes 5 00 

Detroit, First 100 00 

W. G. Smith 20 00 

Dexter 10 00 

Dorr, Rev. A. D. Whaley 1 00 

Douglas, Rev. E. W. Miller 10 00 

East Nelson 5 00 

Gaylord, F. C. Wood 8 34 

Grand Rapids, First, Mrs. J. J. Tucker 5 00 
Mrs. Jennie M. Dewell, in memory of 

Mrs. Wm. Miller 1000 

Mrs. E. E. Mason 1 00 

Miss Nellie Mason 1 co 

W. F. Easton 2 00 

Eleanor Bushnell 1 00 

Mrs. Carrie Farnam $ 00 

Etta M. Milbourne 200 

G. W, Hart 5 00 

Miss Mary Elliott 1 00 

T. F. Moseley . 1000 

C. H. Hollister 10 00 

Mrs. G. A. Davis 5 00 

■ Mary E. Barnard 5 00 



Mrs. M.S. Chapman 

Miss M. S. Chapman 

Grand Rapids, Second, Rev. J. T. 

Husted 

Mrs. Herrick 

Grand Rapids, South, Y. P. S. C. E 

Jane E. Petrie 

Grand Rapids, Smith Memorial Ch 

E. Cj. Greenwood 

Grand Haven 

Hart 

Hartland, S. S 

Hopkins Station, Rev. F. W. Bush, 

bal. of memorial offering 

Jackson, First 

Plymouth, Mrs. G. R. Foster 

Lake Linden 

Lansing. Plymouth 

Merrill, Rev. M. J. Sweet 

Minden City, Rev. C, C. Omans 

Mulliken, Y. P. S. C. E 

Olivet, Ch 

F. L. Reed 

Prof. G. N. Ellis 

Owosso, S. Elmyra Sherwood 

Perry, Rev. T. H. Warner 

Pontiac, in memory of " Grandma," 
Bristol * 

Rockford, Y. P. S. C. E 

Jr. Y. P.S. C.E 

S.S 

Ladies 1 Soc 

Saginaw 

Stanton, Rev. W. C. Burns 

Salem, Second 

Vermontville. in memory of the found- 
ers of the church 

Watervliet, Ch 

George Parsons 

Webster, Dea. Isaac 



$1 


00 


I 


00 


65 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 



10 00 

5 5° 

2 40 

5 00 
20 00 

3 °° 
10 00 
16 75 

5 00 

2 00 

3 °° 



$536 49 



Receipts of W. H. M. U. of Michigan in 
Tuly, 1898, for Home Missions, by 
Mrs. E. F. Grabill. Treas.: 

Addison, L. H. M. U 

Almont, W. M. S 



fii 00 
5 00 



148 



The Home Missionary 



October, 1898 



Charlotte, L. B. S $25 00 

Cheboygan, W. H. M. U 10 oo 

Church, W. H. M. U 15 oo 

Detroit, First, W. Asso 60 00 

Woodward Ave., W. U 37 5° 

Grand Rapids, Park, W. H. M. U 59 15 

Greenville, W. H. M. S 100 

Hart, W. M. S 5 co 

Laingsburg, W. A 425 

Lake Linden. L. M. S 7 00 

Lansing, W. H. M. S 4 69 

Stanton, W. H. M. S 5 so 

Three Oaks, W. M. S 7 00 

Union City, L. H. M. U 22 25 

£ 269 34 

YOUNG PEOPLE'S FUND 



Allegan, Jun C. E. S 

Ann Arbor, Y. P. S. C. E. 



|)2 OO 

4 65 



Detroit, Canfield Ave., S. S. 
Webster, Y. P. S. C. E 



Receipts of the W. H. M. U. of Michi- 
gan in August, 1898, for Home 
Missions : 

Ellsworth. W. H. M. U 

Grass Lake, W. H. M. S 

Greenville, W. H. M. S 

Lawrence, W. M. S 

Saginaw, First, W. S 

Somerset, W. M . S 

South Haven. W. M. S 

Stanton, W. H. M. U., Thank-offering 

Traverse City, W. H. M. S 

Watervliet, W. H. and F. M. S 



$10 00 
1 °S 

$17 70 

$287 04 



$4 


20 


15 


00 


2 


75 


7 


20 


75 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


5 


62 


25 


00 


7 


21 



$148 98 



WOMAN'S STATE HOME MISSIONARY 
ORGANIZATIONS 



1. NEW HAMPSHIRE 
FEMALE CENT INSTITUTION 

Organized August, 1804 

and 

HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized June, 1890 

President, Mrs. Cyrus Sargeant. Plymouth. 

Secretary, Mrs. M. W. Nims, 16 Rumlord St., 

Concord. 
Treasurer, Miss Annie A. McFarland, 196 No. 
Main St., Concord. 

2. MINNESOTA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized September, 1872 

President, Miss Catherine W. Nichols. 230 E. 9th 

St.. St. Paul. 
Secretary, Mrs. A. P. Lyon, 910 Sixth Ave., S., 

Minneapolis. 
Treasurer, Mrs. M. W. Skinner, Northfield. 

3. ALABAMA 
WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized March. 1877 
Reorganized April, 1889 
/'resident, Mrs. G. W. Andrews, Talladega. 
Secretary, Mrs. J. S. Jackson. Montgomery. 
Treasurer, Mrs. E. C. Silsby, Talladega. 



4. MASSACHUSETTS AND RHODE 
ISLAND * 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY ASSOCIA- 
TION 
Organized February, 1880 
Prcsidnt, Mrs. C. L. Goodell. 32 Congregational 

House. Boston 
Secretary, Mrs Louise A. Kellogg. 32 Congrega- 
tional House. Boston. 
Treasurer, Miss Annie C. Bridsrman, 32 Congre- 
gational House, Boston. 



OFFICERS 

5. MAINE 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY AUXILIARY 

Organized June, 1880 
President, Mrs. Katherine B. Lewis. So. Berwick. 



Secretary, Mrs. Gertrude H. Denio, 168 Ham- 
mond St., Bangor. 

Treasurer, Mrs. Rose M. Crosby, 64 Grove St., 
Bangor. 



6. MICHIGAN 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1881 

President, Mrs. I. P. Powell. 76 Jefferson Ave., 

Grand Rapids. 
Secretary, Mrs. E. N. Thorne, 212 So. Union St., 

Grand Rapids. 
Treasurer, Mrs. E. F. Grabill, Greenville. 

7. KANSAS 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1881 

President, Mrs. R. B. Guild, 1336 Fillmore St., 

Topeka. 
Secretary, Mrs. M. H. Jaquith, 1157 Fillmore St., 

Topeka. 
Treasurer, Miss May Wilkinson, Ottawa. 

8. OHIO 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May. 1882 

President, Mrs C. W. Carroll, 48 Brook-field St., 

Cleveland. 
Secretary, Mrs. J. W. Moore. 515 The Ellington, 

Cleveland. 
'Treasurer, Mrs. George B. Brown, 21 16 Warren 
St., Toledo. 



* While the W. H. M. A. appears in the above list as a State body for Massachusetts and Rhode, 
Iolan.I, it has certain auxiliaries elsewhere. 



October, 1898 



The Home Missionary 



149 



9. NEW YORK 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1883 



15. CONNECTICUT 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized January, 1885 



President, Mrs. Wm. Kincaid, 483 Greene Ave., President, Miss Ellen R. Camp, 9 Camp St., New 

Brooklyn. Britain. 

Secretary, Mrs. Wm. Spalding, 511 Orange St., Secretary, Mrs. C. T. Millard, 36 Le\vis St., 

Syracuse. Hartford. 

Treasurer, Mrs. J. J. Pearsall, 153 Decatur St., Treasurer, Mrs. W. W. Jacobs, 530 Farmington 

Brooklyn. Ave., Hartford. 



10. WISCONSIN 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1883 

President, Mrs. E. G. Updike, Madison. 
Secretary, Mrs. A. O. Wright, Madison. 
Treasurer, Mrs. L. E. Smith, Madison. 

11. NORTH DAKOTA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized November, 1883 

President, Mrs. N. M. Lander, Wahpeton. 
Secretary, Mrs. Silas Daggett, Harwood. 
Treasurer, Mrs. J. M. Fisher, Fargo. 



12. OREGON 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized July, 1884 

President, Mrs. F. Eggert. The Hill, Portland. 
Cor. Sec, Mrs. D. D. Clarke, 447 E. 12th St., No. 

Portland. 
Treasurer, Mrs. C. F. Clapp, Forest Grove. 



13. WASHINGTON 

Including Northern Idaho 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized July, 1884 

Reorganized June. 1889 

President, Mrs. A. Judson Bailey, 1614 Second 

Ave.. Seattle. 
Secretary, Mrs. W. C. Wheeler, 424 South K St., 

Tacoma. 
Treasurer, Mrs. W. D. Wood, Holyoke Block, 

Seattle. 



16. MISSOURI 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY. UNION 
Organized May, 1885 

President, Mrs. Henry Hopkins, 916 Holmes St., 

Kansas City. 
Secretary, Mrs. L. F. Doane, 3319 East Ninth St., 

Kansas City. 
Treasurer, Mrs. K. L. Mills, 1526 Wabash Ave., 

Kansas City. 



17. ILLINOIS 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1885 

President, Mrs. Isaac Claflin, Lombard. 
Secretary, Mrs. A. O. Whitcomb, 463 Irving Ave., 

Chicago. 
Treasurer, Mrs. L. A. Field, Wilmette. 



18. IOWA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized June, 1886 

President, Mrs. L. F. Berry. Ottumwa. 
Secretary. Mrs. H. H. Robbins. Grinnell. 
Treasurer, Miss Belle L. Bentley, W. Grand Ave., 
Des Moines. 



ig. CALIFORNIA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Organized October, 1887 

President, Mrs. E. S. Williams, Saratoga. 

Secretary, Mrs. F. B. Perkins, 546 24th St., Oak- 
land. 

Treasurer, Mrs. J. M. Haven, 1329 Harrison St., 
Oakland. 



14. SOUTH DAKOTA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized September, 1884 

President, Mrs. C E. Corry. Columbia. 
Secretary, Mrs. K. M. Tenney, Huron. 
Treasurer, Mrs. F. M. Wilcox, Huron. 



20. NEBRASKA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized November, 188.7 

President. Mrs. D. B. Perry. Crete. 
Secretary. Mrs. H. Bross. 2004 Q St.. Lincoln. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Charlotte C. Hall, 1318 C St 
Lincoln. 



r 5o 



The Home Missionary 



October, 1898 



21. FLORIDA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized February, 1888 

President, Mrs. S. F. Gale, Jacksonville. 
Secretary, Mrs. J. H. Phillips, Melbourne. 
Treasurer, Mrs. W. D. Brown, Interlachen. 



27. GEORGIA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized November, 1888 

President, Mrs. H. B. Wey, 253 Forest Ave., 
Atlanta. 

Secretary, Mrs. H. A. Kellam, 176 Ivy St., At- 
lanta. 

Treasurer, 



22. INDIANA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1888 

President, Mrs. W. A. Bell, 223 Broadway, In- 
dianapolis. 
Secretary, Mrs. D. F. Coe, Elkhart. 
Treasurer, Mrs. A. H. Ball, Anderson. 



28. MISSISSIPPI 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized April, 1889 

President, Mrs. C. L. Harris, 1421 31st Ave., Me- 
ridian. 

Secretary, 

Treasurer, Mrs. L. H. Turner, 3112 12th St., Me- 
ridian. 



23. SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized May, 1888 

President, Mrs. Warren F. Day, 949 So. Hill St., 

Los Angeles. 
Secretary, Mrs. Kate G. Robertson, Mentor.e. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Mary M. Smith, Public Library, 

Riverside. 



24. VERMONT 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized June, 1888 

President, Mrs. W. J. Van Patten, 386 Pearl St., 
Burlington. 

Secretary, Mrs. M. K. Paine. Windsor. 

Treasurer, Mrs. Rebecca P. Fairbanks, St. Johns- 
bury. 



25. COLORADO 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October. 1888 

Hon. Pres., Mrs. J. W. Pickett, Whitewater. 
President, Mrs. E. R. Drake, 2739 Lafayette St., 

Denver. 
Secretary, Mrs. Addison Blanchard, 309 31st Ave., 

Denver. 
Treasurer, Mrs. B. C. Valentine, Highlands. 



26. WYOMING 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1888 

Reorganized December, 1892 

President, Mrs F. W. Powelson. Cheyenne. 
Secretary, Mrs. W. L. Whipple. Cheyenne. 
Treasurer, Mrs. J. M. Brown, Wheatland. 



29. LOUISIANA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized April, 1889 

President, Mrs. L. St. J. Hitchcock, 2436 Canal St., 

New Orleans. 
Secretary, Mrs. Matilda Cabrere, 2419 Conti St., 

New Orleans. 
Treasurer, Miss Mary L. Rogers, 2436 Canal St., 

New Orleans. 



30. ARKANSAS, KENTUCKY, AND TEN- 
NESSEE 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION OF THE 
CENTRAL SOUTH ASSOCIATION 

Organized April, 1889 

President, Mrs. Ella S. Moore, Box 8, Fisk Uni- 
versity, Nashville, Tenn. 

Secretary, Miss Mary L. Corpier, Florence. Ala. 

Treasurer, Mrs. J. E. Moreland, 216 N. McNairy 
St., Nashville, Tenn. 



31. NORTH CAROLINA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1889 

President, Mrs. S. S. Sevier, McLeansville. 
Seer eta ry 

and !-Miss A. E. Farrington, Oaks. 
Treasurer, 



32. TEXAS 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized March, 1890 

President, Mrs. Eunice Heflin. Sherman. 
Secretary, Mrs. Donald Hinkley, Dallas. 
Treasurer, Mrs. A. Geen, Dallas. 



October, 1898 



The Home Missionary 



151 



33. MONTANA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1890 



38. INDIAN TERRITORY 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized April, 1892 



President, Mrs. V. F. Clark, Livingston. President 

Secretary, Mrs. H. J. Miller, Livingston. Secretary, Miss Louise Graper, Vinita. 

Treasurer, Mrs. W. S. Bell, 410 Dearborn Ave., Treasurer, Mrs. Raymond, Vinita. 
Helena. 



34. PENNSYLVANIA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized June, 1890 

President, Mrs. J. S. Utpon, Ridgway. 

Secretary, Mrs. C. F. Chamberlain, Cambridge- 
bro. 

Treasurer, Mrs. T. W. Jones. 511 Woodland Ter- 
race, Philadelphia. 



39. NEVADA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1892 

President, Mrs. L. J. Flint, Reno. 
Secretary, Miss Margaret N. Magill, Reno. 
Treasurer, Miss Mary Clow, Reno. 



35. OKLAHOMA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1890 

President, Mrs. J. H.Parker, Kingfisher. 
Secretary, Mrs. Joel Harper, Oklahoma City. 
Treasurer, Mrs. A. B. Hammer, Oklahoma City. 



36. NEW JERSEY 

Including District of Columbia, Maryland, 
and Virginia 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION OF 
THE NEW JERSEY ASSOCIATION 

Organized March, 1891 

President, Mrs. A. H. Bradford, Montclair. 
Secretary, Mrs. F. J. Goodwin, Glen Ridge. 
Treasurer, Mrs. J. H. Denison, 150 Belleville Ave., 
Newark. 



37. UTAH 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1891 

Reorganized December, 1892 

President, Mrs. W. S. Hawkes. 135 Sixth East 

Street, Salt Lake City. 
Secretary, Mrs. L. E. Hall, 78 East First North 

Street. Salt Lake C'ty. 
Treasurer, Mrs. J. D. Nutting, Third North and 

Quince Streets, Salt Lake City. 



40. NEW MEXICO 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized November, 1892 

President, Mrs. E. H. Ashmun, Albuquerque. 
Secretary, Mrs. F. A. Burlingame, Albuquerque. 
Treasurer, Mrs. M. McClaskey, Albuquerque. 



41. BLACK HILLS, SO. DAKOTA 

BLACK HILLS WOMAN'S MISSIONARY 
UNION 

Organized October, 1893 

President, Mrs. J. B. Gossage, Rapid City, Black 

Hills, South Dakota. 
Secretary, Mrs. C. H. Brown, Rapid City, Black 

Hills, South Dakota. 
Treasurer, Mrs. S. Cushman, Deadwood, Black 

Hills, South Dakota. 



42. IDAHO 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1895 

President, Mrs. R. B. Wright, Boise. 
Secretary, Mrs. C. E. Mason, Challis. 
Treasurer, Mrs. G. L. Cole, Mountain Home. 



152 The Home Missionary October 



, 1898 1 



SECRETARIES OF YOUNG PEOPLE'S WORK 

Minnesota -. Miss Carrie S. Pond, 60S Canada St., St. Paul. 

Mass. and R. I Miss Bertha M. Shepard, 607 Congregational House, Boston. 

Michigan Mrs. W. J. Gregory, 459 Third St., Manistee. 

Kansas Miss Harriet Broad, Topeka. 

OHIO '......,. Mrs. W. S. Sperry, Mt. Vernon. 

New York Mrs. Geo. R. Haines, 978 Delaware Ave., Buffalo. 

North Dakota Mrs. E. S. Shaw, Cooperstown. 

Oregon Mrs. W. D, Palmer, 546 Third St., Portland. 

Washington Mrs. W. C. Davie, 423 North N St., Tacoma. 

South Dakota Mrs. Grace Burleigh, Mitchell. 

Illinois Mrs. J. T. Blanchard, 232 Walnut St., Aurora. 

Missouri Mrs. A. K. Wray, 2220 E. Eighth St., Kansas City. 

Iowa Miss Fannie Spencer, Alden. 

California. . . , Miss Caroline A. Potter, 600 Seventeenth St., Oakland. 

Nebraska Mrs. J. N. Hyder, 1520 U St., Lincoln. 

Southern CALIFORNIA. . .Miss Phebe Mayhew, 4 Barnard Park, Los Angeles. 

Vermont Mrs. C. P. Smith, 159 Pine St., Burlington. 

Colorado Mrs. Burke Turrell, Longmont. 

Montana Mrs. E. E. Esslestyn, Red Lodge. 



SECRETARIES OF CHILDREN'S WORK 

Minnesota Mrs. W. B. Northrup, 2724 Pleasant Ave., Minneapolis. 

Michigan Mrs. Henry Marsh, Olivet. 

Kansas Miss Hattie Booth, Newton. 

Ohio Mrs. Chas. H. Small, Hudson. 

North Dakota Miss Grace Made, Eargo. 

South Dakota Miss Emily. N. Perrin, Armour. 

Illinois Mrs. Thornton Ware, 4201 Ellis Ave., Chicago. 

Nebraska Mrs. IP I). Neely, 4371 Hamilton St., Omaha. 

Southern California. .Miss Emily M. Peck, 920 W. Eighth St., Los Angeles. 



Congregational Home Missionary Society 

Field Secretaries 

Rev. W. G. Puddefoot, South Framingham, Mass. 
Rev. C. W. Shelton, Norwalk, Conn. 

Superintendents 

Rev. Moritz E. Eversz, D.D., German Department, 153 La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 

Rev. S. V. S. Fisher, Scandinavian Department, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Rev. Henry A. Schauffler, D.D., Slavic Department, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Rev. Edw. D. Curtis, D.D. Indianapolis, Ind. Rev. W. H. Thrall Huron, S. Dak, 

Rev. S. F. Gale Jacksonville, Fla. Rev. John L. Maile * Fargo, N. Dak. 

Rev. J. H. Morley Minneapolis, Minn. Rev. H. Sanderson Denver, Col. 

Rev. Alfred K. Wray Kansas City, Mo. Rev. W. S. Hawkes Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Rev. L. P. Broad Topeka, Kan. Rev. J. K. Harrison San Francisco, Cal. 

Rev. E. H. Ashmun Albuquerque, N. M. Rev. James T. Ford Los Angeles, Cal. 

Rev. A. Judson Bailey Seattle, Wash. Rev. C. F. Clapp Forest Grove, Ore. 

Rev. Homer W. Carter, D.D Beloit, Wis. t>„„ rp w t ■ • t-. t~, J 511 Woodland Terrace, 

v a . Pmm „ "1 Black Hills and Wyoming. Rev. T. W. Jones, D.D. ... -j ^ Philadelphia, Pa. 

Kev. A. A. brown ... ( Ho( . SprmgSi South Dakota. Rev. W. S. Bell Helena, Mon. 

Rev. Harmon Bross, D.D Lincoln, Neb. Rev. S. C. McDaniel Atlanta, Ga. 

Rev. S. F. Gale (Acting Supt. Ala.), Jacksonville, Fla. Rev. J. Homer Parker Kingfisher, Okl. 

Secretaries and Treasurers 

of the Auxiliaries 

Rev. David P. Hatch, Secretary Maine Missionary Society. . .First Nat. Bk. Bldg., Portland, Me. 

John L. Crosby, Esq., Treasurer " " " Bangor, Me. 

Rev. A. T. Hillman, Secretary New Hampshire Home Miss. Society Concord, N. H. 

Hon. Lyman D. Stevens, Treasurer " " " " " ....Concord, N. H. 

Rev. Charles H. Merrill, Secretary Vermont Domestic " " St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

Wm. C. Tyler, Treasurer ' " " " " ... .St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

Rev. Joshua Coit, Secretary Massachusetts Home " " . . . . 1 609 Cong'l House, 

Rev. Edwin B. Palmer, Treasurer " " " "....( Boston, Mass. 

Rev. Alexander McGregor, Secretary Rhode Island " '• " . . . .Pawtucket, R. I. 

Jos. Wm. Rice, Esq., Treasurer '■' " " " Providence, R. I. 

Rev. William H. Moore, Secretary Missionary Society of Connecticut Hartford, Conn. 

Ward W. Jacobs. Esq., Treasurer " " " Hartford, Conn. 

Rev. Ethan Curtis, Secretary New York Home Miss. Society Syracuse, N. Y. 

William Spalding, Treasurer " " " " Svracuse, N. Y. 

Rev. J. G. Fraser, D.D., Secretary Ohio " " " Cleveland, Ohio. 

Rev. J. G. Fraser, D.D., Treasurer " " " '■' Cleveland, Ohio. 

Rev. James Tompkins, D.D. , Secretary Illinois j 153 La Salle St., 

Aaron B. Mead, Esq., Treasurer... " " " " I Chicago, 111. 

Rev. Homer W. Carter. D.U., Secretary ....Wisconsin " " " Beloit, Wis. 

C. M. Blackman, Esq., Treasurer " " " " Whitewater, Wis. 

Rev. T. O. Douglass, D.D. , Secretary Iowa " " " Grinnell, Iowa. 

J. H. Merrill, Esq., Treasurer " " " " Des Moines, Iowa. 

Rev. Wiluam H. Warren, D.D. , Secretary.. Michigan " " " Lansing, Mich. 

Rev. John P. Sanderson, Treasurer " " " " Lansing, Mich. 

Geo. H. Morgan, Secretary .„...,.„,._.. Cong. City Miss. Society St. Louis, Mo. 

Rev. A. K. Wray, Superintendent " " " " Kansas City, Mo. 

Lewis E. Snow, Treasurer " " " " St. Louis, Mo. 

Communications 

relating to general business of the Society may be addressed to either of the Secretaries for Correspondence. 
Communications relating to the Editorial Department of The Home Missionary, or of the Home Missionary 
section o^Congregational Work, may be addressed to Rev. Alex. H. Clapp, D.D. Correspondence of the 
Woman's Department may be addressed to Mrs. H. S. Caswell, Congregational Rooms, New York. 

Donations and Subscriptions 

in Drafts, Checks, Registered Letters, or Post-Office Orders may be addressed to Wm. B. Howland, 
Treasurer, Fourth Avenue and Twenty-second Street, New York. 

A PAYMENT OF $50 CONSTITUTES A LIFE MEMBER 

Form of a Bequest 

I bequeath to my executors the sum of dollars, in trust, to pay over the same, 

in months after my decease, to the person who, when the same is payable, shall act as Treasurer 

of the Congregational Home Missionary Society, formed in the City of New York, in the year eighteen hundred 
and twenty-six, to be applied to the charitable use and purposes of said Society, and under its direction. 



Congregational Home Missionary Society 

Fourth Ave. and 2 2d St., New York 



Major-Gen eral Oliver O. Howard 

President 

Secretaries for Correspondence 
Rev. Joseph B. Clark, D.D. 

Rev. Washington Choate, D.D. 

Rev. Alexander H. Clapp, D.D., Editorial Secretary 

Mr. William B. Howland, Treasurer 

Executive Committee 

Wm. Ives Washburn, Esq., Chairman 

Asa A. Spear, Esq., Recording Secretary 

Mr. Joseph Wm. Rice 

Rev. Charles H. Richards, D.D. 

Mr. George P. Stockwell 

Rev. John D. Kingsbury, D.D. 

Mr. George W. Hebard 

John H. Terry, Esq. 

Rev. Thomas B. McLeod, D.D. 

Mr. John F. Anderson, Jr. 

David A. Thompson, Esq. 

Mr. Wm. H. Wanamaker 

Rev. Charles M. Lamson, D.D. 

Rev. Charles A. Savage 



Press of J.J. Little & Co., Astor Place, New York 



The 



Home Missionary 



res h m 



i3 i*toi t Soc 
— Wa [nut 8t 



January, 1899 



Vol. LXXI. No. 3 



New York 
Congregational Home Missionary Society 

Congregational Rooms, Fourth Ave. and 2 2d St. 

Entered at the Post-Office at New York, N. Y. , as Second-Class [Mail] Matter 



Contents for January, 1899 



I'AGE 

Our Slavic Home Missionary Work 153 

Samuel Hopkins Willey 160 

An Appeal from Alaska 166 

Our Scandinavian Work 168 

Our Organizing Council on Wheels 170 

The Work in New Mexico 172 

The Story of the Little Log Church 174 



A Year in Oregon 177 

Notes by the Way : His First Ex- 
perience on the Frontier 179 

The Dying Miner's Last Hours . . . 186- 

Appointments and Receipts 189 

Woman's State Organizations.... 212 

Young People's and Children's 

Work 216 



The Home Missionary 



Is published quarterly, at thirty cents a vear, postage paid. It is sent without charge, on 
request, to be made annually, to Life Members; Missionaries of the Society and its Aux- 
iliaries ; Ministers securing a yearly collection for it in their congregations ; also to individu- 
als, associations, or congregations, one copy for & year for every ten dollars collected and paid 
over to the Society or an Auxiliary. Suitable names should accompany the payment. 
Fastors are earnestly requested to serve Home ?\Iissions by promoting the use of this journal 
and "Congregational Work" at the Monthly Concert and among their people. 

Immediate notice of discontinuance or chanee of post-office address should he given. 



The Home Missionary 



Vol. LXXI 



JANUARY, 1899 



No. 3 




VIEW ON BROADWAY, CLEVELAND, OHIO 




OUR SLAVIC HOME MISSIONARY WORK 

By Superintendent H. A. Schauffler, Cleveland, Ohio 

HE above view on Broadway, Cleveland, as seen from the gate 
of my yard, is full of significance. In the center is Bethlehem 
Bohemian Church, the first church building erected (in 1884) 
for our Congregational Bohemian home missionary work, and where 
(in 1888) our first Slavic church was organized. It is named after the 
famous Bethlehem church built in Prague, Bohemia, for the great Bohe- 
mian reformer, John Huss, to preach a free Gospel in. It may be prop- 
erly called the cradle of our whole great home missionary work for the 
foreign population. It stands for a free Gospel and a pure Christianity. 
Look now at its surroundings. In the foreground is a large Roman 



154 The Home Missionary January, 1899 

Catholic hospital, where zealous nuns worship the Virgin Mary and the 
saints, and (this on the best authority) make proselytes of Protestant pa- 
tients. This institution represents superstition and Mariolatry, recom- 
mended by works of mercy. Beyond Bethlehem Church stands a great 
Bohemian National Society hall, the meeting place for Bohemian Free- 
thinking societies, where drinking, dancing, the theater, infidel addresses, 
and a Free-thinking Sunday-school (!) attract old and young. That 
stands for infidelity, hatred of Christianity, and gross worldliness. Still 
further on stands a large Bohemian Roman Catholic church, whose priest 
does his utmost to hold the people in the old-country bondage of super- 
stition and fear. To build that fine church he compelled people to put 
large mortgages on their homes. That stands for priestcraft and Rome's 
tyranny. The three great buildings have been. erected since Bethlehem 
was built. Thus we see the strong enemies of true liberty and pure 
Christianity closing in upon our Slavic mission work and exerting them- 
selves to the utmost to crush it. May the Lord open the eyes of his 
people to see, what Elisha's servant realized, that " they that be with us 
are more than they that be with them." 

" The Slavic Hour " of the last anniversary of the Congregational 
Home Missionary Society, held in Plymouth Church, Cleveland, last 
June, gave striking proof and living illustration of the blessing which 
has attended our denomination's work for Bohemians, Poles, and Slovaks 
in this country, and the progress made from a very small beginning in 
spite of the bitter opposition of powerful foes. Having been asked to 
prepare some kind of an " object lesson " illustrative of our Slavic work, 
I grouped as many of our Slavic mission workers and students as were 
within reach, twenty-two in all, in the large low choir gallery just behind 
the pulpit. The singing of a Bohemian hymn to a Bohemian national 
air was followed by a responsive Scripture reading in four languages by 
the Bohemian, Polish, Slovak and Magyar missionaries in those languages, 
•and by the pupils of the Slavic Department of Oberlin Theological Sem- 
inary, and by the Slavic and Magyar pupils of the Bethlehem Bible and 
Missionary Training School of Cleveland, in English. I then quoted 
Psalm xcii. 4, 5 : " For thou, Lord, hast made me glad through thy work : 
I will triumph in the works of thy hands. O Lord, how great are thy 
works ! and thy thoughts are very deep," and in a few words pointed to 
God's deep thoughts of wisdom and mercy for the salvation of the Slavic 
peoples in our country, and the great work he is doing among them 
through the home missionary agencies of our churches. One of these 
deep thoughts God planted, in 1882, in the heart of Rev. Charles Terry 
Collins, then pastor of the church whose guests we were, and he became, 
as the memorial tablet which fronted the congregation states, " The founder 
of Bohemian Missions in the United States." The most striking proof that 



January, i$ 



The Home Missionary 



155 



this work is of God is found in the band of Christian workers whom he has 
raised up from among Bohemians, Poles, and Slovaks, about one-third of 
whom appeared before that congregation. The short- addresses made gave 
such a good idea of the work in its several parts that I cannot do better 
than to quote some of the most important parts. Rev. John Prucha said : 

"Prior to the year 1882 there were in the whole United States and 
Canada three Bohemian Protestant ministers : one in the East, one in 
the West, and one in the South. The Bohemians had been coming to this 
country in large numbers. The streets where they settled were filling up. 
They appeared in the shop, in the store, in the professions. Their children 
knocked at the door of our public 
schools and of our colleges. The 
Catholic church grew in strength and 
numbers. The political demagogue 
soon learned of their presence, and 
taught them the first lessons in cor- 
rupt politics. The devil had out his 
missionaries in large numbers. Infi- 
delity and atheism were rapidly strik- 
ing their roots into the minds of the 
people. 

ei But what had been done prior to 
the year 1882 to meet the spiritual 
needs of the Bohemians? With one 
exception, none of the Protestant 
churches in this country took any 
practical interest in their spiritual wel- 
fare. It was left to Rev. Charles Terry Collins, a former pastor of this 
church, to be the founder of the Bohemian Mission of the Congregational 
churches directly, and of the other denominations indirectly. He saw the 
Bohemian people, knew of their heroism for Christ in the past, and the 
voice of God whispered to his soul : ' Help them.' But how? He could 
not speak their language, and they could not understand his. Where to 
find some one to take up the work ? That was the difficult question. 
God was preparing his workers in the persons of Dr. Schauffler and Dr. 
Adams of Chicago, who did not know of their future work, but in the 
proper time they were called to the front. When, in 1882, Dr. Schauffler 
preached the first time in Bohemian in this city, but a handful of Bohemi- 
ans attended, perhaps a dozen, the speaker among them. That was the 
mustard seed of this work sown in the Olivet Chapel, then a mission of 
this church. Then we sojourned a time with the Methodists, enjoyed the 
hospitality of a Republican wigwam, and finally entered our promised 
land, our Bethlehem Church. 




REV. JOHN I'RUCHA 



156 



The Home Missionary 



January, 1899 



" Now let us compare the beginning with this year's results : In 1884 
Dr. Schauffler and Dr. Adams were alone ; this year the number of work- 
ers, including the wives of the pastors and the students, is sixty-two ; 
more than half of these were converted in our work. Then only two 
States were touched ; to-day the work has extended into twelve States. 
In 1884 only the Bohemians were thought of, but now. the work has 
branched out to the Poles, Slovaks, and Magyars. We had no church 
building then ; now we have fourteen. There was no church organiza- 
tion ; now we have twelve churches, twenty-four preaching stations, with 
a church membership of 643, not including those of the large Chicago 
Bohemian work, aided for many years by this Society, but now wholly sup- 
ported by the Chicago Congregational City Missionary Society. The 
first preaching service in Cleveland was attended by about twelve per- 
sons ; last missionary year the average attendance in the whole Slavic 
field (except Chicago) in all preaching services was 1,084. The aver- 
age attendance at all other meetings, including Sunday-schools, was 
3,383. Our Sunday-school enrollment is 2,031. Our churches contrib- 
uted for missions $804.15 the past year, and received 101 new members, 
of whom seventy-three were on confession of faith. 

" That is the contrast between the beginning and now, after sixteen 
years of work. But we can never measure the extension of Christ's king- 
dom by figures. All estimates of the real effects of the Gospel escape 

our mathematics. The presence of 
a Christian man in a society is a 
power. When we think of the faith- 
ful work that is done in our Sunday- 
schools, among the young people in 
the Christian Endeavor societies, the 
hand-to-hand struggle with souls in 
our visiting, all figures would be in- 
adequate to express the real result." 

Rev. John Lewis, missionary to 
Poles in Detroit, spoke of " The 
Pole with and without the Bible." 
"When I first went to Detroit, eleven 
years ago, I found two Polish factions ; 
one followed the priest Kolaszinski, 
and the other the priest Dombrowski. 
The first party forsook bishop and 
pope and formed an independent church. For religion's sake, both par- 
ties hated, beat, and killed one another. When I went among them and 
tried to win them for the peaceful religion of Jesus Christ, each party 
thought I was sent by the other to gain them. My position was very 




REV. JOHN LEWIS 



January, 1899 The Home Missionary 157 

dangerous. Once I was attacked very strongly by four women, who 
wanted to give me a good thrashing ; but God heard my prayer, sent a 
fifth woman, who pleaded with them, and I was left without a scratch. 
Several times I was attacked by bad men. But through all this trouble I 
have been preaching Christ, selling and giving Scriptures and tracts — 200 
Bibles, r,ioo New Testaments, and 25,000 tracts and many good books. 
The Heavenly Father has blessed us wonderfully in our work. It is im- 
possible to tell just how many souls have been won for Christ during 
these eleven years, for a number have gone away to other lands, even as 
far as Brazil and Australia, and some are preaching the Gospel. It is 
very hard to win Poles for the pure Gospel, because they are so full of 
ignorance, superstition, and fear of the priest ; but by God's blessing we 
have now in Detroit a Polish Congregational church of forty-two mem- 
bers, and we have recently entered our own little church building, which 
kind friends have provided. This makes us very happy and thankful, 
thankful to God, thankful to our friends in Detroit, and thankful to 
this Society for your prayers, your faith, your patience, and your gifts. 
We are only at the beginning of the great work of saving the Poles of 
the United States, and making them true Christians and true American 
citizens." 

As an apt illustration of his theme, Mr. Lewis told the story of the 
conversion in Detroit of a very wicked Pole. 

" Before he had the Bible he was such a great drunkard and fighter 
that several times he was nearly killed. His step-father used to say that 
he was so bad that if he were hanged on a tree, it would dry up from the 
roots. His good wife was in great fear of him. He beat her and the 
children. Once he nearly killed his own child and came near to shooting 
his wife. When he was sober she told him : ' You had better kill us all 
at once, because I cannot live any longer such a miserable life.' He was 
so bad that he now thinks that he must have had many devils in him. 
He often thought there is no God, no heaven, no hell except for poor 
people in this world. Once he was going to commit suicide, and once on 
Euclid Avenue, in Cleveland, smelling such fine fragrance from the cigar 
of a rich man sitting in a rocking chair, he said to himself, 'You rich 
devil, I would like to shoot you and get some of your money to buy 
drinks and fine cigars.' Now see what God's Bible did for him. When 
he got it he began to read it every evening, and though he worked very 
hard all day he was never too tired to read the Bible. His wife went to 
bed at nine o'clock and began to call him to come, because if he read so 
long he may get crazy. She heard that from the priest. But he said : 
' Sleep, wife, sleep ; good night, God bless you.' Sometimes he read till 
one o'clock in the morning, but he was always up early and could do more 
work than men that go to bed at nine p.m. without reading the Holy Bible. 



i58 



The Home Missionary 



January, 1899 



He began to change his hellish life right at once. He did not look into 
a place from which temptation comes. He no more hates rich men, 
because he found in the Bible that he should love all people, and that 
God has the rich for his stewards that they may help the poor and give 
money to the missionary society to convert wicked sinners to God. Now 
he loves his wife and his children, and has begun to save money to clothe 
them. He tells others how much good the Bible has done for him. He 
soon joined a Christian church, became a good teacher in the Sunday- 
school, where he teaches, without much trouble, a large class of unruly 
boys. In short, the Bible changed him from a drunkard to a sober, 
industrious man, from the lion to a lamb, from the wicked one to a saint, 

walking with God and trying with all 
his heart and strength to do God's 
will, and to make wicked people into 
good Christians. I know many more 
men and women like that man." 

Rev. John Jelinek, of Braddock, 
Pa., gave some account of the remark- 
able work among Slovaks or Hun- 
garian Slavs. He said : 

" The beginning of my mission 
work among Slovaks was in Novem- 
ber, 1890. Our first services were 
held with a congregation of six, who 
were : My wife, our daughter. Miss 
Houdous, our Bible reader, two men, 
and myself. The first of these men 
was Mr. Kovac, who is preparing for 
missionary work at Oberlin, Ohio. The second man was a great drunk- 
ard. When visiting and speaking with him about salvation, he said to 
me : 'If you will not let me alone I will kill you.' Then I said : 'Very 
gladly I would give my life if that would be the means of saving your 
soul, but that will not help, I am sure ; only if you will repent.' That 
moment Avas a change in his life. He stopped drinking, saved money 
and sent for his family, to which he had not written nor sent any money 
for eight years. When his wife came to this country she lamented that I 
had led her husband astray, and just because he did not drink liquor, for 
she liked liquor herself. This is now a loving Christian family, and 
grateful to God for all he has done. 

" The Slovaks have four religions : Roman and Greek Catholic, 
Lutheran and Calvinistic ; but about true religion they have no idea. 
The words, ' Who believes on me shall have eternal life,' are dark to them, 
and they do not believe them. The Protestant ministers, as well as 




REV. JOHN JELINEK 



January, 1899 The Home Missionary 159 

Catholic priests, live the same as anyone else ; drunkenness is to them 
something usual. For Slovaks Christianity means going to church Sun- 
day morning, paying the priest, and going at least once a year to con- 
fession or communion. And if a Slovak has not at least a keg of beer or 
a bottle of whiskey for Sunday or a holiday, he would think he had no 
Sunday or holiday. Weddings and christenings are very noisy with 
dancing and a plentiful supply of liquor, so that even a poor Slovak pays 
about $40 or $50 for liquor, and usually they have a fight and go before 
the 'squire and pay a fine. All this changes when they become Chris- 
tians. I have to say that not one of our members uses liquor or tobacco 
in any form. 

" After about a year of work in -Braddock the people gathered, but 
also Satan began his work. I preached against sin, and then all forsook 
us except a former bartender. He broke into tears, and to my question 
why he cried, he answered, ' that we are left alone.' But I said, ' God is 
with us.' Soon after many people began to come. In January, 1892, we 
organized a church with a membership of twelve. To-day the church has 
a membership of 137, not counting the thirty-eight who left, as follows : 
six to other churches, and thirty-two settled in Virginia on farms, Avhere 
there is now a Congregational church, numbering about fifty members. 

" One man with whom I spoke about the needs of his soul and salva- 
tion said : ' I am a Protestant,' and asked me to tell him where Cain got 
his wife. He would not speak with me any more. I visited his family. 
Their home was orderly. His wife and two children were at home, but 
something seemed to be wrong in that home. I began to speak the Word 
of God, but it went very hard, for the wife was self-righteous ; only their 
eldest daughter listened very attentively to my conversation. One father 
spent all for liquor and abused his wife and daughter. It happened more 
than once that he chased all from the house, and they had to be out bare- 
footed and very poorly dressed through the night hours. And would you 
wish to see those families now ? Yes, I wish you could see what the Word 
of Jesus Christ has done for them." 

There followed an address by Professor L. F. Miskovsky, principal of 
the Oberlin Slavic Department, who spoke of the fundamental work of 
training Slavic missionary preachers. Mrs. H. A. Schauffler was to have 
spoken of the Bethlehem Bible and Missionary Training School of Cleve- 
land, of which she is principal, but time failed. 

Subsequent expressions of opinion by auditors showed that the testi- 
mony given to the extent and transforming power of our missionary work 
among Bohemians, Poles, and Slovaks, vividly illustrated by the attractive 
group of workers present, had made a deep and most favorable impression. 
Faith in this form of work had been strengthened and new enthusiasm for 
it kindled. 



i6o 



The Home Missionary 



January, 1899 



SAMUEL HOPKINS WILLEY 

A HOME MISSIONARY VETERAN 

By E. Lyman Hood 

Fifty years a missionary of the Gospel ! How few are thus so 
graciously blessed. Just half a century ago, December 1, 1848, the Rev. 
Samuel H. Willey left New York in the steamer Falcon for Aspinwall, 

on his way to the distant Pacific 
Coast. Success in the war with 
Mexico had only recently given 
California to the United States. 
The news of the discovery of 
gold had not yet reached the 
Eastern States. If anything 
were needed to prove the pro- 
found wisdom of the adminis- 
trators of the American Home 
Missionary Society in those 
early years, surely this example 
of prophetic instinct would fur- 
nish it. While the now famous 
El Dorado was still unorganized 
politically, unregulated socially, 
unredeemed spiritually, the di- 
rectors, with unwavering faith, 
sent forth to those distant shores 
two evangelists to preach the 
Gospel of Christ. 

One of our wittiest poets 
once declared a man's education began with his grandfathers. And it 
may be said that the preparation of every true missionary of the Cross 
begins in his ancestry. Twenty years after the Pilgrim Fathers landed 
on Plymouth Rock, Isaac Willey reached Boston. On the mother's side, 
the lineage of the subject of our sketch may be traced to a Thomas 
Brown, who left England in 1635 and settled in Newbury, Massachusetts. 
The two families bore an honorable part in the upbuilding of New Eng- 
land. At length, in the first decade of the present century, a newly 
married couple, whose only capital was education, whose endow- 
ment, character, left their old homes and went to " break " a farm 
amidst the woods of New Hampshire. Here in the log farmhouse, on 
the stony hillside of Blueberry Mountain, at whose feet still runs the 




REV. SAMUEL H. WILLEY, D.D. 



January, 1899 The Home Missionary 161 

sparkling Pemigewasset, was born, March n, 182 1, Samuel Hopkins 
Willey. 

He was the youngest of ten children — five sons' and five daughters. 
His father was a hard-working, silent man, a Puritan of the Puritans ; his 
mother was a saintly woman of rare spiritual gifts. His was a happy 
childhood, yet disciplined in the strict school of severe economy. Many 
were their hard struggles ; yet every member of the large family gladly 
bore a part. Driving barefooted the cows afield in early morning or at 
set of sun, the lad looked up with inspiration to lofty Moosehillock, a 
giant among the mountains, and resolved to go onward, upward, and ob- 
tain an education. His parents, though they needed his help, willingly 
spared him. Thus in Pembroke, Ashby, and Kimball Union academies 
he prepared for Dartmouth College, where he was graduated in 1845. At 
the close of his seminary course in Union, in 1848, he accepted a call to 
the pastorate of the Congregational church in Medford, Mass., but soon 
resigned it to go to California. 

At his ordination as an evangelist, in the old Broome Street Presby- 
terian Church, New York, the Rev. Mr. Spaulding spoke prophetically of 
the strange land to which he was ere long to sail: " A land of wheat and 
barley and vines and fig-trees and pomegranates, a land of olive oil and 
honey, a land whose stones are iron and out of whose rocks flow rivers of 
oil; it is a place of sapphires and it hath the dust of gold." But there 
were others who had no such hope. At the time of annexation, Mr. 
McDuffie declared on the floor of the United States Senate, " Why, sir, of 
what use will this territory be for agriculture ? I would not, for that pur- 
pose, give a pinch of snuff for the whole of it." Daniel Webster regarded 
the region no more favorably. 

It is pleasant rrow to recall a meeting in the rooms of the Society, then 
in the Tract House, December 1, 1848. There were present the Secre- 
taries, Drs. Badger and Hall, with a number of the Executive Committee, 
Drs. Wm. Adams, E. F. Hatfield, and Joseph P. Thompson. The lay 
members were represented by Jasper Corning and Christopher R. Robert. 
After the reading of the Scriptures and the singing of hymns, all joined 
in prayer for the safety and success of the two young missionaries. Ris- 
ing from their knees, they accompanied them to the ship and bade them 
Godspeed as they sailed out to sea. 

On reaching New Orleans, the missionaries first learned of the dis- 
covery of gold. This report was confirmed when, in the early morning 
of February 23, 1849, the steamship California, the first of the mail line, 
on her maiden trip, dropped anchor in the harbor of Monterey. 

Before them was a small Mexican town, the capital of the Territory. 
The scene indicated that nature had done much for the beauty and pros- 
pects of the place, but man very little. There was intense excitement 



162 The Home Missionary January, 1899 

among all in the frantic rush for the precious metal. There were others, 
however, among these early voyagers, whose passion was for other things 
than gold. Four ministers had come on this little vessel. They at once 
separated and began preaching. " There was not a Protestant church or 
house, or school of any kind in all California." It was Friday. On the 
following Sunday, Mr. Willey preached in a small adobe hall from the 
text, "We preach Christ crucified, unto the Jews a stumbling-block, and 
unto the Greeks foolishness ; but unto them that are called, both Jews 
and Greeks, Christ the power of God, and the wisdom of God." 

The work had begun in earnest. He soon gathered the children into 
a day-school and Sunday-school. In the beginning, they could not speak 
a word of English, nor he Spanish. It was at this time that he estab- 
lished the first public library in California. He also served jointly with 
Padre Ramirez as chaplain of the convention that met in Monterey in 
September, 1849, to frame a Constitution for the new State. Being per- 
suaded that a great city would rise some day upon the shores of the beau- 
tiful bay within the Golden Gate, he left Monterey, scarcely larger now 
than it was then, and went to San Francisco. On September 15, 1850, he 
organized the Howard Street church, with four members, all men. At 
the close of the year, the town contained 15,000 people and nine Protes- 
tant churches. There were twenty-one in the entire State. 

Those were the days of small things, yet of grand possibilities. 
Before me lies a copy of the farewell sermon preached at the close of 
this happy pastorate of twelve years. If ever the consolations of religion 
were needed, they were in that early time. And this active church, led 
by its consecrated pastor, bore no small part in laying the foundations 
upon which to-day securely rests this metropolis of the Pacific with its 
population approaching half a million. In 185 1, two disastrous fires 
swept over the town, leaving ruin and ashes. In 1854-55, a financial 
panic proved equally destructive to the fortunes of the citizens. Hittell, 
the historian, says : "By the middle of 1854, out of a thousand business 
places in San Francisco, more than three hundred were unoccupied." 
Yet, withal, the church moved steadily onward with increasing usefulness. 

In the perspective of years, it now seems probable that Dr. Willey's 
most enduring and far-reaching labors were those outside of the pastoral 
relation. For four years he served efficiently as the agent in California 
of the Home Missionary Society. No religious paper was published on 
the Coast. Yet all felt the need of a paper which should be a common 
bond among the missionaries, and also carry life and light to distant 
ranch and miner's cabin. In August, 185 1, the first issue of The 
Pacific was taken from the press. The Rev. J. W. Douglas, who was 
Dr. Willey's fellow-voyager, was editor, assisted by Rev. Messrs. J. A. 
Benton, S. H. Willey, and T. Dwight Hunt. In the same year, after 



January, 1899 The Home Missionary 163 

much opposition, public schools were organized in the city. This led to 
their establishment throughout the State. 

During the first year's residence, correspondence was begun by Dr. 
Willey with educators in the East. He hoped to found a Christian col- 
lege. Early in 1853, the Rev. Henry Durant, a Congregational pastor 
from Massachusetts, arrived, and soon opened a school in Oakland. He 
began with three pupils and a rental of $150 per month. Nevertheless, 
the academy prospered, and on April 13, 1855, the College of California 
was chartered. Thirteen years later, the institution and its properties were 
turned over to the State, a free gift. Out of it at once sprang the pres- 
ent University of California, now having a magnificent endowment and 
2,500 students. To no one is the State more indebted for its educational 
system than to Dr. Willey. The College of California was very largely his 
creation. During all of its existence he was Secretary of the Board of 
Trustees, and for eight years was its chief executive officer. Very appro- 
priately, he has written a history of the college in an entertaining volume. 

In 1870 Dr. Willey began a successful pastorate of ten years in the 
church in Santa Cruz ; later, he served, in the same capacity, the church 
in Benicia for seven years. Space permits only the mere citation of these 
facts. But how much they mean. The State was becoming fortified and 
the churches strengthened. After years of patient service our friend pub- 
lished "Thirty Years in California," in which the development of the 
commonwealth is reviewed. A few sentences from this valuable mono- 
graph may be quoted with profit : "One of the lessons my California 
life has most thoroughly taught me is, that transplanted people do not 
begin life on new ground on as high a plane as they occupied before." 
Again, " One of the marked facts respecting religion in California during 
these thirty years is this : as a rule, the professional men, the educated 
men, the doctors, the lawyers, and to a great extent the merchants, have 
refrained from church attendance, and have given little support to the 
institutions of religion." Speaking of the support of the churches, he says 
on the same page (71) : " It is remarkable how exclusively this has been 
done by working people of moderate means, and to-day I hardly know of a 
church of any one of these denominations in which there is a rich man." 

Since Dr. Willey's retirement from the active ministry, he has been 
an honored member of the First Church of San Francisco. The ac- 
companying pictures well illustrate the significant origin of this house- 
hold of faith, so soon to observe its semi-centennial.* It was organ- 
ized July 29, 1849, and was the first church of our communion in the 
State. The Rev. T. D. Hunt, the pioneer Protestant clergyman, who had 
been engaged as chaplain of the town, was the first pastor. He remained 
seven years, and was followed by Rev. E. S. Lacy and Dr. A. L. Stone, 
* Of its present beautiful edifice a cut will appear in our April number. — Ed. 



164 



The Home Missionary 



January, 1899 




FIRST BUILDING OF THE FIRST CONGREGATIONAL 
CHURCH, SAN FRANCISCO 



who together served 
over twenty-four years. 
It marks a long dis- 
tanceand greatadvance 
from the first house of 
plain boards, twenty- 
five by fifty feet, to the 
present imposing struc- 
ture in the heart of the 
metropolis. It is the 
largest Protestant audi- 
torium in the city, pro- 
viding seats for 1,500 
people. Three times, 
because of enlarging 
opportunities and in- 
creasing needs, the 
church has felt called 
upon to rise and build a new sanctuary. As a church, it has had its full 
share of trouble, yet, withal, has never lost faith, and to-day, under the 
leadership of its able pastor, Dr. George C. Adams, and its office-bearers, 
is doing a larger work than ever before. We may take just pride in "the 
Old First." 

In the expanding work of 
Home Missions, men are needed 
not alone for service in the field, 
but it is equally important that 
there should be volunteers 
among those of experience, 
and in whom the churches have 
the utmost confidence, to serve 
on the executive committees 
which have general oversight 
of the work. Among the latter, 
one stands preeminent in Cali- 
fornia, in that he has faithfully 
served for many years as chair- 
man of the State executive mis- 
sionary committee. The Rev. 
George Mooar, D.D., left the 
pastorate of the church in An- 
dover, Mass., the home of his 
boyhood, to go to California as rev. george mooar, d.d. 




January, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



165 



pastor of the First Church of Oakland. The success and growth of 
this church, now the largest of our order on the Coast, has been due not 
a little to his prayerful ministry. Later he was persuaded to accept a 
professorship in the Pacific Theological Seminary, and for more than a 
quarter of a century has taught in this .school of the prophets. 

Our communion owes much to his unrequited labors, for " the care of 
all the churches" has been on his heart these many years. He is known 
as the friend of young ministers, whose more restless tempers are calmed 
by his undisturbed serenity. Intuitive insight into the characters of men 
he has to a marked degree, and though firm in conviction, never awakens 
antagonism. His most prominent characteristic is humility, yet it is al- 
ways accompanied by the gracious dignity of self-respect. Illness has 
long been a guest in his household, and he has not been unacquainted with 
grief. These experi- 
ences have but sweet- 
ened his spirit and quick- 
ened his faith. It is 
indeed fitting that the 
pictures of two such 
men as Dr. Willey and 
Professor Mooar should 
appear in this number. 
Together, cordially, un- 
selfishly, they have been 
building the walls of Zion 
on the Pacific Coast. 

At the close of the 
century, it is well to look backward and see what God has wrought in fifty 
years. The early pioneers to California are passing away ; in fact, but 
very few remain. Of the earliest group of ministers, Dr. Willey alone is 
living. This sketch, brief as it is, were incomplete did it not speak of 
her who has been his willing helpmeet through all these passing 
years. Six months after landing, September 19, 1849, Dr. Willey 
married Miss Martha Jeffers, whom he had previously known in New 
York. Four of their six children are still living, and she is also spared 
to share the honor and love so heartily given by hosts of steadfast friends. 
The one Congregational church has increased to more than 200. 
The few who covenanted together in 1850, to 20,000. And in the 
entire State there are now 2,500 Protestant churches, with nearly 200,000 
members and property worth $12,000,000. The State has proved to be 
so opulent in natural gifts that its fame has gone out to all the world. 
May the time hasten when, because of rich spiritual fruitage, this great 
empire of the West may be as widely known in the kingdom of God. 




BUILDING OF THE FIRST CONGREGATIONAL 
CHURCH, SAN FRANCISCO 



1 66 



The Home Missionary 



January, 1899 




JUNEAU, ALASKA, FROM AN OLD WHARF 

AN APPEAL FROM ALASKA 

[The latest communication received at the Society's office from our lone missionary 
in Alaska, Rev. Loyal L. Wirt, left him on October 31. Its substance is an earnest ap- 
peal for instructive and entertaining books, wherewith the friends of purity and religion 
can help Mr. Wirt to a degree that few in our older homes can understand. In his care 
of the thousands, mostly young, who in their wintry hours of compulsory idleness will be 
subject to the terrible temptations of the place and time, few things, as he well says, 
can be so helpful to him as good books, counteracting the taste for and the destructive 
effects of the vile and corrupting literature which the Adversary finds means to scatter 
so freely in ail our newer settlements. 

We commend Mr. Wirt's appeal to all our readers, and beg them to act at once in 
generous response. Let our churches, ladies' societies, Christian Endeavorers, and other 
organizations move promptly. But how many individuals and families have in their 
libraries favorite, well-read volumes of just the character he needs. Without waiting for 
combined action, will not our friends select one of these useful books and at once 
mail it (post-paid) to Rev. L. L. Wirt, Juneau, Alaska? It will be a real Christian ser- 
vice. — Ed.] 

" An Alaska winter is upon us. This cruel enemy of human life and 
comfort is a hydra with three heads : cold, darkness, and enforced idleness. 



January, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



167 



Suffering there will be, but local charities will endeavor to cope with that, 
unassisted from the outside world. From sixteen to twenty hours of dark- 
ness there will be daily, but a good electric lighting plant will do much to 
dispel the gloom. The third and greatest evil, however, is one which we 
cannot hope successfully to overcome unless many in the homeland are 
ready to render a simple service to these their isolated brothers and 
sisters. 

" For five months 7,000 people will be storm-bound in and around 





STREET IN JUNEAU, ALASKA 

Juneau, the hub of Alaska. Half of them will remain in idleness all of 
the time, the rest part of the time. If the devil still finds work for idle 
hands to do under ordinary circumstances, how much more in a frontier 
mining camp, where every form of sin is made seductive. You cannot 
remove these people from temptation by giving them work, but you can 
do so by giving them books. The ratio of intelligence is high among 
them ; and that many a ' fraternity pin ' is seen in our saloons and dance 
houses is, I submit, because no other place both warm and light is ope-n 
to their wearers. These things ought not so to be ; neither shall they be 
long, if the reader and others whom he may interest will each select from his 



1 68 The Home Missionary January, 1899 

library, or from the publisher, one book which he knows will be of inter- 
est and profit to the average reader, and will mail that book to my ad- 
dress. I will see that every such book is shelved, catalogued, and placed 
in free circulation without further expense. 

" What if 500 or 5,000 books be sent in response to this appeal — there 
cannot be too many — and we at this end shall not have^been idle mean- 
while. Already in faith believing, we have leased a room twenty-five by 
thirty feet in the busiest part of this busy little city, which we are now fit- 
ting up as a 'men's rendezvous.* It is to be, if love and hard work can 
make it so, a roomy, bright, cheery place, where books, periodicals, games, 
writing desks, comfortable chairs, warmth, light, and above all, a genuine 
Christian welcome, shall be offered free to every homeless soul who lives 
in or passes through Juneau. 

" Of this equipment we can provide all but the books, and books are 
the weapons with which best of all we can fight the devil in Alaska this 
winter." 



OUR SCANDINAVIAN WORK 

By Superintendent S. V. S. Fisher, Minneapolis, Minn. 

The opportunity for our Scandinavian work was never so good as 
now. Doors are opening ; fields are inviting our occupancy ; people are 
asking for the hearing of the Word and for spiritual oversight, and men 
are offering themselves to speak that Word, visit the uncared for, and 
seek out the neglected. There is no end of promising work to be done, 
which no body of Christian workers seems on the alert to do. There are 
large areas of untilled territory. The lacking thing is not new, but some- 
thing a long time lacking — the means for bringingthe willing workers 
and the waiting fields together. 

Strong appeals come from little groups of people who infrequently 
enjoy the religious privileges and services with which the more favored, 
living in the centers, often feel themselves surfeited, and which these 
groups are desirous of having with some degree of regularity and cer- 
tainty. But about all that the Scandinavian Department has been able 
to do in these latter days is to keep the work which is already begun, and 
in hand, up to the level of its absolute demands. And even this has not 
been feasible in every instance. 

These appeals are not limited to any one region ; but come from 
various and distant quarters. There are Scandinavians in Nebraska, 
Kansas, Colorado, Montana, Idaho, and North Dakota, who would be 
very glad to welcome the messenger with " the beautiful feet," and listen 



January, 1899 The Home Missionary 169 

to the "good tidings of good " which he publisheth. The need is so 
pressing in some of these fields, and the calls so loud and often repeated, 
that some of our American brethren cannot understand, they say, much 
as they know of our Society's stress, how this department can hear' 
these calls and not respond to them without being derelict to duty. 
Two things, however, are essential in a response to any call, no matter 
how urgent : a willing mind, and the ways and means. The officers of the 
Society all have the willing mind ; but how to do that which they would, 
they find not. A larger committee on ways and means is needed, even 
"the committee of the whole " church. 

Some of the specific things which are especially needed just at this 
present writing are a general missionary among the Scandinavians, Nor- 
wegians, and Swedes, in North Dakota, and on the east side of the Red 
River, in the border counties of Minnesota ; a general missionary in the 
Northwest among the Finns ; a weekly or monthly publication, which will 
stand for the interests of our Swedish Congregational churches, and 
inform the people of their work and its progress ; and assistance in sus- 
taining our Dano-Norwegian paper, " Evangelisten." 

For the year past we have had a general worker in the region of 
which Fargo, North Dakota, is the natural center. Rev. L. J. Pedersen 
was pastor of the Fargo Scandinavian church. He had so many invita- 
tions to labor in the region round about as to interfere with his regular 
work, and was so impressed with the importance of the outside work that 
he resigned his charge and became an itinerant. His labors have been 
abundant, and have been attended with excellent and large results ; but 
on account of his wife's ill health he has been obliged to seek a warmer 
climate. For the remaining months of the year Rev. N. C. Barrie is 
filling out the service of Mr. Pedersen. The Sunday-school Superintend- 
ent of North Dakota, Rev. E. H. Stickney, speaks highly of Mr. Barrie's 
work, and thinks that by all means he should be kept at it. The Sunday- 
school and Publishing Society joined hands with our Home Missionary 
Society in employing Mr. Pedersen, and would no doubt be willing to do 
the like in the case of Mr. Barrie ; for a good man can, in many circum- 
stances, labor most efficiently for both Societies with greatest economy for 
each. 

There is as imperative a call for a general worker among " another 
race from the far north" — the Finns. In the region bordering on the Great 
Lakes — Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota — dwell many of these folk. Rev. 
Franz Lehtinen, pastor of a Finnish Congregational church at Ashtabula, 
Ohio, for the past nine years, has last summer been visiting his country- 
men in this territory, making over forty addresses in twelve different 
towns and districts. Again and again he was importuned to return and 
preach the Word to them. His heart goes out to these his brethren, 



170 The Home Missionary January, 1899 

"scattered abroad as sheep having no shepherd ;" and he would gladly 
leave the easier work in order to give these neglected ones an occasional 
opportunity to listen to the preaching of the Gospel. 

One of the greatest helps in church and denominational work is the 
religious paper, which is deemed so important as, in some quarters, to be 
multiplied needlessly. Our Swedish Congregational work* has no help of 
this kind, and is feeling the need of it very much indeed. The eastern 
Swedish Congregational churches did have a publication, with headquarters 
in Boston ; but it is numbered among the things of the past. And this is 
held by some to be a good and sufficient reason why another attempt should 
never be made. Where would our denominational papers be, if this argu- 
ment had always prevailed ? The Swedish ministers in the Northwest are 
very desirous of having some publication through which they may give 
expression to their views and opinions regarding their work, and may tell to 
each other what they are doing. It would aid the Swedish work amazingly 
if it only had an organ of this kind, to inform and inspirit all the workers. 

And this prepares the way to say that the Dano-Norwegian part of 
our work has an excellent publication, " Evangelisten," which has been 
rendering efficient aid to all the Norwegian churches and their ministers. 
But the hard fact is that this paper is not yet self-supporting. It has been 
a burden upon its friends through all the years of its existence ; especially 
has Prof. R. A. Jernberg, of the Chicago Theological Seminary, stood 
under the load. He has worked incessantly, doing the work of managing 
and literary editor without remuneration, and carrying the financial burden 
in addition. Just now this efficient and almost indispensable helper is in 
desperate need of friendly assistance. The paper has done good work; it 
is doing good work ; but it is to be feared that it will not be able to con- 
tinue "to do good and to communicate," unless some financial friends 
come to its rescue. One or two hundred dollars would preach the Gospel 
widely through the pages of this paper, if any one is moved in his spirit 
so to do ; and a worthy agent would be supported in a beneficent mission. 

These are some of the pressing needs of the Scandinavian work, and 
also some of its open doors of opportunity. 



OUR ORGANIZING COUNCIL ON WHEELS 

By Rev. F. F. Lewis, Holdridge, Neb. 

It was a chilly October afternoon when we started for the first of four 
inviting fields waiting for us, viz., Union, thirty miles away. The lay 
bishop drove the horses. With him rode the home missionary bishop, the 



January, 1899 The Home Missionary 171 

Sunday-school bishop, and the pastor. It was dark when we reached the 
sod palace, with its many roofs stretching one after the other like an old- 
time castle, where we were to have supper. Of course the rooms were 
ceiled with pine, the walls papered, the floors carpeted. The parlor had 
a piano, a guitar, and other evidences of acquaintance with the world of 
culture. Next to brick or granite, for real comfort and solidity give me 
the sod house. 

Supper over, we sought the schoolhouse near by ; large, well-lighted, 
with organ. Bibles, and hymn-books. The Council was duly organized, 
and listened to the story of beginnings. For over thirteen years a Sun- 
day-school had been kept up. Often there was not a single avowed Chris- 
tian in the entire school, but still they kept up their study of the Bible. 
Last winter a Sunday-school missionary held meetings ; the Word bore 
fruit, and twenty-seven members united in a church. (The nearest church 
was seven miles away.) They were duly welcomed to Congregational fel- 
lowship, and the members of the Council sought repose, not all in sod 
houses, for many a two-story frame house shows prosperity returning to 
the farmer. 

Ten miles the next morning, in a drizzling rain, to Platte Valley. 
Again the Council was organized. Again the story of a Sunday-school 
started by a Sunday-school missionary ; many Swedes and Germans inter- 
ested ; a revival meeting in the winter, and twenty-seven church mem- 
bers waiting for their place in the Pilgrim brotherhood. After dinner, 
thirteen miles to Keystone. The schoolhouse filled with people ; " strong 
thinking," they were called, and rightly. The welcome story of Sunday- 
school and evangelistic work is told, and, with peculiar joy, the right 
hand of fellowship is extended to these new adherents to the Faith which 
was once delivered unto the saints. A bountiful supper is served at the 
church, and another drive of nine miles brings us to Pleasant Grove, 
where sixty people, mostly young, are gathered to greet this Council on 
wheels, and the fourth church is welcomed to Congregational work, fel- 
lowship, missions, and, as one brother naively confessed, " to the debt." 

In this, as in the others, the mission Sunday-school had prepared the 
way for the evangelist. In all, there was no original Congregational 
material, but the people, passing in review the various denominations, 
voluntarily chose ours for its principles of local self-government and fel- 
lowship. It seemed to them most simple, reasonable, and Christ-like. 
In all, the Confessions of Faith were taken from that of the Chicago 
Avenue Church or from the Creed of 1883. In all, the records of meet- 
ings and preparations for the Council were models of completeness. 

These four churches unite with the Union Church in the village in 
the support of a pastor. Originally, a Congregational church supplied the 
needs of the village. Then a church came in, whose motto is, " With- 



172 The Home Missionary January, 1899 

out controversy, great is the mystery of godliness." So they encourage 
controversy, that the mystery may be cleared up. Then the denomination 
founded a church ; after a while the pinch for funds compelled the Con- 
gregational and this last-named body to unite in a Union Church. One 
pastor serves the village church and the new organization, and there is 
no call on the Home Missionary Society for aid. 

The value of missionary Sunday-school work appears from this brief 
account. Each church had its beginning in a Sunday-school, carried on 
in one instance for thirteen years, at times without a single declared 
Christian in the school. The seed was sown, and when the Sunday-school 
missionary came and special meetings were held, the harvest was abund- 
ant and sure. 



THE WORK IN NEW' MEXICO 

During the months lately passed we as a nation have been brought 
into closer connection with Spanish-speaking people than ever before. 
We have come to know and feel their peculiarities. Their false pride, 
their ideas of the requirements of honor, their underhand dealings, and 
their lack of human feeling have opened up to us a character not alto- 
gether lovely. 

Over 350 years ago Spain sent her language, and a bit of her peculiar 
character, into a territory that has since fallen to us. The majority of 
the population of this Territory of New Mexico are the descendants of 
those Spanish adventurers and the American Indian. This undesirable 
mixture has produced the New Mexican of to-day. He speaks the 
Spanish language more or less imperfectly. He is nominally a Romanist, 
but, in reality, is indifferent to moral and religious teaching. Those who 
live near the American towns have learned a little of the modern ways of 
doing things, and their minds have been unconsciously developed to some 
extent by this contact with a new life. A large number of our Mexican 
population live in the mountainous regions, where they raise their sheep, 
and where a little water can be had for the irrigation of their scanty 
crops. Their farming is carried on in the rudest fashion. The ground 
is ploughed, or rather scraped, with the smallest-sized plough, which is 
usually dull. Then the grain is sown broadcast. When very ripe it is 
cut with sickles, threshed out with horses on a dirt floor, and winnowed 
by tossing in the wind with large paddles. The wheat is washed, ground 
in a very old home-made mill, and is sifted by hand. This flour is made 
into a thin, indigestible cake called a tortilla. 

Their towns are small, a collection of low, flat, dirt-roofed, rectangular, 
sun-dried brick houses. The floors are usually of this same dirt, which is 



January, 1899 The Home Missionary 173 

in evidence everywhere. It is easy to believe that the majority of the 
people are also made of earth, for many have never experienced the 
sensation of a good bath. One fourteen-year-old- boy said, after taking 
his first bath in several years, " How light one feels ! " 

The Spanish language has no equivalent to our cherished word home. 
Casa, a house, is the word used, and that is all home means to them — a 
stopping place for the family when night comes. It is not strange, then, 
that we sometimes know of able-bodied parents trying to give away their 
children, and in rare cases of even selling them. 

Being shut off from the outside world, and having no books nor 
papers, it is only natural that their minds should become narrow and 
weak. A very few mothers, and a small portion of the fathers, can read 
and write. The Roman Catholic church has done little, and is doing 
less and less, to develop the intellect of this forgotten people. When 
children who will become voters have not the intellectual power to learn 
to read and write well even the easy Spanish language, it is time some 
organization should begin to develop mind in these United States citizens. 
They have been neglected too long already. Out of eighty school 
children from five to fifteen years of age, enrolled last year in a school of the 
Congregational Education Society, twelve and one-half per cent, could 
keep up in the grades of an American school ; fifty per cent, will be able 
to learn to read and write their own language, to read and write English 
poorly, and in arithmetic to struggle through " division " ; thirty-seven 
and one-half per cent, will never be able to learn to read and write their 
own language intelligently. These children live in a town of 500 inhabi- 
tants, which is the center of a large isolated district. The process of 
developing the rudiment of a mind is a slow one. What a task is before 
the teacher ! A book is almost useless in such hands. Ordinary school 
methods fail. The kindergarten ideas and industrial training will do 
, more than books can to unfold their minds. Thus the mind and hand 
and heart will develop, little by little, and a more symmetrical life will be 
the result. 

A race with so little mental capacity is not usually very moral. What 
can we expect of a people begotten of the reckless adventurer and the 
Indian, who has almost no moral code ? The Roman Catholic priests, 
who have been their only religious teachers, have not taught them better 
ways by their example, whatever they may have done by precept. New 
forms have been grafted upon old thoughts, so that what worship they have 
is idolatrous. They do not closely connect religion with moral conduct. 
Their idea, as one expressed it, is that religion is to go to heaven on, 
and moral conduct is for the missionary, who receives a fine salary for 
"being good." They say to us : "Oh, you can do what is right, but we 
cannot, God sees our necessity if we lie, cheat, and steal, and he is 



174 The Home Missionary January, 1899 

merciful and will forgive us." Our town is largely given up to the 
" works of the flesh" as enumerated by Paul. 

Within a radius of sixty miles we have an isolated Mexican population 
of 2,400. In this district, .where the towns are small and the distances 
great, there are three missionary teachers and one missionary, who are 
Americans, and one native helper. The work is slow, as it ever is in the 
beginning of things in heathen lands among a degraded people. Preach- 
ing has little effect until the true Christian life is lived before them. The 
missionary needs the patience of a Judson and the energy and faith of a 
Paton. The churches which support us also need patience and faith. 
One of the hardest things the missionary to the Mexican has to endure is 
the thought that people do not care to give, except where their money 
will give immediate results in conversions. Perhaps this has been one 
reason why our Mexican work has had so few friends, and why the long 
years of sowing in faith have not yet passed. We know that the harvest 
will come. All of God's promises and the history of missions assure us 
of this. Our great desire is that the sowers may be increased, and that 
many friends may arise to help and cheer them on. 

D. S. B. 

» 
THE STORY OF THE LITTLE LOG CHURCH 

By Mrs. Lettice H. Johnston, Challis, Idaho 

Allow me to introduce myself to you as a very common little log 
building in Idaho. About five years ago, after, lying idle and empty for 
several years, I was agreeably surprised one afternoon by a visit from 
four gentlemen and two ladies. I learned from their conversation that I 
had been, or was soon to be, purchased, and used as a Congregational 
church. 

It may seem incredible to you that after five o'clock that Saturday 
afternoon, these people tore down a partition, cleaned my floor, swept my 
log walls, brought in planks and fixed them up on blocks of wood, for 
seats, covering them with blankets of all sizes and colors, brought in an 
organ, a table, lamps, chairs, etc., and that all things were arranged, and 
services held here at eleven o'clock the next morning. But such was the 
case ; and on every Sabbath morning since that time, at that hour the 
people have met within my walls to worship God. 

With the hope of encouraging and helping you, and receiving help 
from you, I wish to tell some of the things that have interested me since 
serving as The First Congregational church in Custer County, Idaho. 

The first thing of interest was the formation of a church society, 






January, 1899 The Home Missionary 175 

which was done on the first Sabbath ; then the celebration of the Lord's 
Supper ; then the call to Mr. Nash to become the pastor. How well 
I remember his letter of acceptance ! Soon I learned that he had been 
coming over a dangerous mountain road all through the long winter 
months, and that it was due to his perseverance and courage that Super- 
intendent Hawkes had become interested, and moved to come and organ- 
ize a church society, and purchase a building for its home. 

During the months in which Mr. Nash served so faithfully as pastor 
of this church I learned to know him well, and all his discouragements in 
this new field ; among these the great need of a bell to call the people 
together at the right hour ; and a far greater lack — that of interest in 
spiritual things. Still another cause of regret was that he was unmarried, 
for he wisely felt, and when no one but me could hear often said : " How 
much more successful a minister could be with the help of a good Chris- 
tian wife." Yet he never seemed to know just how to get either bell or 
wife while here. However, he did succeed in increasing the interest in 
the work, and I have often heard his people tell — in words that I wished 
I could repeat to him for his encouragement — of his helping them, by his 
preaching and example of Christian living, to become followers of Christ. 

The yearly visits of Superintendent Hawkes were " red letter days " 
for me. He always seemed to enjoy preaching here as well as though I 
were built in the latest style, and I never heard him speak a disparaging 
word of me. 

When the present pastor, Mr. Mason, came, I looked for some great 
changes, as he brought the needed wife, and I have not been disappointed. 

First, a Woman's Missionary Society was organized, and I will tell 
how it was done. I distinctly remember hearing the notice read one 
Sabbath morning, requesting all the ladies to meet on a certain afternoon 
of that week to organize a missionary society. As this was something 
entirely new to me, I looked forward anxiously to the appointed time. 
At the hour came the pastor's wife with another lady well known to me. 
They waited and watched the doors and windows anxiously, and at last, 
after watching a very long time, the pastor's wife said, with a faint sus- 
picion of tears in her voice, " What shall we do if no one comes ?" The 
other, who seemed to know the ways of the people, said, " We will read 
a chapter from God's Word, pray for his help, and organize our society." 
The pastor's wife seemed encouraged, and said hopefully, " Well, you sing 
something, and if no one comes by that time we will do as you propose." 
So they sung and read and prayed ; then read an agreement to do certain 
things, and each signed it. But that was only the beginning of the soci- 
ety, which has since grown and become a power for good in this com- 
munity. 

They hold public meetings every quarter ; they take charge of prayer- 



176 The Home Missionary January, 1899 

meeting once every month ; they have held one thank-offering meeting 
here which interested me greatly, and I learned from reports that there 
had been three such held before at private houses. This society raised 
money and bought the bell that Mr. Nash wished for so much, and also a 
bell for the new schoolhouse. It seems to me since they have made such 
a success of everything undertaken so far, that had the ladies been so 
organized when Mr. Nash was here, they would have devised some way of 
getting him the needed wife. 

Last winter Mr. Mason called a meeting to see about organizing a 
Christian Endeavor Society, and a successful one was started. 

The Sunday-school, which has been held here ever si-nce that first 
Sabbath, is something to be glad of. The " Children's Day " exercises 
every year are made most interesting, and I have heard that this school 
contributes more to help needy Sunday-schools than any other in Idaho. 

They hold "harvest festivals," and I have wondered if a more costly 
building would look much nicer than I do when decorated from floor to 
ceiling with vines and flowers, fruit and vegetables, mottoes and pictures. 

" Temperance Sunday " comes once or twice a year with its songs, 
recitations, etc. " Home Missionary Sunday " is never forgotten. The 
children always come to the front on all these occasions. Last Fourth of 
July was celebrated in a right loyal way — the young people expressing 
their love of country in songs, recitations, and declamations. I was just 
as proud of them as any large city church could have been. 

Mr. Mason can think of more things that ought to be remembered by 
extra exercises than any man I have heard of ; and if he had a larger 
society to work with him, I do believe he would have something going on 
here every day in the year. I have heard this remark made : " Our pastor 
and his wife are as good as gold." I do not understand by this any desire 
to exchange them for that precious metal, anxious as all seem to be 
to get it. 

Two things are greatly desired here. One is more room ; for, willing 
as I am, I am really too small to accommodate all who wish to come to 
these extra anniversaries, Children's Days, etc. I have been expecting to 
hear the Woman's Missionary Society talk it up and do something toward 
an addition, but the fact that so many have been sick the past year, no 
doubt accounts for their delay. 

There is another matter over which there is more anxiety manifested 
than this lack of room. I very often hear different members of the 
church speak of numbers being added to churches in the East, North, 
South and West, and in foreign lands. This is what the pastor, his wife, 
and the faithful ones pray and weep over. They say, " Why do we not 
see men and women added to our church ? This burden seems laid upon 
them, and for this they are watching, working, and praying. The chief 



January, 1899 The Home Missionary 177 

object I had in telling of our work and interests, has been to interest you 
in us, that you may remember the Little Log Church and those who wor- 
ship in it, in your prayers. 

Will you not unitedly cry unto God that he will pour out such a 
blessing upon us, that my walls shall not have room to contain all who 
shall come asking, " What must we do to be saved ? " 

The Home Missionary Society, with the Woman's Missionary Unions, 
and all their varied interests, members and officers, have a warm place in 
the hearts of all who worship in the Little Log Church. 

A YEAR IN OREGON 

By Superintendent C. F. Clapp, Forest Grove 

The State Association which this year met at Forest Grove, the home 
of Pacific University, was in a measure a jubilee meeting. It was fifty 
years since the College was founded, and the Association recognized the 
fact and made the meeting one of historical interest. A history of the in- 
stitution from its beginning ; a history of the organization of the Congre- 
gational churches in the State ; a glance backward at some of the work 
which has been accomplished, and other similar themes, occupied the 
time of the meeting. The past year was not as rich in spiritual results 
as were some of those immediately preceding, although entered upon with 
much preparation and courage. The history of revivals, and of times 
when there were large numbers of conversions, is not flattering to human 
nature. In the main, the years of temporal prosperity and advancement 
in worldly things have been seasons of drought and famine in the spirit- 
ual kingdom ; while the years of disappointment and disaster, financially, 
have often been the richest in the harvest of souls. The campaign so 
carefully planned last fall, in which the brethren were to exchange work 
and assist each other in special meetings, was practically carried out, and 
while great good resulted in awakened churches, in healing divisions, and 
the building up of Christian character and lives, fewer additions to the 
churches resulted than had been hoped. On an average something like 
eight persons united with each church where such meetings were held ; 
at one or two points, however, there were no additions at all. Twenty- 
seven missionaries were employed during the year, and they supplied forty- 
six churches and nine out-stations. Fifteen churches were left without 
pastoral supply, a dozen of which would have been worked if there had 
been money to assist in the support of the minister. Forty-three Sunday- 
schools and thirty-six Endeavor Societies are under the pastoral care of 
these missionaries. 
12 



178 The Home Missionary January, 1899 

Only one church was organized within the year, and one parsonage is 
being built. We have passed through a warm political campaign and a 
war with Spain, within the year, and they were about equally distracting 
to religious work. They were conditions that had to be met, however, 
and will in the end perhaps work out a far more exceeding and eternal 
weight of glory. We have been learning a little of what it means when 
we say- we must " save America to save the world." America may come 
to mean more than we have hitherto supposed. The organization of some 
of the aided churches, as reported in the meeting, was of special interest. 
One was organized as the result of the self-sacrificing labors of Father 
Roberts, a returned foreign missionary. Thirteen persons were gathered 
into a church eight years ago ; it has built two houses of worship (the first 
having been destroyed by wind) ; has built a parsonage ; organized Sunday- 
schools ; a Christian Endeavor Society ; and enrolls forty-four members at 
present, while a goodly number have gone elsewhere or have been trans- 
lated into the upper kingdom. It has been the birthplace of many souls. 

Another was organized in Portland, eleven years ago, with a charter 
membership of the same number — thirteen. It has for more than a decade 
been a beacon light in a needy field. Its Sunday-school has, from the 
beginning, been large and sometimes phenomenal. It has been almost con- 
stantly supplied with a pastor, and to this owes its success. It numbers 
a membership of ninety; owns a house of worship and parsonage, worth 
together four or five thousand dollars; has thirty members in the Senior 
Endeavor Society, and fifty Juniors, and more than two hundred in its 
Sunday-school. There was raised in the field last year for religious pur- 
poses something over $600. 

Sherwood is two years old, and was organized by Rev. Mr. and Mrs. 
Barber. It also had the charmed number of thirteen as charter members, 
and now enrolls forty. It has purchased and repaired a house of worship ; 
has a Sunday-school and Endeavor Society, with a large Junior Endeavor ; 
a ladies' missionary society, to which men also belong ; and has stood for 
an intelligent faith in a community where it is thoroughly appreciated. 

The Hood View church, a little over seven years old, was also organ- 
ized by Mr. and Mrs. Barber. Thirteen charter members constituted its 
working force, and a strong faith in God characterized its pastor and peo- 
ple. They have built and paid for a large and comfortable house of wor- 
ship and a parsonage ; have a large Sunday-school ; an Endeavor Society, 
and a missionary society, strong and vigorous. The church's membership 
is now sixty, while more than ninety have been on its rolls ; it has raised 
$953 for missions during its short life, and $3,850 for religious purposes. 
It is in a farming community where almost every member is poor, and 
some are very poor. It has accomplished this, too, during what has been 
known as the unprecedented hard times. 



January, 1899 The Home Missionary 179 

Most of the churches of this Pilgrim way, organized in the State, 
were primarily out-stations of the field of some faithful missionary. In 
response to urgent demands special meetings would be planned, and a 
revival follow, which would lead to the necessity for a church where the 
ordinances could be maintained. Of the last twenty-five churches organ 
ized in the State, fifteen or more were the direct outgrowth of revivals, 
and most of the others which have reached any degree of vitality have 
been baptized in the glowing fire of a revival. Without this experience 
their spiritual life is feeble, and flickers unsteadily; jealousies easily creep 
in, and alienate or divide them. They make large issues out of small 
differences, and are easily offended in their earlier church lives. But the 
fusing power of the Holy Spirit, when poured out in revival showers, is a 
panacea for most of the diseases that attack young churches. On the 
whole, the outlook is encouraging. These pastorless churches must soon 
have help or they, will be lost. The churches with pastors are mostly 
doing well. A large number of the homeless societies have, within the 
past five or six years, secured substantial church buildings. A fair sprink- 
ling of them have also built parsonages. 

There are still some eight or ten shelterless churches and a larger 
number that greatly need parsonages. The coming winter is looked for- 
ward to with hope and expectancy. Already two or three fields have held 
special services or are planning to do so in the early future. Pastors 
have organized Bible classes where the Bible is studied systematically. 
The topic of the Holy Spirit and his connection with the extension of the 
Kingdom is receiving special attention and careful study and prayer. 
The Endeavor Societies in some places keep alive the Christian life when 
no pastor is available, for lack of funds. This, with the Sunday-school, 
is in such cases the center of spiritual power in such neglected fields. 
May the time speedily come when all such fields will be supplied with a 
living Gospel delivered by living men ! 



NOTES BY THE WAY 

HIS FIRST EXPERIENCE ON THE FRONTIER 
By Mrs. H. M. Union 

We sat together in the cozy living room of the little home missionary 
parsonage. " Tell me," I asked the preacher, "how you began the work 
which has brought civilization to this frontier ? " Here is substantially 
his answer : 

At about nine o'clock of a bright cold morning in early May our 



i8o The Home Missionary January, 1899 

buckboard started for a 125-mile trip to Fort Robinson. Twenty-four 
hours later we rode into the White River bottom, to the station nearest 
Fort Robinson and Crawford. Oh, that twenty-four hours ! The horses 
and drivers were changed at intervals, stopping long enough to feed the 
horses and get meals at the stage stations, when we kept on over the weary 
expanse of prairie and along the interminable road. And such meals ! 
We came into one station just as the gray streaks of morning struggled 
up the eastern horizon. The family were just beginning to stir. It 
was a low log house, with various sheds and pens round about. On 
one side the roof timbers projected four or five feet from the eaves and 
were covered with brush and earth, as was the whole roof. This formed 
a sort of piazza. A stovepipe ran up through this extension, and the 
cook-stove was out on the veranda. They were now getting breakfast, 
and being both cold and hungry, it was natural for us to gather about the 
stove and watch the preparations. I think the chicken-house must have 
been near, because the chickens were so fearlessly familiar with the other 
members of the family and showed such interest in what was going on. 

Our hostess was busily frying potatoes on the stove, and also setting 
the table inside. When she attended to the potatoes she turned them 
with a knife, which she laid on a saw-bench when she went into the 
house. Then the chickens jumped upon the bench, walked over the 
knife, and picked off bits of potatoes from its blade. The hostess came 
out, drove the chickens off, picked up the knife they had walked around 
on, and turned over the potatoes with it. Now, we like our potatoes 
turned and fried on both sides, but we did not feel much like eating those. 
I selected a little that seemed to threaten as small amount of risk as any- 
thing, and swallowed a few unrelished mouthfuls. After having paid 
my fifty cents I thought to myself that I had never before paid more 
money for less value. 

The morning was crisp and cold as we rode down from the "table- 
land " into the valley of White River, passing a freighters' camp. The 
horses were picketed near by, the wagon with its canvas top stood beside 
the road, and under it, wrapped in their blankets, the freighters were still 
asleep. The scene as we wound down into the valley was beautiful in 
the early morning light. Beneath us lay the deep winding valley, and 
beyond the strange, rugged bluffs just north of Fort Robinson, their bare 
rocks, like the turrets of some vast castle, lifting themselves against the 
sky, while at their base grew the dark green pines. Away off to the right 
(the east) extends the uneven line of the Pine Ridge, with " Crow Butte " 
standing out against the morning sky like the giant captain of a giant host. 

Presently the driver turned into a yard, in which was a long, low log 
house with sheds for horses. A woman stood in the door. Children, 
dogs, and various other domestic animals uttered for us each his peculiar 



January, 1899 The Home Missionary 1 8 1 

greeting. Here our horses stopped, and our journey was ended so far as 
staging was concerned. I could see nothing but open and apparently 
uninhabited prairie as I looked around with interest, not to say forebod- 
ing, for the town in which my missionary labors were to be expended. I 
asked the driver, " Where is Fort Robinson ? " Pointing off across the 
valley and toward the buttes, he said : " Jest over th' hill an' th' trees a 
little ways ; yer can't see it f'm here." 

A little encouraged, I asked : " Where is Crawford ? " " Wall, th' 
aint much Crawford now. 'Tis goin' to be over thar. Yer ken go out t' 
thet ridge thar an' see all ther is." 

I went as directed. I could see a small clear stream winding along 
under the cottonwood trees and brush, also a line of embankment, evi- 
dently a partial grade for a railroad, and where the grade approached the 
stream a pile-driver was sending down the heavy posts for a bridge. 
That was a sign of coming life, but it wasn't a town. Over a little farther 
I could see a tent, and beside it a few pieces of timber sticking up in the 
air. Evidently some one had begun a building of some sort. That was 
all I could see — all there was to see. That tent contained the first stock 
of goods ever brought upon the site of the present city of Crawford, and 
those pieces of timber were the posts of Crawford's first frame building — 
a hardware store. That was Crawford as I first saw it. 

For a few days I was kindly entertained in the house of an officer at 
Fort Robinson, and then I met General Missionary Bross and three of 
my fellow-students from the seminary. They were traveling in a wagon 
in real emigrant style on their way to a point still farther up the line of 
the projected railroad. After a pleasant dinner with them about the 
camp fire, and consultation with the general missionary, which gave me a 
notion of what he wanted me to do, I bade them farewell, saw them move 
out of sight on the trail to Wyoming, and turned to the task before me. 

The town of Crawford had not come yet, and there was nothing to do 
at that point ; but down the valley, twelve miles farther, was a little 
hamlet called "Earth Lodge." There my work was to begin. That 
same afternoon the ambulance, at the generous command of my host, 
took me to the settlers' cabin at the foot of " Crow Butte," to which Mr. 
Bross had directed me. There I found a Christian brother and a Chris- 
tian home, though housed in a log cabin. That evening was pleasantly 
spent in conversation and in singing gospel hymns, and after the season 
of worship came rest and refreshing slumber. 

Early on the following morning the brother took me to his farm, 
pointed out the location of Earth Lodge, and directed the way to it. 
Taking my grip, I trudged along afoot and found my way to Earth Lodge 
that day. Ten or a dozen small houses, huddled together on the banks 
of the White River, constituted the hamlet. Announcing preaching for 



1 82 The Home Missionary January, 1899 

the next Sabbath, I began making acquaintance with the people. My 
first inquiries as to whom I might expect to help in the commencement 
of Christian work, were made of the local postmaster : " Do you know 
any Christians about here?" "Christians? That depends on what you 
mean by Christians." "I mean those who follow Christ as their Lord 
and Master." "Well, then, I don't know of any Christians 'round he?-e." 

I was put to great straits to find a place to study and prepare my ser- 
mons. There was a "hotel." It had three rooms and a shed kitchen, 
but no room in which I could be by myself daytimes. A few hundred 
yards away ran "Ash Creek," a small stream with steep banks, along 
which were a few trees. Under them was a log, well shaded by foliage. 
That shady nook I appropriated for a study, and during the most of that 
summer what reading I could do and the work of preparing my sermons 
were done almost wholly in that outdoor study. My Bible, the com- 
mentary of nature, and my observation of men and things were all the 
helps I had. 

Our Sunday services at first were held in an empty store-room, in one 
corner of which was a land office. Such boards and supports as could be 
had served for pews. 

Within about two weeks of the beginning of my work at Earth Lodge, 
rumor said that people were coming into Crawford. I promptly rode 
down to investigate. Imagine my surprise when, coming in sight of the 
place where a few days before were a solitary tent and part of a frame 
building, I beheld a village of at least 200 inhabitants ! The railroad 
graders were at work in the immediate vicinity, and things were 
" booming." 

There were two or three frame business houses of the frontier sort — 
light frame, rough boards, battened over cracks, no paint, no plaster, no 
finish ; the rest of the town consisted of tents, some of them stretched 
over thin joists, some with walls of wood ; in fact, every sort of con- 
trivance to make a temporary shelter for goods and work-room. Some 
structures were covered with tar paper tacked over light frames, and held 
in position by laths tacked on the outside. It was a strange-looking town, 
and a motley collection of people — humanity in epitome : business men 
(Americans and. Jews), workmen — mostly carpenters, blacksmiths, and day 
laborers, frontier men of every stripe, hunters, freighters, cattlemen and 
land agents, railroad men of the various "gangs," negro soldiers of Fort 
Robinson, close at hand, and the floating population that infests a new 
town — toughs, gamblers, saloon keepers and saloon loafers, lewd women, 
and various other grades and sorts of degenerate humanity, the nomen- 
clature of whose species I am not able to command. One thing I soon 
noticed. There were no hotels and no residence houses. Every building 
was some sort of a business house, or shop, or office. Men and their 



January, 1899 The Home Missionary 183 

families, if they had any, lived in their places of business. Restaurants 
there were, but no rooms for lodging. Every man was supposed to have 
his own roll of blankets, and to find a place to spread 'them under his own 
or some one else's canvas. I soon discovered my former friend with 
whom I had lodged at Crow Butte, and agreed with him for six feet of 
space on the floor of his wagon shop. 

Seeking a place in which Sunday service could be held, I learned of a 
large tent only partially occupied as a store-room for a feed store, and 
gained the owner's permission to use it for preaching. The announce- 
ment was given out, and on the next Sabbath I preached the first sermon 
in Crawford. The tent was well filled. In one corner of it a young man 
had placed a barber's chair, and was plying his trade. Not until the ser- 
vice had proceeded some time did he cease work. The audience repre- 
sented nearly all the classes I have named above, and were seated 
somewhat' irregularly on boards and blocks, some on bran-meal sacks of 
various heights, and many stood ; but all were respectful, and listened to 
the young and inexperienced missionary less critically, I am sure, than 
some more highly favored audiences would have done. 

At the close of the sermon the question of Sunday-school was pre- 
sented. The blacksmith moved that we have a Sunday-school " to-day." 
It was carried. The audience resolved itself into classes, disposing them- 
selves among the planks and grain sacks to the best advantage possible, 
and an hour was spent in the study of the lesson. Preaching services 
were held through the whole summer. In the earlier months of my stay 
we never knew one Sunday where the service would be held on the next. 
Empty rooms in partially completed buildings were the favorite refuge, 
but the dining-room of a hotel (when one was built) and the waiting-room 
of a railroad station are among the places which served our purpose. 
Then I secured posts and boards, set the posts in the ground, nailed the 
boards on, put up a frame roof, took some heavy duck to the home of a 
lady, and stitched the seams myself on her sewing machine, and put this 
cover on the roof. My friend, the wagon-maker, assisted in making some 
benches, and we had our own place for worship. The floor was mother 
earth, and our carpet the velvet grass, but many worshipers, such as the 
Father seeketh to worship him, have lifted spiritual song and fervent prayer 
to the God and Father of all, in places less attractive and comfortable. 

I have spoken of the difficulty of securing lodging during those first 
weeks in Crawford. Of course, in that day the gambling profession was 
liberally represented. It was no uncommon thing to see a man walk out of 
one of the saloons, set up a little three-legged stand in the middle of the 
main street, cry out, "Walk up here, gentlemen, walk up ! Bet your money 
and win your pile. This way, fellows, this way," and go forward with 
his gambling business as unconcernedly as though he were selling fruits 



184 The Home Missionary January, 1899 

or notions. One of the favorite devices of this gentry was the "ball and 
shell " trick. With his little stand, or some board or counter, before him, 
the gambler produced half of the shell of a large walnut and three balls, 
each about the size of a pea. These he would appear to put under the 
shell, and, manipulating them with great skill, would induce some one to 
bet that one or more of the balls was under the shell, or was not, when of 
course the victim was taken in, or his money was, by the trickster. 

For some days we had noticed one of these men about town, who ap- 
peared to be of rather a quiet disposition for one of his class. He was in 
the audience at our first service, and of course knew who I was. One 
day he spoke to me : " Where are you going to sleep to-night ? " I said, 
"Oh, I don't know. I shall have to find a chance to turn in somewhere." 
" Well, say, come and sleep with me. I have got a good tent all by my- 
self and a comfortable bed. The tent is in a quiet place, too." 

I was a little surprised. I knew he was a gambler, and he knew I was 
"the preacher." I knew he had no thought of making money from me. 
I was perfectly safe on that score ; he could not enrich himself through 
me. I gave him an indecisive answer, thanking him for his offer. Before 
night he repeated the invitation, and the outcome was that when night 
came on I went with him to his tent and slept with him. It was pitched 
on a grassy plot, about forty feet to the rear of a large saloon tent. In 
that saloon, with nothing but canvas intervening, I could hear the conver- 
sation and revelry whenever I awoke through the night. He had a com- 
fortable bed in one corner, and he also had an extensive collection of 
various devices which he used. in his vocation as a gambler. He became 
quite confidential, showed me the contrivances, and explained sparingly 
how the various tricks were worked. When we were talking about the 
" ball and shell " trick I asked, " Where is the ball when you get people 
to bet it is under the shell?" He answered, " In my pocket." Aside 
from the matter of morals, I concluded there was little prospect for the 
patrons of gamblers to become rich. After I had heard him for some 
time, I took up my Bible and asked him if he would listen to a chapter 
from the Book. " Oh, yes, I'll listen. You can read if you want to. I 
ain't got nothing agin the Bible," he said. So I know that he heard one 
chapter from the Gospel of our divine Lord, whether he ever heard an- 
other or not. W T hen the evening was growing later, perhaps ten or ten- 
thirty, he rose and said to me : " Now you can turn in whenever you 
want to. There is the bed, an' it's all right. I am going out and see if I 
can make something." 

He vanished into the night, and I lay down to sleep. Then the 
strangeness of the situation came upon me : I, a preacher, in the tent of 
a frontier desperado, and he out " to make something " ! I heard the 
chink of the glasses and the click of chips, the boisterous laughter in the 



January, 1899 The Home Missionary 185 

saloon tent, and wondered just where my friend and bunk-mate was, and 
just what were his transactions. But presently I fell asleep, and did not 
know when he came to bed. Some time during the, night I was wakened 
by the sound of voices. My gambler friend was by my side in bed. An- 
other man was in the tent, pleading with my bedfellow in husky and ex- 
cited half-whispers. The intruder was the first to speak : " Say, pard, let 
me take your pop [revolver] just for a few minutes." The voice at my 
side answered: "No, I can't let yer have it." "Oh, say, pard, I don't 
want it but just a little while. Let me take it." " No," more decidedly, 
" I won't let it go." " Oh, come now, I've got to have a pop. I'll bring 
it back to you in jest a few minutes. I'll do anything for ye if ye will 
jest let me have your pop a few minutes." 

But my companion steadily refused to lend his revolver. The other 
kept up his excited pleading for some time, using every persuasion, but 
to no avail. During the progress of the confab, I felt something under 
the blanket touch me, and I knew that in his determination not to let this 
stranger, whoever he might be, get possession of his gun, he had shoved 
it back into the bed between us. Finally the intruder became convinced 
that his request was not going to be granted, and went away. As he dis- 
appeared into the night the gambler said: 

"You bet I ain't goin' to give up my gun for anybody. Ye don't 
ketch me without my gun." A pause. Then : " I wonder if he thought 
I'd let him take my gun. Not mueh. I've got too many enemies 'round 
here. There is one fellow if I ever meet again it's jest who can shoot 
first — that's all ; 'n' he's lookin' f me, too." A pause. " Thafs why I 
wanted you to stay with me. That feller may come into this town." This 
was interesting. I suppose he thought that if there were two men in his 
tent, and his enemy should put in his appearance, there would be some 
chance that he would not hit him. We talked in this refreshing way for 
some time. I asked : " Did you see that fellow before he spoke to you ? " 
" You bet ; I heard him before he got to the tent, and I had my gun right 
on — pointed at his heart." 

Then, as we lay down to sleep again, I did some thinking. What a 
life this man is leading ! To be every moment on guard for his life, night 
and day ! That man had approached our tent over the soft grass with 
well-nigh a noiseless footfall in the dead of night. He might easily 
enough have surprised me, for I did not hear him until his voice awoke 
me ; but this gambler was living under such a tension of watchfulness 
and dread that he had been aroused and was fully prepared for self- 
defense before that stranger had reached the tent. 

" Truly," I said, " the way of the transgressor is hard." No further 
interruption disturbed our slumbers ; but for many a day I shall not for- 
get the night when I enjoyed the hospitality of the border gambler. 



i86 The Home Missionary January, 1899 

THE MINER'S DYING HOURS 

By Rev. A. E. Ricker, Chadron, Nebraska 

The mellow sunlight of an autumn afternoon gleamed softly on hill 
and plain as the missionary and his wife drove out to spend the half-day 
making calls in the country. A crisp breeze set the blood a-tingling and 
made mere breathing delicious. Some three miles from town the road 
crossed a gentle elevation. The buggy paused for a moment at its crest, 
and a landscape lay exposed to view that would have made the fortune 
of any painter who could have reproduced it. We were facing the south. 
Beginning a mile or so away at the left, a broken and pine-clad range of 
hills swept away, far to the south and west, in a mighty circle, like the 
ramparts of some vast fortress. The haze of distance, softening the 
details of outline, lay upon all, like the vanishing smoke of recent battle. 
Winding down 'from a canon in this range of hills, a wavering line of 
trees, marking the meandering course of a small creek, made an orna- 
ment for the landscape, like a graceful "throw " over the corner of a vast 
picture. An early frost had touched the foliage with its magic fingers 
and interspersed with the lively green of summer the varied hues of 
autumn, yellow and crimson and scarle*t. The red bulbs among the fading 
leaves of the rosebush, the bright crimson of the woodbine among the 
sober colors of the cottonwood and box-elder, and the white, velvety 
" frizzes " of the wild clematis, thrown here and there over the foliage, 
like the veil over the wedding gown of a bride — these were among the 
noted features. And overhead arched the glorious blue of a Nebraska 
sky, transparent, fathomless, like the skies of Syria and Italy. A scene 
like that is a vacation in a whiff. It was a moment when the soul drinks 
inspiration from the treasures of nature. And the missionafy&rtti his wife 
were consciously strengthened for the work before them. 

A drive of nine miles, and a few calls are made. One family is just 
about to move away, and there is time to say good-by and Godspeed. 
Another call is upon an old lady, eighty years of age, whose two sons and 
herself make up the household, and who very seldom steps outside the 
limits of her own farm. There the missionary learns that in a neighbor's 
house an old man lies at the point of death. Shortly afterwards he ties 
his horse to the dooryard fence, his wife goes to the other members of the 
family, and the missionary enters the sick chamber. It is a bare, roughly 
finished room. A bed, an old chair or two, a box that served as a table, 
and a huge home-made easy chair that had been constructed for the sick 
man (for he could not lie down), comprised the furnishing. A glance 



January, 1899 The Home Missionary 187 

showed that the sufferer was in the last stages of " Bright's disease," and 
that the battle was well-nigh at an end. A neighbor was assisting the 
dying man's son in every possible ministration. There was, indeed, little 
that human hands could do. The sick man was in great distress. Dropsy 
had ensued, and the poor frame was shaken with pain from the swollen, 
bursting limbs. " Oh — oh — my God — I can't — stand this — much — much 
longer — John." And his son was in instant attendance. " I — want — oh — " 
The breathing was hard. " What is it, father ? What do you want ? " 
The poor man pointed away. The son looked, but could see nothing. 
The sufferer made signs with his fingers, but the son could not under- 
stand. "I can't understand you, father; can't you tell me what you 
want?" "Oh — I — don't want — anything — but — to die — I — want to die 
— that's all — John." 

John Healy was a strong man. He had known the full meaning of 
life's hard experiences in the desperate struggles of his busy years in a 
frontier community. But now the mark of grief was plain on his sun- 
tanned face, his strong frame quivered, and he turned away in the bitter- 
ness of his sense of the utter helplessness of even a son's hand in the 
hour and the presence of death. Then he said : " Here's a gentleman, 
father ; I guess he'd like to speak to you. Maybe he can help you." And 
he motioned to the missionary. With what a feeling of weakness, and 
yet with confidence in the power of God to light even the gloom of this 
valley of the shadow, did the missionary step up to the chair of the dying 
man ! He directed him toward God. He told him of the Father's 
readiness to save every man who would look to him. " Yes," the sufferer 
gasped, " I — used — to believe in — God — long ago." " But God is just as 
good and just as ready to forgive and to save now as he was then." The 
assurance seemed to have just a little effect. " I — don't — know. I — 
don't — know. Well— if you — want to — read — the Bible — and pray — you 
can do it." Then the missionary read from the Gospel of John those 
wonderful words, " God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten 
Son, that whosoever believeth on him should not perish, but have ever- 
lasting life." And those others, " Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that 
heareth my words, and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting 
life, and shall not come into judgment, but is passed from death into 
life." Other like priceless promises — a few with simplest words of ex- 
planation ; then a prayer to God for his help and saving grace, then 
a few words such as could be spoken there. 

At first there seemed to be no light, no indication of any understand- 
ing of the mercy of God. Then a little gleam of intelligence, a faint 
sign of taking feeble hold of the promise. And when, a little later, the 
missionary left, there seemed little more than a flickering light in the 
darkened mind. But afterwards the poor man prayed for himself, and 



i88 The Home Missionary January, 1899 

seemed to lay hold on the assurances of the Gospel — so his son reported. 
For in a few days John came to town on the sad but inevitable errand, 
and on Sabbath afternoon neighbors and friends gathered in the modest 
schoolhouse for the funeral. The missionary preached to the living from 
the words he had read to the departed a few days before. Henry Healy 
had turned the last page in the book of the life that now is, and his mortal 
form rests beneath the prairie sod. 

Pathetic and full of warning is his simple but all too common story. 
Sixty-four years ago he had first opened his eyes to the bright Kentucky 
sky. In the days of his strength he had removed to Iowa. Thence 
lured by the glow-worm's spark that tempts the " prospecter," he had 
entered the gold region of southwestern Colorado. For sixteen years he 
had lived among the rough scenes, and in the isolation from the ameni- 
ties and religious influences of civilized society, that mark the regions of 
mining camps. The story of his part in the unwritten history of that 
wild life, of his temptations and yieldings, of his battlings and victories 
and sins, will remain forever unknown on earth, kindly covered by the 
charitable mantle of oblivion. But at last the grip of that dread disease 
was upon him. He fought against it for two long years. He spent his 
all upon physicians, but all was to no purpose. When the end drew nigh, 
he barely managed to get money enough to pay his fare, and came to the 
home of his son to die. 

Such is the meager outline of the story. And how evident and sadly 
impressive are its lessons ! Oh, the unspeakable folly that wastes the 
years of youth and manhood, that sacrifices health and spurns opportunity 
with vain pursuits of money-getting in the unrestrained ways of sin, and 
leaves the greatest of all questions — that of the soul's fitness for the eter- 
nal kingdom and the unsearchable riches of God — to the last few, dis- 
tracted, uncertain moments of the death-bed ! 

But one blessed result came apparently from that sad experience. 
When the missionary visited John Healy's home before his father's death, 
John was not sure whether they had a Bible in the house or not. But 
some elements of that experience touched his heart. He was a black- 
smith by trade, and a few weeks after his father's death he moved to 
town. A little later, gospel meetings were in progress in the Methodist 
church, and one night the missionary had the joy of seeing John Healy 
stand up, accepting an invitation to begin the Christian life. Since that night 
we have heard him confess the name of Jesus again and again, and have 
often heard his voice in prayer. Now the missionary often hears the ring 
of his sturdy blows upon the anvil, and as often is reminded of that brief 
chapter in the experience of a home missionary pastor, and rejoices in the 
strong faith and stalwart Christian character of John Healy, the black- 
smith. 






January, i< 



The Home Missionary 



189 



APPOINTMENTS 



SEPTEMBER, 1898 



Not in commission last year 

Anderson, Harold E., Strong City, Kan. 
Anderson, Martin E., Tacoma, Wash. 
Austin, Lewis A., Orange City, Fla. 
Briggs, G. A., Randall, Minn. 
Brunker, Thomas A., Kingfisher, Okla. 
Countryman, Asa, Starkville and Sopris, Colo. 
Cutler, Fred. M., Armour, So. Dak. 
Darling, Miss May, Mclntosh,Mmn. 
Dodd, Arthur C, National City, So. Cal. 
Duncan, Calvin W., Dexter, Minn. 
Eells, D. B., Granite Falls and vicinity. Wash. 
Ellis, John F., Iroquois and Osceola, So. Dak. 
Harwell, J. Henry, Siloam Springs, Ark. 
Heberlin, Frederic W., V/est Superior, No. Wis. 
Johnson, John W., Pillsbury and Swanville, Minn. 
Johnson, W. N., Melville and Rose Hill, No. Dak. 
Jordan, W. T., Fruita, New Castle, and Trinidad, 

Colo. 
Lee, Phineas B., Pauline, Kan. 
McClane, W. R., Duluth, Minn. 
O'Brien, James P., Kansas City, Mo. 
Oxley, Charles G. , Granada and Frazer, Minn. 
Owen, Edward P., Jennings and Bryan, Okla. 
Parker, Lyman B., Perkins and Olivet, Okla. 
Price, E. H., Hamilton, Mo. 
Samuel, Benjamin, Verndale and Perham, Minn. 
Searles, Wilbur G., El Reno, Okla. 
Sewell, B. F., Perry, Okla. 
Stevens, John L., Wallace, Neb. 
Thompson, Robt. M., Rogers, Ark. 
Van Luven, Sanford A., Lake Preston, So. Dak. 
Wells, C. B., New Castle, Colo. 
Wood, Ernest, Hibbing and Ferndale, Minn. 
Wrigley, Francis, Campbell, Minn. 



Re-commissioned 

Allen, Jessie F., Sulligent, Ala. 

Arnold, William A., Roy, Wash. 

Baker, George, Washougal and Mt. Pleasant, 

Wash. 
Barber, Jerome M., Sherwood, Ore. 
Becker, James A., Spearfish. So. Dak. 
Berlin, O. J., Winfred and Freedom, So. Dak. 
Brady, Alexander, Wilsonville, Ore. . 
Brink, Lee A., Iron River, No. Wis. 
Brown, James M., Keystone, So. Dak. 
Burleigh, B. W., Mitchell, So. Dak. 
Bushnell, Campbell W., Rosalia, Wash. 



Canfield, Lewis E., Academy and Kirkwood, So. 

Dak. 
Carlson, Walter G., Willow Lakes, So. Dak. 
Cram, D. W., Staples, Minn. 
Crater, George W., Meckling, So. Dak. 
Crawford, Charles H., Baltimore, Md. 
Davies, James, Plankinton, So. Dak. 
Dawson, William, Green River, Wyo. 
Day, Ernest, Clearwater and Hasty, Minn. 
De Groff, Charles F., Letcher, So. Dak. 
Dent, T. J., North Yakima, Wash. 
Fowler, Olin L., Aldertown, McMillen, Orting 

and Kelly, Wash. 
Gearhart, Charles D., Pierce, Neb. 
Grupe, Fred. W., Farnam, Neb. 
Halbert, Charles T., Ellis, Kan. 
Hjetland, J. H., Williston, No. Dak. 
Hogan, Bert M., Park City, Utah. 
Hopkins, Harold L., Wardner, Idaho. 
Howard, Charles E., Westcott and Sargent, Neb. 
Jenney, E. W., State Evangelist, So. Dak. 
Kimbell, James E., Central, Ala. 
Lee, Vinton, Vinton, La. 
Lehtinen, Frans, work among the Finns in the 

Northwest. 
Lindsay, George, Salt Lake City, Utah. 
Lodwick, William, Stewartville. Minn, 
Long, Joseph B., Hot Springs, So. Dak. 
Lyons, E. C., Perham, Minn. 
Martin, John L., Wimbledon, No. Dak. 
Menzi, Ernest U., Carthage, So. Dak. 
Murphy, J. S., Denison, Texas. 
Nichols, John T. , Fremont, Wash. 
Parker, F. W., Beaverton, Ore. 
Parks, W. N., Clark, So. Dak. 
Philbrook, Charles E., St. Helens and Scappoose, 

Ore. 
Radford, Walter, Bowdle, So. Dak. 
Read, James L., Crested Butte, Colo. 
Richards, Emanuel, Kansas City, Kan. 
Rogers, Alonzo, New Whatcom, Wash. 
Rogers, Enoch E.. Lamberton, Minn. 
Ruddock, E. N., Willard and Hudson, Minn. 
Smith, A. C. Provo, Utah. 
Stutson, H. H., Winona, Minn. 
Taggart, George A., Portland, Ore. 
Thomas, Isaac, Horatio and Lindsey, Penn. 
Trandt, Adam, Globeville, Colo. 
Upton, Rufus P., Ellsworth. Kanaranzi and Ash 

Creek, Minn. 
Watson, Charles E., Helena, Mon. 
Weage, Arthur D., Villa Park, So. Cal. 
Winter, Paul, South Shore, So. Dak. 
Woodcock, Thomas J., Lead, So. Dak. 



OCTOBER, 1898 



Not in commission last year 

Anderson, Frank, Missoula, Mon. 

Ard, David T., Spio, Ala. 

Benton, J. A., Vanas, No. Cal. 

Brown, J. Newton, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Hawkes, George B.. Indian Valley, Idaho. 

Hays, Herbert E , Thayer and Christy, Mo. 

Lambert, Charles E., Tacoma, Wash. 

Layfield, Robert L., General Missionary in Texas. 

Miss Kate Varina. Iowa City. Iowa. 

Reed, Lucius F., Stockville, Neb. 

Remele, W. A., Olympia, Wash. 

Roberts, John. Petersburg, Neb. 

Robertson, William J., Addison, Houston, Up- 

shaw, and Hatton, Ala. 
Robjent, Thomas S., Braddoek, Penn. 



Saunders, Harry L.. Wellston, Oklr 
Stuart, David C, Cerrogordo, Fla. 
Triplett, H. M.. Ainsworth, Neb. 
Wells, Clayton B., Elyria, Colo. 



Re-com m issioned 

Appleman. H. H., Sauk Rapids, Minn. 

Bostwick, Elmer D., Big Timber, Mon. 

Brooks, Raymond C., Eugene, Ore. 

Clarke, Almon T., Shelby, Ala. 

Cone, James W., Powhattan, Kan. 

Ham, Richard K., Ocean View, San Francisco, 

No. Cal. 
Henshaw, Thomas D., Elossburg. Penn. 
Harris, Robert N., Mt. Garmel, Penn; 



190 



The Home Missionary 



January, 1899 



Hobart, Miss Ella, Cleveland, Ohio. 
Jenkins, John J., Wanamie. Penn. 
Jones, John L., Appleton, Minn. 
Kimball, Jeremiah, Aitkin, Minn. 
Long, Harry B., Marion, Ind. 
Lodwick, William, Stewartsville, Minn. 
Lyons. Eli C, Springfield. Minn. 
Mitchell, T. G., Netawaka, Kan. 
Osinek. Miss Antonie, Braddock and vicinity, 
Penn. 



Parsons, H. W., St. Paul, Minn. 

Perrin, David J., Oacoma and out-stations, So. 

Dak. 
Phillips, J. W., Oakland, No. Cal. 
Ravey, George M., West Guthrie. Okla. 
Ream, William T., Cumberland. Wis. 
Rominger, Henry V.. Crawford, Neb. 
Smith, J. L., Birnamwood, Norrie, and Eland, 

Wis". 
Stewart, John L., Leon, Ala. 



NOVEMBER, 1898 



A T ot in commission last year 

Bowdish, Austin C, Hemingford and Reno, Neb. 
Chapman, William J., Nickerson, Kan. 
Cleveland, Henry C, Hyannis, Neb. 
Dexter, Granville M., Little Shasta, No. Cal. 
Drake, Frank E.. Howard and Vilas, So. Dak. 
Essig, William, Friend, Neb. 
Habbick, J. D.. Los Angeles, So. Cal. 
Hunter, William, Heber Miss., Utah. 
Berks, Barry, Adin, Providence, and Station Hill, 

No. Cal. 
Schwabenland, Johan C Glenullin, No. Dak. 
Sewell, Charles L., Morrison, Okla. 
Strong, D. A., Highland Lake, Colo. 
Todd, William E. Brookfield, Mo. 
Van Lien. F. E.. Frankfort and Turton, So. Dak. 
Vogler, Henry, Friedens and Petrus, So. Dak. 
Wheat, F. I.. San Francisco. Cal. 
Whitmore. O B., Kirkland, Wash. 
Wieder, Franklin E., Philadelphia, Penn. 
Withington, H. Jay, Ford, Kan. 



Re- 



comnnssionet 



Anderson. Charles, Bloomfield, Neb. 

Bentley, Frank D., Duluth, Minn. 

Boss, Roger C, Pittsburg, Kan. 

Bown, Frank A.. Walker, Minn. 

Bushnell. Campbell W.. Kalama, Wash. 

Campbell, Charles, Sand ford, Fla. 

Chakurian, E. E., Field's Landing and Elk River, 
No. Cal. 

Conard, William J., General Miss'y in Minn. 

Conry, Henry W., D.D., Pond Creek, Okla. 

Davies, William, Spokane, Wash. 

Doane, Frank B.. Cheney, Wash. 

Edward, William, Abercrombie, No. Dak. 

Emerson, Fred. C Glenullin, No. Dak. 

Ferguson. Frank P., Big Lake, Minn. 

Field, F. A . West Los Angeles. So. Cal. 

Fowler. William C, Genesee, Idaho, and Union- 
town, Wash. 

Fiske, Wilbur, Freedom, Minn. 

Forbes, C. A., North Denver, Colo. 



Fuller, Edgar R., Bakersfield. So. Cal. 

Grieb, Edmund, Seattle and Ballard, Wash. 

Gunn, Elbry B.. New Site. Ala. 

Hershner, John L., Hood River, Ore. 

Houston, Warren H.. Arcadia. Neb. 

Jackson, Frank D., Omaha, Neb. 

Johnson, William, St. Louis. Mo. 

Johnson, William N., Melville and Rose Hill, No. 
Dak. 

Knapp, G. W., Ogalalla, Neb. 

Kranse. F. C, Fitchburg, No. Cal. 

Lewis, Frank F., Holdrege, Neb. 

Lewis. T. G., Green Lake, Wash. 

Martin, Edwin, Iroquois, So. Dak. 

Miller, C. I , Sykeston and Cathay. No. Dak. 

Miller. Willie G.. Dorcas, Fla. 

Minnis. Thomas W., Grand Meadow, Minn. 

Munnecke, Stado. Lesterville, So. Dak. 

Newman, George H., Ritzville, Wash. 

Paine, S. D.. West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Patchell, William T.. Eaton, Colo. 

Peterson, Mathias, Aberdeen, Wash. 

Poeton, Josiah, Taylor. Neb. 

Reid, Matthew D., Crary, No. Dak. 

Rich, Ulysses G., Dickinson. No. Dak. 

Richards, Emanuel, Kansas City, Kan. 

Rood. John, Sauk Rapids rfnd St. Cloud, Minn. 

Saunders, E. E., Oberon and Matthews School- 
house, No. Dak. 

Searles, George R., Hancock, Minn. 

Smith. J. F., Starkville, Colo. 

Stevens, Julius, Bryant, So. Dak. 

Thomas, C. M., Fruita. Colo. 

Thomas, David L., Highmore. So. Dak. 

Thomas, C. M., New Castle, Colo. 

Waldrop, Isaac M., Fairview, Western, Alanthus, 
and adjacent district. Kan. 

Walters, T. W., General Missionary in Wash. 

Webb, Hugh P., Coalville and Echo Mission, 
Utah. 

Whitelaw, James D., General Missionary in No. 
Wis. 

Wilkinson. William A., North Branch and Sun- 
rise, Minn. 

Woodruff, Paul G., Vernon, Fla. 

Woods, Merrick W.. Willow Springs, Mo. 

Young, Joseph C, Port Townsend, Wash. 



RECEIPTS 

For account of receipts by State Auxiliary Societies, see pages 205 to 212 



MAINE— $i 7 .co. 



Brownville by Rev. W. C. Curtis. . . . 

New Castle, Second, by J. P. Hus 

ton 



SEPTEMBER, 1898 

NEW HAMPSHIRE-$47-oo. 
N. H. H. M. Soc, by Hon. L. D. 



V7 00 Stevens, Treas. 

10 00 Concord, A Friend 



$42 00 
5 °« 



January, l< 



The Home Missionary 



191 



VERMONT— $647.78 ; of which lega- 
cies, $534.79. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. R. P. 

Fairbanks, Treas. : 
Barton 

A Friend 

Jericho Center 

Jonesville, Mrs. Balch's S. S. class, 

for Salary Fund 

Middlebury, L. D. M. S., for Salary 

Fund 

St. Johnsbury, North Ch., for Salary 

Fund , 

Westminster West, for Salary Fund 



Manchester, Miss E.J. Kellogg- 

Plainfield, Estate of Mrs. S. S. Kin- 
ney, by L. E. Batchelder, Adm 

Rochester, by Mrs. B. D. Hubbard... 

White River Junction, Legacy of Ly- 
dia E. Allen, by E. J. Wallace, Ex. . 



$10 


00 


5 


00 


14 


92 


3 


00 


25 


00 


25 


00 


5 


00 



8792 



MASSACHUSETTS— $11,313.8 
which legacies, 110,404.00. 



of 



Mass. Home Miss. Soc, by Rev. E. B. 
Palmer, Treas 270 81 

Amherst, First, A Friend 2 00 

Boston, Estate of J. A. Ambrose, by 

T. Weston 44 00 

W. A. Wilde, for Salary Fund 25 00 

Greenfield, Estate of R. W. Cook, by 

H. W. Hubbard, Trustee 60 co 

Holbrook, Estate of Sarah J. Hol- 

brook, by A. H. Wellman, Ex 10,000 00 

Leicester, Estate of M. W. Lamb, by 

H.A.White, Ex 30000 

Mansfield, Orthodox Ch., by E. P. 

Fitts 12 29 

Monson, by E. F: Morris 24 59 

New Bedford, Extra -Cent- a -Day 

Band, by M. E. L. Theaka 21 67 

Northampton, Dorcas Soc. of the First, 
by Mrs. J. E. Clarke, for Salary 
Fund 56 25 

" W. " -300 00 

Pittsfield, Y. P. S. C. E. of the First, 

by I. W. Strong, for Alaska . 10 00 

Springfield, A Friend 150 00 

Ware, Silver Circle, by H. S. Hyde... 20 00 

West Springfield, First, of which from 

an aged member $5, by A. H. Smith 17 25 



CONNECTICUT- 
legacies, $6,2 



3,014.56 ; of which 



Miss. Soc. of Conn., by Rev. W. H. 
Moore 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. W. W. 
Jacobs, Treas. : 
Pomfret, by Miss O. Mathewson, for 

Salary Fund 38 00 

Bozrah, by C. J. Abell 6 00 

Branford. Estate of T. P. Gillett, by 

W. J. Gabb, Adm 244 20 

Bristol, First, by L. G. Merrick 44 83 

Connecticut, A Friend 10 00 

A Friend 5 00 

East Hampton, by S. M. Bevin 5 33 

East Haven, by Mrs. W. S. Coker . 24 00 
Enfield, S. S. of the First, by H. E. 

Allen 25 00 

Farmington, First, by R. H, Gay 130 oq 



Greenwich, Stillson Benev. Soc. of 
the Second, by C. M. Mead, to 
const. Mrs. W. Barrows, Mrs. W. 
S. Mead, Mrs. W. Marshall, Miss 
S. H. Mead, Miss J. E. Bell, Miss 
C. M. Mead, and Mrs. M. S. Crumb, 

L.Ms $40000 

Hadlyme, R. E. Hungerford 10 00 

Middlebury, by R. M. Fenn 18 45 

Middletown, Miss F. Hazen, Silver 

Circle 5 00 

New Haven, Estate of Jane A. Malt- 
by, by D. F. Maltby , Adm 5,066 78 

Dwight Place Ch., Dr. J. E. 
Twichell, by Rev. E. P. Herrick.. 18 17 

New Milford, Boardman Union S. S., 
for Cuban Work, by Rev. E. P. 

Herrick 6 10 

Newtown, by G. F. Duncombe. 6 go 

North Windham, by O. E. Colburn. . . 2 16 

Norwich, Estate of E. R. Thompson, 

by O. A. Beckwith, Adm 97000 

Sherman, Y. P. S. C. E., for Cuban 

Work, by Rev. E. P. Herrick 10 60 

Stratford, Ch., of which $5.80 from 
the Oronoque mon. con., to const. 
Miss A. Evans a L. M., by Mis. S. 

A. Talbot 57 73 

Westbrook, by T. D. Post 18 95 

Windsor, First, by S. H. Barber 47 80. 



NEW YORK-$2i 3 .n 

New York Home Miss. Society, W. 
Spalding, Treas. : 

Newburgh 39 25 

Rensselaer Falls 8 80 

48 05 
Buffalo, Niagara Square People's Ch., 

by C. E. Potter 2 03 

Cortland, First, by A. M. Waterbury. 100 00 
East Rockaway, Bethany Ch., by D. 

Storm 12 00 

Jamesport, by C. S. Tuthill 5 35 

New York City, "S.E. G."... - 2500 

Sherburne, S. S., by C. H. Bickett 20 68 



NEW JERSEY— $49.90. 

Dover, Swedes, bv Rev. L. Akeson.. 
East Orange, Y. "P. S. C. E. of the 

First, by F. G. Wheeler, special 

Jersey City, Waverley Ch., by Rev. J. 

C. Emery 

Newark, Belleville Avenue, by G. B. 

D. Reeve 

Plainfield, S. S., by G. A. Powlison... 
Woodbridge, First, by W. H. Voor- 

hees 



56 PENNSYLVANIA— $13.33. 



Bangor, Welsh Ch., by J. Williams.. . 

Lindsey, by Rev. I. Thomas 

Mt. Carmel, First, by Rev. R. N. 
Harris 



MARYLAND— $6.00. 
Frostburg, by Rev. G. W. Moore. . : . 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA— $36.57. 

Washington, from the Estate of Lu- 
cius E. Reynolds, by W. B. Stod- 
dard, Ex 



6 


75 


20 


6i 


1 


29 


S 


00 


10 


00 



6 25 



5 00 
1 10 



3 6 57 



192 



The Home Missionary 



January, 1899 



NORTH CAROLINA— $2.00. 

Haywood, by J. E. McNeill 

Kernersville, Miss L. M. Harmon 

GEORGIA— $7.00. 

Atlanta, Immanuel Ch., by Rev. S. C. 

McDaniel 

Demorest, Union Ch., by Rev. W. O. 

Philips 



ILLINOIS— $119.23 ; of which legacy, 

$100.00. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. B. C. 
Crosby, Treas. : 

Geneseo 

Rockford, Second 



$10 00 

4 CO 



5 °° Griggsville, Estate of E. Bazen, by T. 

Turnbull, Ex 100 00 

200 Normal, by E. S. Chipman 523 



ALABAMA— $6.12. 

Central, Balm of Gilead Ch.. $1 ; Kid, 
Union Ch., $1, by Rev. J. C. Butler. 

Clanton. Mountain Spring Ch., by 
Rev. J. L. Busby 

Sulligent, by Rev. A. T. Clarke 



LOUISIANA- 



Hammond, by J. Q. Adams. 
Iowa, by Rev. V. Lee 



ARKANSAS-$io. 55 . 

Ft. Smith, C. A. H 

Siloam Springs, First, by W. H. Davey 



FLORIDA— $19 00. 

Crestview, Holley, and Laurel Hill, 
by Rev. D. A. Simmonds 

Sanford, People's Ch., by Rev. C. 
Campbell 

Tavares, Union Ch., and Ocoee, by 
Rev. L. J. Donaldson 



NEW MEXICO-S20.00. 

Received by Rev. E. H. Ashmun: 

Check from C. E. Soc 

Cook's Peak 

Deming 

White Oaks 



Gallup, by Rev. P. A. Simpkin. 



ARIZONA— $7.10. 

Received by Rev. E. H. Ashmun: 

Jerome 

Seligman 



OHIO-S20.60. 

Received by Dr. H. A. Schauffler, 
Supt. Slavic work : 
Mt. Vernon, for Polish work 



Freedom. First, by F. M. Heyds. 
Geneva, L. E. Hitchcock 



INDIANA-$2 9 .o2. 

Bremen, First, by Rev. P. E. Bauer 

Indianapolis, Trinity Ch., by Rev. L. 

White 

Orland, Ch. and S. S., by Rev. E. D. 

Curtiss 

Michigan City, Scand9.,by Rev. L. T. 

Lindholm 



1 12 

3 °° 



S 20 
3 °° 



5 00 
5 55 



6 50 
5 °° 

7 5° 



5 5° 

1 50 
3 9° 
8 10 



6 60 

5 °° 



6 76 



MISSOURI— $7.00. 

Kansas City, Ivanhoe Park Ch., by 
Rev. L. Warren 

Willow Springs, by Rev. M. W. Woods 



WISCONSIN— $87.01. 

Received by Rev. H. W. Carter : 

Ashland, W. H. M.U 

Hayward 

New Richmond 

Ladies 

Rhinelander , 

West Superior, W. H. M. U. . . . 



Bobb's Mill, $1.19 ; Curtiss, 45 cts., by 

Rev. J. D. Whitelaw 

Clintonville, Scands., by Rev. A. L. 

Larson 

Curtiss, $1.41; Fifield, $4.15; and 

Withee, 38 cents, by Rev. J. D. 

Whitelaw 

Glenwood, by Rev. S. V. S. Fisher... 
Hayward. W. H. M. U. (bal.), by Rev. 

H. W. Carter 

South Milwaukee. First, by Mrs. E. 

B. Ingalls 



5 

1 

23 
10 


JO 

5- 
00 
00 


11 
10 


40 
28 


61 


40 


1 


64 


2 
1 


00 


5 

3 


94 
00 


6 


4S 


6 


55 



IOWA— $3.30. 

Church. Miss Mary Meekfessel, 
Rev. A. Kern 



by 



19 00 MINNESOTA-$6i2.82. 



Received by Rev. J. H. Morley 

Alexandria Circuit 

S. S 

Anoka 

Austin 

Bertha 

Granite Falls 

Hawley 

Lake City 

Minneapolis, E. R. S 

Fifth Avenue C. E 

Morristown 

New Ulm 

Rochester 

St. Anthony Park 

Wadena 

Waterville 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. M. W. 
Skinner, Treas. : 

Austin 

Benson, $1.25. S. S., $1.35 

Custer, Bethel 

Crookston 

Dawson 

Elk River 

Faribault 



3 37 

2 50 

3 77 
27 25 

6 00 
10 00 

5 73 
14 42 

3 60 
2 00 

4 00 

14 27 
57 14 
12 09 

15 5° 
2 15 



183 79 



41 

2 


23 
60 


5 
4 


70 
62 


9 

in 


5° 

3S 



January, i< 



The Home Missionary 



193 



Fair Oaks, Y. P. S. C. E $2 00 

Lake City, Mrs. Collins 2 50 

Lamberton 3 00 

Madison 5 00 

Marshall 9 00 

Minneapolis, Plymouth 54 92 

First 7 50 

Pilgrim 14 00 

Lyndale, $6.68 ; Young Ladies, 

$2-50 9 18 

Missionary Union 827 

Bethany, Miss. Band, $1.50; A 

Friend, 90 cts 2 40 

Vine, $15 ; S. S., $3.01 18 01 

Monticello 4 co 

New Paynesville .■ 5 40 

Owatonna 20 62 

Rush City, Swedish 4 00 

Rev. J. F. Taintor.. 8 00 

Rochester 3 25 

St. Paul , Park 4 70 

Cyril Chapel 15 00 

Plymouth 21 55 

Spring Valley 13 90 

Staples 2 00 

Stewartville 3 00 

Wabasha 15 00 

Waseca, C. E. Soc 5 00 

Winona, First 51 55 

Winona, S. S . . , 5 00 

Zumbrota 10 20 

402 98 

Less Expenses 1000 



392 98 

Glenwood, Union Ch., by Rev. W. J. 

Brown 17 80 

Hancock, by Rev. G. R. Searles 500 

Minneapolis, " Rodelmer " 2 00 

Plainview, First, by F. J. Brown 10 00 

Winona, Scands., by Rev. N. F. Jo- 

sephson 1 25 



KANSAS-$5 4 . 7 8. 

Received by Rev. A. C. Hogbin,Treas.: 

Chase 3 00 

Diamond Springs 5 32 

Kansas City, First 2 47 

Osage City 386 

Pantleg 2 53 

Rev. J . W. Metcalf 10 00 

Dial, Mt. Ayr and Ash Rock, by Rev. 

N. Emmerson 

Hiawatha, by Rev. E. L. Hull 

Valley Falls, by N. Hay ward 



NEBRASKA— $92.84. 

Danbury, First, by Rev. F. A. Dun- 
gan 

Dunbar, A Friend 

Ft. Calhoun, by Rev. C. A. Arnold. . . 

Hallam, German Ch., by Rev. R. Hil- 
kerbaumer 

Neligh, by Rev. J. F. Bacon 

Omaha, Pilgrim Ch., by Mrs. E. J. 

Beech 

Parkvale Ch., by Rev. F. H. Ander- 
son * 

Cherry Hill, Birthday Box, by Rev. 
L. R. S. Hand 

Spencer, First, by Rev. G. Wads- 
worth •• ; < , . i 



27 18 

4 60 
12 00 
11 00 



9 25 
10 00 



NORTH DAKOTA— $54.31. 

Received by Rev. J. L. Maile : 
Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. M. M 

Fisher, Treas. : 

Courtenay 

Cumings , 

Fargo, First 

John Wetz, Treas 

A Friend, by J. L. Maile 

Havana Conference Meeting 

Kelso Conference Meeting 

Kensal 

Mayville 

Portland 

Tappen. . 

Wahpeton, Children's Fund 

Wimbledon 



SOUTH DAKOTA— $110.71. 

Academy and Kirkwood, by Rev. L. 

E. Camfield 

Alcester, by R. B. Harding 

Canton, by Rev. R. M. Coate 

Elk Point, by Rev. C. E. Taggart. . . . 

Erwin, First, by Rev. E. Martin 

Huron, Rev. W. H. Thrall 

Lebanon and Springs, by Rev. C. H. 

Dreisbach 

Rapid City, by C. A. Trowbridge 

Ree Heights, by Rev. P. B. Fisk 

Revillo and Elmira, Chs. and S. S., by 

Rev. T. Thompson 

South Shore, $7.80 ; Mazeppa, $4.00 ; 

and Troy, $14.05, by Rev. P. Winter 
Winifred, by Rev. J. Alderson 



COLORADO— $24.80. 

Received by Rev. H. Sanderson : 
Fox, S.S. (Cope District^, $3.50; 
Tuttle, S.S., Cope District, $1.05 ; 
Cope, Ch., $7.05 

Creede, by Rev. J. R. Adams 

Denver, Villa Park Ch., by Rev. E. R. 

Flagler, First/by Rev! C W. Smith . . 

Whitewater, Union Ch., by Rev. O. 

T. Robinson 



MONTANA-$i 4 . 5 2. 

Received by Rev. W. S. Bell 

Aldridge 

Horr 

Logan 

Madison 

Plains 



$2 


00 


7 


00 


7 


5° 


10 


00 


2 


3° 


4 


2 3 
38 


2 


00 


10 


00 


1 


25 


1 


50 
6S 


3 


50 



3 41 Columbus and Laurel, by Rev. J. Pope 
40 00 

3 °° 

10 00 IDAHO— $17.30. 
00 

Woman's Missionary Union, Mrs. G. 
L. Cole, Treas. : 

Boise 

Weiser 



s 


00 


6 


00 


4 


62 


25 


00 


2 


00 


11 


5i 


2 


33 


12 


00 


25 


85 


2 


90 



4 20 

5 00 



2 50 

4 55 

5° 

1 10 



10 52 
4 00 



6 00 Boise, First, by Rev. R. B. Wright. . , 



II 


°5 


3 


75 


14 


80 


2 


S° 



i 9 4 



The Home Missionary 



January, i! 



CALIFORNIA-$2o. 7 o. 

•Decoto, First, by Rev. E. D. Hale 

Field's Landing and Elk River, by 

Rev. B. M. Palmer 

Fresno, German, by Rev. J. Legler.. 
Scotia, Rio Dell, and Pepperwood, by 

Rev. W. Gordon 

Sierra Valley, by Rev. L. Wallace. . . . 

OREGON— $20.00. 

Received by Rev. C. F. Clapp : 
Woman's H. M. Union 

Portland, German Ch., by Dr. M. E. 
Eversz 



WASHINGTON— $9.50. 

£6 20 

Endicott, German Ch., by Rev; J. M. 

5 50 Preiss $8 50 

5 00 Long Beach, Union Ch., S.S., by Rev. 

H. W. Mercer 1 00 

3 °° 
1 00 

September Receipts— Contributions... 84,381 18 

Legacies J 7i356 34 

Interest 576 85 

Home Miss'n'y. 7 15 

15 00 Literature 1 00 



£22,322 52 



OCTOBER, ii 



$55 85 

10 05 

40 

4 35 



5 °° 
18 56 



MAINE— $70.65. 

Kennebunk. Union, by F. W. Nason. 
Kennebunkport, Second, by W. R. 

Wheelwright 

Park, Mrs. F. I. Pendleton 

Wells. First, by N. M. Bailey 

NEW HAMPSHIRE— $65.32. 

Claremont. by H. W. Frost 

Hinsdale, Y. P. S. C. E., by H. C. 
Holland 

Keene, Mrs. S. Rising 

Littleton, First, by D. C. Renwick.... 

Merrimack, Jr., Y. P. S. C. E. of the 
First, by Rev. S. Rose 

Nashua, Pilgrim Ch., by P. A. Ham- 
mond 

New Ipswich, Ch.. $4.45 : C. E. Soc, 
$2 ; Children's Fair, $5.10, by C. E. 
Taylor 



VERMONT— $108.62. 

Vermont Domestic Miss. Soc, W. C. 
Tyler, Treas 

Bridport. Y. P. S. C. E., by C. A. 
Pratt, for Alaska 

Royalton, by J. Wild 

Rupert, Y. P. S. C. E., by J. E. Aus- 
tin, for Alaska 

South Royalton, by Rev. H. M. God- 

dard 

Y. P. S. C. E., by Rev. H. M. 
Goddard 

Stockbridge, T. S. Hubbard 

VVaitsfield, by Mrs. G. Olmstead 



MASSACHUSETTS — $8,653.11 ; of 
which legacies, $4,618.35. 

Mass. Home Missionary Soc, by Rev. 

E. B. Palmer, Treas 1,00000 

By request of donors, of which for 
Salary Fund, $100 ; Alaska, $10; 

special, $20 350 04 

From W. H. M. A., for Salary Fund 2.225 °° 
Roxbury, Walnut Ave., special 25 00 

2,600 04 

Boston, W. A. Wilde, for Salary Fund 25 00 

Colerain, Rev. C. M. Crooks 4 53 

Curtisville, Y. P. S. C. E., by M. O. 

Ford, for Alaska 10 00 



ro 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


J 5 


5° 


5 


00 


5 


00 


15 


00 



Groton, Union Ch., by W. Shattuck. . $68 20 
Lowell. Estate of L. R. Parker, by F. 

H. Wiggin. Trustee 213 35 

Eliot, by J. Howard 31 34 

Massachusetts, A Friend 1 00 

Middlefield, O. Church 5000 

Newburyport, Legacy of Miss J. N. 

Balch, by A. Abbot, Ex 475 00 

Mrs S. C. Hale 100 00 

Northampton, Miss E. A. Babb, 

freight 285 

Norton, by S. H. Cobb 55 00 

Shirley, E. N. Livermore 1 00 

Springfield, South Ch., by H. K. Cha- 

pin 8571 

Westfield, Estate of Mrs. O. C. Baker, 

by H. Fuller, Adm 2,000 00 

Williamsburg, Estate of W. A. Nash, 

by W. W. Nash and C. S. Nash, Ex's 1,930 00 



RHODE ISLAND-S6.70. 

Providence. M. I. Fuller 120 

Tiverton, Four Corners, by J. D. 
Humphrey 5 50 



CONNECTICUT— $3,624.25 ; of which 
legacies, Si,9 2 S-5°- 

Miss. Soc. of Conn., by Rev. W. H. 
Moore 37 12 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. W. W. 
Jacobs, Treas.: 

Bridgeport. South Ch., L. B. Fund, 
by Miss W. L. Higby, for Salary 
Fund 55 25 

Kent, Aux., for Salary Fund, by 
Mrs. R. J. Hopson 5000 

Suffield, by Mrs. M. H. Jones, spe- 
cial 16 13 

Wallingford, L. B. S.. by Miss J. E. 
Doolittle, for Salary Fund 25 co 

146 38 

Bridgeport. Y. P. S. C. E. of the Sec- 
ond, bv F. C. Fox 581 

Bristol. S. S. of the First, by Miss J. 

E. Beckwith '3 74 

Cornwall, Estate of S. C. Beers 42 50 

Goshen, by L. S. Ostrom 92 57 

Greenwich. Second, by Dr. E. N. Judd 260 17 

S. S. of the Second, by H. S. Child. 16 48 

Hartford, Fourth Ch., by F. W. Haw- 
ley 32 50 

Mrs. G. C. Perkins 250 00 

Higganum, Y. P. S. C. E., by L. A. 

Forbes, for Al.-iska 5 00 

Madison, C. E. Soc, by E. U. Bishop 15 00 



January, li 



The Home Missionary 



195 



Middlefield, Y. P. S. C. E., by Miss 

L. C. Miller $11 32 

Middletown, South Ch., by G. A. 

Craig. 33 99 

New Haven, Center Ch., by F. T. 

Bradley 155 95 

New London, Estate of J. N. Harris, 
by R. Coit, H. R. Bond, and M. S. 
Harris, Trustees 1,875 °° 

First Ch. of Christ, by G. Whittlesey 47 99 

Second, by Dr. F. N. Braman 303 58 

New Milford, A Friend 5 00 

Northfield, Y. P. S. C. E., by Mrs. E. 

A. Hopkins, for Alaska 5 00 

Salisbury, " Philamiss " 2 00 

A Friend 2 00 

Shelton, Ch., $42 ; S. S., $25, by J. 

Tomlinson 67 00 

Southport, by R. W. P. Bulkley 155 23 

Suffield, Estate of Susan A. King, Div. 

on Stock, by H. D. Bartlett, Adm.. 8 00 

Winnipauk, First, by E. L. Boyer.... 24 92 

NEW YORK— $539.09 ; of which leg- 
" acy, $40.56. 

New York Home Missionary Soc, 
William Spalding, Treas. : 

Fairport, A Friend '. 10 00 

Lockport, First 655 

Mannsville 5 00 

Osceola 10 00 

Roscoe, Ch. $5 ; Rev. W. J. Carter, 

$5 IO °° 

Wilmington 2 co 

Rev. E. Curtis 10 00 

53 £5 

Angola, A. H. Ames 5 00 

Brooklyn, Y. P. S. C. E. of Beecher 

Memorial, by Rev. D. B. Pratt 5 00 

Mrs. L. P. Wood 5 00 

Copenhagen, by H. A. Lawrence 18 62 

Fairport, by M. Olney 16 25 

A. M. Loomis 10 00 

S. S. Rally, by C. D. Case 10 00 

Flushing, First, by W. H. Lendrum... 65 28 
Hopkinton, Ladies' Aid Soc, by Mrs. 

E. Chittenden 5 00 

Orient, by M. B. Brown 15 10 

Port i^eyden, A. J. Schroeder 36 co 

Poughkeepsie, Y. P. S. C. E., by Miss 

N. M. Felton, for Alaska 10 00 

Sayville, by W. Green 20 05 

Sherburne, First, by G. W. Lathrop. . 144 68 

Mrs. O. A. Gorton 55 o-> 

Walton, S. S. of the First, by F. A. St. 

John 30 00 

Willsborough, Estate of Mrs. S. A. 

Stower, by A. J. B. Ross 40 56 

NEW JERSEY— $370.65 ; of which leg- 
acy, $55.15. ■ 

Woman's H. M. Union of the N. J. 
Asso., Mrs. J. H. Denison, Treas. : 

Bound Brook 14 00 

Montclair, for Salary Fund 123 00 

Westfield 36 50 

175 50 

Chester, J. H. Cramer 40 00 

East Orange, Legacy of Mrs. L. H. 

Everest, by Rev. C. H. Everest.. 55 15 

" K," for Salary Fund 100 co 

PENNSYLVANIA-^ . 50. 

Minersville, T. R. Richards 12 00 

Plymouth, Elm Ch., by Rev. T. Mc- 
Kay 225 



Renovo, Swedish Ch., by Rev. B. O. 

Johnson $3 25 

Williamstown, First, by Rev. D. L. 

Davis ■ 10 00 



MARYLAND-$i 4 . 5 o 

Baltimore, Canton Ch., by Rev. T. M. 
Beadenkoff 



VIRGINIA- $10.00. 

Falls Church, First, by A. C. Rore- 
beck 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA— $37.50. 

Woman's H. M. Union of the N. J. 

Asso., Mrs. J. H. Denison, Treas.: 
Washington, of which for Salary 

Fund $23.50 . ., 



GEORGIA— $26.85. 

Amandaville, by Rev. M. G. Fleming 1 00 

Braswell, by Rev. H. E. Newton 3 25 

Columbus, by Rev. G. W. Cumbus. . . 3 90 

Five Forks, by Rev. T. J. Burden ... 2 00 

Fort Valley, by Rev. J. F. Blackburn 3 00 
Hoschton, $3.00 ; Oxford, $3.50, by 

Rev. J. C. Forrester 6 50 

North Rome, by Rev. J. W. Gilliam.. 1 00 

Strickland, by Rev. A. J. Lyle 50 

Surrency. by Rev. D. F. Steadley 1 20 

Walker's Chapel, by Rev. G. Home.. 2 50 

Waycross, by Rev. J. S. King 2 00 



ALABAMA— $45.44. 

Art, Christian Hill Ch.,-and Asbury, 

Union Hill Ch., by Rev. S. R. 

Branan 3 00 

Blackwood, Echo, Friendship Ch., 

and Wicksburg, St. John's Ch., by 

Rev. W. H. Newton 1 05 

Clanton and Kingston, by Rev. C. A. 50 

Milstead 1 00 

Dothen, Newton Chapel. Dundee, 

Echo, Zada Ch., Watford, Basford 

Ch., by Rev. M. V. Marshall. . ..... 3 40 

Floy, Liberty Ch., Lebanon, Liberty 

Hill Ch., and Tenbroeck, Union 

Hill Ch., by Rev. J. M. Dobbs 100 

Good Hope, Texas Union Ch., Kent, 

Mt. Olive Ch., Tallassee, Liberty 

Ch., and Tallassee, by Rev. A. C. 

Wells 3 75 

Hallton, Hickory Grove Ch., and 

Volina, New Hope Ch., by Rev. I. 

J. White 25 

Hilton, Antioch Ch., by Rev. T. A. 

Pharr 1 00 

Lightwood, Union Ch., by Rev. C. 

Hill 25 

Millville, Oak Hill Ch., by Rev. H. T. 

McKay 37 

Shelby, Ch. of the Covenant, by Rev. 

A.T.Clarke 1020 

Talladega, by E. C. Silsby 20 17 



LOUISIANA-$io. 75 . 

Lake Charles, First, by Rev. B. C. 
Mills,.., 



196 



The Home Missionary- 



January, 1899 



FLORIDA— $44.88. 

Avon Park, Union Ch., by Rev. F. D. 

Rood 

Caryville, New Effort Ch., Westville, 

First, and Bonifay, by Rev. P. G. 

Woodruff 

Cottondale, County Line Ch., by 

Rev. S. B. Judah 

Haines City, United Ch. of Christ, by 

Rev. S. J. Townsend 

Interlachen, Ch., $7 ; W. H. M. U., 

$6, by Rev. W. D. Brown 

Millisran, Pyron Chapel, by Rev. T. 

A. Pharr 

Moss Bluff and Panasoffkee, by Rev. 

E. D. Luter 



OKLAHOMA— $17.75. 

Alpha, Parker, and Otter, by Rev. W. 

Kelsey 

Camp Russell, by Rev. S. J. Mc- 

Reynolds 

Park and Bulah, by Rev. J. F. Rob- 

berts . .'. 

Seward, by Rev. L. S. Childs 

Tecumseh, by Rev. C. F. Sheldon 

Waynoka. by Rev. J. W. McWilliams 
West Guthrie, by Rev. G. M. Ravey. 

ARIZONA— $8.50. 

Received by Rev. E. H. Ashmun : 

Crittenden 

Jerome 



OHIO-$ 3 6 7 . 4 2. 

Ohio Home Miss. Soc., by Rev. J. G. 
Frazer, D.D 



Received by Ohio H. M. Soc. in Sep- 
tember : 

Akron , West, Special 

Andover, by Mrs. L. R. Griffis 

Brighton, by O. F. Goss 

Cleveland. Swedish, by Rev. D. 

Marcelius 

Lakewood. C. E. Ferrell 

Trinity, by C. J. Shaw 

Olivet, by Miss L. C. Alexander . 

Columbus, Eastwood, by A. S. 
Hentig, Treas 

Croton, by Rev. F. D. Bentley 

Hudson, by Miss E. E. Metcalf, 
Treas 

Lock, by Rev. F. D. Bentley 

Lyme, by Melvin Wood. Treas 

North Bloomfield, by Miss M. J. 
McAdoo, of which $5 from A 
Friend 

Radnor, John S. J., W. R , and J. 
W. Powell. $ 1 ; D. H. and Edwin, 
50 cts., by John Powell 

Richmond, by Rev. W. D. Fergu- 
son 

Saybrook, by Mrs. W. H. Mills 

West Williamsfield, by C. R. Cole- 
man 



615 00 

10 25 

5° 

3 13 

13 00 

1 00 

2 00 



6 00 

5° 

3 ZS 



4 °5 

4 45 



8 50 



76 


11 


5 


1 


3 


OO 


3 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


25 


40 


3 


50 


4 


00 


4 


SO 


21 


3« 



2 50 
9 18 



ILLINOIS-$39. 5 o. 

Chicago, J. Mabbs $30 00 

Fall Creek, German, by Rev. M. E. 
Eversz, D.D 9 50 

MISSOURI-$ 3 i. 7 8. 

Amity, by Rev. B. F. Logan 4 00 

Kidder, by Rev. A. L. Gridley 8 00 

Peirce City. First, by W. A. Rhea 15 28 

Springfield, German Ch., by Rev. J. F. 

Graf 4 so 



MICHIGAN-$io.oo. 

Detroit, First Polish Ch., by Rev. J. 

Lewis 500 

Lamont. Ch. and C. E. Soc, by J. A. 

Luther, for Alaska 5 00 



WiSCONSIN-$ 4 i. 4 9. 

Woman's H. M. Union of No. Wi 

Antigo 

Bloomer 

Eagle River 

Apollonia, $5 66 ; and Bruce, $1.91, by- 
Rev. J. D. Whitelaw 

Falun, Swedish Ch., by Rev. N. I 
Nelson 

Glenwood, Swedish Ch., by Rev. O 
Ohlson 

Maple Valley, Scands., by Rev. A J 
Andrewson 

Milwaukee, German Y. P. S. C. E., 
by Rev. M. E. Eversz., D.D. . 

IOWA— $190.25 ; of which legacy, 
$68.75. 

Davenport. German S. S., by Rev. C. 
F. Finger 

Des Moines. From Estate of Mrs. H. 
Rollins, by G. A. Merrill 

Goldhcld, Charles and Elizabeth 
Thurston Phjlbrook, by F. T. Phil- 
brook 

Traer, Mrs. T. H. Best 

A Friend of the Cause 



II 
8 


31 

00 


5 


00 


24 


31 


7 


57 


1 


oc 


1 


75 


3 


76 


3 


10 



68 75 



50 00 
45 °° 
25 00 



At water, by G. W. Weldy. 
Bellevue, S. W. Boise 



186 92 
8 50 



MINNESOTA-$ 3 i 4 . 4 8 ; of which leg- 
acy, $264.67. 

Biwabik, by Rev. C. E. Wilcox 1 30 

Campbell, Union Ch., by Rev. F. 

Wrigley 500 

Dawson, by Rev. J. Watt 6 00 

Ellsworth, Kanaranzi, and Ash Creek, 

by Rev. R . P. Upton 824 

Glyndon, Ch. and S. S., by E. E. 

Tracy 781 

Lake Park, by F. M. Higley 3 15 

Mcintosh, First, by Miss M. Darling. 1 25 

St. Charles, by Mrs. A. F. Knebler. . 1 04 
St. Paul, Olivet Ch., Merriam Park, 

by S. J. Clark 16 02 

Winona, Legacy of Mrs. C. C. Curtis, 

by F. A. Rising, Ex 264 £7 



INDIANA— $6.18. 

Andrews, by Rev. J. R. Mason 

Fort Wayne, South Ch., by Rev. E. E. 

Frame 

Oakland Citv, Mrs. P. W. Wallace, 
by W. Curtis 



KANSAS-$26 7 . 5 i. 
1 18 

Received by Rev. A. 
4 00 Treas. : 

Almena, S. S 

t 00 Alton *..... 



C. Hogbin< 



January, ii 



The Home Missionary 



197 



$2 


60 


2 


25 


I 


00 


I 


60 


IS 


59 


I 


00 


I 


72 


10 


00 


6 


47 


18 


05 


7 


11 



Buffalo Park 

Collyer 

Chase, Jr. Y. P. S. C. E 

Douglas, S. S 

Downs 

Independence, Ingraham Memorial, 

Kanwaka, Harvest Festival 

Kiowa 

Onaga, Harvest Festival 

Partridge, Harvest Festival 

Severy, Harvest Festival 



Woman's H. M. Union, Miss M. Wil- 
kinson, Treas : 

Alma 3 85 

Arkansas City 10 00 

Ar vonia 6 00 

Carson, Ladies 1 Soc 3 00 

Centralia 12 00 

Clay Center. 900 

Dover 5 00 

Emporia 15 00 

Eureka, Mrs. Dale's S. S. class 3 55 

Fairview 3 00 

Kirwin 2 50 

Lawrence, Plymouth Ch 2 60 

Manhattan 225 

Newton : 2 '00 

Olathe 8 50 

Oneida 240 

Paola 11 50 

Russell 3 00 

Sabetha 2 55 

Smith Center 250 

' Wabaunsee 10 00 

Wakarusa Valley Miss. Soc 7 00 

Wellsville 3 00 

Westmoreland 2 50 

Wichita, Plymouth Ch 10 00 

Fairmount Ch 5 00 

Alma, Jr. C. E 70 

Kirwin, Jr. C. E 1 00 

Lawrence, Plymouth Jr. C. E 2 50 



Less Expenses. 



Brookville, by Rev. J. H. Embree 

Fairview, Western and Alanthus, by 

Rev. I. M. Waldrop 

Fredonia, by Rev. H. C. Shoemaker.. 

Highland, by B. A. Sutton 

Maize, S. J. Londenslager 

Wallace, by Rev. R. H. Harper 



NEBRASKA-$io 3 . 9 8. 

Received by C. C. Smith, Ass't Treas. : 

Exeter 

Wisner 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. C. C. 
Hall, Treas 

Bladen and Campbell, by Rev. A. S. 

Heathcote 

Carroll, Welsh Ch., by Rev. S. Jones. 

Cowles, Rev. S. Deakin 

Cuibertson, Paul Wacker, by Rev. M. 

E. Eversz, D.D 

Germantown, German Ch., by Rev. 

F. Woth 

Lincoln, German Ch., by Rev. E. C. 

osthoff :.. 

A Friend 

Palisade, First Ch., and Eureka, by 

Rev. J. H. Beitel 

Petersburg, by Rev. J. Roberts 

Pierce, by Rev. D. Gearhart 



151 90 
3 °3 



148 87 

5 00 

2 S° 

6 75 
13 00 



6 05 
S °° 



28 48 
39 53 



1 75 

2 5° 

5 °° 

7 5° 

1 30 
17 9° 

7 50 
10 00 
10 00 



NORTH DAKOTA-$62. 4 i. 

Fargo, Scand., by C. R. Martin $5 00 

Geidt, Jacob Schultz, by Rev. M. E. 

Eversz, D.D. „ 5 00 

Harwood, First, by Rev. J. R. Mc- 

Connehey 10 35 

Hillsboro, $6.45 ; Kelso, $2.00 ; Baxter 

Schoolhouse, $2.59, by Rev. D. T. 

Jenkins n 04 

Jamestown, by Rev. C. H. Phillips... 16 co 

Michigan City and Niagara, by Rev. 

N. P. McQuarrie 13 02 

Pingree, First, by Rev. E. Halsall... 2 00 



SOUTH DAKOTA— $129.88. 

Woman's Home Missionary Union 
Mrs. F. M. Wilcox, Treas. : 

Badger Lake 

Clark 

Firesteel 

Wakonda 

Yankton 

Black Hills Union 

Received by Rev. W. H. Thrall : 

Drakola 

Lake Henry ; . 

Armour, by H. B. Mead 

Belle Fourche, by Rev. A. D. Sbockley 
Buffalo Gap and W. G. Flat, $7.00 ; 

Ladies' H. M. S., $8 52, by Rev. T. 

Thirloway 

Columbia, by Rev. I. R. Prior 

Cresbard, $3.00 ; Myron, $7.00, by 

Rev. R. Jones 

Lake Preston, by Rev. S. A. Van 

Luven 

Mission Hill, by Rev. D. B. Nichols.. 

Plankinton, by Rev. J. Davies 

Springfield, by Rev. C. Seccombe 



COLORADO— $201.47. 

Woman's Home Missionary Union, 

Mrs. B. C. Valentine, Treas 147 95 

Denver, Second 5 00 

Boulevard 5 25 

Highlandlake, Y. P. S. C. E 3 00 

VillaPark 1 00 

162 20 
Crested Butte, Union Ch., by Rev. J. 

L. Read 27 70 

Gillett, First, by Rev. M. C. Haecker 3 00 
Montrose, Union Ch., by Rev. W. A. 

Hutchinson 1 50 

North Denver, by Rev. D. S. Bayley. 2 07 
Piceance, W. H. Violet, by Rev. R. 

H. Harper 5 00 



WYOMING— $6.25. 

Woman's Missionary Union, Mrs. J. 
H. Kevan, Treas. : 
Wheatland 6 25 

MONTANA— $17.00. 

Woman's Missionary Union, Mrs. W. 
S. Bell, Treas., in full, to const. 
Mrs. W. S. Bell a L. M. : 
Big Timber 1 75 



2 


24 


2 

I 

5 


40 

47 
00 


4 


5° 


15 
18 


61 
72 


34 


33 


2 


00 


2 


00 


4 


00 


16 
18 


10 
00 


15 
4 


52 

68 


10 


00 


5 
6 


00 

25 


15 


00 


1 


00 



198 



The Home Missionary 



January, 1899 



Missoula 

Plains, Ladies of Ch. 
Red Lodge 



UTAH— $11.00. 

Salt Lake City, Philips Ch., by Rev. 
G. Lindsay 



$3 00 



Rosedale, First, by Rev. A. K. John- 
son $10 00 

San Diego, Second Ch.. and La Mesa,- 
First Ch., by Rev. T. R. Earl 4 00 

San Dieg;>, H . Sheldon 25 00 

San Luis, Y. P. S. C. E. of the First, 
by J. W. Darke, for Alaska 10 00 

San Rafael, First, by Rev. W. H. At- 
kinson 4 50 



IDAHO— $2.00. 

Vollmer. Swedish Ch., by Rev. M. 
Peterson 



CALIFORNIA-$2i 3 .oo. 

Received by Rev. J. T. Ford. : 

Highlands 

Pasadena. Lake Ave 

Los Angeles, First, Mrs. H. G. Bil 

lings 

Santa Monica, Mrs. Susan Wells.. 



Woman's Home Missionary Union of 

So. Cal., Mrs. M. M. Smith, 

Treas. : 

Avalon 

Corona Co. Meeting 

Los Angeles Co. Meeting.... 

First, Mrs. A. A. May hew . 
Pasadena. Y. P. S. C. E. of the 

First, for Salary Fund 

Redlands, Ladies' Union of the First 

Avalon, by Rev. E. O. Tade 

Etna, by Rev. A. B. Cochran . . . 
Hydesville. by Rev. J. D. Foster 
Murphy, by Rev. M. J. Luark 
Poway, by C. H. Abernethy 



6 


00 


5 


00 


25 


00 


2 


00 



38 00 



5 


00 


10 


00 


20 


00 


40 


CO 


5 


00 


t 10 


00 


90 


00 


IS 


00 


5 




4 


00 



104 65 

68 75 
7 5° 



OREGON— $201. 75 . 

Received by Rev. C. F. Clapp : 

Woman's Home Missionary Union. 
Received by I. A. Macrum. Treas. : 
Portland, First, by C. L. Fay, Treas. 
Forest Grove. Mrs. S. A. Sloan. .. 
Freewater. First and Ingles Chapel, 

by Rev. VV. Hurlburt 

Mink, St. John's and St. Peter's, by 

Rev. M. E. Eversz, D.D 

Portland, Miss. Ave. Ch., by Rev. 

G. A. Taggart 

Scappoose, by Rev. C. E. Philbrook 



WASHINGTON— $35.90. 

Christopher, White River Ch., $12.00 ; 

S.S , $2.00. by Rev. H. W. Mote.... 14 00 

Eureka, First, by Rev. A. R. Olds 10 25 

Row by Rev. W. A. Arnold 715 

Seattle, Taylor Ch., by Rev. G. H. 

Lee 2 50 

Tolt, by Rev. G. Kindred 2 00 

October Receipts: Contributions $8,962 33 

Legacies 6,972 98 

Interest 450 25 

Home Missionary. 14 70 

Leaflets 5 70 

$16,405 96 



NOVEMBER, 1898 



MAINE— $47.41. 

Machias, Center Street, by W. W. 

Bradbury $641 

Portland, Ladies of Bethel Ch., by 

Miss M. E. South worth 30 5c 

A Thank-offering, by Rev. J. G. 

Wilson . . 5 oc 

West Nevvfield, by Rev. J. G. W. 
Herold 5 50 



NEW HAMPSHIRE — $327.90 ; of 
which legacy, $ioc.oo. 

N. H. H. M. Soc, Hon. L. D. Stevens, 
Treas 137 00 

Boscawen, Legacy of Mary G. Cogs- 
well, by David Cross. Adm 100 00 

Claremont, Mrs. N. P. Washburn.... 10 00 

Colebrook, by J. A. Hodge 4 50 

Hanover. A Few Friends 15 00 

Merrimack, First, by Rev. S. Rose. .. 26 00 

. North Hampton, J. L. Philbrook 25 40 

West Rindge, G. G. Williams 1000 

[Erratum : Amherst, " L. F. B"., 
$150 ; erroneously ack. in July Home 
Missionary, March receipts, under F. 
C. I. and H. M. Union of N. H.] 



VERMONT— $57.74. 

Vermont Domestic Miss. Soc, W. C. 
Tyler, Treas 

Bennington Center. I. H. N 

Bridport, S. S. Rally, by C. A. Pratt. 
Brookfield. S. S. of the First, by G. B. 

J. Hall 

Hartland, by Rev. S. E. MacGeehon. 

Underhill, by T. B. Burney 

Vermont, A Friend 

Waterbury, Rev. G. E. Ladd, for 

Alaska 



MASSACHUSETTS — $1,898.36 ; of 
which legacies, $1,219.35. 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc, by Rev. E. B. 
Palmer, Treas.: 
By request of donors, of which $30 
for Alaska 

Amesbury, Main Street, by C. F. 

Hovey 

Amherst, add'l, by L. W. Clark 

Boston, W. A. Wilde, for Salary 

Fund 

Charlestown, Y. P. S. C. E. of the 

First, by G. Bates 

Conway, Estate of Sarah C. Forbes, 

by S. D. Conant, Adm 



1 20 

2 00 

3 00 
5 °° 
2 00 

10 00 



r 7 


71 


1 


25 


25 


00 


7 


00 


644 


72 



January, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



199 



Cummington, A Friend of Missions. . $10 00 

Curtisville, by F. W. Heath 17 71 

Dorchester, Second, by Miss E. Tol- 

man 25 00 

Fairhaven, First, Joseph Damon 

Fund, by C. E. Lumbard 50 00 

Fitchburg, Rev. and Mrs. J. Wood.. 10 00 

Graniteville, C. F. Keyes 10 00 

Greenfield, H. E. Tilton, special 2 00 

Haverhill, Union Y. P. S. C. E., by 

F. M. Warren, for Alaska 5 00 

Holyoke, First, by J. H. Wylie, Jr... 59 00 

Grace Ch., A Friend 100 

Marlboro, Legacy of Miss M. G. Par- 

menter, by S. S. Parmenter 500 00 

Mittineague, by E. H. Shepard 14 35 

Monson, E. F. Morris 200 00 

Newbury port, Estate of Harriet M. 

Savorey, by L. Patriquin 24 63 

North Andover, Y. P. S. C. E. of Trin. 

Ch., by M. S. Robinson, for Alaska. 10 00 
Pittsfield, Legacy of Vinet Walker, by 

W. M. Prince, Ex 50 00 

S.S., by R. H. Barrett 30 00 

Sheffield, by A. T. Wakefield 5 55 

Springfield, North Ch., by E. E. 

Hamilton 75 00 

Templeton, " A.D.T.'' 500 

Turner's Falls, by E. L. Goddard .... 13 66 



RHODE ISLAND— $100.00. 
Central Falls, E. L. Freeman 



CONNECTICUT— $1,296.66; of which 
legacy, $305. 

Miss. Soc. of Conn., by Rev. W. H. 

Moore 405 13 

Berlin, Second, add'l, by C. S.Webster 15 00 

Second Ch. and S.S., by F. L. Wil- 
cox 30 28 

Bethany, by E. U. Clark " 6 85 

Chester, by A. Hall 21 00 

Mrs. L. J. Gaylord, by Rev. A. Hall 1 00 
Coventry, S.S., by A. Kingsbury, 

Rally 3 40 

Cromwell, by S. M. Savage 89 75 

Hartford, Mrs. M. A. Williams 15 00 

Harwinton, by A. G. Wilson 9 24 

Kent, First, by C. L. Sproun 13 72 

New Milford, Mrs. I. Smith, by Rev. 

E. P. Herrick 2 00 

Norfolk, by S. A. Selden 256 02 

Rockville, Y. P. S. C. E. of Union Ch., 

by H. L. James, for Alaska 11 00 

A Friend 20 00 

Simsbury, First Ch. of Christ, by A. 

J. Holcomb sg 86 

South Norwalk, Y. P. S. C. E., by H. 

O. Bailey, for Alaska 10 00 

Suffield, Estate of Susan A. King 305 00 

Vernon Center, by W. C. Driggs 15 00 

Windsor, Y. P. S. C. E. of the First, 

by S. H. Barber, for Alaska 7 41 



Syracuse, Good Will S. S. 

Plymouth 

Bible School 

A Friend 

Rev. E. Curtis 



$12 


OO 


7 


5° 


57 


20 


2 


00 


IO 


00 



264 69 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. J. J. 
Pearsall, Treas. : 

Albany, Home Circle 3 00 

Brooklyn, Clinton Avenue, L. B. S. 5 88 

Buffalo, Plymouth Chapel , 5 00 

Canandaigua 133 00 

Homer, Aux 5 00 

Honeoye, Aux , 4 50 

Ithaca 500 

S. S 9 50 

Riverhead 1987 



19° 75 



Brooklyn, Tompkins Avenue, by P. 

Palmer 1,000 00 

Y. P. S. C. E. of the Tompkins 
Avenue Ch., by E. R. Hilton, for 

Alaska 30 00 

South Ch.. by E. A, Ford 60 88 

S. S. of the South Ch., by De H. 

Bergen 25 00 

Clifton Springs, Mrs. Z. Eddy, freight 3 00 

Currytown, A King's Daughter 210 00 

Honeoye, by S. M. Day 2100 

McGraw, H. D. Corey 1 00 

Mt. Sinai, Y. P. S. C. E., by E. L. 

Randall 3 00 

Morrisville, by Miss J. B. Webber 12 00 

New York City, Bedford Park, by W. 

R. Post 16 75 

Mrs. C. B. Tompkins, by C. L. 

Tompkins 50 00 

New York State, A Friend 15 00 

North ville, by J. T. Downs 15 69 

Norwich, First, by J. McCarr, to 

const. H. M. Dunham, a L. M 6033 

Port Chester, First, by C. S. Whitney 2 75 

Port Leyden, by B. F. Betts 10 26 

Richford, by W. J. Hutchinson 27 00 

Rockaway Beach, First, by F. H. 

Browne 10 00 

Rocky Point, C. E. Soc, by A. M. 

Dickinson 4 17 

Say ville, S. S., by G. Edwards 13 62 

Wellsville, First Ch.,by E. M.Fisher, 

to const. Rev. S. W. Haven a L. M. 51 08 

West Bloomfield, by M. H. Shepard.. 43 45 



NEW JERSEY— $45.35. 

Cedar Grove, Union Ch., by Rev. B. 

F. Bradford 10 00 

East Orange, Trinity Ch., Woman's 

Guild, a Thank-offering, by A. G. 

Bates 9 10 

Jersey City, First, by W. W. Inger- 

soll 25 25 

Rev. J. C. Emery 1 00 



NEW YORK— $2,141.42. 

Received in October by Wm. Spald- 
ing, Treas. : 

Cambria, Rev. J. B. Dare 

Henrietta 

Libson 

Norwood 

Ogdensburg 

Sherburne. "' A. B. C." 

Mrs. C. S. Gorton 

Sidney, Y. P. S. C. E 



5 00 
4 00 
45 15 
2 3 34 
37 5° 
50 00 
10 00 



PENNSYLVANIA. -$2.95. 

Arnot, Swedish, by Rev. C. J. Wide- 
berg 

Chandler's Valley, Free Evan. Scand. 
Ch., by Rev. C. J. Lundquist... ... 



MARYLAND.— $7.00. 

Baltimore, Second Ch., by Rev. C. H. 
Crawford 



1 70 
1 25 



200 



The Home Missionary 



January, 1899 



WEST VIRGINIA-$2. 9 8. 

Huntington, Y. P. S. C. E. of the 
First, by A. Johnston 



GEORGIA-$ 3 8. 5 o. 

Received by Rev. S. C. McDaniel : 
Barnesville 

Antioch, $1.00 ; Duluth, $2.50, by Rev. 

W. F. Brewer 

Atlanta, Ladies' H. M. Soc. of Central 

Ch., by Mrs. J. L. Moore 



ALABAMA— 75 cents. 

Birmingham, First, by A. Simmons.. 
Edwardsville, Salem Ch., Oxford, 

Union Grove Ch., by Rev. G. W. 

Vaughan 



FLORIDA— $4.80. 

Hurobo, Forty-nine Pine Ch.. by Rev. 

L. Miller 

Tampa, by Rev. E. P. Merrick 



$2 98 



3 50 
20 00 



2 50 
2 30 



23 60 
1 00 



TEXAS-$2. 5 o. 
Denison, First, by Rev. J. S. Murphy. 



OKLAHOMA— $29.00. 

Carney, by Rev. W. Lumpkin 

Oklahoma City, Pilgrim Ch., by Rev. 

J. Harper 

Perry, by Rev. B. F. Sewell 



NEW MEXICO-$io.oo. 

White Oaks, Y. P. S. C. E., by M. W. 
Hoyle 



OHIO-$i, 4 45.55- 

Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, D.D., 
in October : 
Ashtabula, Finnish, by K. A. Lin- 
dross 6 00 

Burton, by Rev. E. O. Mead n 00 

Castalia, by Rev. C. J. Dole 7 00 

Cleveland, First S. S., by F. V. An- 
derson 3 83 

Euclid Avenue, by J. Snow 31 18 

Plymouth, by S. H. Stilson 45 75 

Columbus, Mayflower, by M. B. 

Rose 5 65 

Dayton, by F. E. Wilson 10 12 

Kingsville, Miss E. S. Comings 5 00 

Litchfield, by Rev. R. Chapin 5 03 

Mansfield, First, by J. L. Lauck . . . 130 82 
North Kingsville, Mrs. S. C. Kel- 

log-g 5 00 

Oberlin, First, by A. M. Loveland. 26 13 

Parkman, by Mrs. H.J. Ford 6 00 

Richfield, by Mrs. A. C. Garman... 4 00 

Ruggles. by J. Inness 3800 

Springfield, First, by J. Duncanson. 6 40 
Lagonda Avenue, by Rev. W. H. 

Baker 830 

Thompson, by Rev. W. O. Town . . 10 00 

York, by Rev. L. W. Mahn 9 40 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. G. B. 
Brown, Treas. : 
For vear 1897-8 : 

Alexis, W. W $2 so 

Alliance, Sisters' Aid 5 00 

Ashtabula, of which from Mrs. 

Wagner, $5 600 

Austinburg 3 00 

Belpre 4 00 

Burton, Personal, Salary Fund... 4 85 

Cincinnati, Walnut Hills 12 00 

Cleveland, First 16 80 

Plymouth 14 oo 

Pilgrim, W. A . 1700 

Mt. Zion 350 

Franklin Avenue 3 00 

Bethlehem 2 00 

Conneaut 2 00 

Coolville, for Salary Fund 10 00 

Cortlandt 2 20 

Cuyahoga Falls 2 00 

Dayton , 5 00 

Fairport Harbor 5 00 

Freedom 1 00 

Garrettsville 6 00 

Geneva 2 50 

Gustavus, for Salary Fund 1 00 

Hudson 317 

Huntsburg, K. E. S 5 00 

Kent 4 00 

Lexington 4 00 

Litchfield 3 00 

Lorain 8 00 

Lyme 2 00 

M. B 3 50 

Mansfield, First, K. Ink's Dime 

Bank 5 00 

Mayflower 3 00 

Marietta. Harmar 8 65 

Marysville, of which $5, Mrs. O. 

M. Scott's Dime Bank 6 co 

Medina, Mrs. Root's Dime Bank. 5 00 

New London 3 00 

North Ridgeville • 2 40 

Oberlin, Second. T . S., to const. 
Mrs. J. F. Siddall a L. M. and 

for Salary Fund 50 00 

Pittsfield 2 50 

Ravenna 5 00 

Sandusky, L. U 5 00 

Steubenville 2 50 

Tallmadge 7 00 

Toledo, First, Dime Bank, Mrs. 
Stevens, $2.50 ; Mrs. Cray and 

Mrs. Wilhelm, $2 4 50 

Washington Street W. M . U. . . . 18 87 

C. E 2 50 

Unionville 1000 

West Andover, for Salary Fund.. 6 00 

Williamsfield 2 50 

York 5 50 

3<7 94 
1898-99 : 

Brownhelm. for Salary Fund 2 50 

Ceredo, West Va., W. M. C 3 00 

Twinsburg, A Friend 60 00 



374 6 i 



Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser. D.D., 
Treas. Rohemian Mission Board: 
Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. G. B. 
Brown, Treas. : 

Akron, First 

West 

Andover 

Austinburg 

Berlin Heights 

Charlestown 

Cincinnati. Vine Street 

Walnut Hill 

Claridon 



65 5° 



17 


00 


3 


00 


4 


00 


3 


00 


4 


5° 




75 


5 


OO 


3 


00 


S 


00 



January, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



201 



Cleveland, Pilgrim, Jr. Dept. S. S. 

Trinity, Intermediate C. E 

Columbus, Plymouth 

Mayflower 

Conneaut, C. E 

Fredericksburg, C. E 

Geneva, C. E 

Kirtland, K. E. S 

Litchfield, Jr. C. E 

Lyme, Y. P. M. C 

Mansfield, Mayflower C. E 

Mt. Vernon 

North Amherst, C. E 

Oberlin, Second, C. E 

S. S 

Painesville 

C. E 

Plain 

Rootstown . Boh 

Sandusky, Pilgrim, C. E 

Jr. C. E 

Springfield, First 

Toledo, Second, C. E 

Unionville, S. S. , Boh 

Wakeman 

West Williamsfield, C. E 

Windham 

Zanesville 



Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, D.D.: 

Akron, Arlington Street, by Rev. E. 
F. Macmahan 

Ashtabula, Second, by Rev. A. J. 
Williamson 

Berlin Heights, by Mrs. Fannie 
Page 

Chagrin Falls, by Rev. F. W. Grif- 
fiths 

Cleveland, Pilgrim, by H. C. Holt.. 

For Bohemian work 

Swedish, by Rev. D. Marcelius. . 

Cortland, bv F. P. Evans 

Isle St. George, by Rev. W. F. Mc- 
Millen 

Kent, by M. C. Bossinger 

Lenox, $2.50; C. E., $2.50, by Rev. 
J. B. Jones 

Lucas, by G. W. Leiter 

Marietta, Second, by Rev. John Ed- 
wards, D. D 

Medina, by H. A. Horn, in full to 
cont. L. M 

Monroe, Second, by Rev. H. J. Tay- 
lor 

Oberlin, First S. S., by Gertrude S. 

Loveland 

Prof. A. H. Currier, D.D 

Second, by C. T. Beckwith 

Peking, China, Rev. W. S. Ament, 
D.D.... 

Stanleyville, by Rev. John Ed- 
wards, D.D 

Toledo, Washington Street, by A. 
W. Boardman 



Dover, by D. D. Osborn. 



INDIANA— $63.75. 

Received by Rev. E. D. Curtis : 
Fort Recovery ... 

Indianapolis, Brightwood Ch. 



Woman's H. M. Union Ind., Mrs. A. 
H. Ball, Treas. : 

Anderson 

Brightwood 

Central 



2 


00 


s 


00 


2 


00 


4 


00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


8 


45 


1 


25 


10 


00 


2 


00 


6 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


6 


00 


10 


00 


4 


00 


5 


00 


3 


75 


3 


00 


1 


CO 


5 


00 


1 


3° 


4 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


3 


00 


2 


00 



7 00 

12 IO 
12 OO 



6 og 
17 63 



5 °° 
3 °° 



3 °° 
156 20 



25 
13 °5 



5 00 
8 50 



2 50 
1 5° 



Macksville 

Michigan City 

Plymouth 

Terre Haute, First 

Cardonia and Perth, by Rev. C. F. 

Hill 

Central, Beechwood, Cedarwood and 

Grassig Valley, by Rev. W. B. 

Frost 

Portland, Liber Mem. Ch., by Rev. 

R. Smith 



ILLINOIS-$68. 95 . 

Woman's H. M. Union, Miss B. E. 
Crosby, Treas.: 

Elgin, First 

Jacksonville, Y. P. M. S 

Ottawa 

Rockford, Second 



MISSOURI— $50.65. 

Chillicothe, Union Ch., by Rev. J. P. 
Field 

Hamilton, by J. N. Morton 

Maplewood,. Covenant Ch., by Rev. 
T. T. Holway 

Riverdale, by Rev. J. A. McCroskey. 

St. Louis, Reber Place Ch., by Rev. 

F. Stringer 

Bethlehem, Bohemian, by E. 
Wrbitzky. ... 

Sedalia, Second Ch., by Rev. J. B. 
Toomay 

Springfield, Ladies' Sew. Circle, Ger- 
man Ch., by Rev. J. F. Graf 



37 47 
60 00 
go 00 

2 50 

7 80 MICHIGAN 



Detroit, German Evan. Ch., by Rev. 

A. Huelster 

Omena, S. S., by P. H. Davis 



WISCONSIN— $4.58. 

Fulton, by D. F. Sayre 

Unity, Easton, and Waupaca, Scands.., 
by Rev. C. J. Jensen .* 



13 00 IOWA— $2.60. 
5 00 
34 91 Cromwell, F. C. Child. 



MINNESOTA-$662.ao. 

Received by Rev. J. H. Morley : 

Ada 

Owatonna 

St. Paul, South Park 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. M. W. 
Skinner, Treas.: 

Cannon Falls, S. S 

Carleton College 

Duluth, Plymouth 

Edgerton 

Excelsior 

Hawley, $5.50; S. S., $4 :. 

Lake City 

Montevideo 

Mantorville 

Mazeppa, C. E 

Minneapolis. Plymouth 

Vine C. E., $2.96 ; Primary, $5.01 
Lena Holoister 



$3 00 
" 75 
10 00 
15 oo 

44 75 



15 

5 


50 
00 


3 1 


45 


17 


00 



68 95 



I 


75 


II 


IS 


2 


5° 


12 


25 


IO 


00 


3 


00 


5 


00 


5 


CO 



3 °° 

75 



3 58 
1 00 



14 
16 


89 
38 


12 


50 


5 


00 


39 
22 


39 
87 


3 


70 


5 


50 


9 
3° 


50 
63 


2 


77 


5 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


7 


97 


5 


00 



202 



The Home Missionary 



January, 1899 



Park Avenue $25 00 

First 15 00 

Swedish Temple 421 

New Richland 15 00 

Pillsbury, Aux. and C. E 1 02 

Rochester, $5 ; C. E., $3.50 8 50 

St. Paul, Park 1500 

St. Anthony Park, $12 ; S. S.. 85.. . 17 00 
Sleepy Eye, ? 5 ; C. E.. $3.25 ; Jr. C. 

E., §1 9 25 

Wadena 185 

Waterville ....'. 5 00 

Winthrop 300 

Winona, First, $153 ; S. S., $5 158 00 

Waseca 15 00 

Stewartville 3 00 

Worthington 60 75 

552 68 

Less Expenses 30 00 

522 68 
Athens and Spencer Brook, Scands., 

by Rev. A. P. Engstrom 1 25 

Excelsior, by Rev. C. L. Mears 20 65 

Fertile, by Rev. B. Ivons 12 75 

Freeborn, S. S., by Miss M. L. Homen 1 77 

Graceville, by Rev. R. Watt 25 00 

Granite Falls and Belview. by Rev. J. 

Earl 2 50 

Kasota, Swedes, by Rev. E. V. 

Bjorklund 6 00 

Minneapolis, Forest Heights Ch., by 

Rev. R. A. Hadden 5 00 

Scands., by Rev. J. F. Okerstein... 2 20 

Perham, Rev. W. E. Griffith 5 00 

Silver Lake, S. S. of Free Reformed 

Ch., by J. S. J 5 00 

Bohemian Free Reformed Ch.. 
Thanksgiving offering, by J. S. 

Jerabek 50 00 

Walker, by Rev. F. A. Bown 3 10 

KANSAS-$2o 4 .25. 

Received by Rev. A. C. Hogbin, 

Treas. : 

Buffalo Park 1 60 

Collyer 1 69 

Eureka 100 32 

Ford, Harvest Festival 2 87 

Mary E. Smedley 1 00 

Great Bend 7 05 

Kansas City, Y. P. S. C. E. of the 

First 3 50 

Maple Hill 3 32 

North Topeka, Jr. C. E. 5 00 

Ocheltree, Harvest Festival 5 25 

Olathe 1 38 

Russell 5 83 

South Bend 5 00 

Wellsville 6 00 

Western Park 1 91 

S. S 2 00 

Harvest Festival 3 95 

157 67 

Emporia, Second, by H. J. Whitby. . . 6 00 

Hiawatha, by Rev. E. L. Hull 12 00 

By Rev. I. M. Waldrop 12 00 

Kansas City. Pilgrim Ch., by Rev. D. 

Banies Griffiths 3 50 

Kensington, by Rev. W. H. Merrill.. 13 08 

NEBRASKA— $94.58. 

Received by Rev. H. Bross : 

Grant, $3.15 ; Wallace, $2.56 5 71 

Received by Rev. M. E. Eversz, 
Supt. Germans, Stockham, $ 1.45 ; 

Sutton, $1.00 2 45 



Burvvell, First, by Rev. E. Booth, Jr. 
Genoa, Y. P. S. C. E., by L. Mc- 

Fayden, for Alaska 

Guide Rock, German Ch.. $1.50 ; Mrs. 

Emily Lich, $1.20; Liberty Creek, 

German Ch., $2.30, by Rev. P. Li,ch. 
Lincoln, Emanuel Ch., by Rev. J. 

Johnson 

By Rev. E. C. Osthoff 

McCook, German Ch., by Rev. W. F. 

Vogt 

Nebraska City, Park Ch., by Rev. A. 

Farnworth 

Omaha, Hillside Ch., by F. M. Ham- 
ling 

Pilgrim Ch., bal. of coll. from chil- 
dren, by Mrs. E. J. Buck 

Princeton, by Rev. R. Hilkerbaeumer 

Rokeby, by Mrs. J. F. Hay 

Strang and Shickley, by Rev. A. L. 

Squire 



2 


Ci'J 


13 


< >o 


10 


00 


4 


00 


21 


*3 




25 


3 


53 


14 


70 



6 96 



NORTH DAKOTA— $299.56. 

Received by Rev. J. L. Maile : 

Amenia 3 00 

Buxton, Ladies' Soc 5 00 

Cando to 

Carrington 15 00 

Fargo, First, Ladies' Soc 8 50 

Gardner 7 00 

Getchels 22 67 

Glenullin 1 50 

Harwood Ladies 1 Soc, by Mrs. M. 

M. Fischer 1000 

Mrs. S. Daggett 2 50 

Inkster 13 44 

Mayville 12 00 

Pingree and Buchanan 2 62 

Rose Valley 12 02 

Valley City 37 3° 

153 15 
Received by Rev. P. Burkhardt : 
German Chs. : 

Guadenfeld 20 41 

Kulm 13 65 

G. Roedel 15 00 

Alberta, Friedensfeld 8 00 

57 ° 6 
Antelope, $5.05 ; Dwight, $g.oo, by 

Rev. O. P. Champlin 14 05 

Buxton, $4.65 ; Cummings. $3.22 ; 

Hatton, $3.20 ; Portland Ch., §5.83 ; 

and C. E. Soc, $1.10, by Rev. J. T. 

Killen 1800 

Dickinson. First, by Rev. U. G. Rich. 15 50 

Kulm, German Ch.. by Rev. J. Fath. . 8 00 

Oberon, First, by Rev. E. E. Saunders 12 80 
Sanborn, Central Ch., by Rev. J. R. 

Beebe 17 00 

Williston, by Rev. J. H. Hjetland.... 4 00 



SOUTH DAKOTA-$i22. 77 . 

Received by Rev. M. Treiber : 

Friedensfeld 

Hoff nungsberg 

Parkston 

Zion 

Athol, by Mrs. M. E. Moore 

Badger and Hetland, by Rev. W. R. 

Smith 

Garretson, by Rev. H. Adams 

Gettysburg, First, by Rev. H. W. 

Webb 

Henry, by Rev. W. M. Mair 



7 


00 


7 


00 


6 


10 


8 


00 


28 


16 


3 


TO 



6 93 

4 35 
2 50 



January, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



203 



Redfield, First, by Rev. L. Reynolds. 
Ree Heights, by Mrs. F. R. Gardner. 

Worthing, by Rev. J. Spittell 

Yankton, by Supt. W. H. Thrall 



COLORADO— $68.57. 

Buena Vista, First, by Rev. J. H. 

Jenkins 

Denver, S. S. of Plymouth Ch., by C. 

A. Root 

Harmon, Union Ch., by Rev. H. M. 

Skeels 

Lafayette, First, by Rev. G. L. Shull. 

Otis, by Rev. G. Dungan 

Whitewater, Union Ch., by Rev. O. T. 

Robinson 



$15 00 

5 87 

4 00 

40 00 



3 


So 


6 


75 


13 
23 
3 


65 
67 
5° 



Los Angeles, Bethlehem Ch., by Rev. 

D. W. Bartlett 

Moreno and Alessandro, by Rev. W. 

H. Wolcott 

Nordhoff, by Rev.' F. F. Pearse 

Norwalk, Bethany Ch., by Rev. G. H. 

DeKay 

Redondo Beach, Ch. of Christ, by 

Rev. N. L. Rowell 

San Diego, Y. P. S. C. E. of First, by 

L. Munger 

West Saticoy, Rev. W. W. Snell 

Whittier, Plymouth Ch., by Rev. G. 

Willett 



OREGON— $13. 20. 
Oregon City, First, by M. E. Stevens. 



S 00 
IS °° 



S °° 
1 00 



WYOMING— 50 cents. 

Dayton, First, by Rev. B. H. Wood- 
ford 



Woman's Missionary Union, Miss A. 

Baker, Treas . . 6 70 



IDAHO-29.95. 

Woman's Missionary Union, L. H. 
Johnston, Treas. : 
Challis 9 95 

Boise, First, by Rev. R. B. Wright. . . 20 00 



CALIFORNIA-$n 4 .95. 

Received by Rev. J. T. Ford. : 

Los Angeles, Olivet Ch 4 10 

VillaPark 5 45 

9 55 

Campbell, Y. P. S. C. E., by Rev. J. 

Tompkins for Alaska 5 00 

Decoto. First, $2.40 ; Niles, $2, by 

Rev. E. D. Hale 4 40 

Etiwanda, by Rev. A. W. Thompson. 9 00 

Lemon Grove, by Rev. A. C. Dodd... 3 00 

Llano, L. Morley 15 00 



WASHINGTON— $506.00. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. E. B. 
Burwell, Treas. : 
For Salary Fund 300 00 

Received by Rev. A. J. Bailey : 
Seattle, Plymouth Ch 71 50 

Ahtanum Valley, by Rev. L. W. 

Brintnall 16 85 

Anacortes, Pilgrim Ch., by Rev. E. 

D. Farnsworth 2 80 

Cheney, First, by Rev. F. B. Doane. 26 00 

Endicott, German Ch.,by Rev. J. M. 

Preiss 30 00 

Endicott, Alkali Flats and Walla 

Walla, German Chs., by Rev. J. 

Hergert 5 00 

Granite Falls, by Rev. D. B. Eells... 7 00 

Port Angeles, First, by Rev. G. W. 

Nelson 3 00 

Puyallup, by A. B. Gibbs 1 00 

Ritzville, Emmanuel Mission, by 

Rev. G . Graedel 4 00 

Tacoma, East Ch., by Rev. A. J. Smith 15 60 

Tekoa, First, by Rev. G. E. Atkinson 19 25 

Yesler, First, by Rev. L. A. Smith. . . 4 00 

November Receipts: Contributions $8,152 73 

Legacies 1,62435 

Interest 114 00 

Home Missionary 14 45 
Literature 1 20 



1,906 73 



DONATIONS OF CLOTHING, ETC. 



Aurora, 111., New England Ch., by Mrs. 

D. W. Hurd, barrel $43 

Bangor, N. Y., W. H. M. S., by Mrs. R. 

E. Andrews, barrel 41 

Bellevue, O., W. M. S. of First Ch., by 

Mrs. W. C. Walter, two barrels 93 

Binghamton, N. V., Helpers' Soc. of 
First Ch., by Mrs. Ellen C. R. Goff, 

box 217 

Black Rock, Conn., Ladies, by Miss S. 

J. Bartram , barrel 85 

Bridgeport, Conn., Second Ch., by Mrs. 

Geo. L. Porter, two barrels 250 

Brooklyn, N. Y., Ladies' Benev. Soc. of 
Central Ch.,by Harriet E. Haight, 

seven barrels 528 

Woman's Miss. Soc. of Lewis Ave. 
Ch., by Mrs. W. Simpson, two boxes 252 
Burlington, la., by Mrs. J. J. Little, box. 



Canandaigua, N. Y, W. H. M. S. of 
First Ch., by Mrs. G. Parmele, three 
barrels and draft $186 63 

Cedar Rapids, la., Davenport Asso. of 
First Ch., by L. A. Munger, two 
boxes 58 55 

Chatham. O., L. H. M. S. of Chatham 
and Lafayette Chs., by Mrs. L. S. 
Rogers, barrel 43 00 

Claremont, N. H., Ladies' Asso., by 
Fannie S. Goss, barrel 50 00 

Claridon, O., by Lottie W. Wilmot, bar- 
rel 51 85 

Clifton Springs, N. Y., Mrs. Z. Eddy, 
package 25 00 

Danbury, Conn., Y. P. S. C. E. of First 
Ch., by Grace Clark, box 115 00 

Davenport, la., Edwards Ch., by Mrs. 
G. S. Rollins, box 115 00 



204 



The Home Missionary 



January, 1899 



Dubuque, la., W. M. S. of First Ch., by 

Mary F. Bissell, barrel $100 00 

East Concord, N. H., by Mrs. G. H. 

Dunlap, two boxes 37 5° 

East Orange, N. J., Trinity Ch., by 
Fannie S. Halsey, two barrels and 

package 17206 

Essex, Conn., L. M. S., by Mrs. Frances 

E. Banning, box 88 50 

Gloversville, N. Y., L. B. S., by Mrs. 

E. M. Hutchinson, box and barrel.. .. 92 10 

Greenwich, Conn., L. B. S. of Second 
Ch., by Amelia Mead, three barrels 

and (cash, $14.00) 14 00 

Greenwich, O., L. H. and F. M. S., by 

Mrs. Flora Mead, barrel 33 00 

Guilford, Conn., L. H. M. S. of First 

Ch., by Frederic E. Snow, barrel 54 00 

Hartford, Conn., H. M. S. of Pearl St. 
Ch., by Miss Florence M. Cone, 

box 13578 

L. B. S. of Asylum Hill Ch., by Mrs. 

Delia B. Kline, box 73 34 

Ladies, by Mrs. Emily S. Taintor, 

box tOOO 

Haverhill, N. H., L. M. S., by Alice M. 

R. Skinner, box 35 00 

Hollis, N. H., Ladies' Reading and 
Charitable Society, by Mrs. C. A Col- 
burn, barrel 85 98 

Iowa City, la.. Ladies, by Mrs. L. W. 

Andrews, box. 
Keene. N. H.. H. M. S. of First Ch., by 

Emma W. Richards, two barrels 99 76 

Kensington, Conn., Ladies' Sewing 

Soc, by Mrs. S. M. Cowles, box 15 00 

Lakeville, Conn., Sewing Soc, by Mrs. 

Geo. B. Burrall, barrel 92 00 

Lyme, N. H., Ladies, by Mrs. Adna 

Chase, box and cash 98 00 

Manchester, N. H., Benev. Asso. of 
Franklin St. Ch., by Etta A. Canis, 

two barrels 159 r 

Aux. to A. B. C. F. M. of South Main 
St. Ch., by Mrs. G. H. Eastman, 

barrel . 60 97 

Mason, N. H., Mrs. P. S. Wilson, box. 
Medina, O., Ladies' Benev. Soc, by 

Mrs. G. D. Taylor, box 100 co 

Meriden, Conn., L. B. S. of First Ch., by 

Mary' J. Benham. box and freight.. 152 72 
Y. P. S. C. E., clothing for a child.. . 26 00 
Middletown, Conn., H. M. S. of First 
Ch., by Mrs. A. R. Crittenden, bar- 
rel 6200 

Union Soc. of South Ch., by Miss N. 

A. Douglass, box ico 00 

Milford, N. H., Ladies' Charitable Soc, 

by Mrs. J. B. Melendy, barrel 33 00 

Moline, 111., First Ch., by Mrs. S. M. 

Atkinson, barrel and cash 71 08 

Muscatine, la., First Ch., by Mrs. W. 

W. McQuesten, box 108 57 

New Britain, Conn., W. H. M. S. of 
First Ch., by Emma L. Pickett, two 

boxes 246 40 

W. H. M. S. of South Ch., by Miss 
Mary E. Bingham, two boxes.. .. 211 44 
New Haven, Conn., H. M. S. of Second 
Ch., by Mrs. L. E. Bray, two bar- 
rels 102 91 

W. H. M. S. of Second Ch., by Miss 

H. R. Burwell.box. barrel and cash. 67 00 

L. B. S. of Dwight Place Ch., by Mrs. 

H. S. Higby, barrel 105 00 

Newington, Conn., Ladies' Eumean 

Soc, by Mrs. F. C. Latimer, barrel.. 55 90 

Newton, Conn., by Mrs. Eloise Barker, 

barrel 22 50 

North Hampton, N. H.. Ladies' Dorcas 
Circle, by R. M. Chapman, box and 

package 34 19 

Norwalk, Conn., L. B. S. of First Ch., 
by Mrs. E. W. Brown, barrel 100 00 



Norwich, Conn., W. H. M. S. of Broad- 
way Ch., by Mrs. E. D. Fuller, two 

boxes and cash $507 42 

L. H. M. S. of Park Ch., by Louisa G. 
Lane, box 150 00 

Norwood, N. Y., W. H. M. S., by Mrs. 

D. A. Kinsman, box 65 06 

Oberlin, O.. Ladies' Soc. of Second Lb., 

by Miss Adell Royce, two barrels and 
package 143 17 

Old Saybrook, Conn., L. H. M. S., by 
Agnes A. Acton, box and barrel 97 00 

Oskaloosa. la., L. M. S., by Mrs. H. A. 
Hoover, box 50 00 

Ottumwa, la., First Ch., by Mrs. A. D. 
Moss, cask 79 00 

Paterson, N. J., Woman's Asso. for 
Christian Work of Auburn St. Ch., by 
Etta Van Houten, barrel 90 00 

Philadelphia, Pa., W. H. M. S. of Cen- 
tral Ch., by A. W. Goodell, two barrels 
and package 151 24 

Plainville, Conn., Ladies' Benev. and 
H. M. Socs., by Mrs. C. E. Blakes- 
lee, barrel and package 70 72 

Plantsville, Conn., Ladies' Indust. Soc, 
by Sarah L. Twichell, box 88 29 

Pomona, Cal., Ladies of Pilgrim Ch., 
by Mrs. C. P. Nichols, box 50 05 

Randolph, N. Y., H. M. S., by Mrs. G. 

W. Fenton, barrel 22 45 

Redding, Conn., Aux. to Conn. W. H. 
M. S., by Mrs. Edgar Field, barrel... 64 26 

Rensselaer Falls, N. Y., by Mrs. N. E. 
Doty, box and cash 33 01 

Ridgway, Penn., W. M. S. of First Ch., 
by Annette D. A. Hamblen, two bar- 
rels 211 16 

Rootstown, O., Young Ladies' Sew. 
Soc, by Ellen Seymour, barrel 16 31 

St. Louis, Mo., Compton Hill Ch., by 
Mrs. D. M. Fisk, two barrels 100 00 

Saratoga Springs, N. Y., Sarah L, Wood, 
barrel and freight 57 17 

Sharon, Penn., Ladies, by Mrs. O. E. 
Dyer, barrel 80 00 

Simsbury, Conn., L. H. M. S., by Mrs. 
A. J. Holcomb, box 76 00 

Southington, Conn., H. M. S. of South 
Ch., by Mrs. Edward F. Cowles, 
barrel 51 59 

South Manchester, Conn., L. B. S. of 
First Ch., by Antoinetta B. Spencer, 
box 144 73 

Suffield, Conn , L. A. S., by Mrs. M. F. 
Newton, barrel 95 60 

Talcottville, Conn., L. H. M. S., by 
Augusta A. Waite, barrel. 71 n 

Terre Haute, Ind., Ladies, by Mrs. L.J. 

Weinstein, barrel 75 00 

Tilton, N. H., by C. C. Sampson, bar- 
rel 40 00 

Toledo, O., L. M. S. of First Ch., by 

• Mrs. N. B. Eddy, two barrels 75 00 

Miss. Soc. of Washington St. Ch.. by 
Mrs. Laura E. Johnson, box and 
package 82 50 

Torringford, Conn., Ladies' Sew. Soc, 
by Mrs. W. L. Durand, box and pack- 
age 59 12 

Wallingford. Conn., L. B. S., by Jennie 

E. Dooliule, barrel 5692 

Walton, N. Y., L. H. M. S., by Mrs. C. 

C. Tobey, barrel 8456 

Washington. D. C., Ladies of Mt. Pleas- 
ant Ch., by Mrs. B. P. Davis, box, 
cash and freight 66 50 

Waterbury, Conn., L. B. S. of Second 
Ch., by Mrs. J. M. Burrall, two boxes. 2S5 01 

Wellsville, N. Y., Ladies, by Miss E. A. 
Lawrence, box 77 39 

W T est Hartford, Conn., Elmwood Sew. 
Soc, by Miss Elmora M. Newton, 
barrel 86 92 



January, ii 



The Home Missionary 



205 



Westmoreland, N. Y., Ladies' Aid and 
H. M. Socs., by Mrs. Chas. Fox, bar- 
rel. 

Windham, O., Helping- Hand Soc, by 
Mrs. H. C. Jagger, box and bar- 
rel 



Windsor Locks, Conn., L. H. M. S., by 
Mrs. C. H. Coye, barrel 

Winthrop, la., W. M. S., by Laura G. 
W. Eddy, box 



45 00 



3,987 19 



AUXILIARY STATE RECEIPTS 



MAINE MISSIONARY SOCIETY 



Receipts of the Maine Missionary Society from August 15 to September 15, 

P. Hubbard, Treasurer 



1898. W. 



Acton, by Rev. W. S. Muttart 

Albany, by Miss Hattie E. Wilbur 

By Miss Anna K. Gumming 

Allen's Mills, by Rev. W. B. Kenneston 
Amherst and Aurora, by W. Yarrow.. . 
Andover, by Rev. W. C. Adams 

By Miss M. G. Perley....: 

Auburn, by Mrs. Lucy J. Little 

Augusta, So. Parish, by Miss S. W. 

Waldron 

Bangor, Central, A Friend 

By A. C. Sawyer 

Bar Mills, by Rev. F. H. Baker 

Bath, Mrs. Harriet N. Bailey, deceased, 
by Rev. O. W. Folsom, balance of 
legacy 

Winter St. Ch., by F. H. Low 

Boothbay Harbor, byG. B. Kenniston.. 
Bucksport, Mrs. S. B. Swasey 

A Friend 

Cape Elizabeth, First, by Mrs. Chas. 

Lovett 

Cranberry Isle Mission, by Rev. C. N. 

Davis 

Cumberland Mills, S. S. class, by Fred. 

L. Allen 

Dedham, by Rev. H. A. Freeman...... 

Deer Isle, First, by Rev. S. W. Chapin. 

Second, by Mrs. C. F. Powers 

Denmark, by Mrs. A. L. Browne 

Dexter, by Chas. S. Hutchinson 

Dresden, by J. E. Le Bosquet 

East Bangor, by Richard Peters 

Fryeburgh. by E. Ballard 

Gorham, by S. E. Stone 

Gray, by Rev. E. M. Cousins 

Groveville, by Rev. F. H. Baker 

Hallowell, by J. R. Boardman 

Harpswell, by William E. Eaton 

Harpswell Center, A Friend 

Harrison, by Rev. A. G. Fitz 

Holden, by Rev. H. A. Freeman 

Isle au Haut, bv G. M. Tones 

Jackson, by Rev. F. S. Doll iff 

Kittery, by Rev. H. V. Emmons 

Limerick, by Rev. J. A. Waterwcrth.. . 

Litchfield Corners, Y. P. S. C. E., by 

Rev. J. Richmond 

Church, by Rev. J. Richmond 

By D. T. Smith 



$2500 Lyman, by J. E. Newton $300 

8 00 Machiasport, by J. A. Lawrence 13 00 

2 00 Martinicus, People, by H. W. Young... 16 00 

5 00 Medway, by Rev. A. B . Hunt 3 00 

10 51 Monson, by Rev. G. B. Hescock 10 00 

10 00 Mt. Desert (Somerville), by Rev. F. W. 

500 Barker 717 

200 00 Y. P. S. C. E., by Rev. F. W. Barker. 1 00 

North Bangor, by Rev. M. R. Peters... 4 00 

35 00 Belfast Ch., by Mrs. Ellen C. Gay 8 00 

10 00 Bridgton, by Rev. A. G. Fitz 7 45 

60 00 Harpswell, A Friend, by Mrs. Mary 

12 75 C. Eaton 1 00 

Northfield, by Mrs. William Alber 3 00 

Oxford, by Rev. S. A. Apraham 7 50 

8488 By Mrs. I. M. Keith 200 

102 25 Phillips, by A. M. Greenwood 12 38 

6 00 Portland, Scandinavian, by H. B. 

S 00 Gunquist 6 00 

1 00 Second Parish, by C. A. Kennard ... 32 00 

State Street, by H. M. Bailey 20000 

10 00 Presque Isle, Y. P. S. C. E., by Rev. C. 

Harbutt 3 00 

17 00 Princeton, by Rev. G. H. Woodward... 3 51 

Rockland, by E. M. Stubbs - 2586 

1 00 Rumford Point, by E . P. Smith 9 00 

2 00 Sandy Point, by Miss Emma Black 8 00 

7 00 Scarboro, by Rev. J. G. Merrill 15 00 

5 00 Searsport, by Mrs. N. T. Pendleton... 25 61 

11 00 South Paris, For Good Cause, by W. 

8 00 D. B 10 00 

5 00 Standish, by Mrs. L. P. Creston 8 00 

6 oo^ Sunset, by John Brown 9 00 

6 30 Thomaston, by Harriet E. Tillson 7 00 

5 00 Topsham, by Miss Fannie E. Purinton. 1 00 

407 Upton, by R. H. McPherson 2 10 

5 75 Vanceboro, by Rev. F. K. Ellsworth... 5 00 

3 50 Vassalboro, Adams Memorial, by Miss 

12 00 Burleigh 5 00 

1 00 Waldoboro, by Everett Trowbridge 15 00 

4 55 Woodford's, S. S., by Mrs. Rackliff 20 00 

1700 Woolwich, by Rev. H. M. Perkins 500 

4 co Woman's Maine Missionary Auxiliary. . 435 43 

5 00 Dividends 107 50 

9 2 5 7 

7 73 KS17 85 

5 00 Previously acknowledged 8,980 60 

15 00 

1 80 $10,798 45 



Received September 15 to December I, i{ 



Andover, by Rev. W. C. Adams $7 70 

Auburn, by J. F. Atwood 35 32 

Boston, Mass., Mrs. F. C. Stewart 2 00 

Bangor First, by W. P. Hubbard 100 00 

Hammond Street, Y. P. S. C. E 6 00 

Brewer, First, S. S., by John Harlow. . 10 00 



Cape Elizabeth, South, by Mrs. Sarah 
Cushman 

North, by Rev. S. Laughton 

N. Dyer, Thank-offering 

East Orrington, by Miss Ruth A. 

George 



6 35 



206 



The Home Missionary- 



January, 1899 



Eastport, by H. Kelly $18 03 

Farmington Falls, by Rev. G. A. Mer- 
rill 7 50 

Jackman, by Clara Colby 10 00 

Island Falls, Whitten Ch.. Y. P. S. C. E. n 00 
Kennebunk, Second, by W. R. Wheel- 
right 10 00 

Lyman, by J. E. Newton 50 

Lewiston, Pine Street, by A. L. Temple- 
ton 70 10 

Mt. Desert. A Lady 84 years old 1 00 

New Sharon, by Rev. G. A. Merrill 2 50 

North Edgecomb, by Rev. C. F. Bur- 
roughs 3 61 

Yarmouth, by Howard Cole 7 00 

Otisfield. by L. G. Spurr 4 00 

Portland, State Street, for debt 100 00 

Patten. C. W. Scribner r 00 

Perry, by G. H. Bachelor 5 00 

Penobscot Conference, by J. S. Ellis 6 00 



South Freeport, by Rev. A. Smith $29 28 

Sherman Mills, Washburn Memorial... 6 00 
South Brewer, $11.00 ; Y. P. S. C. E., 

$1.00 ; by Rev. J. Ramage 12 00 

South Gardiner, by H. Martin 10 50 

Solon, by Rev. G. K. Goodwin 7 45 

Union, Ch., $2.50 ; Rev. H. M. Perkins, 

$5-°° 7 5° 

West Brooksville 3 00 

Newfield. by Rev. J. G. W. Herold... 14 00 

Woodford's, Mrs. Mary A. Baxter 40 00 

Saco, Collection at Annual Meeting.... 40 61 

Bridgton, First, by A. E. Littlefield 15 80 

Machias, Center Ch., by W. W. Brad- 
bury 9 64 

Damaris Libbey, Legacy, add'l 3000 

Mary Fifield, Legacy, add'l 3805 

Woman's Auxiliary 279 33 

Dividends, etc 313 00 

$1,289 83 



NEW HAMPSHIRE HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Receipts of the New Hampshire Home Missionary Society in the quarter ending' November 
i, 1898. Hon. Lyman D. Stevens, Treasurer 



Berlin, Ch. and Soc 

Stoddard, Ch. and Soc 

East Sullivan, Ch. and Soc 

Bennington. Ch. and Soc, $3.45 : Y. P. 

S.C. E.,$6. 35 

East Andover. Ch. and Soc 

Wolf borough, First Ch. and Soc 

Wakefield, Ch. and Soc 

Andover, Ch. and Soc 

Milton. Ch. and Soc 

Wilmot, Ch. and Soc 

Dalton, Ch. and Soc 

Bradford, Ch. and Soc 

Epsom, Ch. and Soc 

South Barnstead, Ch. and Soc 

Goffstown, A Friend 

Alton, Ch. and Soc 

Pelham. Ch. and Soc, $29.50 ; for C. 

H. M.' S., $30 

Jaffrey, Ch. and Soc 

Keene. First Ch. and Soc 

Bartlett, Ch. and Soc 



*>5 


2 5 


9 


71 


5 


86 


9 


80 


17 


00 


30 


00 


H 


00 


7 


00 


11 


7" 


8 


C ■ > 


21 


1 ,0 


6 


60 


25 


53 


1 


00 


1 


00 


3 


65 


59 5° 


14 


00 


50 


00 


7 


23 



Walpole, Ch. and Soc $26 27 

Union. Ch. and Soc 1000 

Manchester, Hanover St., Ch. and Soc, 

S 5 ; S. S. $11.25 16 25 

Hinsdale, Ch. and Soc, $10.55 ; freight 

bill, Si. 45 12 00 

Pembroke, Legacy of Mrs. Mary W. 

Thompson 500 00 

Seabrook and Hampton Falls. Ch. and 

Soc, $4 ; Y. P. S. C. E., %2 600 

Meredith. First Ch. and Soc 20 50 

Lisbon, Heirs of W. H. Cummings 75 00 

Durham, Ch. and Soc 53 00 

Errol '7 35 

Canterbury, Ch. and Soc 4 00 

Lyndeboro, Ch . and Soc 10 54 

Plymouth, Ch. and Soc 60 00 

Campton, Income of Marsh Estate .... 8 00 

Dublin, Ch. and Soc 2 00 

Washington, S. S. of Ch. and Soc 5 00 

Hanover, Ch. Soc. and at Dartmouth 

College, for C. H. M. S 137 00 



VERMONT DOMESTIC MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Receipts of the Vermont Domestic M > 1 t ugust 2b to September 20, 

189S. Wm. C. Tyler, Treasurer 



Burke, for Women Evangelists. 

Cambridge ( Jefferson ville) 

Fair Haven 

Peacham 

Thetford. North. Junior C. E . . 
Troy, North 



$11 69 Vergennes $10 00 

10 00 Woodstock 179 11 

9 50 Vermont Missionary 1 60 

2016 W.H.M.U 5018 

12 00 Interest 71 00 

4 20 

$379 44 



Receipts from September 20 to October 20, 1898 



Bennington, North. 
Brattleboro, West.. 
ForC. H. M. S .. 
Bridgewater. First. 
Bristol, First 



$9454 Brown ington (for Evan.) $14 00 

17 00 Craftsbury. North 7 00 

2300 Dover, West 250 

22 06 Fairlee, West 3 50 

720 Marlboro 827 



January, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



207 



Montpelier (Bethany) $21 00 

Newfane, for work on frontier 30 60 

Springfield 2375 

Waterbury, for C. H. M. S 18 12 

Westminster, West 12 51 



W. H. M.U.. 

Vt. Missionary. . . . 
Interest, Trust Fd . 



$ 24 74 
28 98 
53 3° 

$434 °7 



Receipts from October 20 to November 20, li 



Arlington, East 

Benson 

Berkshire, East, S. S 

Brattleboro, Mrs. Mary L. Hadley. 

Bridgewater, Mrs. Scales 

Cornwall 

Coventry, C. H. M. S 

Danville 

Hardwick, East 

Hartland 

Irasburgh " 

Manchester, Dea. Sam'l G. Cone... 

Manchester 

Middlebury 



2.5 


OO 


10 


OO 


15 


OO 


25 


OO 


25 


00 


17 


3° 


12 


00 


18 


°5 


20 


00 


l8 


76 


5». 


75 



Morgan 

Northfield 

Troy, North, Willie D. Kelley. 

Waitsfield 

Weathersfield Center 

Weathersfield 

Wilmington 

Windsor Co. Conference 

Worcester, for Women Ev. . . . 

Supply of pulpit 

Interest 

Vermont Missionary 



$6 
16 


75 

66 


3 
8 


13 
00 


7 


5° 


3 
6 


00 
26 




29 


5 


00 


10 


00 


18 


90 


4 7° 



$343 27 



MASSACHUSETTS HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Receipts of the Massachusetts Home Missionary Society in September, 1898. Rev. 
Edwin B. Palmer, Treasurer 



Abington, First, by J. T. Richmond $12 29 

Amherst, South, by Rev. J. F. Gleason. 9 91 

Bank, Balances, August interest on 12 18 

Boston, A Friend 500 

Dorchester, second, E. C. A. Day 

Band, by Miss E. F. Merrill 10 00 

Village, by H. D. Hutchinson 12 00 

Roxbury, West, South Evan., by Mrs. 

Emily A. Hanmer 25 00 

Brookline, Harvard, by Jas. H. Shap- 

leigh 57 98 

Special for Italian mission 17 39 

Chatham, by Rev. D. W. Richardson.. 10 00 

Concord, Trinitarian, by Thomas Todd. 19 00 

Dalton, Crane, Mrs. Z. M 100 00 

Erving, Church, $3 ; King's Dau.'s, $3 ; 

C. E. Soc, $2 ; S. S., $2, by Rev. J. 

W. Brownville 10 00 

Everett, Mystic Side, by E. F. Tracy. .. 7 00 

Falmouth, First, by Obed F. Hitch. ... 33 00 
Fitchburg, Rollstone, by David Lowe.. _ 27 63 
Great Barrington, Housatonic S. S., by 

Miss A. R. Turner 25 00 

Holyoke, Second, by J. N. Hubbard.... 121 79 
Huntington, First (Norwich), by C. H. 

Kirkland 7 00 

H)'de Park, First, by E. A. Runnells. .. 14 08 

Ipswich, First, A Friend 5 00 

Lawrence, South, by J. Z. Buzzell (of 

which $8.81 for C. H. M. S.) 15 22 

Marion, S. S., by Susan A. Conro 2 10 

Marlboro, Union, by W. A. Dudley ... 109 88 
Middleboro, North, by Chas. S. Tink, 

ham 3033 



Newton, First (Center), by J. E. Rock- 
wood $165 51 

North Brookfield, First, by H. F. Moore 38 82 

Peabody, South, by Benj. M. Moore 125 00 

Pelham, by Mrs. L. C. Boynton 2 44 

Packardville, by D. O. Chickering.. . 3 00 

Reed, D wight. Fund, Income of 252 50 

Sandisfield, First, by Mrs. Sarah J. 

Hawley 3 50 

Shelburne Falls, by S. T. Field 2 00 

Topsfield, by E. S. Clifford 20 00 

Warren, A Friend 5 00 

Wayland. Trinitarian, by E. Carter. .. . 1050 
West Springfield, Ashley School and 

Char. Fund, by Sam'l Smith 178 06 

Weymouth, South, Union, by H. B. 

Reed ; . . . 31 09 

Whitin, J. C. Fund, Income of "25 00 

Williamsburg, Haydenville, by C. D. 

Waite 6 06 

Winchester, First, by H. A. Wheeler... 75 00 
For work among For. Pop., $75 00.* 
Pastor and Deacons. D. N. Skilling's 

annuity, by W. D. Middleton 100 00 

Worcester, Estate of Harriet W.Damon, 
by Executors Jamison and Barton 

(balance) 800 00 

Pilgrim, by F. L. Stetson, add'l 6 50 

Plymouth, by F. W. Chase 3582 

$2,584 58 

Home Missionary... 1 80 



$2,586 38 



Received in October, li 



Amherst, A Friend $50 00 

South, by Rev. J. F. Gleason 13 n 

Andover, Ballardvale, by Lizzie M. 

Rowland 74 85 

South, by John Alden, for Sal. of Rev. 

R. B. Wright, Boise City, Idaho. . 100 00 

West, by F. S. Boutwell 45 00 



Ashby, Ortho., by C. F. Hayward $12 66 

Ashland, by Edwin Perry 10 00 

Bank Balances, Sept. interest on. 6 59 

Berkley, by Rev. F. K. Beem 5 00 

Bernardston, by H. L. Crowell 6 45 

Beverly. Dane St., by Chas. L. Odell... 207 50 

Blandfbrd, Second, by Mrs. F. M. Bliss 5 00 



* Received and credited on special account. 



208 



The Home Missionary 



January, 1899 



Boston, Brighton Evan., by L. E. Bates, 

Treas $'3613 

Charlestovvn, Winthrop, by Geo. S. 

Poole . ... 113 80 

Dorchester, Fullerton, Mrs. Jacob 10 00 

Sunset offering of Mrs. J. T. Tucker 30 00 

Jamaica Plain, Central, by A. A. Max 

well 236 75 

Neponset. Mrs. A. A. Winsor 5 00 

Norwegian, by S. Clements 3 60 

Olivet, by L. P. Adams io 00 

Union, Special, for French-Am. Col- 
lege •. 50 00 

Boxford, West, by Rev. C. H. Hubbard 7 17 

Brackett, Fund, Income of 80 00 

Bridgewater. Scotland, by Mrs. S. O. 

Keith 2 25 

Brockton, Y. M. C. A., by B. F. Pierce, 

Treas 2 72 

Brookline, Leyden, by Geo. E. Adams. 143 26 
Cambridgcport, Pilgrim, by N. H. Hol- 

brook 82 37 

Canton, Ponkapoag, C. E. Soc.,byAmy 

A. Hunt 1 co 

Cohasset, Beech wood, by Miss Ella M. 

Bates 6 00 

Dedham, First, Allen, Evan. S. S., by 

H. A. Guild 17 30 

Duxbury, by J. H. Haverstock . . 24 oc 

Easthampton, First, by W. H. Wright.. 33 10 

Easton, Evan., by W. H. Andrews 25 00 

Fall River, French S. S. Army, by Miss 

Mary Bowcher 4 00 

Falmouth, Woods Holl, by Mrs. J. W. 

Bowles 7 58 

Framingham, South, Grace, by G. M, 

Amsden 7500 

Fitchburg, Calvinistic, Rally Service. .. 9 01 

Rollstone, C. E. Soc, by Martha S. 

Wright 5 50 

Franklin, by J. Herbert Raker 18 31 

Frost, Rufus S-, Fund, Income of 16 00 

Gurney, R. C, Fund, Income of , 39 25 

Hailc. S. W., Fund, Incomeof 62 50 

Hale, E. J. M., Fund, Incomeof 55 00 

Hanover, Second, by A. M. Barstow ... 2 24 

Harvard, Rev. C. C. Torrey 2 00 

Haverhill, West. C. E. Soc, by Rev. J. 

N. Lowell 2 00 

Hawlev, bv Rev. J. A Pogue 02 

West, by C. C. Fuller, Taft Thank- 
offering 10 11 

Hinsdale, by M. M. Went worth . . 16 00 

Kingston, Rally Service g qi 

Leicester, First, by David Bemis, Treas. 23 87 

Leominster, Rally Service 10 00 

Manchester, by Geo. F. AMen 26 78 

Marlboro, Miss Lucy A. Patch 70 

Mass., a Friend 10 00 

Medford Union, by Rev. I. Pierson, 

D.D., in part 1500 

West, by J. H. Gerrish 16 00 

S. S., by A. H. Wyatt ,0 00 



Medway, West, Third, by Geo. W. Bul- 

lard $ig 00 

Monson, W. S. Nichols, net proceeds of 

Hubbardston Estate 527 41 

New Bedford , a Friend 25 00 

Newbury, First, by Edward Perkins... 18 22 
Newton, Auburndale, by C. C. Burr, 

add'l 1 00 

Eliot, by Geo. N. Putnam 300 00 

S. S., by Geo. R. McFarlin 27 67 

North Attleboro, Trinity, C. E. Soc, by 

Rev. C. A. Ratcliff 6 20 

Northbridge, Whitinsville, E. C. A. day 

Band, by Mrs. C. E. Whitin 17 01 

Oxford, by Rev. A. E. Bradstreet 5 00 

Plymouth Manomet, Twenty four Indi- 
viduals, by Mrs. David Clark 11 00 

Reading, by Dean Peabody 2500 

Reed, Dwight fund, Income 64 00 

Rollins, fund. Income of 20 00 

Shutesbury, by Dea. N. A. Briggs 25 00 

Somerville, First, by Geo. E. Dustin. .. n 89 

Springfield, First, by Henry G. Camp. . 10 00 

Hope, by Jas. B. Keene 21 06 

North Ch., $4.00 ; Ladies' H. M. Soc, 

S350, by Miss H. M. Towne 7 50 

Olivet, by Geo. L. Kilbon. w. p. g. to 
const. Mrs. S. A. Street a L. M. 

of C. H. M. S 45 00 

Bible School, by L. C. Burnett 15 00 

St John's, by Rev. F. W. Sims. .,. 5 co 

Stockbridge, Orth. C. E. Soc, by Miss 
M. Byington (of which $10 for Alaska 

Work) 1500 

Sudbury, South, Memorial, by L. F. 

Richardson 28 25 

Wakefield , by W. P. Preston 23 72 

Wall fund, Incomeof 32 00 

Walpole, Second, by S. E. Bentley 16 75 

Warren, by Eugene F. Wood 166 22 

Westport, Pacific Union S. S., by J. C. 

Macomber 9 83 

Whitcomb, David fund, Income of 193 50 

Whitin J. C. fund, Income of 337 50 

Whitman, Remnant 40 

Williamstown, White Oaks, C. E. Soc, 

by W. R. Stocking 6 50 

Worcester, Damon, Harriet W., Est. 
of, by Sam'l Jennison, Ex., on 

acc't 474 88 

Piedmont, by A. W. Eldred .. 5500 

Pilgrim, by F. L. Stetson 25 00 

Union, by C.'B. Greene 74 28 

Yarmouth, William Matthews 1 00 

Woman's Home M issionary Association, 

by Miss A. C. Bridgman, Treas. : 

Grant of Association to C. H. M. Soc. . 2.225 °° 
Boston, Rox., Wal. Ave. Aux., for Sal. 

of Rev. S. Deakin 4500 

$8,189 77 



Home Missionary 



Received in A'ovember, 1898 



Abington, First, by J. T. Richmond $8 

Barnstable Co. Conference, by Rev. 

John J . Walker 5 

Barre, S. S., by Mabel D. Hancock 8 

Bedford, by Wm. M. Sawin 21 

Boys' and Girls' H. M. Army, by 

Miss C.P. Webber 

Boston, Central, by John A. Bennett... 1,093 
Dorchester, Second, E -C.-a-day Band. 

by Miss E. F. Morrill 6 

For work of Dr. H. A. Schauffler. . . 4 

Village, by H. D. Hutchinson 3 

Mount Vernon. A Member 20 

Old South, in part, by Jos. H. Gray . . 1.382 



31 Brackett, Fund, Income of $ 80 00 

Braintree, First, by A B. Keith 6 00 

27 Brockton, Campello, South, by Frank 
96 P. Mills, to Vonst. Rufus P. Keith, 
51 Herbert Holmes, Miss Charlotte L. 

Kimball, and Miss Lizzie L. Mitch- 
50 ell L. Ms. of C. H. M. Soc 20000 

32 Porter, Rally Service, by C. P. Hol- 

land 14 05 

00 Brookfield, Mrs. C. P. Blanchard for C. 

00 H. M. S 3500 

50 Brookline, Leyden-, by G. E. Adams 

00 ( add '1 ) 1 3 20 

28 Chicopee, Second, by Chas. A. Taylor.. 3071 



' January, li 



The Home Missionary 



209 



Cohasset, Second, by P. Bates ; . . . $68 50 

Conway, by Francis Howland 22 00 

C. E. Soc, by F. Howland, for Alaska 

work 10 00 

Dartmouth, South, by E. B. Sturtevant. 5 00 

Dighton, North, H. M. Soc, by Mrs. M. 

L. Smith 10 50 

Dover, by J. W. Higgins 11 00 

Dunstable, by Wm. P. Proctor 500 

Falmouth, James Nye, Annuity, one 

and a half years 16 80 

Fitchburg, Grace U. Davis 500 

Foxboro, Bethany, by Horace Carpen- 
ter 11 SS 

Freetown, by G. M. Nichols 516 

Gloucester, Trinity, C. E. Soc, by 

Marg't S. Millard, for Alaska work. .. 20 00 

Grafton, Evan., by Geo. K. Nichols 37 02 

Hale, E. J. M., Fund, Income of 20 00 

Halifax, by Mrs. Lydia H. Grover 20 00 

Hamilton, by Joseph P. Lovering 22 10 

Hanson, C. E. Soc, by Abbie J. Clark. . 3 00 

Haverhill, West, S. S.. by H. A. Poore, 

to const. E. F. Webster a L. M. of 

C. H. M. S 50 00 

Hawley, C. E. Soc, by Eva C. Holden. 2 85 

Hinsdale, by M. M. Wentworth SS 30 

Holden, by Mrs. M. E. Warren 14 73 

Hudson, S. S. H. M. Army, .by Milton 

T. Bailey 3 89 

Lancaster, Ladies' Benev. Soc, by Mrs. 

H.A.Marshall 1000 

Lawrence, Lawrence St., by Rev. W. E. 

Wolcott, for Local Arm. Work, $15.* 
Leicester, C. E. Soc, by Herbert E. 

Currier, " for debt " 1000 

Leverett, First, by S. K. Field 9 25 

Longmeadow, Benev. Association, by L. 

C. Fay 12296 

Lowell, Armenian population, by Rev. 
H. K. Santikian, for Local Arm. 
work, $30.00.* 

Eliot, by James Howard, for Local 
Arm. work, $15.90.* 

High St., by G. H. Candee 131 96 

Lynn, First, by Mrs. C. M. Staton 45 00 

North, by A. Earle iS 71 

Maiden, First, by C. F. Belcher 141 12 

Manchester, W. B. M. Auxiliary, by 

Miss A. A. Phillips 10 00 

Marion, Rally Collection, by Dana M. 

Dustan 7 26 

Medford, South, H. L. Jones 30 00 

Monson, by E. F. Morris 30 00 

Newton (Center), First, C. E. Soc, by 

Wm. E. Cobb 2 42 



Natick, South, Home Miss. Army, by 

Eleanor B. Smith 

North Andover, by F. W. Frisbee 

(add'l) 

Northbridge, Rockdale, H. M. Army, 

by Benj. W. Brown 

North Brookfield, Mrs. J. E. Porter 

Palmer (Thorndike), First, by C. F, 

Smith ~ 

Plympton, by Rev. E. C. Davis 

Silver Lake, C. E. Soc, by Geo. O. 

Glass 

Porter, Rev. J. S., by Treas. A. B. C. F. 

M 

Rollins, Fund, Income of 

Salem, Tabernacle, S. S., Primary Dept., 

by Miss A. K. Woodbury 

Saugus, by John E. Stocker 

Shirley, Jr. C. E. Soc, by Mrs. Joseph 

Torrey 

Southboro, by Mrs. Chas. Temple 

South Hadley, First, by L. M. Gay lord. 

Spencer, Chas. W. Powers 

Stoneham, by O. W. Richardson (add'l) 

Swampscott, by J. W. Butcher 

Taunton, Broadway, Rally Collection.. 

Trinitarian, by A. E. Williams, to 
const. Rev. Francis E. Fate and 
Mrs. Lottie B. Fate L. Ms. of C. H. 
M. Soc, and Chester E. Walker, 
Frank P. Smerdon, Mrs. Nettie B. 
Hutchinson, and Mrs. Helen C. 

Williams L. Ms. of M. H. M. S 

Wakefield, Rally Collection, by W. P. 

Preston 

Walpole, " G. " 

Waltham, Trinitarian, by T. W. Temple 

Westboro, Evan., by R.'F. Corey .. 

Westhampton, by A. D. Montague 

West Stockbridge, First, by Rev. W. 

W. Curtis 

Weymouth and Braintree, Union, by 

E. F. Bowles.... 

Whitcomb, David, Fund, Income of . . . . 
Williamsburg, Rally Collection, by Geo. 

T. Hillman 

Woman's Home Missionary Association, 

by Miss M. L. Woodberry, Asst. 

Treas. ; Grant towards Salary of Mrs. 

I. N. Tillinghast, of the French Prot. 

College in Springfield, $200.00 



12 

2 


51 
SS 


5 


00 


5 
20 


00 
00 


5 
35 


00 
IS 


2 


00 


23 

18 

1 


00 

°3 
12 


1 


00 


9 
8 


42 
09 



223 aa 

14 00 
25 00 
19 79 
56 11 
23 00 

10 00 

36 00 
250 00 

4 36 



Home Missionary. 



THE MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF CONNECTICUT 



Receipts of the Missionary Society of Connecticut in September, 1898. 

Jacobs, Treasurer 



Ward W. 



Bridgeport, Black Rock, by D. H. Stur- 

ges 

Swedish, by Martin A. Moller 

Bristol, Swedish, by Rev. H. Palmer... 

Colchester, First, by Edward F. Strong. 

Cornwall, Second, by H. M. Pratt 

Coventry, Second, by Andrew Kings- 
bury 

Danburv, Swedish, by Charles J. Lar- 
son ..." 

East Hartford. First, by Erastus C. 

Geer 

South, by Rev. F. P. Bacheler 

Fairfield, Southport, by Mrs. Henry T. 
Bulkley « 



Glastonbury, First, by M. S. Tracy, for 
C. H. M. S 

Haddam, First, by Rev. E. E. Lewis.. 

Hamden, Mt. Carmel, by L. A. Dicker- 
man, for C. H. M.S 

Lebanon, First, by Julia R. Maxwell.. 

Litchfield, First, by Miss Clara B. Ken- 
nev 

Middletown, First, by E. P. Augur 

Morris, by Samuel A. Whittlesey 

New Hartford, Nepaug, Church and 
Y. P. S. C. E., by J. B. Spencer 

New Haven, D wight Place, by Fred. C. 

Lum 

Taylor, by J . E. Leighton 



2B 50 

15 48 



I 00 

19 03 



102 60 
4 4o 



* Received and credited on special account. 



2IO 



The Home Missionary 



January, 1899 



North Branford, by Reverend Charles 
Page 

North Canaan, Pilgrim, by J. B. Reed. 

Plainville, by M. S. Corning, for C. H. 
M. S 



Thomaston, First, by H. A. Welton, for 

822 82 C. H. M. S 

15 08 Woodstock, West Woodstock, by A. W. 
Bicknell 

50 22 



$10 12 
Q 00 



&i,2i8 57 



Received in October, 1S98 



Andover, Y. P. S. C. E., by C- C. Case. $10 00 
Avon, West Avon, by Rev. John A. 

Hawley 1000 

Bethlehem, by Samuel P. Hayes', for 

C. H. M.S 36 63 

Branford, Stony Creek, by Rev. George 

A. Pelton 10 00 

Bridgeport, Black Rock, by Rev. H. C. 

Woodruff 25 00 

Canterbury. First, by Thomas G. Clark, 

forC. H. M. S 1200 

Canton. Collinsville, Swedish, by Rev. 

J. E. Widen 12 50 

Farmington, First, by Richard H. Gay. 70 00 

Gilead, by A. W. Hutchinson 26 28 

Glastonbury, South Glastonbury, H. D. 

Hale 2000 

Greenwich. Second, by E. N. Judd.. . 48 22 

Griswold. by Rev. F. E. Allen, for 

C. H. M.S 26 00 

Haddam, Haddam Neck, by William F. 

Brainerd 10 00 

Hartford, First, by C. T. Welles, for 

C. H. M. S 127 87 

Warburton Chapel S. S., by Miss 

Eliza F. Mix 6 06 

Asylum Hill, by Charles E. Thomp- 
son 100 00 

Hebron, by F. N. Gillette 12 13 

Madison, First, Ladies' Cent Society, by 

Mrs. John S. Hoyt 30 93 

Manchester, North, Mrs. Lucy G. Spen- 
cer 100 00 



Mrs. Lucy J. Ford 

Mansfield, First, by H. S. Brown 

Marlboro, by John Lord 

Middletown, South, by G. A. Craig 

Third, by J. J. Wilcox 

Swedish, by A. P. Bergman 

Naugatuck, Swedish Mission, by Aug. 

J. Lindquist 

New Haven, First, by Fred. T. Eradley. 
New London, First, by George Whittle- 
sey 

Second, by Francis N. Braman 

Est. of Jonathan N. Harris, \ of \% 

of income from trust fund 

Newtown, by George F. Duncombe 

North Canaan, First, by A. B. Garfield. 

Preston, by H. H. Palmer 

Putnam, Second, by E. F. Whitman 

Somers, C. B. Pease 

Suffield, West Suffield, by Benjamin 

Sheldon 

Thomaston, First, by H. A. Welton, for 
C. H. M. S 

Swedish, by A. Carlson 

Union, by Roscius Back 

Vernon, by H. L. James, forC. H. M. S. 
Voluntown, Ekonk, by Rev. John Elder- 
kin 

Waterbury, Third, by Miller C. Haynor. 
Woodstock, Swedish, by Rev. C. E. 

Carlson 



©100 00 . 
43 00 

3 58 
28 03 

6 59 

4 00 

5 25 
155 95 

27 32 
250 00 

1,875 00 

7 20 
4 22 



25 69 

13 25 
3 55 
7 28 



8 00 

18 02 



$3,346 25 



Received in November, \i 



Barkhamsted, by Wallace Case 

Riverton, by D. F. Ransom 

Bridgeport, Park Street, by Adna S. 

Hall 

Burlington, by Samuel Russell 

Chester, S. S. Mission Circle, Special, 

by Rev. Alexander Hall 

Clinton, by E. E. Post 

East Haddam. First, by E. W. Chaffee. 

For C. H. M. S 

Guilford, First, S. S.. by S. D. Blatchley 
Hartford, First, Home Department in 

S. S., by Knighton Smith 

Harwinton. by Albert G. Wilson 

Madison. First, Ladies' Missionary Soc, 
by ( harlotte A. Gallup 

North Madison, by Joel M. Hill, for 

C. H. M. S 

Manchester, Second, by Levi Drake.. .. 

ForC. H. M. S 

Middlefield, by Rev. John Allender 



$11 07 
12 00 

45 35 
12 00 

12 75 
40 10 

18 ^\ 
20 58 
25 00 

25 00 
4 80 



73 82 
73 82 
36 49 



New Haven, Danish, by John Meng. . . . 

Norfolk, by Stephen Selden 

Old Say brook, bv Robert Chapman 

ForC. H. M. S 

Oxford, by Rev. G. L. Schaeffer 

Plymouth, First, by Arthur Beardsley.. 
Stamford, North Stamford, by William 

B. Weed 

Southington, Plantsville, by E. P. 

Hotctikiss 

Thompson, by J. W. Dike, for C. H. 

M.S 

Vernon, Rockville, by H. L. James, for 

C. H. M. S 

Windham, North Windham, by O. E. 

Col burn 

Windsor Locks, by C. A. Porter 



iio 


00 


79 


16 


9 


J 3 


9 


12 


20 


47 


'9 


i»i 


10 


00 


32 


2 2 


3° 


00 


5 


00 



5 00 
70 85 



;i 94 



M. S. C, $590.92 ; C. H. M. S., $141.02. $731 94 



MICHIGAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Receipts of the Michigan Home Missionary Society in September, 1S98. Rev. John 

P. Sanderson. Treasurer 



Detroit. First $75 00 

Drummond 1 00 

East Gilead 1 76 

Imlay City 70 00 

Kalkaska 2 00 



Kinderhook . 
Lake Linden 

Merrill 

Solon 

Somerset 



7 25 
2 91 

8 go 



January, li 



The Home Missionary 



211 



Webster, Y. P. S. C. E $2 

Watervliet 5 

Williamston 1 

Refunded bv C. H. M. S 153 

W. H. M. U., by Mrs. E. F. Grabill, 

Treas 442 



[Anonymous gift of $70 reported in 
August should have been $35.] 

FOR THE DEBT 

Big Rapids, V. H. Hanchett , $3 

Charlevoix, Rev. John Allworth 5 

Detroit, First 175 

Dowagiac, Rev. C. H. Couch 2 

Grand Haven, Mrs. D. A. Richardson.. 1 

Grand Rapids, First, E. D. Winchester 5 

Mrs. H. C. Clay 1 

Hudson, Rev. H. A. Putnam 5 

Lake Linden : 15 

Muskegon, First 10 

L. K. Soper 1 

Olivet, Mrs. W. G. Sperry 1 

Ypsilanti, Rev. B. F. Aldrich 5 



Receipts of W. H. M. U. of Michigan 
for Home Missions;- in September, 
1898, by Mrs. E. F. Grabill, Treas.: 

SENIOR SOCIETIES 

Ann Arbor, W. H. M. U 

Bay View, Mrs. Joel Martin 

Bronson, W. H. M. U 

Cheboygan, W. H. M. U 

Highland Station, W. H. M. U., thank- 
offering 

Hopkins Station, W. H. M. S 

Jackson, W. H. M. S 

Lake Linden, W. H. M. S 

Manistee 

Muskegon, First, W. M. S 

Olivet, L. B. S 

Victor, W. H. M. S 

Whitehall, L. A. S 

Whittaker, W. H. M. S 



YOUNG PEOPLE'S FUND 

Ann Arbor, Y. P. S. C. E 

Greenville, Jun. Miss. Band 



$5 00 



11 11 

3 5° 
25 05 
20 00 
50 00 

S °° 
27 00 

5 °° 
10 00 

4 S° 



182 16 



15 co 
58 



Received in October, li 



Alamo $6 25 

Allenville 1 50 

Atlanta 50 

Big Rock 1 35 

Bridgman 3 00 

Chase 3 00 

Clinton 15 00 

East Paris 5 00 

Farwell S 00 

Flat Rock 1 85 

Freeport 4 34 

Garden 10 00 

Harrison, Miss Seaver 500 

Hunter's Creek, Y. P. S. C. E 2 00 

Jackson, Plymouth 4 09 

Lacey 5 00 

Lawrence 13 21 

Lewiston 7 50 

Mulliken 25 00 

Olivet 735 

Rapid River 2 06 

Rochester, Y. P. S. C. E 7 50 

Salem, First 11 00 

Y. P. S. C E 2 00 

Salem, Second 17 06 

Vanderbilt 5 10 

Vienna 3 10 

Wheatland 26 15 

Wolverine 5 00 

Y. P. S. C. E 5 00 

A Friend . 100 00 

Mrs. E. W. Woodward, Stockbridge.. . 2 00 

Interest 10 00 

W. H. M. U. of Michigan, by Mrs. E. 

F. Grabill 399 57 

$721 42 

FOR THE DEBT 

Detroit, First $50 00 

Galesburg, Rev. Wm. Millar 2 00 

Grand Rapids, First, D. F. Bradley.... 20 00 

Mrs. H. C. Clay 100 

Lamont, Y. P. C. E., Jr 5 00 

Lansing, Plymouth 33 25 

Owosso 1375 

Interest 30 

$125 30 



Receipts of W. H. M. U. of Michigan, 
in October, 1898, for State work, by- 
Mrs. E. F. Grabill, Treas.: 



SENIOR FUND 

Allegan, W. M. S $9 37 

Thanksgiving 5 00 

Alamo, W. H. & F. M. S 4 50 

Benton Harbor, L. M. U 7 23 

Ceresco, W. M. S 4 93 

Charlotte, L. B. S 25 00 

Church, W. H. M. S 11 00 

Clinton, W. M. S 1900 

Detroit, First, W. A 20 00 

Woodward Ave., W. U 37 5° 

Dexter, W. H. M. S 12 00 

Dorr, W. M. S 5 00 

Dundee, W. M. S 10 00 

Grand Blanc, W. M. S 600 

Grand Rapids, Plymouth, W. M. S.. 3 00 

Grass Lake, W. H. M. S 15 00 

Greenville, W. H. M. S 2 15 

Hopkins, First, W. H. M. U 5 00 

Interest on Notes 75 00 

Interest on Gas Bonds 125 00 

Lansing, Plymouth, L. S 9 47 

Ovid, W. Y. C. M. S 4 00 

Reed City, W. M. S-, Thank-offering. 6 90 

Salem, Second, W. H. M. S 12 30 

St. John, W. M. S 6 09 



YOUNG PEOPLE S FUND 



Greenville, Juvenile Miss. Band. 

Hudson, Y. P. S. C. E 

Saginaw, First, Y. P. S. C. E. . . . 



40 44 



$036 

7 00 

10 00 

Bi7 36 



[Omitted in August: Tipton and Franklin, W. 
H. & F. M. S., $4.-00.] 



212 



The Home Missionary 

Received in November, 1898 



January, 1899 



Ada, Second 

Ann Arbor 

Alpena, S. S 

Bellaire 

Bethel 

Bronson 

Central Lake, S. S 

Charlotte 

Chassell, Y. P. S. C. E 

Chester Station 

Chippewa Lake 

Copemish 

Crystal 

Delhi 

Detroit, Woodward Ave 

Durand 

Grand Ledge, S. S 

Harrison 

W. H. S 

Jr. Y. P. S. C.E 

Hart 

Highland Station 

Hopkins, S. S 

Hudson 

Hudsonville 

Ionia, propeny rent 

Jackson, First 

Kalkaska, Y. P. S. C. E 

Lake Odessa 

Lansing. Plymouth 

Mancelona, S. S 

Muskegon. First 

Newburyport, Mass., for freight 

Oak wood, Harold T. Campbell 

Pontiac 

Ransom 

Rodney 

Thompsonville . 

Three Oaks 

Whittaker 

W. H. M. C, by Mrs. E F. Grabill, 

Treas 



$6 56 

103 80 

8 91 

6 50 

2 87 
12 17 

3 5° 

20 00 
2 03 

5 00 

15 00 
2 00 

6 17 
1 90 

100 00 

4 05 

1 60 

16 CO 

2 00 

2 00 

2D IO 

3 2I 

5 56 
5i 3° 

5 00 
10 25 
100 00 

5 °° 

2 SO 

37 35 

6 83 

21 74 

2 00 
10 

36 25 
10 00 

5 00 

3 00 

6 00 

4 5^ 

244 5i 
$902 28 



FOR DEBT 



Ada. First. Rev. T. \V. Spanswick. 

Cheboygan, Rev. F. C. Wood 

Galesburg 

Kalamazoo. R. W. McLaughlin 



Receipts of W. H. M. U. of Michigan in 
November, 1898. for Home Missions, 
by Mrs. E. F. Grabill, Treas.: 

SENIOR FUND 

Alpena. W. H. M. S 

Ann Arbor. W. H. M. S 

Armada, W. M. S 

Detroit, Mt. Hope, L. S 

Brewster. L. H. M. S 

Dowagiac, W. H. M. U 

Frankfort, W. H. M. U 

Grand Rapids. Park, W. H. M. U. ... 

South. W. M. S 

Grape, W. H. M. S 

Greenville, W. H. M. S 

Hancock, L. M . S 

Harrison, W. H. M. S 

Interest on note 

Leslie. Second. W. M. S 

Litchfield, Miss C. A. Turrcll 

Muskegon, First. W. M. S 

Otsego, W. H. M. S 

Portland, L. M. S 

Saginaw, W. S 

Vermontville. W. H. M. S 

Watervliet, W. H. M. S . of which 

Thank-offering, $15 

YOUNG PEOPLE'S FIND 

Allegan, Junior, C. E. S 

Detroit, First. Young Woman's Union 
Owosso, Y. P. S. C.E 






$2 

I 


50 

66 


10 


50 


IO 


00 



$24 66 



$50 00 
40 00 
25 00 

3 00 
10 00 

6 00 

8 00 
30 00 

9 00 
5 00 
2 85 

10 oo- 
10 00 
5 08 

5 °° 

6 00 
20 00 

8 00 
6 00 



17 80 



$341 


73 


$3 


00 


25 


OO 


5 


OO 


33 


00 



$374 73 



WOMAN'S STATE HOME MISSIONARY 
ORGANIZATIONS 



1. NEW HAMPSHIRE 
FEMALE CENT INSTITUTION 

Organized August. 1804 

and 

HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized June. 1890 

President, Mrs . W. D Knapp Sotncrsworth. 

a ■!. Mrs M- W. Nims, 16 Rumiord St., 
(uncord. 
Treasurer, Miss Annie A. McFarland, 196 No. 
Main St., Concord. 

2. MINNESOTA 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized September, 1872 
President, Miss Catherine W. Nichols, 230 E. <>th 

St.. St. Paul. 
Secretary, Mrs. A. P. Lyon. 010 Sixth Ave, S.. 

Minneapolis. 
Treasurer, Mrs. M. W. Skinner. Northfield. 



OFFICERS 

3. ALABAMA 
WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized March. 1877 
Reorganized April, 1 
President. Mrs. G. W. Andrews, Talladega 

tary, Mrs. J. S. Jackson. Montgomery. 
Treasure) . Mrs. E. C. Silsby, Talladega. 



4. MASSACHUSETTS AND RHODE 
ISLAND * 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY ASSOCIA- 
TION 
Organized February, 1880 
President, Mrs. C. L. Goodell, 32 Congregational 

House, Boston. 
Secretary, Mrs Louise A. Kellogg, 32 Congrega- 
tional House. Boston. 
Treasurer, Miss Annie C. Bridgiran. 32 Congre- 
gational House. Boston. 



* While the W. H. M. A. appears in the above list as a State body for Massachusetts and Rhode 
Island, it has certain auxiliaries elsewhere. 



January, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



213 



5. MAINE 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY AUXILIARY 

Organized June, 1880 

President, Mrs. Katherine B. Lewis. So. Berwick. 

Secretary, Mrs. Gertrude H. Denio, 168 Ham- 
mond St., Bangor. 

Treasurer, Mrs. Rose M. Crosby, 64 Grove St., 
Bangor. 

6. MICHIGAN 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1881 

President, Mrs. I. P. Powell, 76 Jefferson Ave,, 

Grand Rapids. 
Secretary, Mrs. E. N. Thorne, 212 So. Union St., 

Grand Rapids. 
Treasurer, Mrs. E. F. Grabill, Greenville. 

7. KANSAS 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1881 

President, Mrs. R. B. Guild, 1336 Dillon St., 

Topeka. 
Secretary, Mrs. M. H. Jaquith, 1157 FilmoreSt., 

Topeka. 
» Treasurer, Miss May Wilkinson, Ottawa. 

8. OHIO 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1882 

President, Mrs C. W. Carroll, 48 Brookfield St., 

Cleveland. 
Secretary, Mrs. J. W. Moore, 515 The Ellington, 

Cleveland. 
Treasurer, Mrs. George B. Brown, 2116 Warren 

St., Toledo. 

9. NEW YORK 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1883 

President, Mrs. Wm. Kincaid, 483 Greene Ave., 

Brooklyn. 
Secretary, Mrs. Wm. Spalding, 513 Orange St., 

Syracuse. 
Treasurer, Mrs. J. J. Pearsall, 153 Decatur St., 

Brooklyn. 

10. WISCONSIN 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1883 

President, Mrs. E. G. Updike, Madison. 
Secretary, Mrs. A. O. Wright, Madison. 
Treastcrer, Mrs. L. E. Smith, Madison. 



12. OREGON 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized July, 1884 
President, Mrs. F.- Eggert, The Hill, Portland. 
Cor. Sec, Mrs. D. D. Clarke, 447 E. 12th St., No. 

Portland. 
Treasurer, Mrs. C. F. Clapp, Forest Grove. 



13. WASHINGTON 

Including Northern Idaho 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized July, 1884 

Reorganized June, 1889 

President, Mrs. A. Judson Bailey, 1614 Second 

Secretary, Mrs. W. C. Wheeler, 424 South K St., 

Tacoma. 
Treasurer, Mrs. W. D. Wood, Holyoke Block, 

Seattle. 



14. SOUTH DAKOTA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized September, 1884 
President, Mrs. C. E. Corry, Columbia. 
Secretary, Mrs. K. M. Jenney, Huron. 
Treasurer , Mrs. F. M. Wilcox, Huron. 

15. CONNECTICUT 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized January, 1885 

President, Miss Ellen R. Camp, 9 Camp St., New 

Britain. 
Secretary, Mrs. C. T. Millard, 36 Lewis St., 

Hartford. 
Treasurer, Mrs. W. W. Jacobs, 530 Farmington 
Ave., Hartford. 

16. MISSOURI 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1885 
President, Mrs. Henry Hopkins, 916 Holmes St., 

Kansas City. 
Secretary, Mrs. L. F. Doane, 3319 East Ninth St., 

Kansas City. 
Treasurer, Mrs. K. L. Mills, 1526 Wabash Ave., 

Kansas City. 



17. ILLINOIS 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1885 

President, Mrs. Sidney Strong, 234 N. Elmwood 

Ave., Oak Park. 
Secretary, Mrs. A. O. Whitcomb, 463 Irving Ave., 

Chicago. 
Treasurer, Miss B. E. Crosby, 416 N. Oak Park 
Ave., Oak Park. 



11. NORTH DAKOTA 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized November, 1883 
President, Mrs. J. L. Maile, Fargo. 
Secretary, Mrs. Silas Daggett, Harwood. 
Treasurer, Mrs. J. M. Fisher, Fargo. 



18. IOWA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized June, 1886 
President, Mrs. L. F. Berry. Ottumwa. 
Secretary. Mrs. H. H. Robbins, Grinnell. 
Treasurer, Miss Belle L. Bentley, W. Grand Ave., 
Des Moines. 



214 



The Home Missionary 



January, ii 



19. CALIFORNIA 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Organized October, 1887 

President, Mrs. E. S. Williams, Saratoga. 

Secretary, Mrs. F. B. Perkins, 546 24th St., Oak- 
land. 

Treasurer, Mrs. J. M. Haven, 1329 Harrison St., 
Oakland. 



25. COLORADO 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1888 

Hon. Fres., Mrs. J. W. Pickett, Whitewater. 
President, Mrs. E. R. Drake, 2739 Lafayette St. 

Denver. 
Secretary, Mrs. Addison Blanchard, 309 31st Ave., 

Denver. 
Treasurer, Mrs. B. C. Valentine, Highlands. 



20. NEBRASKA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized November, 1887 

President. Mrs. D. B. Perry. Crete. 
Secretary. Mrs. H. Bross. 2904 Q St., Lincoln. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Charlotte C. Hall, 1318 C St. 
Lincoln. 



26. WYOMING 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1888 

Reorganized December, 1892 

President, Mrs. F. W. Powelson, Cheyenne. 
Secretary. Mrs. W. L. Whipple. Cheyenne. 
Treasurer, Mrs. J. M. Brown, Wheatland. 



21. FLORIDA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized February, 1888 

President, Mrs. S. F. Gale. Jacksonville. 
Secretary, Mrs. J. H. Phillips, Melbourne. 
Treasurer, Mrs. W. D. Brown, Interlachen. 



27. GEORGIA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized November, 1888 

New Organization October, 1898 

President, Miss M. L. Graham, Savannah. 
Secretary, Miss Jennie Curtis, Mcintosh. 
Treasurer, Miss Mattie Turner, Athens. 



22. INDIANA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1888 

President, Mrs. W. A. Bell, 223 Broadway, In- 
dianapolis. 
Secretary, Mrs. D. F. Coe, Elkhart. 
Treasurer, Mrs. A. H. Ball, Anderson. 



28. MISSISSIPPI 
WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized April, 1889 

President, Mrs. C. L. Harris, 1421 31st Ave., Me- 
ridian. 

Secretary, 

Treasurer, Mrs. L. H. Turner, 3112 12th St., Me- 
ridian. 



23. SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized May, 1888 

President, Mrs. Warren F. Day, 949 So. Hill St., 

Los Angeles. 
Secretary, Mrs. Kate G. Robertson, Mentone. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Mary M. Smith, Public Library, 

Riverside. 



2g. LOUISIANA 
WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized April, 1889 

President, Mrs. L. St. J. Hitchcock, 2436 Canal St., 

New Orleans. 
Secretary, Mrs. Matilda Cabrere, 2419 Conti St., 

New Orleans. 
Treasurer, Miss Mary L. Rogers, 2436 Canal St., 

New Orleans. 



30. ARKANSAS, KENTUCKY, AND TEN- 
24. VERMONT NESSEE 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION OF THE 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION CENTRAL SOUTH ASSOCIATION 

Organized June, 1888 Organized April, 1889 

President, Mrs. W. J. Van Patten, 386 Pearl St., President, Mrs. Ella S. Moore, Bo.-: 8, Fisk Uni 
Burlington. versity, Nashville, Tenn. 

Secretary, Mrs. M. K. Paine. Windsor. Secretary. Miss Mary L. Corpier, Florence. Ala. 

Treasurer, Mrs. Rebecca P. Fairbanks, St. Johns- Treasurer, Mrs. J. E. Moreland, 216 N. McNairy 
bury. St., Nashville, Tenn. 



January, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



215 



31. NORTH CAROLINA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, i8Sg 

President, Mrs. S. S. Sevier, McLeansville. 
Secretary \ 

and >-Miss A. E. Farrington, Oaks. 
Treasurer, ) 



32. TEXAS 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized March, i8go 

President, Mrs. Eunice Heflin, Sherman. 
Secretary, Mrs. Donald Hinkley, Dallas. 
Treasurer , Mrs. A. Geen, Dallas. 



33. MONTANA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1890 

President, Mrs. V. F. Clark, Livingston. 
Secretary, Mrs. H. J. Miller, Livingston. 
Treasurer, Mrs. W. S. Bell, 410 Dearborn Ave., 
Helena. 



34. PENNSYLVANIA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized June, 1890 

President, Mrs. J. S. Utpon, Ridgway. 

Secretary, Mrs. C. F. Chamberlain, Cambridge- 
boro. 

Treasurer, Mrs. T. W. Jones, 511 Woodland Ter- 
race, Philadelphia. 



35. OKLAHOMA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1890 

President, Mrs. J. H. Parker, Kingfisher. 
Secretary, Mrs. Joel Harper, Oklahoma City. 
Treasurer, Mrs. A. B. Hammer, Oklahoma City. 



36. NEW JERSEY 

Including District of Columbia, Maryland, 
and Virginia 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION OF 
THE NEW JERSEY ASSOCIATION 

Organized March, 1891 

President, Mrs. A. H. Bradford, Montclair. 
Secretary, Mrs. F. J. Goodwin, Glen Ridge. 
Treasurer, Mrs. J. H. Denison, 150 Belleville Ave., 
Newark. 



37. UTAH 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1891 

Reorganized December, 1892 

President, Mrs. W. S. Havvkes, 135 Sixth East 

Street, Salt Lake City. 
Secretary, Mrs. L. E. Hall, 78 East First North 

Street, Salt Lake City. 
Treasurer, Mrs. J. D. Nutting, Third North and' 

Quince Streets, Salt Lake City. 



38. INDIAN TERRITORY 
' WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized April, 1892 

President, 

Secretary, Miss Louise Graper, Vinita. 
Treaszerer, Mrs. Raymond, Vinita. 

39. NEVADA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1892 

President, Mrs. L. J. Flint, Reno. 
Secretary, Miss Margaret N. Magill, Reno. 
Treasurer, Miss Mary Clow, Reno. 



40. NEW MEXICO 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized November, 1892 

President, Mrs. E. H. Ashmun, Albuquerque. 
Secretary, Mrs. F. A. Burlingame, Albuquerque. 
Treaszcrer, Mrs. M. McClaskey, Albuquerque. 



41. BLACK HILLS, SO. DAKOTA 

BLACK HILLS WOMAN'S MISSIONARY 

UNION 

Organized October, 1893 

President, Mrs. J. B. Gossage, Rapid City, Black 

Hills, South Dakota; 
Secretary, Mrs. C. H. Brown. Rapid City, Black 

Hills, South Dakota. 
Treasurer, Mrs. S. Cushman, Deadwood, Black 

Hills, South Dakota. 



42. IDAHO 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1895 

President, Mrs. R. B. Wright, Boise. 
Secretary, Mrs. C. E. Mason, Challis. 
Treasurer, Mrs. L. H. Johnston, Challis. 



216 The Home Missionary January, 1899 

SECRETARIES OF YOUNG PEOPLE'S WORK 

Minnesota Miss Carrie S. Pond, 60S Canada St., St. Paul. 

Mass. and R. I Miss Bertha M. Shepard, 607 Congregational House, Boston. 

Michigan Mrs. W. J. Gregory, 459 Third St., Manistee. 

Kansas Miss Harriet Broad, Topeka. 

Ohio Miss M. C. Smith, S53 Doan St., Cleveland. 

New York Mrs. Geo. R. Haines, 97S Delaware Ave. , Buffalo. 

North Dakota Mrs. E. S. Shaw, Cooperstown. 

Oregon. . . .Mrs. W. D. Palmer, 546 Third St., Portland. 

Washington Mrs. W. C. Davie, 423 North N St., Tacoma. 

South Dakota Mrs. ('.race Burleigh, Mitchell. 

Illinois. ... Mrs. J. T. Blanchard, 232 Walnut St., Aurora. 

Missouri Mrs. A. K. Wray, 2220 E. Eighth St., Kansas City. 

Iowa Miss Fannie Spencer, Alden. 

California Miss Caroline A. Potter, 600 Seventeenth St., Oakland. 

Nebraska Mrs. J. N. Hyder, 1520 U St., Lincoln. 

Southern California. . .Miss Phebe Mayhew, 4 Barnard Park, Los Angeles. 

Vermont Mrs. C. L. Smith, 159 Pine St., Burlington. 

Colorado Mrs. Burke Turrell, Longmont. 

Montana Mrs. E. E. Esslestyn, Red Lodge. 

SECRETARIES OF CHILDREN'S WORK 

Minnesota Mrs. W. B. Northrup, 2724 Pleasant Ave., Minneapolis. 

Michigan Mrs. Henry Marsh, Olivet. 

Kansas ... Miss Hattie Booth, Newton. 

Ohio Mrs. Chas. H. Small, Hudson. 

North Dakota Mrs. O. J. Wakefield, Wahpeton. 

South Dakota Miss Emily N. Perrin, Armour. 

Illinois Mrs. J. A. Thome, 1006 Garfield Blvd., Chicago. 

Nebraska Mrs. H. D. Neely, 4371 Hamilton St., Omaha. 

Southern California. . .Miss Emily M. Peck, 920 W. Eighth St., Los Angeles. 



Congregational Home Missionary Society 

Field Secretaries 

Rev. W. G. Puddefoot, South Framingham, Mass. 
Rev. C. W. Shelton, Norwalk, Conn. 

Superintendents 

Rev. Moritz E. Eversz, D.D., German Department, 153 La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 

Re.v. S. V. S. Fisher, Scandinavian Department, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Rev. Henry A. Schauffler, D.D., Slavic Department, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Rev. Edvv. D. Curtis, D.D Indianapolis, lnd. Rev. W. H. Thrall Huron, S. Dak. 

Rev. S. F. Gale Jacksonville, Fla, Rev. John L. Maile Fargo, N. Dak. 

Rev. J. H. Morley Minneapolis, Minn. Rev. H. Sanderson. Denver, Col. 

Rev. Alfred K. Wray, D.D Kansas City, Mo. Rev. * Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Rev. L. P. Broad Topeka, Kan. Rev. J. K. Harrison , San Francisco, Cal. 

Rev. E. H. Ashmun Albuquerque, N. M. Rev. James T. Ford Los Angeles, Cal. 

Rev. A. Judson Bailey Seattle, Wash. - Rev. C. F. Clapp Forest Grove, Ore. 

Rev. Homer \V. Carter, D.D Beloit, Wis. tj„,. t-. w T _.i„ c r, t-, \ 511 Woodland Terrace, 

Rev 4 A Ppovvn j Black Hills and Wyoming. -Kev. 1. W. Jones, U.U.. . . - ( Philadelphia, Pa. 

Kev, A. A. brown... ( Hot Springs> South Dakota . Rev. W. S. Bell Helena, Mon. 

Rev. Harmon Bross, D.D Lincoln, Neb. .Rev. S. C. McDaniel Atlanta, Ga. 

Rev. S. F. Gale (Act'g Supt. Ala.), Jacksonville, Fla. Rev. J. Homer Parker Kingfisher, Okl. 

Secretaries and Treasurers 

of the Auxiliaries 

Rev. David P. Hatch, Secretary Maine Missionary Society. . .First Nat. Bk. Bldg., Portland, Me. 

W. P. Hubbard, Esq., Treasurer "'■ " " ....Box 1052, Bangor, Me. 

Rev. A. T. Hillman, Secretary New Hampshire Home Miss. Society Concord, N. H. 

Hon. Lyman D. Stevens, Treasurer " " " " " Concord, N. H. 

Rev. Charles H. Merrill, Secretary , .Vermont Domestic '.' " .... St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

Wm. C. Tyler, Treasurer " " '!■ " ... .St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

Rev. Joshua Coit, Secretary .' Massachusetts Home " " | 609 Cong'l House, 

Rev. Edwin B. Palmer, Treasurer " " " " i' Boston, Mass. 

Rev. Alexander McGregor, Secretary Rhode Island " " " . . . .Pawtucket, R. I. 

Jos. Wm. Rice, Esq., Treasurer " " " " .... Providence, R. I. 

Rev. William H. Moore, Secretary Missionary Society of Connecticut Hartford, Conn. 

Ward W. Jacobs, Esq., Treasurer " " '■' Hartford, Conn. 

Rev. Ethan Curtis, Secretary. ..... ..... New York Home Miss. Society Syracuse, N. Y. 

William Spalding, Treasurer " " " " Syracuse, N. Y. 

Rev. J. G. Fraser, D.D. , Secretary Ohio " " li Cleveland, Ohio. 

Rev. J. G. Fraser, D.D. , Treasurer " " " '■ Cleveland, Ohio. 

Rev. James Tompkins, D.D. , Secretary Illinois. " " ■" I 153 La Salle St., 

Aaron B. Mead, E^q., Treasurer " - " " u ( Chicago, 111. 

Rev. Homer W. Carter, D.D., Secretary. . . .Wisconsin " " " Beloit, Wis. 

C. M. Blackman, Esq., Treasurer , " Whitewater, Wis. 

Rev. T. O. Douglass, D.D., Secretary Iowa Grinnell, Iowa. 

J. H. Merrill, Esq., Treasurer. " " " " Des Moines, Iowa. 

Rev. William H. Warren, D.D., Secretary. .Michigan Home Miss. Society Lansing, Mich. 

Rev. John P. Sanderson, Treasurer " " " " Lansing, Mich. 

Geo. H. Morgan, Secretary .Cong. City Miss. Society St. Louis, Mo. 

Rev. A. K. Wray, Superintendent ll " " " Kansas City, Mo. 

Lewis E. Snow, Treasurer " " " " St. Louis, Mo. 

Communications 

relating to general business of the Society may be addressed to either of the Secretaries for Correspondence. 
Communications relating to the Editorial Department of The Home Missionary or of the Home Missionary 
section of Congregational Work, may be addressed to Rev. Alex. H. Clapp, D.D. Correspondence of the 
Woman's Department may be addressed to Mrs. H. S. Caswell, Congregational Rooms, New York. 



Donations and Subscriptions 



in Drafts, Checks, Registered Letters, or Post-Office Orders may be addressed to Wm. B. Howland, 
Treasurer, Fourth Avenue and 22d Street, New York. 

A PAYMENT OF $50 CONSTITUTES A LIFE MEMBER 

Form of a Bequest 

I bequeath to my executors the sum of dollars, in trusty to pay over the same, 

in months after my decease, to the person who, when the same is payable, shall act as Treasurer 

of the Congregational Home Missionary Society, formed in the City of New York, in the year eighteen hundred 
and twenty-six, to be applied to the charitable use and purposes of said Society, and under its direction. 



Congregational Home Missionary Society 
Fourth Ave. and 2 2d St., New York 



Major-General Oliver O. Howard 

President 

Secretaries for Correspondence 

Rev. Joseph B. Clark, D.D. 

Rev. Washington Choate, D.D. 

Rev. ALEXANDER H. Clapp, D.D., Editorial Secretary 

Mr. William B. Rowland, Treasurer 

Executive Committee 

Wm. 'Ives Washburn, Esq., Chairman 

Asa A. Spear, Esq., Recording Secretary 

Mr. Joseph Wm. Rice 

Rev. Charles H. Richards. D.D. 

Mr. George P. Stockwell 

Rev. John D. Kingsbury, D.D. 

Mr. George W. Hebard 

John H. Perry, Esq. 

Rev. Thomas B. McLeod, D.D. 

Mr. John F. Anderson, Jr. 

David A. Thompson, Esq. 

Mr. Wm. H. Wanamaker 

Rev. Charles M. Lamson, D.D. 

Rev. Charles A. Savage 



I'ress of J.J. Little & Co., Astor Place, New York 



The 



Home Missionary 



p reaby g 






April, 1899 



Vol. LXXL No. 4 



New York 
Congregational Home Missionary Society 

Congregational Rooms, Fourth Ave. and 2 2d St. 

Entered at the Post-Office at New York, N. Y., as Second-Class [Mail] Matter 



Contents for April, 1899 



PAGE 

The Mother of Churches 217 

Our First Church in Alaska 219 

Report cf The Commission on Cuba 224 

Pastoral Visiting 231 

Among the Mormons 231 

The Busybody Hotel 232 

Thankful, Hopeful, But Handicapped 236 



PAGE 

A Chinese Christian 236 

Obedient to the Heavenly Vision. . 237 

Work in Nebraska 242 

Work on the Frontier 244 

A Profitable Wedding 24; 

The Annual Meeting 24 



The Home Missionary 



Is published quarterly., at thirty cents a year, postage paid. It is sent without charge, on 
request, to be made annually, to Life Members; Missionaries of the Society and its Aux- 
iliaries ; Ministers securing a yearly collection for it in their congregations ; also to individu- 
als, associations, or congregations, one copy for a year for every ten dollars collected and paid 
over to the Society or an Auxiliary. Suitable names should accompany the payment. 
Pastors are earnestly requested to serve Home Missions by promoting the use of this journal 

and "Congregational Work" at the Monthly Concert and among their people. 

a 

immediate notice of discontinuance or change of post-office address should be given. 




The Home Missionary 

Vol. LXXI APRIL, 1899 No. 4 

THE MOTHER OF CHURCHES 

By Rev. E. Lyman Hood 

HE Mother of Churches. How affectionate the term ! Could 
any eulogy be more expressive of the history of the " Old First" 
of San Francisco? 

The pages of the last (January) number of The Home Missionary were 
adorned with the pictures of the first two structures occupied by this his- 
toric church, and on the following page may be seen its present Early 
English Cothic edifice, one of the most beautiful of the many sanctuaries 
reared in the City by the Golden Gate. 

This church, which is the oldest of our order in California, will next 
July observe its semi-centennial, and in October, when the General Asso- 
ciation of California gathers in annual meeting as its guests, further ser- 
vices appropriate to the occasion will be held. The historic spirit will 
not be lacking. The Pacific Coast has reached a point of perspective ; 
Congregationalism, a period of self-consciousness. The noble band of 
early pioneers builded better than they knew. But their eyes were set on 
the future. They had no past; tradition, precedent, history — all were 
wanting. 

Fifty years, however, have wrought wonderful changes. A mighty 
empire has arisen in the West, and in the growth of the great common- 
wealths the Church of Christ has always borne an honorable part. The 
record of the First Congregational Church may be said to be the history 
of our communion in the city of San Francisco. She has been a loving 
mother, imparting to her children her own strength in their birth, and 
continuing to watch over them with tender solicitude and generous care. 

It has been a missionary church. From the time of the calling of the 
first pastor, who had himself been a missionary in the Hawaiian Islands, 
the church has never withheld its aid from missions, whether foreign, 
home, or city. 

It has been an evangelical church. At its altar the Gospel in its 




FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. — PRESENT BUILDING. 



April, 1899 The Home Missionary 219 

purity and simplicity has been ably preached. Twenty years ago Messrs. 
Moody and Sankey conducted, for six weeks, services in which many were 
led to confess the Christ. Since then there have been seasons during 
which the blessed influences of the Holy Spirit have been quietly fostered 
and appropriated by many hearts. 

It has been a home church. Standing on the very shores of the wide, 
Western sea, its open portals and cordial, self-sacrificing members have 
welcomejLjhe strangers within the gates to the Father's house. Many, 
many young men and women, far from their old homes in the East, often 
disheartened and cast down, have found within its walls a shelter in the 
time of storm, a veritable rock in a weary land. 

But enough. The happiest, the most hopeful features of these remi- 
niscences will be the sure promise of still larger and better things. The 
church has had its full share of trouble and anxiety, but to-day is stronger, 
more confident, and more consecrated than ever before. In its " Annual 
Directory," just issued from the press, the beloved pastor, the Rev. 
George C. Adams, D.D., sends out this helpful message to his people : 
" Let us all unite to make this year memorable by the rehearsal of what 
God has done for us, and in gratitude to him let us start into a new future 
that shall be worthy of the best of the sacrifices and labors of the past." 



OUR FIRST CHURCH IN ALASKA 

[Our readers will remember Superintendent Wirt's joy over his prospects of success 
in building a home for the First Church of Douglas, across the river from Juneau,, as 
given in The Home Missionary for October last, and his later accounts of progress in 
that line, in " Congregational Work " in its issues since that date. 

These readers and the many cheerful givers in aid of the promising work in that 
new land will be interested to hear of the full realization of the hopes of Mr. Wirt and his 
Douglas flock, as detailed in the following article from the local press, which we are glad 
to illustrate with cuts showing the outside and inside of the new structure, and a third 
cut letting us see what sort of people are the Christian Endeavorers who have rallied to 
the pastor's aid. The first two faces in the upper left-hand corner are those of Mrs. and 
Mr. Wirt.— Ed.] 

The American's first thought in settling a new country is of church 
and school ; and Douglas City is no exception in this respect. Four re- 
ligious denominations hold regular services, and the Peniel Mission is 
well attended. The Catholics and Friends will each erect fine church 
edifices during the year— their present buildings being too small.- 

But this week we present our readers with a description of the First 
Congregational Church of this city, which has just been completed at a cost 
of $3,250. The building was commenced October 17, 1898; was com- 



220 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1899 



pleted January u, 1899, and dedicated February 12th. On the evening 
of February 3d a large gathering shared in a " house-warming," made at- 
tractive by singing by Sunday-school children and adults, recitations by 
the young people, and other pleasant exercises, closing with a generous 
repast. 

The cost is far from being represented by the above figures, as will be 
seen by this sketch, and it is doubtful whether this amount of money would 
actually erect so beautiful a building anywhere in the States. 



r 



NSn^. 




FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, DOUGLAS, ALASKA — EXTERIOR 

This is the first-fruit of the Congregational Home Missionary Society 
in Alaska. Rev. Loyal L. Wirt reached Juneau, May 7, 1898 ; May 22d 
a Sunday-school was organized on Douglas Island with six present ; De- 
cember nth the membership was ninety-five, with eighty-one present; 
July 14th a Young People's Society of Christian Endeavor was organized 
with fifteen members — it now numbers twenty-three active and four as- 
sociate members ; August 14th the church was organized with sixteen 
members ; December 24th a " Christmas-tree " service was held in the 
new edifice. 

The lot, 100x200 feet, was given by the Tyee Consolidated Mining 
Company, R, F. Lewis, agent, The building is placed equidistant 



222 The Home Missionary April, 1899 

between Tread well and Douglas City, because it would behard to tell which 
end of the town has been most interested or most helpful in its erection. 
Without the generosity of the Treadwell management, and the company's 
extension of courtesies in many ways, the enterprise would not have 
been possible. 

The church is a modern edifice in every respect. The auditorium is 
36 x 50 feet and seats 200 people comfortably. The chapel or Sunday- 
school room opens by sliding doors into the audience room, thus adding 
100 additional sittings when necessary. 

The chapel, which occupies the L of the church, is a model of beauty 
and convenience. Here the decorators have exhibited their art to per- 
fection ; united dado, frieze, and paneling with ingrain paper, " pinch 
work," and silver molding. The room, as indeed does the decorating of 
the whole church, reflects great credit on the contractors, who certainly 
put much more work and skill upon the finishing of the church than their 
contract called for. 

A visiting clergyman was heard by the pastor to remark, after he had 
inspected the new building, "Why, this church is too good for Douglas." 

" Not by any means," was Mr. Wirt's earnest reply, " and you would 
not say so if you knew the people as well as I do." 

Great credit is due the architect, who not only designed and drew 
the plans for the church, but superintended its construction with con- 
scientious economy and the skill of a master mechanic. In addition to 
all this, he contributed seventy dollars to the building fund. The lumber 
was furnished at an extremely low figure, and the quality was of the very 
best. A Boynton & Richardson furnace costing $250 gives entire satis- 
faction. The pews, made in Juneau, are a handsome seat finished in 
natural wood, and we never wish to sit in a more comfortable pew. Open- 
ing both into the chapel and the auditorium, is as cozy and convenient a 
kitchen as any ladies' society could wish. But that of which, perhaps, the 
pastor is proudest of all is the office, or study, which is in the tower, and 
is reached by a handsome flight of stairs leading up from the vestibule. 

To the ladies of the church and congregation, to the management and 
employees of mill and mine, to the dealers in material who have liber- 
ally discounted their bills, to the workmen who have given days of 
labor, to the many who have given good coin of the realm in sums rang- 
ing from ten cents to $150, to the Ferry Company for courtesies ren- 
dered — to one and all who have given material assistance or kind words 
of encouragement, which have often been the help most needed, Mr. 
Wirt desires to extend, in the name of the First Congregational Church 
of Douglas City, his profound and heartfelt gratitude. 

This sketch would be incomplete were it concluded without mention- 
ing the pastor, Rev. Loyal L. Wirt, the source of the inspiration resulting 



224 The Home Missionary April, 1899 

in this church building. To say that he is an eloquent, cultured, Chris- 
tian gentleman would not give the reader a true picture of the man. He 
is a man outside of, as well as in, the pulpit ; a fine scholar and close 
student, extensively traveled and a close observer, something of an art 
critic, and passionately fond of music ; of broad, liberal views, up-to-date 
on all subjects, especially religious. A man who recognizes the fact that it 
is not absolutely necessary for a person to belong to his church, or even a 
Protestant church, in order to be a Christian. When at Christmas he ex- 
tended a hearty invitation to the Catholic children to join in the Christ- 
mas-tree festivities, it was in no proselyting spirit, but one of brotherly 
kindness and generous impulse. We judge men by their little acts and 
every-day life. As Territorial Superintendent, his branch of the church 
has not one minister in a thousand as well qualified for the work in 
Alaska as is Mr. Wirt. 

* 

REPORT OF THE COMMISSION ON CUBA 

By Rev. J. D. Kingsbury, D.D., of Bradford, Mass. 

To the Executive Committee of the Congregational Home Missionary 
Society : 

On the 9th of January I was appointed to visit Cuba and find out 
whether there be need of missionary work, and what opportunity there 
may be for our Congregational churches. 

Leaving home January 19th, I met my fellow-worker, Rev. E. P. 
Herrick, at Tampa, Fla., and found him a man admirably fitted for the 
work committed to us. He speaks the Spanish language fluently, has 
worked among Cubans for years, and is pastor of a Cuban church. We 
laid our plans and prosecuted them in perfect harmony from the begin- 
ning to the end. 

THREE DAYS AT TAMPA 

Tampa has a Cuban population of 5,000, and a church of a hundred 
members, refugees and exiles. I visited their homes, saw their schools, 
and worshiped with them on the Sabbath. They opened their hearts to 
us, telling of the anguish of their souls in the years of the war, and of 
their hope and faith in God that he would give the Gospel to their 
beloved island. 

Their words seemed to have the tone of inspiration when they uttered 
their belief that this visit was the answer of God to their prayers. I 
addressed them through their interpreter, making them to understand 
more fully the meaning of our mission. When I had finished, a young 



April, 1899 The Home Missionary 225 

man came forward to make a response. He was intelligent, earnest, 
modest, but eloquent in speech, and there was a peculiar beauty in his 
spirit and character. This was young Peralta. - He interested me from 
the first. He was born of a once wealthy family, made poor by the war ; 
was himself an exile, well connected in Havana, and ardent in his newly 
found faith in the Son of God. 

When we left Tampa, with the blessing of all believers, and letters of 
introduction to friends, we took young Peralta with us as our helper. 
He became our Timothy. 

OUR PLANS 

In laying out our work we determined to gain access to the homes of 
•the people. We cared not so much for the discussions in the clubs, or 
for opinions of leaders and agitators, as for the sentiment and conviction 
and sense of religious need which we might gain by acquaintance with 
the people at home. We sent messages by mail, friends in Tampa sent 
word to their kindred announcing our coming, and Peralta made us 
acquainted with all his friends during our voyage over the Gulf. 

OUR RECEPTION 

When we were anchored in the harbor of Havana we were welcomed 
by a little company who boarded the steamer and almost carried us in 
their arms to the still larger number at the landing, who expressed their 
joy in words of no uncertain sound. We had hardly settled down at our 
hotel before the old friends of Peralta and the members of the Tampa 
church began to visit us, laying plans for our introduction to their families 
and for a public meeting in Yebolona Hall. 

OUR WORK 

We first bowed before God and sought his immediate guidance and 
blessing, and we promised to seek each day his direction, and our good 
Lord answered the largest longing of our hearts. 

We visited from house to house. We distributed freely a Spanish 
tract prepared by Mr. Herrick, defining Congregationalism and setting 
forth the simple articles of the Protestant faith. We held a public meet- 
ing ; forty-five were present, who listened with eagerness and hearty 
appreciation. Peralta made an address which affected all hearts, in which 
he told his old friends how this religion gives the heart large themes, fills 
it with high hopes, and makes life to be fitted for larger work and an 
immortal destiny. 

At the close of the service we held a long and most fruitful confer- 
ence. 



226 The Home Missionary April, 1899 

OUR VISITS 

We very soon passed beyond the range of our first acquaintance. 
One friend would introduce us to another ; that one would take us across 
the street to make us acquainted with a new family. We were very soon 
in touch with domestic life in Havana. There is peculiar beauty in the 
Cuban family. When you enter the home through the prison-like door 
you will be led to the reception-room. The father, mother, and all the 
children will be seated in a circle, when each one will make an effort to 
entertain. They say : <; This house is at your disposal. We are made 
happy by your coming ! " 

There are a culture and refinement and grace in their domestic life 
and perfect artlessness and sincerity in conversation. They told of the 
anguish of the war, of the years of fear and broken ness, and atrocity and 
death. This led to the religious sentiment and conversation. 

CLASSES OF PEOPLE 

But I must first speak of the classes of people. 

The Cuban Army. — We saw them here and there with their guns and 
machetes along the lines of travel, sometimes in groups in the outskirts of 
towns. They are of all races, hardened by service, muscular, resolute, 
fearless, and having from their years of soldier life a certain love of 
adventure and a restlessness of spirit which make it hard for them to lay 
down their arms. Their number is not large ; it is growing less. They 
will soon be employed in guard duty or absorbed into the new industrial 
life which is soon to appear, when the waste places of war are changed 
into the fertile fields, yielding abundant product to the labor of men. 

Reconcentrados. — In every city there is a pitiable throng of suffering, 
emaciated, and starving people. They were driven from their homes by 
Weyler. Their thatched houses were burned, and they were made 
beggars by the war. They walk by your window and appeal to your pity 
while you dine ; they follow you in the street ; they lie often helpless on 
the stone pavements ; sleep there at night, often are found dead there in 
the morning. 

The government issues 20,000 rations every day to those in Havana 
alone. They are beyond reach religiously. If you should speak to them 
of God or of Christ they would smile feebly, while out from the bundle of 
filth and rags would come forth a skinny hand, and they would cry 
" Bread, bread ! " 

The Spaniards. — Of course Cuba was peopled by Spaniards. There 
have been mingled the Africans, the coolies, the remnant of the aborig- 
ines, but the main body of the people is Spanish, and yet there is a dis- 
tinction. The merchants, bankers, manufacturers, hotel-keepers, and 



April, 1899 The Home Missionary 227 

financiers upheld Spain. They favored the conquest of the insurgents. 
They were Royalists. From them, especially in Havana province, was 
recruited the body of "Volunteers." The Volunteers are disbanded, 
but that class remains. They are called Spaniards to-day. They are 
loyal to the Catholic Church. The number is not large, but it has large 
influence, for it controls finance. 

Cubans. — There was another class, larger by far, who were called 
Cubans. They were the "pacificos," the "non-combatants." This is 
the great body of the population. They were eliminated by the enlist- 
ment of the Volunteers. The line of demarcation was drawn. They did 
not bear arms. Few of them gave support to the patriot army, but they 
were known as the enemies of Spain. This is the class now called 
Cubans, and with them we had our work. 

THE TRANSITION 

The Catholic Church has been for centuries affluent, independent, 
insolent, and tyrannical. It was leagued with Spain. It was the willing 
tool of royalty in the attempt to destroy the Cuban love of liberty, even 
if it resulted in the extermination of the race. The confessio?ial was 
debauched. " Tell me all, daughter," said the priest. " Is your husband 
in sympathy with the patriots ? " Then when she had given the fatal 
answer, she heard, soon after, a knock at the door. If it was not opened 
it was broken down ; there was a squad of soldiers, a call for the hus- 
band, and he was marched away to the castle and to death. 

This happened so many times that it produced an entire revolution in 
the religious sentiments. The Cuban people have lost all confidence in 
priests. They believe that the priests are utterly devoid of sympathy. In 
all the agony of their hearts the people never had one word of comfort 
from the church. More than this, they believe that the priesthood is 
lustful, cruel, malignant, and utterly immoral. 

I said to them : " We have no robes or pictures or candles or incense 
or magnificent ceremonial. Will you not by and by long again for the 
glory of the ritual of the church of your fathers I " They said: " No, no; 
it is full of immorality, immorality. We will have no more of that." 

THE SECRET LEADING OF GOD 

This led them to speak of how they had been compelled to seek for 
personal help from God. In their deep and hopeless agony they had no 
sympathizing priest. They were compelled to seek God. They felt that 
God would come to their personal hearts. They left the confessional and 
the church and found God in their homes. We visited a great number of 
families, and this was the universal sentiment. Only three persons said 



228 The Home Missionary April, 1899 

they wanted to abide in the Catholic faith, and even those said they 
wanted to know more of the Protestant religion. 

Our visits were not confined to the common people. We saw pro- 
fessors in Havana University. One of them said: "The people cast off 
the priests because they are oppressive and unchristian, and they tax them 
for masses, for marriages, for baptism, and for burial, and even place a 
yearly rent on their graves. There is a pile of bones in the cemetery at 
Havana, flung out because the rent was not paid on the graves. If Prot- 
estantism can be known it will be received. The way is open. The 
crimes of the priests are known. They can never be forgotten. It can 
never be made to be the will of God that his children should suffer such 
things. Humanity revolts. The Cubans welcome Protestants. Their 
religion is like American statesmanship, like American civilization, or 
American war — it is for the brotherhood of men. There is a great moral 
necessity that the Cuban should know the gospel of liberty." 

Another professor said: " The people are disgusted with the customs, 
the duplicity, the selfishness, and the lusts of the priests. They fear 
them no longer. The Spaniard is the worst man on earth, and the priest 
is the worst Spaniard. He is leagued with the Spaniard — he must go with 
the Spaniard." 

AUDIENCE WITH THE MAYOR 

Peralta came in with a peculiar joy to say that he had arranged an 
audience with the Mayor of Havana. 

We were ushered into the Mayor's private reception-room. The 
Mayor, Hon. Perfecto Lacosta, a Cuban patriot, is a man of great refine- 
ment, graceful in manner and address, and speaks English fluently. I 
addressed him, saying we were happy to come for his approval and bless- 
ing. I explained our simple faith and worship, and asked his opinion as 
to the wisdom of introducing it to his people. His reply was this : 
" You will be welcomed by my people. You give and do not receive. 
The Catholics do the opposite. Your mission is like your generous 
people. And though I am a Catholic I give you a hearty and sincere 
welcome. If I can aid you with letters of introduction, or in any way, I 
shall be most happy." 

Our beloved Peralta came in one evening to say, in a sort of rapture: 
" I have been to Guanabacoa, the place of my birth. I was seven years 
in the monastery school. I have told the people of your work. They must 
see you. I have engaged the theater ; there will be a great gathering." 
And so it happened. 

In preparation for this meeting Peralta said, while his face blushed 
with fear that he was too bold in spirit. " I have been thinking what I 
will say to my old friends. I read a chapter and then prayed for help, 



April, 1899 The Home Missionary 229 

and it seemed to me that the Holy Spirit made the thought fill my heart 
with new light and love. Do you think God is so good to me, or am I 
deceived ? " 

MATANZAS 

Our visit to Matanzas repeated and emphasized the experience at 
Havana. It was a great joy to see how gratefully they received the sim- 
ple doctrine of our Protestant faith. The thoughts that gave them greatest 
satisfaction were the personal revelations of God in the Gospel, the privi- 
lege of having the Bible in their own language and in their own homes, and 
the blessing of mutual worship before the throne of grace. Not one in five 
hundred had ever had a Bible in the house or had ever been in a meeting 
for prayer, and yet their troubles and wants and woes had prepared them 
to receive with conscious joy the Bible and prayer and the simplest form 
of worship. The need of the people is first the Word of God : then 
the living preacher and the church, and along with these the Christian 
school. The Cuban had an intelligent and passionate longing for educa- 
tion. 

After visiting many families in Matanzas with the same results as at 
Havana, Mr. Herrick returned to the meeting in the theater at Guana- 
bacoa and I turned southward. 

BOLONDRON READY FOR PROTESTANTISM 

I went by appointment to Bolondron to find out whether the people 
would favor the Protestant faith. My co-laborer was having a similar 
service in Guanabacoa. I was met by the mayor of the city and all the 
city officials with a brass band playing welcome music. Three little flower 
girls in white presented me flowers. Then the throng of people, fully 
200, marched to the mansion of Dr. Fernandes, where there was an 
address of welcome, and I responded. There was a sumptuous breakfast; 
then a service in which I set forth the freedom and largeness of the Prot- 
estant faith and worship. And all the people said, " That is the religion 
we want." I could have organized a church of a hundred members that 
day. 

We went back to the train in procession, and I received their tender 
farewells, which were so hearty and affectionate that they can never be 
forgotten. Strong men, who could utter themselves in no other way, em- 
braced me in their arms. 

Mr. Herrick had a similar experience at Guanabacoa. Editors, 
lawyers, teachers, and "cultivated people made up the audience. They 
expressed greatest satisfaction in hearing of the " liberty religion," and 
insisted on having another meeting. 

From Matanzas to Cienfuegos the way leads through the richest lands 



230 The Home Missionary April, 1899 

of the island. The desolate fields, the burned sugar mills, and the ashes 
of burned villages show the ravages of war. But capital is again entering, 
fields will soon be planted, the ruin will be repaired. 



CIENFUEGOS 

Editor Rosseau had reprinted Mr. Herrick's tract entire, and had so 
announced our coming that we found the city quite ready to receive us. 
The priest cursed us in his church, but that made 'the people smile. A 
public hall was secured, and at the last meeting there were 200 present 
and there was great enthusiasm. We could hardly resist the desire to 
form a church at once. 

THE END 

The question, " Is there opportunity ?" is solved. The whole island is 
open. At Santa Clara, Puerto Principe, Santiago, at Jesus del Monte, 
and at many other places we had special invitations to come and speak of 
the " liberty religion." Just before we left Cienfuegos a delegation from 
Lajas came urging us to visit that city. They would not be refused until 
we assured them that the churches of America would soon send again the 
messengers of the Gospel. 

We returned by steamer to Betano. and thence by rail to Havana. 
Then followed our last meetings with the believers at Havana and Guana- 
bacoa. We left them banded together, with Peralta in charge, pledged to 
meet weekly for prayer and study of God's Word. 

MY LAST WORDS WITH PERALTA 

I had a tender farewell with Peralta, who was a " son in the faith." 
He said to me: " I wish you to know that I have taken this religion for 
always. The religion I once knew taught me misery and sorrow, but this 
religion gives me joy and serenity and hope and blessing. That is what 
I shall teach all my friends. When you are in your Northern home I 
want you to think of me as your friend." Then he added, "I want more — 
I want to be your son." He went with us to the steamer, and when the 
time came to embark he fell on my neck and kissed me. 

The question is not hard to solve whether Cuba will receive the free 
institutions which belong to our high civilization. Come with me along 
the paths of Cuban travel, visit the sweet homes of the now happy people, 
and enter into the familiar intercourse which grows at once into confidence 
and love, and you shall find the Cuban heart is open to all that is good. 
This wonderful " Pearl of the Antilles " is to grow in beauty and rise to 
a larger life by its fraternal relations with our country. 



April, 1899 The Home Missionary 231 



PASTORAL VISITING 

Wife and I have been lately visiting some of our " outside " families. 
We were most kindly received everywhere. One great difficulty in visit- 
ing these families is getting all the visits made in a day which we desire 
to make. The people are not satisfied with a " pastoral call." You must 
put your horse into the barn and stop with them some time, or they are 
apt to feel slighted. This, with their being so far apart, makes it scarcely 
possible, sometimes, to visit more than one family in a day. One day we 
drove out to visit a couple who have lately joined our church. It was 
something over twelve miles of rough road. We got there about one 
o'clock and left at about four, and they thought it "a very short visit." 
This might seem to be a waste of time. And certainly it does feel rather 
irksome sometimes, after being used to city work. But we must adapt 
ourselves to the wishes of the people in some measure in order to win 
them. Even the Master pleased not himself, going to dine with Simon 
the Pharisee as well as with Zaccheus the Publican. How long he stopped 
with each we are not told. But that he did stay awhile and taught some 
very useful lessons we know. And so while the farmer takes us around 
to see his stock or samples of his crops, we can often gather an illustra- 
tion for a sermon or drop a word for the Master that will not be lost. 
The time is by no means wasted. The Rev. Dr. Geikie, in a magazine 
article, speaks of the overworked ministers in our great cities, and goes 
on to say that "suburban charges and their rural populations offer many 
temptations to the idle." But in my opinion there are no greater tempta- 
tions to be idle in a rural parish than in the city. I am kept just as busy 
now as when in the Master's work in the city. The requirements are cer- 
tainly different, but there is just as much to do. The fact is, in our Mas- 
ter's business we cannot afford to be idle anywhere nor at any time. 
Like him, we must " work while it is day ; the night cometh when no man 
can work." — South Dakota. 



AMONG THE MORMONS 

The difficulties we meet here are those common to work in all Mor- 
mon communities. When I first came no evening service was held in the 
Mormon church, and after two months considerable interest was aroused, 
until we had an average attendance of forty-five. Then opposition 
began. Evening services were started by the Mormons ; they have con- 
tinued, and are made as attractive as possible — speakers often being 
imported, and much attention given to music. Then, in a community 



232 The Home Missionary April, 1899 

mostly Mormon, most people are afraid to come out boldly against that 
"church," because their bread and butter are at stake. There are a 
score or more of officers of " the church " here, and three Mormon mis- 
sionaries have lately been sent, all of whom are working against us, so 
that our church attendance has gone down ; yet, I think, an audience can 
slowly be built up. There have been two attempts at a Gentile church 
organization here, the last made three years ago, but of those members 
only two remain here, one of whom is quite aged and lives at a distance, 
so that practically this is but a "mission." Our most efficient work can 
be done through the school, in which sixty are enrolled, including pupils 
from the primary to the high-school grades. If the school work is kept 
up, and the church services are held without intermission, a Christian 
church can be slowly built up ; but only by educating them can anything 
be made of Mormons, most of whom here, except the leaders, are very 
ignorant. — Utah. 



THE BUSYBODY HOTEL 

Should you glance into the Busybody diary you might find as much 
as one place where it had been transformed into a hotel register. Out 
here in the Northwest keeping a hotel, mostly free of charge, is no small 
part of a missionary's, or rather his wife's, business. The house invaria- 
bly seemed to be full, but the saying "always room for one more " applied 
to it, and its doors were continually opening to receive new guests. The 
village " hotel " was run for the amazement of the town and traveling 
public. Infested with gamblers, the important part of it a saloon, with 
no parlor, women and children having to sit in the dirty smoking office 
to keep warm, it was no wonder that conductors of the incoming trains 
warned passengers away from it. But here many must stop to change 
cars, and where else could the tired travelers go ? 

It was an evening in late October. The Busybody flock was seated 
about the family board ; the door bell rang, and a call was made for the 
minister's wife. Ongoing to the parlor Mrs. Busybody found a pretty, 
genteel lady who explained her errand as follows : "Can you let me stay 
here all night? I've been to the hotel, but they had no room. I've been 
to every other place I could find in town, but cannot get in anywhere." 
What could Mrs. Busybody say ? There seemed to be no other possible 
chance for the stranger ; she was bidden to take off her wraps and take 
supper. Soon after tea a neighbor sent in, asking, " Could you spare one 
of your girls to stay with me to-night ? " That left a vacant place and 
the stranger was told to rest easy, for now she could stay. It was prayer- 
meeting night, and Guest Number One, as we will call her, was invited to 



April, 1899 The Home Missionary 233 

attend. At first she said " No," then " Yes." After her return she said, 
"I am hard-hearted, but I believe if I could be under Pastor Busybody's 
influence I should grow tender-hearted once more,." The next day Mrs. 
B. found opportunity to talk with her guest, and both shed tears. Christ 
was pressed upon her as a helper in exchange for her belief in " stars " 
and the firm conviction that she was born for a certain destiny, and there 
was no help for her. Some good, it is hoped, must have come from the 
conversation and from the letter which Mrs. B. afterward wrote her at 
her distant home. " My Word shall not return unto me void, but shall 
accomplish that which I please." 

Later Mrs. B. learned that "she .was a sinner." As the happy wife of 
a good church-going young man her life looked full of sunshine. But 
sorrow came to her heart one day when her strong husband was laid away 
in his final sleep. No one can tell her agony as she prayed to be laid 
beside him. But her life was spared, that of her fatherless babe also. 
Now came her struggle with life and the world. Having some property 
she kept boarders, and finally a house for "roomers." The serpent in the 
guise of a gambler crept in, and gaining her confidence got control of her 
money. That gone, she fell under his baneful influence and became his 
companion in sin. Discarded by him at last, money, character, and repu- 
tation all gone, she had taken up such work as she could get, only to 
meet everywhere a sneer and reproach for her past life. " Let him 
that is without sin cast the first stone." The Busybodies' home life and 
food seemed to touch a chord long dormant, and when she left it was 
with many tears. 

Guest Number Two came the night before Thanksgiving, just as Mrs. 
B. had said to the eldest son, that day returned from teaching, " We are 
all alone, for a wonder." "Mother, you are wanted," was the message 
brought to the kitchen. Hastening to the parlor, she found a little 
woman with a most doleful expression. " I've been all over this town 
and can't get a place to stay. Won't you please let me stay ? I'd go out 
of town if I could, but there is no way to get out." Of course, there 
was nothing else to say but " Yes." The guest was an " agent " away 
from home and its surroundings continually. A "home" seemed so 
good to her, and the home cooking received its share of praise. She 
seemed especially grateful to be permitted to help prepare the Thanksgiv- 
ing dinner. She was a Christian woman, and the Busybodies felt that they 
were giving" a cup of cold water" to one of His. She stayed four 
days, and the money she willingly paid proved a help in bridging over a 
gap in the parsonage finances. The Busybodies' hearts have been 
warmed many times by the kind, appreciative letters Number Two fre- 
quently sends. 

Guest Number Three, Mrs, B. found on her front steps just as she 



234 The Home Missionary April, 1899 

opened the door to go to town. " Can you let me stay ? The conductor 
told me not to go to the hotel ! " She looked like some one's pet canary 
just escaped. To be sure Guest Number Two was still in the home, but 
readily gave her consent to allow Number Three to room with her till she 
could change roads, her train going only alternate days. The Sabbath 
was spent with us, and in the meantime she found it in her heart to tell 
Mrs. B. some of her perplexing cares. The only daughter of a loving 
mother, she had been promised, for her education, the money inherited by 
the mother. Together the family had moved to the West and taken up 
land. In a few years the mother, weakened by care, had suffered a stroke 
of paralysis. Now at the age of only fifteen that daughter had been called 
home, her studies were given up, and for five years she was called to be 
mother, nurse, cook, and housekeeper. Then death removed the loved 
one, and it seemed as if she could be spared to resume her long-cherished 
studies. But the father by a wicked life had squandered the money 
intended for her education, and five more years of self-denial had been 
added to her life. They had not been without their refining influence, 
for a sweeter, prettier, more lovable young woman is rarely found. 
When she left, after four days of waiting, it was with a comforted heart, 
judging by letters sent back to us. Two guests at once should be 
enough, but on Saturday night the bell announced another caller. This 
was a "Salvation Army" laddie. As usual, there was no room at the inn. 
Why should there be room where sin so much abounds ? "I can't get a 
place to stay. I can't get out of town." Pastor Busybody was away, and 
his "assistant " was to take charge of the services on the morrow, so the 
coming of Guest Number Four was providential. He gave good testi- 
mony. 

Guest Number Five was a poor mother who had only her ticket, fifty 
cents in money, and her baby. The train ran on alternate days, so she 
must wait with her baby for twenty-four hours. The hotel did " only a cash 
business." So after hearing her story they turned her over to the minis- 
ter's family. Her story was sad. Married and living in comfortable cir- 
cumstances, her dreams were cut short by the sudden death of her hus- 
band in the woods of Michigan, leaving her almost penniless, with the 
burden of motherhood upon her. Her own home was small and her 
people unable to care for her. She stayed, however, till the advent of the 
little one, and then started out to earn a living by doing housework. She 
had been doing the work of a family of eight for one dollar a week and 
a home for her child and herself. Hearing of larger wages "out West," 
she had started with her ticket, her baby, and fifty cents. She was made 
welcome in the minister's home, and when she left on an evening train 
with her baby and her fifty cents it seemed to Mrs. B. typical of the poor 
woman's life. The shadows were surely gathering and night was near at 



April, 1899 The Home Missionary 235 

hand, because of ailments which most workers would regard as wholly 
incapacitating them for any manual labor. 

Guest Number Six came when Mrs. B. was laid aside to nurse a sick 
headache. She came with the station agent, who asked as a personal 
favor that she might be cared for in the parsonage. The train " on the 
branch " was blockaded, would probably go out next day, etc. So she 
made herself comfortable, except when she was uncomfortable, and that 
was fully twenty-four hours of the day. " My husband would never hear 
to my staying in a hotel alone. I shall be glad to pay you for your trou- 
ble." She stayed three days, and years have since flown, leaving the 
Busybodies still waiting for their guest to pay the cash she promised so 
faithfully to remit. "I don't like to start out without some money, and 
I'll send it right back to you," were her parting words. 

Guest Number Seven came one stormy night. " I have only a dollar 
left. I offered it to the hotel-keeper, but he sent me here, as his charges 
are two dollars a day. " So room was made for the dear Grandma and 
her orphan grandchild. When Mrs. Busybody went to call the next 
morning she was greeted with, " I'm sure the dear Lord sent me here. 
I've been sick all night. Whatever should I have done in that cold hotel ? " 
So Mrs. B. turned nurse. Remedies were given, faces were washed, hair 
combed, hot-water bottle and hot griddles came upstairs, a tempting 
breakfast was soon spread, and by noon the patient was able to come to 
the parlor and rest on the couch. When she went on her way she was 
told she was more than welcome to her care and keeping, but after she 
left a dollar was found under her plate. Her story was too long to tell. 
Throughout it was full of care, privations, and suffering. But she went 
on her way comforted. 

" It seems good to be alone once more," we said one evening in the 
parsonage. But about ten o'clock the same evening the faithful bell rang 
again and a young girl stepped in, saying, " We have been to the lake to 
skate, and while- there Mr. B. fell and put his arm out of joint. His 
room is so cold he does not dare to stay in it to-night. Can you keep 
him ? He is at the doctor's office, and will be here as soon as he is able 
to come." "Get thy spindle and distaff ready and God will send thee 
flax." It was past midnight before the Busybodies retired. But the 
young man who would otherwise have been miserable was made comfort- 
able and had experience of the practical side of Christianity. " Oh, the 
good we ail may do while the days are going by." 

But it costs no little work, fatigue, and self-denial to put off so often 
and so far other things that we want to do and that so need to be done. 
— Mrs. Busybody. 



236 The Home Missionary April, 1899 

THANKFUL, HOPEFUL, BUT HANDICAPPED 

The new work here opens well. A few faithful ones have long prayed 
for the coming of a pastor. An old lady at the praise service last night 
quaintly enumerated the things for which they should be thankful. 
Among these were a pastor, electric lights, dishes for the Aid Society, a 
pulpit, and some more furniture, together with the hope of a little church 
building very soon. We are now worshiping in a hall rented for Sundays, 
which is, to say the best of it, a very unhandsome and uncomfortable 
place. But the more unattractive the better, for that will be a greater 
motive for the needed building. When I came here they seemed content 
to worship in the hall. A suggestion for a church edifice in the early 
future was vetoed right and left. But already the sentiment has entirely 
changed and those who most strongly opposed it are now enthusiastic in 
its favor. 

Our first prayer-meeting was a praise and thanksgiving service for the 
beginning of a better day in the community, for which many had looked 
forward for years. 

One factor in our condition hereabout our brethren across the conti- 
nent can hardly understand : that the land in this part of the country is 
largely under the control of ungodly men, many of them not only indiffer- 
ent to the church, but openly antagonistic. I called on such a man, some 
days ago, and in all my years of experience among the apostate Mormons 
of Utah I never heard such "rot " and blasphemy as that man flung at 
Christ and the Holy Spirit. And he is but a type of a large class. So 
that while we would gladly get all we can to help evangelize our 
country and the world, too much must not be expected of us. — Wash- 
ington. 



A CHINESE CHRISTIAN 

A while ago I was introduced to an intelligent-looking Chinaman who 
had been referred to me for counsel and sympathy. I was surprised to find 
that he was the pastor of a Chinese church in the city, doing his work so 
quietly that but few knew of it. I visited his school and church, both 
held in a rented hall. In several conferences he has given me a most 
interesting history of his work. 

In 1874 General Howard gave him a Chinese Bible, and the reading 
of it let in the first light upon his pagan mind. He attended a Baptist 
Sunday-school for two years, and then started a school of his own, to 
teach some of his countrymen English and bring them under Christian 
influences. 



April, 1899 The Home Missionary 237 

A "United Brethren " minister found him, became interested in his 
work, assisted him in organizing a church, and prevailed upon the Woman's 
Board of the United Brethren Society to undertake his support. Lately 
this board, on account of the lack of funds, was compelled to withdraw 
aid. Yet this Chinese minister of a regularly organized church, with 
preaching every Sunday evening, with baptisms, communion, conversions, 
and the joys and trials of Christian experience, still keeps up his work, 
though at great disadvantage. As the church is virtually Congregational 
in its administration, they naturally turn to us for help and sympathy, and 
we are searching for some plan whereby the work and the worker may be 
encouraged and their usefulness increased. — Oregon. 



OBEDIENT TO THE HEAVENLY VISION 

By Miss Katharine MacNaughton 

The little village church was brightly lighted, and soft strains of 
music floated on the autumn air. Outside, three laughing girls from the 
seminary in the vicinity were passing. "Oh, a gospel seance" said one. 
" Come in, my dears, and be converted. I think I hear them already 
singing, ' Oh, to be nothing, nothing,' " and her saucy black eyes danced 
as she gently pulled the girl nearest her, to draw her away. The other 
hesitated, with a longing look in her eyes. " I know you want to be there, 
Constance. I can see it in your eyes. All right ; if you go, I can stand 
it for one night." 

The church was crowded with eager, serious listeners. The girls 
entered quietly, and, with a little more whispering, sat down in the rear 
of the church. Presently a white-haired old man rose to speak, saying 
that he had a message especially to those who were just finishing their 
studies. 

" That means you," said, irrepressible Maggie, nudging first one and 
then the other of her companions. 

The speaker had no gifts of eloquence to command attention. Only 
the earnestness and goodness which shone out of his face and spoke in 
his words held his audience. He spoke of the many opportunities of 
serving Christ in the world and of the need of educated talent in mission 
work in our great cities and in foreign lands. He told in simple. language 
how one after another of his own children had dedicated their lives to 
service. Some were working at home, others in China and India. Then 
the speaker dwelt particularly on the usefulness of those who were trained 
as nurses or physicians, in work among the suffering and degraded, of 



238 The Home Missionary April, 1899 

the ways in which they could help their fellow beings in the name and 
spirit of Christ. 

The three girls sat quietly, with rather a shame-faced look as the 
speaker named the advantages they possessed in education and home 
training, and appealed to them to devote their bright youth and energy 
to the service of the Savior. 

Then followed the simple hymn : " I gave My life for thee ; what hast 
thou done for Me ? " 

The old man rose once more and said : " If there are any here to- 
night who feel like consecrating their lives to this work, speak to me after 
the meeting." Black-eyed Maggie looked at Constance and said, without 
the gleam of a smile . "Come on and speak to that good old man. I 
intend to speak to him and try to do something worth while with my life." 

" Oh, Maggie ! " said the two girls, almost overcome with amazement. 

" Why not ? " she retorted. " What good are we, anyway ? I do not 
intend to spend all of my life stagnating in this village. I shall see what 
he wants me to do, and then we will go and talk it all over with Miss 
Martin." They glanced across the aisle and saw a sweet, gentle face 
framed in hair just turning silvery, with a look of calm and patience, as 
of one who had passed through trouble and conquered. Miss Martin 
had the rare power of drawing out the confidence of her pupils, and was 
one of the seminary teachers to whom all who were in doubt or trouble 
came as a matter of course. 

The next afternoon the three girls were seated in Miss Martin's cozy 
sitting-room. On a lounge, drawn near the open fire, the teacher lay, 
propped up by pillows, resting from her morning labor. She smiled as 
enthusiastic Maggie rushed in, followed more slowly by Constance and 
Mabel. 

"We have come to have a good talk. I know that you will laugh to 
think that I was so impressed by what that dear old man said last even- 
ing." Tears stood in Maggie's dark eyes, but the saucy gleam of amuse- 
ment at herself was still there. 

" Well, sit down and tell me all about it." 

"What do you think, Constance?" she said, turning to one of the 
girls. 

" Oh, my ! I cannot go into slum work and that sort of thing — I am 
not cut out for it ; but I honor those brave young people he told about, 
who have nerve to go into such work and help those wretched people. I 
should be perfectly helpless and discouraged. I suppose I shall always 
be one of those who have more money than brains, as some one kindly 
said to me once. I cannot help it if my father is rich and gives me 
everything I want. Yet, I would like to do something in the world, just 
as much as Maggie." 



April, 1899 The Home Missionary 239 

"How about you, little one?" said Miss Martin, turning to Mabel, 
who had said nothing, but whose honest blue eyes told her deep interest in 
the talk. 

" Well, I did not say much. I liked that dear old man as much as 
the others did ; but when I leave school I have a dear father and mother 
to help at home, and my only sister, who is waiting for me to get through 
so that she can go out to India as a missionary. We cannot both leave, 
and she has to work her way, and is waiting until the means of going 
is assured. Sometimes — I suppose it is wicked — I wish I had lots of 
money, and then Bessie could go without waiting for the Board to get 
the money from the churches ; but there ! I did not mean to say all 
that. You are a witch, Miss Martin, and make us say out just what we 
are thinking." 

"Well," burst in Maggie, " why not ? I always say right out what I 
have to say, and then I feel better." 

Miss Martin lay with a dreamy look in her eyes, and when a pause 
came said: 

" My dear girls, it is one of my best rewards as your teacher that you 
come to me with all your thoughts and plans. You make me think of a 
long time ago, when I had planned my life very differently. I was all 
ready to go out as a missionary, had finished my course as a medical mis- 
sionary, and had only to pass the examination as to physical fitness. 
Then came my sore trial. The physician said I was not physically strong 
enough for the strain of such a life. Very reluctantly and rebelliously 
I gave up my cherished plan and took up teaching. Last evening, as I 
listened to those earnest words, all of my old longings came back, and it 
is a joy to me to think that any of my girls have been led to think of this 
way of using their talents." 

"Oh, Miss Martin," said Maggie, "do you think I could do any 
good with my training as a nurse ? I would put down my name at once 
and go into work in the slums as soon as my studies here are finished." 

" I think, my dear, that you have many qualifications. You are 
strong and bright and have had good training, but I cannot decide for 
you. The Lord, who is speaking to your heart, alone can lead you to a 
right choice. I shall feel it a blessed privilege to have one of my pupils 
take up that work, and that my teaching has borne good fruit. You will 
seem like my substitute and in your young life will carry out what I saw 
in vision years ago." 

Constance sat motionless through all, but a new light glowed in her 
eyes and a happy smile just hovered on her lips. 

"I know what I can do now," she said suddenly ; " I can send a substi- 
tute, too. Why cannot I pay Bessie's salary and let her go as soon as she 
can ? Then, even if I am stupid and afraid to go myself, I will be helping 



240 The Home Missionary April, 1899 

by sending someone a great deal better than myself. I have plenty of 
money and father lets me do what 1 like with it. What do you say, 
Mabel ? Don't look as if you had lost your last friend ; " for by this time 
tears were in Mabel's eyes and Maggie was openly crying without the 
least attempt at concealment. 

The teacher closed her eyes, as if in prayer, holding her hands tightly 
clasped, to control her feelings. 

Time rolled on, and the girls graduated with the highest honors. 
Maggie offered her services as a missionary nurse in a neighboring city, 
and among the poor and sinful entered on her work, with many heart- 
sinkings and discouragements. Hence, her brave, cheerful spirit never 
faltered as she took her way into the dreary homes, ministering with 
skillful touch, making the dull rooms bright with her radiant presence, 
winning the love and confidence of those to whom she ministered, and 
inspiring them by her own courage to efforts at better living. 

Mabel's sister went to India, and Constance was prouder of that one 
deed, which she felt was her mission, than of anything which life had 
brought to her. Among her fashionable acquaintances she roused an 
active interest in her " substitute," and made many of them feel the use- 
lessness of their aimless lives, giving them a vision of what a life of help- 
fulness really meant which in their better moments appealed to their 
noblest instincts. 

Maggie was the only one of the trio who ever saw " the dear old 
man " again. He came into their lives, gave his message, and like other 
prophets and teachers went his way. But the vision opened to their eyes 
by the Master's message did not fade from those eager souls. Only eter- 
nity will reveal the results of that one evening's faithful witness. 

Albany, N. V. 



Self-Righteousness. — The beginning here was difficult, for the 
ground was not under cultivation for years, and it seemed to be very 
hard, even stony. Now I have many doors open where I am allowed to 
read the precious Word. One of the greatest difficulties here is self- 
righteousness. Some are a special kind of sinners, such as think they 
"need no mercy nor forgiveness." Once while reading to a lady from 
the third chapter of Romans, that we all have come short of God's glory 
and therefore we need Christ's atonement for our shortcomings, she 
asked, " How is that, anyway ? I always heard that only good people will 
get to heaven, and you are reading, ' all have gone astray ; there is none 
that doeth good, no, not one.' I thought good-hearted people through 
their deeds will get to heaven." I turned then to Luke xiii., where it 
says, " Except ye repent ye shall all likewise perish." After listening 



April, 1899 The Home Missionary 241 

awhile to the story of the only possible way for us to be saved, she said : 
"How nice it must be to read in that book." 1 said, "It is the Bible." 
She said, "Oh, I had one, too, but the reading in ray Bible is different." 
I found hers was a Catechism ! She asked then, " Are these same verses 
in the Baptist Bible ?" for she had one upstairs in her trunk which she 
would get down and read for herself. She was interested to hear that 
we can be saved by acknowledging our sins, truly repenting of them, and 
firmly trusting God's words that he will, for Christ's sake, forgive all our 
unrighteousness and will receive us into his family. Besides self-right- 
eousness there is a good deal of infidelity which is spreading through 
ungodly papers. Some families will not let their children attend Sunday- 
school. — Bohemian Bible Reader. 



Other Attractions. — During a part of this quarter our Trans- 
Mississippi Exposition kept church work at a low ebb. Not only did 
thousands visit our city daily, but the homes of our people were largely 
given up to "roomers" or friends. Then the attractions provided to 
draw large crowds to the Exposition Grounds eclipsed, for the time being, 
everything else. There was one immense stream in Omaha which seemed 
to carry everything with it, and that stream flowed into the Exposition 
Grounds. We suffered perhaps less than many, but our congregations 
were cut in two, as was the attendance of our church and Endeavor 
prayer-meetings. But a few of the faithful stood by and held on to the 
work ; not a service was abandoned or an engagement postponed. 

When the Exposition closed, things began to change. The excite- 
ment died away and the people came back to church. Our congrega- 
tions have not reached their normal size, but there is every indication 
that they will. Our young people are all back with some additions. At 
their last two meetings over forty were present. Our members are taking 
hold of the work with a will to try and repair the loss due to the weeks 
of neglect. There is an increasing interest as we near the close of the 
church year. 

I am not sure that it is right to lay all the blame on the Exposition. 
Expositions may be good for some things, but we have found they are 
not good to build up churches or to make better Christians. Good Chris- 
tian people here are praying and hoping that we shall not have the Expo- 
sition repeated next year. 

Five persons have been received into the church, four on confession 
and one by letter. All these are heads of families and own their own 
homes in the neighborhood. We consider them valuable additions from 
the fact that, owning property, they are more likely to remain in the com- 
munity. — Omaha, Neb. 



242 The Home Missionary April, 1899 



WORK IN NEBRASKA 

I hardly think the dear friends in the East realize what great help their 
missionary boxes are to us out here The simple fact is that we could 
not live and do our work without such help. The few dollars we receive 
as salary are hardly enough to pay for the simplest and most frugal food 
and to provide fuel in winter to keep us warm. Clothes would simply 
be out of the question if we had to buy them. So do not think it is a 
small thing, not amounting to much, as a part of your Christian work. I 
assure you with the utmost earnestness that it is vital with us. God bless 
you abundantly for your efforts and sacrifices in this ministry. 

Now, a word as to my particular work here. During the last five 
years there has been a succession of poor crops, gradually diminishing 
our members until in the year just closed the work here was almost a 
total failure, because many of our people are farmers. Quite a number 
have had to move away or starve. The people were so discouraged that 
they were about to give up having any pastor at present. But the point 
here was too valuable to abandon, and there are elements at work which 
will in time make it a strong field again. The people are beginning to 
devote their attention to cattle, instead of agriculture. I have come here 
to make an effort to resuscitate the people and the work and preserve to 
our church and to the kingdom this vital point. They have responded 
nobly to the effort. In the face of total financial failure they have 
assumed their old obligations to the church and also added fifty dollars to 
them. The attendance has increased from a small handful to almost the 
sitting capacity of the church. The people have taken on a cheerful 
frame of mind and begin the work with a will. Spiritual life is deepen- 
ing, and I confidently look for a real revival spirit to manifest itself dur- 
ing the coming months. There are many young people here who are 
coming our way. 

We work under great difficulties, of course. Our building is in sad 
shape — plaster fallen, walls cracked and dirty, no ornaments, and the 
whole exterior appearance anything but inviting. We have no funds to 
hire a janitor, and so the building is not kept in good shape. We divide 
the janitor work among us as best we can. One man, our deacon, who 
has a family of twelve children to feed and clothe, and who is janitor of 
the public-school building, finds time somehow in the midst of all his 
other matters to attend to our work every alternate month. Another 
good brother living a mile and a half in the country comes in all sorts of 
weather, morning and night, facing the blizzard or wind, to do janitor's 
work. These are illustrations of the earnest, self-sacrificing spirit which 
animates the people. It is a delight to work with them. 



April, 1899 The Home Missionary 243 

These people contribute to the salary in various ways. One family, 
who have heretofore scarcely given a dollar to Christian work, supply us 
with milk for the year ; another with butter ; another does washing for us, 
who has never been able to give more than a dollar before. They are 
beginning totalize the joy and blessing there are in giving, and their own 
interest is deepened. Best of all, they begin to realize that the work can 
go on if they have a mind to put their shoulder to the wheel. The proof 
of their real interest is found in the greatly increased attendance at 
prayer-meeting. We are now studying Prayer, itself. 

In addition to considerable work within forty or fifty miles of here, 
every two weeks I ride seven miles to a little band of people who gather 
in a log schoolhouse. This house is one of the old type, with the excep- 
tion of one feature — the roof is of sod laid on fence boards. About 
half of the sod has blown away or decayed, and the snow and sun alike 
pour in through the cracks between the boards while I talk. The audi- 
ence huddles around an old wood-stove in the middle of the room to 
keep warm. 

I trust we may have a large place in your hearts and sympathies as 
we try to stem the tide of evil on the frontier. — Nebraska. 

Using the Church Kitchen. — On Thanksgiving Day we gave our 
people a Welsh tea party. Like most churches, we need here more money 
to keep up the gospel fires than the people give simply from love of the 
work. So we occasionally prepare something that they all like and are 
willing to pay for. Good food and all they can eat at twenty-five cents 
a head will draw a greater crowd than could the most attractive speaker 
after he had been here a few months. Home Missionary pastors must be 
able to reach the pockets of their people in some pleasant way or fall far 
short of needed support. So when people begin to lose appetite for the 
true manna and the church treasury gets low, which always follows, we 
change off and give them something they like to feast on, thus securing 
means to keep the work going forward. The kitchen holds a prominent 
place in the churches of our day, but I hope the time may come when 
our gifts to the cause of Christ shall be sufficient for all its needs, and 
love for the Master shall be the only motive for giving. — Maryland. 



Sowing in Hope. — While the quarter's additions to our church have 
been few, we have evidence that many have been brought under deep 
conviction for their sins. I have preached a series of Sunday evening 
sermons to the unsaved of the town, using the Sabbath morning hours to 



244 The Home Missionary April, 1899 

talk to the church, and our meetings have been spiritual in so much that 
many have risen for prayer and have remained for conversation. About 
six weeks ago I organized an evangelistic class for Bible study and the 
development of personal workers, as that seems to me to be our people's 
present need. About sixty are enrolled, with an attendance of some 
fifty. Now the climax has been reached and the harvest seems ready to 
be gathered. I have sent to each family a letter, in the hope that they 
may become burdened for souls. A failure to do this I think has been 
the mistake of many churches that have entered haphazard into revival 
services, expecting to defeat the enemy when no preparation had been 
made and where no seed had been sown to promise a crop. — Pennsyl- 
vania. 



WORK ON THE FRONTIER 

You naturally will be interested to know particularly of our work, so I 
will give you a little account of it, though we are doing nothing strange 
or startling. Condon lies in eastern Oregon, a wheat and stock raising 
region, forty miles from the nearest railroad, and forty miles from our 
nearest Congregational church at Lexington. Two church buildings have 
been erected at Condon for the Congregationalists, the first being de- 
stroyed by a wind-storm. The people built a parsonage for us this year, 
and partly furnished it. So we feel quite at home, though so far away 
from former friends. Our field is almost limitless. Over Rocky Moun- 
tain roads, trails, and no roads at all, we go to find people who need the 
Gospel. We find them scattered around in deep canons, out of sight and 
out of sound of almost everything and everybody. But a more hospitable 
people you cannot find. 

If your office duties are not too many will you take a little trip with 
us? Go with me up "Trail Fork," a settlement or canon noted for infi- 
delity, and find who and what the dwellers on that creek are like. Get 
right into the cart. Don't laugh at my little pony ; if ever a missionary 
did faithful work our little "Darkey" has done it, so come along. Yes, 
the cart is heavy for one little horse, but it costs less to keep one than 
two (that is, horses). And the cart is a pretty rough one to ride in over 
these rocky roads ; but until a good warm coat comes, the jolting serves 
to keep the missionary warm. 

We pass down a deep canon for six miles, much of the road being cut 
right out of the steep rocky sides. It makes you dizzy to look down ? 
Well, then, look up. That will be a good motto for the missionary, too, 
before he gets in from this trip. 

The lava rocks tower in majesty above us, both solid and honey- 



April, 1899 The Home Missionary 245 

combed, gigantic monuments of the Creator's power. These mountains 
are most beautiful in their soft covering of green and brown mosses. Out 
a few miles from a ranch we meet a typical cowboy, who directs us on 
our way to a " good square meal," at the ranch. The little birds sing 
merrily, the sun shines cheerily, and you are in good condition for the 
repast you find spread before you, If you are not used to these canons, 
you may be filled with a desire to get upon the ridge and look out ; and 
when you are told that it is a half-day's walk there and back, you simply 
pity the man who has become depraved enough to talk so wide of the 
truth. But if you try the trip once, your pity is speedily transferred from 
your host to his doubting guest. Dinner over, we leave our cart, and go 
up on the trail on horseback. As our fresh ponies gallop along the nar- 
row trail, we are a merry-looking party. All Nature is glad and so are we. 

Here is the house ; yes, and the people are here. Great, long freight 
wagons in lieu of carriages, and dozens who came on foot or on horse- 
back. Let us enter. JThe front room looks much better in its darkness 
(the one window being darkened) than it would were it light. Bare floor 
and walls, little or no furniture, luxuries, comforts. Yet to some this is 
home, therefore the dearest spot on earth. 

You are looking in surprise by this time, first at me, then at the weep- 
ing women and children. Ah, I had almost forgotten that we had 
started to a funeral service. Away up here in these blue mountains, fif- 
teen miles from the nearest church, a young lad has died very suddenly. 
An aged pioneer grandmother insists on a "Christian buryin'," and thus 
it is that men, women, and children who have not heard a sermon in ten 
or fifteen years are hushed into silence by the Gospel story of Christ's 
love, where, a few moments before, the moaning and wailing were fearful 
to hear. 

But in that isolated settlement you will now find a few Christians and 
a Sunday-school, the result of meetings carried on soon after that sad 
funeral service by your humble missionary. 

One of those meetings was essentially interesting. A Mormon might 
have made use of it to prove his ridiculous theories of cloven tongues of 
fire. etc. I had held several meetings in the little old frame schoolhouse. 
The cold October wind blew through the cracks and came boldly in at 
the broken windows. The dim light of several smoky lanterns was our 
total supply of earthly illumination, so you see the sermon had to be 
doubly bright. The people forgot to bring their lanterns, as it was bright 
moonlight, so I took out a large Rochester lamp from the Condon church, 
and hung it over the rude desk used for a pulpit. I got on famously with 
the sermon that night ; had splendid attention from a crowded house and 
was firing at very short range. A young girl attracted my attention, 
about the middle of the discourse, when suddenly her eyes popped out as 



246 The Home Missionary April, 1899 

large as — well, something very large and frightful, and she pointed, with 
a wild gesture, to the roof above me. At that time a smothered cry of 
"fire" was heard. The preacher cut short a long word, climbed up on the 
pulpit, and beat the little flame with the book of notes from which he was 
speaking. The crowd rushed for the little door, in a panic of fear, while 
the parson sought to remove the cause of the fire (the lamp) before it 
should drop to the floor. At this juncture of the service -someone hap- 
pened to think that water would quench the fire, and a bucketful was at 
once emptied into the flaming roof, the parson beneath receiving the 
showers of something not blessings. But the fire was out, so were the 
people, so was the Rochester lamp, but the sermon wasn't. So I called 
them back in ; assured them of their safety, except from eternal fire ; took 
my stand again under the now cooling but smoking, crackling roof, which 
had really burned but very little. By one very dim lantern I concluded 
the discourse. Of all my many audiences in queer places, this was among 
the most attentive. — Rev. H. Burr, Condo??, Ore. 



Better Prospects. — This quarter 1 have observed among my people 
a revival of truer feelings toward the Gospel of Christ. Our friend, Rev. 
H. P. Case, from Los Angeles, Cal., was among us a few weeks ago, and 
we had a good service, using Mr. Case's magic lantern. The pictures 
greatly helped the people to understand more easily the history of our 
Lord. The attendance was over forty-five persons, and every one paid 
very good attention to the speaker's words. Then we went to Los 
Ranchos de Atrisco, where we held a service, using the same pictures, but 
with smaller attendance on account of the prevailing small-pox. Two 
new members have been added on confession to our church at Los 
Ranchos de Atrisco. They were examined, deemed worthy, and formally 
received at the Lord's Supper by Rev. Mr. Birlew, of San Rafael. — Rev. 
J. M. Moya, New Mexico. 



Patient in Tribulation. — Through the past two years our souls 
have been chastened by much sorrow and suffering. Death has come 
twice to our home. Sickness has followed sickness until at times we have 
found it hard, even by faith, to look through the clouds. But the Lord 
has stood faithfully by us. In perplexities, in financial distress, in sick- 
ness and death he has fulfilled toward us all his gracious promises. We 
want to approve ourselves as the ministers of God, even as Paul did, so 
we take for our motto his words in 2 Cor. vi. 1-10. 

Our hearts are deeply thankful that we are permitted to be partakers 
of the joys, labors, trials, and afflictions of the Gospel. — Colorado. 



April, 1899 The Home Missionary 247 



A PROFITABLE WEDDING 

We have married the Sunday-school and the morning sermon. The 
school at 10.30 is followed by the sermon from a text taken from the 
Sunday-school lesson or elsewhere. My aim is, while giving the adults 
their "portion in due season," to so interpret and illustrate the truth that 
the children also may understand and apply it. Result : the entire school 
remains for the sermon and seldom are even the youngest uninterested, 
while more of the children of the neighborhood are present for the sermon 
than in any other church I know of. 

What family is this that cordially invited me to dinner last Sunday ? 
Even the same that, a while ago, with repellent attitude, told me they " had 
no use for our church, nor for such Christians as were in it " — referring to 
one of our Christian.families. But their little girl came to Sunday-school. 
By and by the parents came to church occasionally. Then the head of 
the other family — not very long a Christian, but trying to follow the 
lessons preached on forgiveness and charity — found a way of conferring 
a favor on the other household. Next, the children of the two began to 
visit each other. Now the parents are reconciled, and those who " had 
no use for us" are regular attendants and among our v/armest friends. 
Some of the young people, who were rough and wild, are becoming 
thoughtful, respectful, and interested. There is a feeling of tender unity 
among the members, and a growing conviction that " there shall be 
showers of blessing." — Oregon. 



ANNUAL MEETING OF THE SOCIETY 

The Seventy-third Annual Meeting of this Society will be held in 
Hartford, Conn., on May 23-25 next. This is one week earlier than the 
usual date of the meeting. 

In the heart of New England the work of the year will be reviewed, 
and the outlook considered. Rev. John Henry Barrows, D.D., President 
of Oberlin College, has accepted the invitation to preach the annual, 
sermon, and eminent speakers from different parts of the country will be 
present. 

Every contributing Congregational church is entitled to two annual 
members, who have full voting right at each annual meeting. 



248 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1899 



APPOINTMENTS 



DECEMBER, 1898 



Not in commission last year 

Burkhardt, Paul, Springfield, Mo. 
Cooke, W. H., Edmonds, Wash. 
Darling, Charles B., Washington, Ind. 
Davy, James J., Hope, No. Dak. 
Goodwin, Samuel H., Provo City, Utah. 
Hayes, Edward C Danbury, Neb. 
Peckover, Horace. Scranton. Pa. 
Risser, H. A., St. Paul, Minn. 
Shear, A. I-., St. Louis, Mo. 
Todd, Henry C, Eagle River, No. Wis. 
Wright, William M.. Paynesville, Minn. 



Re-commissioned 

Adams, Hubert G., Garretson, No. Dak. 
Ayres, Alfred W., Wisner, Neb. 
Bates, John M., Wakonda, So. Dak. 
Barnes, Albert E., Clearwater and Hasty. Mil 
Bessey, William N., Linwood, St. Louis, Mo. 
Billings, Charles S., Evangelist in No. Dak. 
Breckenridge, Daniel M., Ormond, Fla. 
Brown, John F.. Los Alamitos, So. Cal. 
Chevis, Ernest C, Staples, Minn. 
Compton, Herbert E., Fessenden, No. Dak. 
Cookman, Isaac, Hennessey, Okla. 
Deakin, Samuel. Cowles. Neb. 
Ellis, John T., Ree Heights, So. Dak. 



Evans, James J., Bangor, Pa. 

Fisk, Pliny H., Edgerton, Minn. 

Foster. Festus, Turkey Creek, Okla. 

Gay, William. Pomona, Fla. 

Gray, John, Butte, Neb. 

Griffith, W. E., Perham. Minn, 

Harper, Richard H., Fruita, Colo. 

Hassell, R. B., Everett, Wash. 

Heald, Josiah H., Nogales, Ariz. 

Hull, Ellsworth L., Garfield, Kan. 

Johnson, Jonas. Lincoln, Neb. 

Jones, Burton H., Hay Springs, Neb. 

McQuarrie, Mrs. Rebecca A., Niagara, No. Dak. 

Martin, Fritz W., Little Ferry, N. J. 

Mason, Horace C, Pullman, Wash. 

Morris, Maurice B., Dayton. Wash. 

Moxie, Charles H., Amery, No. Wis. 

Nott, J. L., Benson, Minn. 

O'Brien. J. P., Kansas City. Mo. 

Olds, Alonzo R.. Eureka, Wash. 

Oxley, Charles G., Granada and Fraser, Minn. 

Palmer. Miss Alice R., Wayzata and Groveland, 

Minn. 
Pease, William P., Bladen. Neb. 
Rowell, N. L., D D., Los Angeles, Cal. 
Sarkeys, Elias J., Waubay. So. Dak. 
Simpkin, Peter A.. Gallup, New Mex. 
Sutherland, John M.. Terre Haute, Ind. 
Thompson, Thomas. Revilloand Elmira, So. Dak. 
Wattenbarger. O. T., Argentine, Kan. 
Williams, M. W., Big Lake, Minn. 



JANUARY, 1899 



A T ot in commission last year 

Barney, Lewis W., Jersey City, N. J. 

Barrie, N. C, General Missionary in No. Dak. 

and N. W. Minn 
Bortel, Harvey B., Aitkin, Minn. 
Brakemeyer, G. L., Friend and Turkey Creek, 

Neb 
Chase, C. E., Etna. Callahan's, McConnaughey, 

and Oro Fino, No. Cal. 
Clark, Allen, Park Rapids. Dorset, and Ackley, 

Minn. 
Cooke, W. H., Sunol Glen and Mission San Jose, 

So. Cal. 
Deering. William A., Michigan City, No. Dak. 
Essig, William F., Wolbach, Neb. 
Esterborg, J., Troy, Idaho. 
Hagquist, C. F., Wood Lake and Doctor's Lake, 

No. Wis. 
Hall, Ransom B.. Gettysburg. So. Dak. 
Hamerson, John, Canton, So. Dak. 
Henry, Emma K., Springfield, So. Dak. 
Hill, George A., Atlanta, Ga. 
Horner, John W., Aberdeen, So. Dak. 
Housaker, David S., Ft. Calhoun, Neb. 
Larkin, Ralph B..Buena Vista, Colo. 
Olsson, Carl F., Titusville. Penn. 
Schaerer, John, Curtiss. No. Wis. 
Slocombe, Samuel, San Francisco, Cal. 
Soderstrom, J. M., Pillsbury, Minn. 
Spence, Walter, Stillwater. Okla. 
Todd, David E., Waukomis, Okla. 
Walters, Luther M.. Fresno. No. Cal. 
Washburn, F. M , Rohnerville, Hydesville, and 

Alton, No. Cal. 



AY- commissioned 

Appleman, H. H.. Sauk Rapids and Cable, Minn. 

Appleman, Hiram H., Sauk Rapids, Minn. 

Asadoorian, Avedis M., Centerville, So. Dak. 

Beadenkoff, T. M , Canton, Md. 

Beede, Aaron, Ashton and Athol, So. Dak. 

Brown. J. N., Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Buswell, Jesse, Kingfisher, Okla. 

Chambers, Alexander, Prentice, No. Wis. 

Chapman. William J., Nickerson, Kan. 

Coate, Robert M.. Erwin, So. Dak. 

Davies, William A., Dodge, Howells. and Fair- 
view, Neb. 

Egerland. Franz, General Missionary among the 
Germans, Neb. 

Essig, Gottlieb, Sutton and Stockham, Neb. 

Farworth, Arthur, Nebraska City, Neb. 

Flook, Jacob, Omaha, Neb. 

Gerrie, William A.. Embarrass, No. Wis. 

Green, George E., Canovaand Dover, So. Dak. 

Griffith. W. R., Ft. Worth, Tex. 

Hale. Edson D., Decoto, No. Cal. 

Henderson, T. H., Salem, Ore. 

Henry, James A., Little River, Kan. 

Hergert, Jacob, Walla Walla, Wash. 

Hughes, Rowland, Black Diamond, Wash. 

Jenkins, David T., Hillsboro, No. Dak. 

Huntington. J. C, General Missionary at large in 
So. W. Minn. 

Jenkins, J. H., North Denver, Colo. 

Jones, John E., Dawson, No. Dak. 

Jones, Robert G., Lake Benton, Minn. 

Killen, John T., Forman, No. Dak. 

Langdale, Thomas G., De Smet, So. Dak. 



April, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



249 



Lich, Peter, Superior, Nelson, Liberty Creek, 

Guide Rock, and Beaver Creek, Neb. 
McKenney, James E., Havelock, Neb. 
McKinney, Samuel T., St. Louis, Mo. 
McRae. Isaac, Wallace, Neb. 
Murphy, J. S., Okarche, Okla. 
Oehler, Fred H., New Richland, Minn. 
Penniman, Andrew O., Dunkirk, Ind. 
Rogers, Enoch E., Lamberton, Minn. 



Sattler, John, General Missionary in So. Dak. 
Smith, G. B., Iberia, Mo. 
Snell, Charles Y., Redondo Beach, So. Cal. 
Thomas, Charles M., New Castle, Colo. 
Vavrina, Miss Katie, Iowa City, Iowa. 
Williams, Samuel,' Riverton, Neb. 
Williams, Stephen, Cando, No. Dak. 
Williams, William T., Aten, Neb. 
Winter, Alpheus, Tryon, N. C. 



FEBRUARY, 1899 



Not in commission last year 

Cotton. Harry H., Park Rapids, Minn. 
Davis, David L., Williamstown, Penn. 
Garvin, Hugh C, Ridgeville, Ind. 
Gimblett, William H., Hankinson, No. Dak. 
Gordon, John, West Indianapolis, Ind. 
Hawkins, W. H., Red Cliff, Gilman, and Min- 

turn, Colo. 
Hubbell, W. H., Kragness, Minn. 
Jordan, W- T., Trinidad, Colo. 
Keniston, George N., Loomis, Neb. 
Lindholm, S. G., Portland, No. Dak. 
Pierce, Robert S., Urbana, Neb. 
Pinney, Ira E., Dora, Minn. 
Plant, G. O., Renovo, Penn. 
Richardson, David A., Bloomer, No. Wis. 
Samuel, Benjamin, Villard, Minn. 
Tomlin, D. R., Mitchell, So. Dak. 
Williams, J. B., Medford, Okla. 

Re-commissioned 

Adams, Clinton B., Philadelphia, Penn. 
Bascom, George S., Oriska, No. Dak. 



Brown, William J., Glenwood, Minn. 
Diffenbacher, Benjamin F., Eagle, Neb. 
Doyle, A. A., Colville, Wash. 
Fellows, Charles B., General Missionary and 

Evangelist in Minn. 
Herrick, Edward P., General Missionary in 

Fla. 
Hess, Henry, Walter, Neb. 
Hull. E. L.. Whitewater, Colo. 
Kokjer, Jordan M., Springview, Neb. 
Krause, F. C, Fitchburg, No. Cal. 
Michael, George, Halsted, Minn. 
Mitchell, Frank, Faulkton, So. Dak. 
Moore, W. H., Mazeppa and Zumbro Falls, 

Minn. 
Pease, William P., McDonald and Atwood, 

Kan. 
Ricker, Albert E., Chadron, Neb. 
Rogers, Samuel J., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Shoemaker, Henderson C. Fredonia, Kan. 
Smith, A. J., South Bend, Wash. 
Thomas, David L., Highmore, So. Dak. 
Webb, Henry W., Columbia, So. Dak. 
Young, Arthur G., Shevlin, Minn. 



RECEIPTS 



For account of receipts by State Auxiliary Societies, see pages 268 to 276 



DECEMBER, 1898 



MAINE-S78.39. 

Auburn, High Street Ch., by J. F. 

Atwood $58 39 

Portland, High Street, by H. W. Shay- 

lor 15 00 

Thomaston, Y. P. S. C. E. , by A. Mayo 5 00 



NEW HAMPSHIRE-$ 3 , 530.38 ; of 
which legacies, $3,200.00. 

F. C. I. and H. M. Union of N. H., 
Miss A. A. McFarland, Treas. : 

Bristol, S. S., toward L. Mp. of Miss 
S. J. Danforth 1600 

Stewartstown, MissS. Converse 4 67 

20 67 

Alstead Center, S. S. Rally, by Mrs. 

E. B. Greene 1 00 

Concord, A Friend 5 00 

Derry, Legacy of J. C. Taylor, by E. 

T. Parker, Ex 3,000 00 

East Jaffrey, by B. E. Martin " 750 



Franklin Falls, S. S. Rally, by N. W. 

Perkins $10 00 

Lyme, by D. A. Grant 56 00 

Milford, First, by A. C. Crosby Co 00 

North Hampton, Gift of the late Eben 

Gore, by F. R. Drake 98 04 

Pitsfield, by M. H. Nutter 22 17 

Raymond, Mrs. H. M. Harriman, to 

const, herself a L. M 50 00 

Warner, Legacy of M. D. Wheeler, 

by C. S. Wheeler 200 00 



VERMONT— $2,269.72 ; of which leg- 
acy, $2,030.00. 

Bennington, Second, by C. B. March. 38 22 

Brattleboro, Mrs. C. L. Howe 1 40 

Burlington, First, by M. H. Stone 207 00 

Granby, S. S. Rally, by Mrs. A. W. 

Williams , 1 00 

Middlebury, Legacy of Emily C. 
Starr, by M. A. Starr, W. P. Cham- 
bers and J. J. Brown, Trustees 2,000 00 

Orwell, R. H. Holmes 3 40 

Quechee, S. S., by Miss A. Wood. ... 2 00 



250 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1899 



St. Albans, L. M. Gilbert $1 00 

Stockbridge. T. S. Hubbard 5 00 

Vergennes, by A. Ross 5 00 

-E. C. B." 70 

Westford, S. S. Rally, by Mrs. L. M. 

Bates 5 00 

MASSACHUSETTS — $10,486.49; of 
which legacies, §1,965.93. 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc, by Rev. E. 

B. Palmer, Treas 6,00000 

By request of donors, of which for 
Salary Fund, $362 ; Rally, $32.61 ; 
Alaska, $18 955 46 

Amherst, First, by B. H. Williams... 198 00 
Boston, A Friend 10 00 

W. A. Wilde, for Salary Fund 25 00 

Brookline, Mrs. C. L. Goodell, Christ- 
mas offering 25 00 

Cambridgeport, Y. P. S. C. E. of Pil- 
grim Ch., by M. J. Snow 5 00 

Cummington, by Mrs. J. L. Porter... 14 00 

Douglas, First, by Mrs. W. L. Church 10 00 

Easthampton, Payson Ch., by H. L. 

Clark, to const. F. L. Clark, J. 

Doyle, Miss M. E. Rust and E. H. 

Sawyer L. Ms 201 96 

Enfield, by L. D. Potter 3736 

Fitchburg, Miss J. M. Gould 10 00 

Greenfield, Estate of R. W. Cook, by 

H. W. Hubbard, Trustee 98 25 

Hatfield, by F. H. Bardwell 25 90 

Haverhill, Friends 27 00 

Hubbardston, Primary class, Rally, 

by L. H . Grimes 1 00 

Lawrence, Estate of Mrs. M. T. Ben- 
son, by Mrs. J. L. Brewster 20 00 

Ludlow, J. H 10 00 

Ludlow Center, First, H. E. Miller... 4 15 

Millbury, M. D. Garfield 10 00 

Needham, S. S., by G. Pond, for Salary 

Fund 5 82 

New Bedford, North Ch., A Lady, by 

J. W. Henry 5 00 

Y. P. S. C. E., by F. V. B. Sawin, 

of which $10 for Alaska 25 co 

Newburyport, Y. P. S. C. E. of the 

Belleville Ch.. by E. M. Howe 10 00 

Northampton, Edwards Ch., by G. L. 

Metcalf 80 33 

Dorcas Soc. of the First, by Mrs. 
J. E. Clark, for Salary Fund 56 25 

" W." 300 00 

Orange, Central Evan. Ch., by I. D. 

Kellogg 32 53 

Pittsfield, First Ch. of Christ, by F. 

W. Dutton 15 00 

Rutland. First, by Rev. S. Crawford. 40 25 

Y. P. S. C. E., by H. D. Bray 10 00 

Somerville, Prospect Hill, by G. W. 

Snow 37 94 

South Hadley, Estate of Maria B. 

Gridley, by John W. Mason 47 68 

Mt. Holyoke College, £120 ; Silver 

Circle, $5, by C. F. Stevens 125 00 

Springfield. Estate of Soplironia Day, 

by H. S. Lee and C. H. Barrows. 1,800 00 

South Ch.. by H. K. Chapin, of 
which special $20 130 71 

S. C. Burnham . . 5 00 

Ware, Y. P. S. C. E., special, by Miss 

M.K.Eddy 1000 

Webster, First, by E. L. Spalding ... 20 90 

Williamsburg, Y. P. S. C. E., by H. 

W. Hill, for Alaska 10 00 

Worcester, Central Ch., " X." 30 00 

Plymouth Ch., by F. W. Chase 1 00 

RHODE ISLAND— $505 00. 

R. I. H. M. Soc, by J. Wm. Rice, 

Treas 500 00 

Woonsocket, Miss F. P. Mowry 5 00 



CONNECTICUT-$3,ooi.9 3 . 

Miss. Soc. of Conn., by Rev. W. 
Moore 



11. 



$179 80 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. W. W. 

Jacobs, Treas. : 
For Salary Fund: 

Bridgeport, Aux., by Mrs. H. 
Treat 18 00 

Brooklyn, Aux., by Mrs. E. M. 
Maine 5 20 

East Hampton, Mrs. Philo Bevin. 11 50 

Aux., by Mrs. E. H. Bevin 28 15 

Mrs. P. Bevin 9 00 

East Woodstock, L. B. S., by Mrs. 
J. C. Ames 8 00 

Hartford, First, by Mrs. S. M. 

Hotchkiss, special 10 00 

Jr. Aux., by Mrs. W. W. Jacobs. 50 00 

New Britain, Union Meeting, South 
Ch., by Mrs. M. S. Wiard.... 10 13 

New Haven, by Mrs. L. Cowles, 
coll. taken at H. M. Rally, Col- 
lege Street, special 8 00 

Plainville, Aux., by Mrs. C. E. 
Rlakeslee 5 00 

Prospect, Aux., by Mrs. W. H. 
Phipps '. 12 00 

Putnam, by Miss S. L. Clarke 36 90 

Sharon, Aux., by Miss M. C. Good- 
win ... 25 00 

Southbury, by Mrs. W. H. Bar- 
rows 3 40 

South Norwalk 25 00 

Wallingford, L. B. S., by Miss J. 
E. Dbolittle , 100 00 

365 28 

Branford, Y. P. S. C. E., by Miss M. 

I. Robbins, for Alaska 1 10 00 

A. J. Palmer 10 00 

Bristol. S. S. of the First, by Miss. J. 

E. Beckwith 27 25 

Clinton, Y. P. S. C. E., by E. Stevens, 

for Alaska 2500 

Columbia, Y. P. S. C. E., by L. Pinck- 

ney , for Salary Fund 24 00 

Deep River, by L. Kellogg 14 48 

Farmington, Y. P. S. C. E., by J. S. 

Porter, for Alaska 10 00 

Goshen, F. M. Wadhams 10 00 

Lebanon, by Rev. M. Burr 27 75 

Granby, South, by C. P. Loomis 15 00 

Greenwich, Second, by Dr. E. M. 

Judd 20 67 

A Member of Second Ch 500 00 

Greenfield Hill, Y. P. S. C. E., by R. 

B. Jennings 18 00 

Guilford, First, by E. W. Leete 25 00 

Hadlyme, R. E. Hungerford 1000 

Hartford, Asylum Hill S. S., by F. H. 

Forbes, for Alaska 35 14 

Home Dept. of Center Ch. S. S., by 

K. Smith 55 43 

Ivoryton, First, by N. D. Miller 16 00 

Ladies' H. M. Soc, by Mrs. S. Che- 
ney 3300 

Madison, Mrs. J. E. Lewis 5 00 

Meriden, Center Ch., by W. F. Smith 50 00 
Middletown, South Ch., by G. A. 

Craig 3009 

Julia Gilbert 100 00 

Milford, by W. L. Merwin 20 42 

Mystic, by E. Williams 17 93 

Nepaug, A Friend 2 70 

New Haven, First Ch. of Christ, by 

Miss M. E. Mersick 250 00 

College Ch.. by B. Perrin 412 90 

Mrs. C. K. Curtis 5 00 

• - S. A. D." 500 

Newington, by E. W. Atwood 48 74 



April, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



251 



New London, First Ch. of Christ, by 

G. Whittlesey $57 48 

Y. P. S. C. E. of First Ch. of 
Christ, by Mrs. C. F. Blake, for 
Alaska 500 

Mrs. M. S. Bixler 25 00 

New Milford, H. Upson 5 00 

New Preston Village, by D. Burnham 102 25 

Northfield, by J. P. Catlin 10 57 

North Greenwich, by N. A. Knapp. . 44 19 

North Woodbury, North Ch., add'l, by 

G.F.Morris 200 

Norwalk, First, by E. L. Boyer 62 83 

" Highwood " 10 co 

Norwich, Second, by N. A. Gibbs, to 

const. J. Rossiter, E. A. Prentice, G. 

D. Coit and J. D. Haviland L. Ms.. 129 47 
Norwich Town, In memory of Rev. C. 

T. Weitzel 10 00 

Plainfield, Rev. and Mrs. S. B. Carter 5 00 

Pomfret, S. S. Rally, by W. B. Greene 16 66- 

Salisbury, Woman's Board of Home 

Missions, by Mrs. A. B. Robbins. 10 00 

A Friend 5 00 

A Friend 2 co 

Simsbury, Y. P. S. C. E., by A. T. Pat- 

tison 7 46 

South Manchester, S. S.,by F. W. Mil- 
ler 697 

Stonington, " For special mercies ".. 10 00 

Talcottville, Y. P. S. C. E., by M. H. 

Talcott, for Alaska 10 00 

Unionville, Woman's Miss. Soc, by 

Mrs. F. A. Chamberlain 11 00 

Westbrook, by T. D. Post 8 76 

West Hartford, First Ch. of Christ, by 

E. S. Elmer 16 36 

Windsor, First, by S. H. Barber 49 35 

NEW YORK— $1,681.87, of which leg- 
acy, $225. 

Received by Wm. Spalding, Treas., 

N. Y. H. M. Soc, in November, 

1898: 
Black River and St. Lawrence Asso., 

by J. J. Doty 6 35 

New Haven 60 00 

Otisco, L. H. M. Soc 14 15 

Plainfield Center 2 50 

Prospect 612 

Sinclairville 12 00 

Syracuse, South Avenue 9 15 

Volney 1375 

Watertown 20 00 

West Winfield 22 75 

Y. P. S. C.E 5 00 



171 77 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. J. J. 
Pearsall, Treas. : 

Carthage 5 oo 

Cortland, Silver Circle 5 00 

Flushing, C. E. Soc, for Alaska. ... 10 00 

Homer, Aux 36 00 

Ithaca, W. M. S., $39.75 ; Special, 

$11.06 5081 

C. E. Soc, $2.75; S. S., $2.75; 

Primary Dept., $1, special 6 50 

New York City, Broadway Taber- 
nacle, S. W. W 118 00 

Sherburne, for Alaska 65 00 

296 31 

Albany, A. E. Husted 10 00 

Brooklyn, Bushwick Avenue, by T. A. 

Cotton 25 00 

South Ch., by E. D. Ford 42 03 

Park Ch., by E. F. Marsh 27 02 

Y. P. S. C. E. of the Tompkins 

Avenue Ch., by P. Palmer ...... 25 00 

Mrs. C. M. Birdseye, Ch. of the Pil- 
grims, by J, E, Leech, 10 00 



Buffalo, First, by R. K. Strickland. . . $350 00 
Clifton Springs, Miss J. M. Gilman.. . 50 00 
Crown Point, Second, by J. A. Pen- 
field 20 00 

Danby, Ch. and S. S., by L. H. Hol- 

lister ." 10 00 

DeKalb, Rev. R. C. Day 2 00 

Gaines, S. S. Rally, by H. R. Ander- 
son 221 

Ithaca, First, by S. D. Sawyer 68 16 

Margaretville, Miss M. I. Ward 3 00 

Morristown, First, by J. Moore 9 86 

Mt. Vernon, First, $5 : S. S., $2.68, by 

J. M. Hurd 7 68 

Munnsville, by Dr. S. P. Moore 3 15 

Newark Valley, by Mrs. H. Winship. 20 05 
New York City, Broadway Taberna- 
cle, add'l, by N. Fisher 233 19 

Mrs. Nicholas Fish, by Rev. E. P. 

Herrick 10 00 

A Friend of the cause 10 00 

Owego, First, by E. E. Strait 15 00 

Patchogue, Y. P. S. C. E., by Miss 

M. E. Brundage , 12 56 

Rensselaer, First, by G. H. Mayer 717 

Sherburne, Estate of H. M. Furman, 

by W. R. Furman, Ex . . 225 00 

Smyrna, S. S., by A. E. Boyden 3 00 

Y. P. S. C. E. of the First, by C. E. 

Ferris, for Western work 5 00 

Warsaw, S. S., by H. L. Martin 7 71 



NEW JERSEY— $4,314.1 
legacy, $4,250.00. 



of which 



Woman's H. M. Union of the N. J. 
Asso., Mrs. J. H. Denison, Treas.: 

Bound Brook, Y. P. S. C. E., for 

Alaska co 00 

Bloomfield, Mrs. R. P. Coe 25 00 

Dover, Swedish Ch., by Rev. L. Ake- 

son 3 00 

Jersey City, Waverly Ch., by W. P. 

Roberts 1175 

Montclair, Estate of Samuel Holmes, 

by S. J. Holmes and W. B. Holmes, 

Exs 4,250 00 

Morristown, First, by Rev. W. T. Pan- 

nell 521 

PENNSYLVANIA-$ 7 28.9 9 . 

Audenried, Welsh, by W. Hughes 5 00 

Braddock, First, $7x9 ; S. S.. $2.91, 

by T. Addenbrook 10 00 

Cambridge Springs, W. M. S., by 

Mrs. W. H. Clift 1000 

Chelsea, A Friend 10 00 

Corry, Ladies' Miss. Soc. of the First, 

by D. Barlow 500 

Ebensburg, W. M. S., by Mrs. W. H. 

Clift 500 

Johnstown, First, by R. R. Thomas.. 6 10 

Lindsey, by Rev. I. Thomas 1 47 

Mt. Carmel, First, by Rev. R N. 

Harris 10 27 

Philadelphia, Central Ch., by W. H. 

Lambert 365 00 

Pittsburg, Cash 200 00 

Plymouth, Pilgrim Ch., by Rev. W. 

L. Evans 5 00 

Ridgway, First, by W. H. Osterhout. 50 00 

Scranton, Providence, Welsh, by Rev. 

R. S. Jones 15 00 

Slatington, Welsh Ch., by H. Roberts 7 00 

Titusville, Swedish Ch 5 00 

Scand. Ch., by Rev. A. J. Isakson.. 5 50 

Warren, Bethel Ch., Scands., by Rev. 

J. A. Dahlgren 200 

Wilkesbarre, Puritan English, by M. 

R. Morgan » 65 



252 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1899 



MARYLAND. -$6.00. 
Frostburg, by Rev. G. W. Moore. 



Lincoln Co., Rising Sun Ch., by Rev. 

J. Faulk $1 16 

Newkirk, by Rev. T. H. Harper 21 00 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA— $143.58. 

Woman's H. M. Union of the N. J. 

Asso., Mrs. J. H. Denison, Treas.: 

Washington, D. C, First, for Salary 

Fund 

Washington, First, by W. Lamborn.. 
S. S. of the First, by A. H. Howell. 
F. W. Tuckerman 



GEORGIA— $2.00. 

Demorest, Union Ch., by Rev. W. O. 
Phillips 



ALABAMA— $8.00. 

Good Hope, Texas L T nion Ch., Kent, 
Mt. Olive Ch., Tallassee, and Tal- 
lassee. Liberty Ch., by Rev. A. C. 
Wells 

Talladega, by E. C. Silsby 



FLORIDA-$2o5.5 4 . 

Received by Rev. E. P. Herrick 

Belleair 

Sanford, So. Fla. Conference. 
Thonotosassa 



56 58 

30 00 

S °° 



3 00 
5 00 



Received by W. H. M. U., Mrs. W. 

D. Brown, Treas.: Special for 

Ybor City Mission, Tampa: 

Avon Park, Aux 226 

Daytona, Aux 10 00 

Y. P. S. C. E 5 00 

Interlachen, Aux 3 10 

Jacksonville, Aux 45 00 

From Collection taken at An. 

Meeting 238 

Lake Helen, Aux 14 00 

Y. P. S. C. E -5 5 o 

Melbourne, Mrs. and Mr. J. W. 

Phillips 10 00 

Miss M. A. Roberts 3 00 

Ormond, Aux 10 00 

Pasadena, Y. P. S. C. E 3 00 

St. Petersburg, Aux 5 80 

Sanford, Aux 10 00 

Tampa, Aux 3 50 

Tangerine, Aux 7 28 

Y. P. S. C. E 1 00 

Tavares, Aux u 45 

Winter Park, Aux 20 00 

Ybor City, Aux 20 00 

190 27 
Crestview, Holly and Laurel Hill, by 

Rev. D. A. Simmons 2 00 



NEW MEXICO-$2. 5 o. 
Gallup, First, by Rev. P. A. Simpkin. 



OKLAHOMA— $43.36. 

Woman's Missionary Union, Mrs. A. 
B. Hammer, Treas 

Kingfisher, Union Ch., by Rev. J. 
Buswell 



OHIO-$ 4 8 3 .25. 

Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, Treas. 

OhioH. M. S.: 

Albion, Pa., by Rev. C. W. Grupe.. 5 00 

Belden, by E. Killip 5 80 

Bristol ville, by Capt. C. P. Lyman. 3 00 

S. S., by Miss Minnie Hollister. . . 5 00 

Centerville, by E. L. Evans 7 27 

Ceredo, W. Va., by Rev. Geo. 

Gadsby 500 

Cleveland, First, by T. G. Newton, 4 00 

For Bohemian Work, by T. G. 

Newton 3 05 

T. M. Bates, special 5 00 

James Reece, special 5 00 

Mt. Zion, S. S., Boys' and Girls' 

H. M. Army 10 59 

Thomas Pi wonka, special 10 00 

Swedish, by Rev. D. Marcelius... 2 50 

Park, by W. C. Ritter 8 83 

Hough Ave., by Elizabeth C. Par- 
sons 51 31 

Lake View, by Mrs. E. F. Barstow 4 00 

Cyril Chapel, by Rev. John Musil 20 00 
Columbus, Plymouth, by E. M. 

Parker 17 25 

Garrettsville, by H. N. Merwin.... 15 55 

Geneva, by S. S. Searle 27 00 

Grafton, by Lulu Cordrey 6 00 

Hampden, by Rev. H. S. Thompson 2 81 

Hudson, by Miss E. E. Metcalf 8 00 

Jefferson, by E. H. Rood 20 00 

Norwalk, by F. M. Husted 7 80 

Oberlin, Second, by C. T. Beckwith 26 91 

Rev. A. D. Barber, D.D., special. jo 00 

Paddy's Run, by James Scott. ...... 19 00 

Penfield. by Rev. W. J. Jacobs 2 91 

Ravenna, " Two Friends " 3 00 

Richfield, C. E., by H. F. Wood ... 3 00 

Rootstown, by Henry A. Deming.. 21 33 

Sandusky, by H. H. West 3 95 

Rev. Henry P. Schaufner 2 00 

Sharon, Pa., S. S., by W. J. Thomas 2 68 

Somerdale, by Mrs. Bottomy 1 00 

Steuben ville, by Miss Martha Leslie 13 10 
Thompson, Mrs. N. F. Moseley, 

special 5 00 

Tokio, Zion Welsh Ch., by J.J.Jones 4 75 

Unionville, by I. W. Cone 360 

Weymouth, by Rev. L. W. Mahn. .. 2 40 

York, by Rev. L. VV. Mahn 5 00 

Ohio Woman's H. M. Union, by 
Mrs. G. B. Brown, Treas.: 

Alexis, Willing Workers, Salary 

Fund 5 00 

Marietta, First, Y. L. M. S., Sal- 
ary Fund 4 00 

Toledo, First, Mrs. S, Second half 
of Mrs. J. N. Stevens' Dime 

Bank , 2 50 

Twinsburg, " A Friend," bal. in 
full to const. Mrs. Clara Ellis- 
ton and Miss Mary E. Buell 

L. Ms 4000 

440 89 

Claridon, by C. C. Kellogg 8 25 

Cleveland, Olivet Ch., by Mrs. J. L. 

Young, add'l 12 

Olivet S. S., by Mrs. J. M. Hull .... 2 95 

Hampden, by S. T. Shattuck ... 2 00 

Marblehead, by E. Mallory 4 00 

Olmsted, Second, by F. G. Robb 5 09 

Pierpont, by R. T. Boyd .... 3 00 

Wakeman, S. S.. by C. H. Todd 11 95 

Wellington, Y. P. S. C. E., by A. L. 

Sprague, for Alaska 5 00 



April, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



2 53 



INDIANA- 

$417.87. 



of which legacy, 



Received by Rev. E. D. Curtis, Supt.: 
Fort Wayne, Plymouth Ch., to 

const. Mrs. M. S. Wilson a L. M.. 
Indianapolis, Mayflower Ch., of 

of which §2 special for Rev. R. E. 

Roberts, Coal Bluff 



Bremen, First, by Rev. P. E. Bauer.. 
Monroeville, Estate of Elihu Bald- 
win, by D. C. Fisher 

ILLINOIS— Legacy, $967.23. 

Galesburg, Estate of Josiah Babcock, 
Sr., by Josiah Babcock, Ex 



17 00 



67 00 

2 00 

417 87 



967 23- 



Lake City, S.S 

Mantorville 

Marshall 

Merriam Park 

Minneapolis, Vine C. E 

Park Avenue 

Plymouth 

Open Door 

Young Ladies, $2.50 ; S. 
$1.50 ; C. E. Soc, $1.25. 

Missionary Union 

Moorhead 

New Paynesville 

Park Rapids 

Rochester 

St. Paul, Park 

Sauk Center 

Stewartville 

Winona, First 

Second 

Zumbrota 



5 00 

12 79 

7 25 

I 73 

8 41 

10 00 

11 40 

5 25 

6 ig 

7 5° 
5 00 
5 00 

65 00 

15 3° 

4 52 

3 00 

25 00 

9 00 
10 00 



MISSOURI-$i 3 8. 39 . 

Received by Rev. A. K. Wray, Supt.: 
Breckenridge 

Aurora, by E. H. Williams 

Bonne Terre, First, by-H. D. Evans.. 
Kansas City, Ivanhoe Park Ch., by 

Rev. L. Warren 

St. Joseph, Tabernacle Ch., by G. P. 

Myers 

St. Louis, Hyde Park, by H. F. Small. 

Immanuel Ch., by Rev. W. N. 
Bessey 

German Ch., by Rev. M. Krey 



S So 
15 °° 



30 40 
14 00 



10 50 



MICHIGAN-I10.65. 

Dorr, S. S. of the First, by A. C. Gil- 
bert 6 25 

Linden, S. S., by Miss N. R. Chapin, 
Rally 4 40 

Estate of C. L. Ford, Ann Arbor, by 
B. Walker, Adm., for Permanent 
Fund 150 00 

WISCONSIN— $13.16. 

Apollonia, by Rev. J. D. Whitelaw.. 3 36 

Bottomville, S. S., by G. C. Lussenlus. 3 70 

Bruce, by Rev. J. D. Whitelaw 85 

Clear Lake,Swedish Ch., by Rev. J. 

Petterson 90 

Clintonville, Scand. Ch., by Rev. A. 

Larson 200 

Lake Nebogamon, by Rev. J. D. 

Whitelaw 23s 



IOWA— $S.oo. 

Central City, S. S., by C. E. Rollins. 3 00 

Newton, Miss Belle E. Smith, for 
Cuban Work, by Rev. E. P. Herrick. 5 00 

MINNESOTA-$ 5 26.68. 

Received by Rev. J. H. Morley ; 

Center City, Swedish 5 00 

Lake City 19 96 

Minneapolis, Oak Park 1 75 

Northfield 59 92 

Waseca 25 00 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. M. W. 
Skinner, Treas. : 

Austin 11 20 

Ada, S. S 3 48 

Detroit 5 00 

Glenwood, S.S 3 00 



Crookston, First, by W. E. Slocum. . . 

Dexter, by Rev. C. W. Duncan 

Faribault, bal. of coll. by Rev. G. S. 

Ricker 

Holdings Ford, J. Soltis, by Rev. P. 

Reitinger 

Lake Benton, by Rev. R. G. Jones. . . 

Minneapolis, First Scand. Evan. Ch., 

by Rev. C. B. Bjuge 

Fifth Avenue Ch., by W. A. James. 

Forest Heights Ch., by Rev. R. A. 
Hadden 

" Rodelmer " 

Moorhead, by J. Costain 

New Brighton, First, by Rev. F. H. 

Bassett " 

Red Wing, D. C. Hill 

St. Paul, German People's Ch., by 

Rev. W. Oehler 

Stewartville, by Rev. W. Lodwick... 
Waterville, Christmas offering, by 

Mrs. L. E. Kenrick „ . . 

Wayzata and Groveland, by Miss A. 

R. Palmer 

Winona, Scands., by Rev. H. F. 

Josephson 

Zumbrota, First, by B. Olson 



KANSAS-$3S2. 7 o. 

Received by Rev. L. P. Broad : 

Argentine 

Buffalo Park, Saline S. S 

J. Hasstedt 

Collyer 

Fort Scott, Ch., Harvest Festival . 

Young Ladies' Aux 

Newton, Ch., Harvest Festival 

Russell 

Sedgwick, Ch., Harvest Festival . 
Twelve Mile 



Received by Rev. A. C. Hogbin, 
Treas. : 

Alma 

S. S 

Atchison 

Seneca 

Tonarancxie 



Woman's H. M. Union, Miss M. 
Wilkinson, Treas. : 

Blue Rapids 

Emporia, First , 



368 65 



3 82 
1 00 



S 00 
8 00 



2 50 
9 00 



2 85 
2 50 



1 00 
23 07 



4 00 
1 00 

1 00 

2 70 
4 02 

8 Q2 
IO 84 

7 60 

3 20 
7 00 

50 28 



18 12 

13 5° 
23 50 

37 °9 
11 20 

103 41 



2 00 
25 00 



254 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1899 



Lawrence, Plymouth Ch., Thank 
offering 

Osawatomie 

Jr. C. E 

Ottawa 

Russell 

Less expenses 



Clay Center, Ch., $29.20 ; S. S., Tents, 
etc., $7 ; Jr. Endeavor, $1.30, by 
Rev. C. L. Mills 

Hiawatha, by Rev. I. M. Waldrop... 

Oneida, by Rev. C. A. Richardson... 

Powhattan, Ch., $6.57 ; and Junior 
Endeavor Soc, $5, by Rev. J. W. 
Cone 

Valencia and Plymouth Rock, by 
Rev. C. E. Roberts 

Wabaunsee, First Ch. of Christ, by J. 
F. Willard 

Wakefield, A Friend 



s 


75 


3 


00 


64 


15 


1 


2« 



Albion, Ch., $10.49; Y. P. S. C. E., 

$2.12, by F. M. Weitzel 

Avoca, First, by Rev. C. J. Sage 

Blair, by T. Haller 

Boyd Co., German Ch. of Christ, by 

Rev. J . Single 

Butte, Zion's German Ch., by Rev. J. 

Single 

Clay Creek, S. S.. $4 ; Dustin, Ch., $4; 

Springview, Ch.,$3, by Rev. J. M. 

Kokjer 

Cowles, $5. 64; Pleasant Ridge, 75 cts. : 

Willow Creek, $1.00, by Rev. S. 

Deakin 

Crete, by H. H. Hosford 

German Ch., by Rev. F. Egerland.. 
Curtis, Ch., $15 .57: S. S.. S3; C. E., 



.55, by Rev. C. W. Preston. 

' s. C. ~ 



By Mrs. C. W. Preston. 
Farnham, First, by Rev. F. W. 

Grupe 

Ft. Calhoun, by Rev. C. A. Arnold... 
Harbine, First, by Rev. A. L. 

Brown 

Holdredge,First,by Rev. F.F.Lewis... 
Hyannis, by Rev. H. C. Cleveland... 

Inland, by D. Stimbert 

Lincoln, Plymouth Ch., by A. W. 

Lane 

Monroe, by Rev. H. A. Shuman 

Newcastle. Rev. G. H. Rice. 

Ogallalla, by Rev. G. W. Knapp 

Ravenna, by Rev. F. W. Pease 

Riverton, Ch.. $13.00; Jr. Soc., $3.00, 

by Rev. S. Williams 

Stanton, by Rev. J. J. Klopp 

Trenton, by Rev. C. E. Campbell 

Weeping Water, First, by Rev. J. 

Poeton 

[Erratum; Lincoln, A Friend, $17.90; 
should be from First Cong. Ch. Errone- 
ously ack. in October receipts.] 



62 87 



11 57 
15 00 



25 25 
24 00 



NEBRASKA— $758.83. 

Received by H. A. Snow, Treas. : 

Aurora 26 50 

Fremont 90 00 

Geneva 10 00 

Sutton 11 50 

York, Y. P. S. C. E 2 50 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. C. C. 

Hall, Treas 332 00 



472 5° 



12 61 
10 00 



7 39 
12 19 

5 °° 



5 


9 3 


10 


5° 


4 


10 


5 


S 2 


5 


00 


19 


00 


21 


Qi 


1 


00 


2 


5o 


16 


57 


12 


5° 


16 


00 


17 


5° 


35 


00 



NORTH DAKOTA— $42.06. 

Received by Rev. J. L. Maile : 
By Mrs. Mary M. Fisher, Treas.: 
Cooperstown. Ladies' Miss. Soc. 

Portland, Y. P. S. C. E 

Sanborn, Ladies' Soc 



Forman, First, by Rev. S. Williams. . 

Oberon, First, by Rev. E. E. Saun- 
ders 

Sykeston and Cathay, by Rev. C. I. 
Miller 

Wimbledon, by Rev. J. L. Martin 



SOUTH DAKOTA— $181.30. 

Received by the Rev. W. H. Thrall: 
From Ladies' Miss. Societies of the 
following places: 

Alcester 5 09 

Aurora 5 20 

Beresford 2 00 

Centerville 1 60 

De Smet 7 00 

Elk Point '. 2 50 

Iroquois 2 60 

Letcher 2 50 

Meckling 8 76 

Mitchell 4 50 

Redfield 1028 

Vermillion 5 00 

Wakonda 5 43 

1 

Mission Hill 

Watertown, A Friend 

Yankton 



62 46 



5 3° 
34 18 

49 48 



6 30 



7 


00 


1 


00 


1 


75 


10 


84 


8 


47 


16 


00 



Bethlehem, German Ch., by Rev. J. 

Single 

Charles Mix Co., German Zoar Ch., 

by Rev. P. Bechtel 

Elk Point, by Rev. C. E. Taggart . . . 

Freedom, by Rev. J. Alderson 

Highmore, First, by Rev. D. L. 

Thomas 

Iroquois, First, by Rev. E. Martin . . . 
Pierre, First, by Rev. W. A. Lyman. . 
South Shore, A Friend, by Rev. P. 

Winter 

Valley Springs, First, by Rev. W. C. 

Gilmore 



COLORADO— $21.31. 

Creede, by Rev. J. R. Adams 3 00 

Elyria, Pilgrim Ch., by Rev. C. B. 

Wells 2 81 

Flagler, First, by Rev. C. W. Smith. . 5 50 
Fruita, Union Ch.,by Rev. R. H. Har- 
per s 00 

Ward, by Rev. H. Sanderson 5 00 



MONTANA— $53.07. 

Big Timber, First, by Rev. E. D. 

Bostwick 7 40 

Columbus and Laurel, by Rev. J. 

Pope 5 00 

Helena, by Rev. W. S. Bell, Supt.... 11 82 

Red Lodge, Ch.,$22.q5 ; S. S., $5.90, 

by Rev. W. H. Watson 28 85 



April, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



255 



WYOMING— $49.00. 

Cheyenne, First, by E. R. Black 

Sheridan, First, by Rev. W. E. M. 
Stewart 



CALIFORNIA— $114.68. 

Received by Rev. J. T. Ford : 

Bloomington 

Claremont 

Los Angeles, First 

Rialto 



Woman's H. M. Union Southern Cali 
fornia, Mrs. M. M.Smith, Treas. 

Chula Vista, S. S., for Salary Fund, 

Claremont, S. S., for Salary Fund. . 

Ontario, Y. P. S. C. E 

Pomona, Pilgrim Ch., Jr. C. E. for 
Salary Fund 

Riverside, S. S., for Salary Fund... 
Mrs. S. L. Atwater 

Byron, by Rev. D. Goodsell 

Fresno, German Ch., by Rev. J. Leg- 

ler 

San Luis Obispo, by Miss K. F. Whit- 

nell 



OREGON— $44.01. 

Received by Rev. C. F. 
Salem, S. S . . 



$45 00 
4 00 



3 


00 


14 


5° 


35 


00 


4 


3° 



56 80 



I 


20 


5 


28 


4 


00 


5 


00 


15 


00 


10 


00 


40 


48 


2 


5° 


4 


5° 


10 


40 



Received by I. A. Macrum, Tr. Ore. 
H. M. Soc. : 
Salem, First, by W. Staiger 

Lexington, by Rev. J. M. Beauchamp. 
Portland, German Ebenezer Ch., by 

Rev. J. Koch 

Hassalo Street Ch., add'l, by H. 

Binnian 

Salem, Central Ch., by Rev. U. S. 
Drake 



fa 81 
9 00 
5 00 
4 00 



Clapp : 



WASHINGTON-$ 59 .66. 

Deer Park, Clayton, and Loon Lake, 
by Rev. F. McConaughy •. . 7 00 

Kalama, First, by Rev. C. W. Bush- 
nell 3 15 

Long Beach, Union Ch., by Rev. H. 
W. Mercer 1 00 

Pataha City, First, by Rev. H. M. 

Painter 15 75 

Spanaway, by Rev. H. Gregory 5 00 

Spokane, Swedish Miss., by Rev. T. 
■ W. Walters 4 00 

Ritzville, First, by Rev. G. H. New- 
man 23 76 

JAPAN— $15.00. 

Matsuyama, Rev. A. W. Stanford, by 
A. F. Thomas 15 00 

December Receipts : Contributions $18,308 53 

Legacies 13,026 03 

Interest 460 75 

Annuity 347 00 

Home Missionary. 28 15 

Literature 94 

$32,171 40 



JANUARY, 1899 



MAINE— $1,096.90; of which legacy, 
$1,000.00. 

Bangor, First, by W. P. Hubbard $25 00 

Central, by A. C. Sawyer 38 80 

Saco, First Parish, by F. A. Lord 14 50 

Scarboro, by J. G. Merrill 10 00 

Portland, Estateof Henry M. Payson, 

by F. C. Payson 1,000 00 

State Street Ch., by H. M. Bailey. . 8 60 



Nashua, Y. P. S. C. E. of the First, by 

B. Spence $13 00 

Newmarket, T. H. Wiswall 10 00 

North Hampton, Mrs. A. Gove 20 00 

Orford, Primary class in S. S., "The 

little men and women," by Mrs. A. 

W. Newcomb 5 00 

Winchester, S. S. Home Dept., by M. 

E. Buffum 9 Co 



NEW HAMPSHIRE— $616.27 ; of 
which legacies, $150.00. 

N. H. H. M. Soc, by Hon. L. D. Stev- 
ens, Treas 253 00 

Epping, by W. S. Mason 9 25 

Goffstown, Y. P. S. C. E., by D. 

Grant 11 14 

Hanover, Estate of Reuben Taylor, 

by L. B. Downing 100 00 

Estate of Andrew Moody, by J. K. 

Lord, Trustee ' 50 00 

Miss H. E. Folsom 110 

Keene, S. S. of the Second, by A. C. 

Gillis 1500 

Lyme, by D. A. Grant 10 00 

Lyme Center, A. Bailey 2 00 

Manchester, S. S. of the South Main 

Street Ch., by A. T. Wathen 5 18 

Milford, Dea. A. C. Crosby and wife. 100 00 



VERMONT— $321.61. 

Vermont Domestic Miss. Soc, by W. 
C. Tyler, Treas 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. R. P. 
Fairbanks. Treas.: 
Bennington, North, Thank-offering 
For Salary Fund : 

Burlington. First ... 

College Street Ch 

Cambridge 

Y. P. S. C. E 

Essex Junction, Opportunity Cir- 
cle. . 

Fairfax, Mrs. E. Purmost 

Mrs. S. S. Forsyth 

Jeffersonville, Y. P. S. C. E 

Jonesville, Mrs. Balch's S. S. Class 

Manchester, Mrs. E. J. Kellogg.. 

Middletown Springs, Mrs. Gray's 

S. S. class 






00 


2 


c ,o 


2 


5° 


5 


00 


5 


00 


3 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 



256 



The Home Missionary 



April, i< 



Newbury, West $2 00 

Newport 1500 

Newfane, Homeland Circle 500 

St. Albans, by Mrs. Stranahan 20 00 

y. p. s. c. e 10 00 

Sunbridge, Y. P. S. C. E 1 50 

Waterbury, Y. P. S. C. E 5 00 

West Pawlet, Y. P. S. C. E 2 00 

St. Johnsbury, South Ch. Y. P. S. 

C. E., for Alaska 6 00 

143 50 

Barnet, S.S., by R. K. Laughlin 16 35 

Brattleboro, Center S. S., by C. H. 

Thompson 25 00 

Burlington, College Street Ch., by G. 

G. Benedict 54 35 

Chester, S.S., by A. D. D. Herrick... 15 88 
Manchester, Mrs. E. M. Wickham, 

for Alaska 5 00 

Milton, by G. N. Wood 3 50 

Newbury, Y. P. S. C. E. of the First, 

by Miss E. Ross, for Alaska 10 00 

Norwich, A Friend 1 70 

Salisbury, by A. D. Beach 456 

Stowe, Y. P. S.C. E., by A. H.Cheney, 

for Alaska 4 75 

West Brattleboro, L. F. Clark 5 00 



MASSACHUSETTS — $11,448.76 ; of 
which legacies, $2,749.51. 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc, Rev. E. B. 

Palmer, Treas 6,250 00 

By request of donors, of which for 
Alaska, gio ; Salary Fund, $500. . 1,037 00 

Boston, W. A. Wilde, for Salary Fund 25 00 
Cambridgeport, A Friend, New 

Year's offering 2 00 

Chicopee, Y. P. S. C. E. of the Third, 

by Rev. H. P. Woodin. for Alaska.. 5 00 
Dorchester, Estate of Mrs. E. J. W. 

Baker, by T. Weston 35 00 

Second, by Miss E. Tolman 265 21 

Second, Mrs. E. Torry, by Miss E. 

Tolman 25 00 

Enfield, Y. P. S. C. E., by E. P. 

Thayer 9 34 

Groton, Y. P. S. C. E. of the First. 

by F. H. Torrey, for Alaska 10 00 

Hadley, Estate of J. B. Porter, by W. 

P. Porter, Trustee 2451 

Housatonic, A Friend 30 

Huntington, Second, by Rev. G. W. 

Fiske 8 22 

Lee, Friends 60 00 

Leicester, Legacy of L. S. Watson, by 

E. L. Watson, Ex 2,375 °° 

Lowell, Kirk Street, by A. L.Thomp- 
son 289 50 

Merrimac, M. P. Sargent 200 

Mittineague, S.S., by E. H. Shepard. 22 15 

Monson, S. E. Bradford 10 00 

New Bedford, S. S. of the First, by F. 

B. Hawes 357 

Newbury, Y. P. S. C. E. of the First, 

by Miss M. F. Brown 926 

North Adams, by W. W. Richmond.. 185 61 

Northampton, Estate of N. Clark 15 00 

H. H. Edwards 5 00 

A Friend 40 

Norton, Trin. Ch., by S. H. Cobb 107 63 

Palmer, A Friend 100 00 

Pittsfield, Y. P. S. C. E. of the South, 

by H. B. Francis 2100 

Rehoboth. by F. A. Bliss 500 

Seekonk, Legacy of Lucy M. Read, 

by Solon Carpenter 300 00 

Sheffield, by Dr. A. T. Wakefield 6 00 

South Framingham. Y. P. S. C. E. of 

Grace Ch., by O. T. Stearns 10 00 



South Hadley Falls, of which $10 for 

Alaska, by Rev. R. L. Swain $15 00 

" G " 50 00 

Townsend Center, Miss M. E. Patch. 70 

Walpole, J. A. Way 25 co 

Webster, Y. P. S. C. E., by R. T. Lar- 

char, for Alaska 10 00 

Westfield, First, by M. E. Searle. ... 114 31 

Williamsburg, First, by H. W. Hill . . 10 00 



RHODE ISLAND— $214.50, legacy. 
Pawtucket, Estate of Hugh McCrum. 



CONNECTICUT— $4,781.68 ; of which 
legacies, §2,806.08. 



Miss. Soc. of Conn., by Rev. W. H. 
Moore 



95 4 1 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. W. W. 

Hartford, Firstj Mrs. S. M. Hotch- 

kiss, special 10 00 

South Canaan, Aux., by Mrs. E. E. 

Manley, for Salary Fund 2 50 

Berlin, Miss J. Hovey, for Salary 

Fund 25 00 

37 5° 

Bethel, First, by A. H. Knox 135 42 

Bristol, First, by L. G. Merick ... 57 00 

Chaplin, H. T. Crosby 70 

Connecticut, in memory of " S. P. C." 25 00 

Connecticut, A Friend 200 00 

Cornwall, First, by J. E. Calhoun.... 100 00 

East Hartford, First, by E. C. Geer. . 27 41 

East Morris, " In Memoriam " 10 00 

Fairfield, Mrs. J. A. Kippen, freight.. 2 00 

Fair Haven, Second, by R. G. Davis . 13 14 

Farmington, First, by R. H. Gay .... 225 00 
Hartford, Center Ch., S. S., by K. 

Smith 25 00 

Glenwood Ch., by R. W. William- 
son 2 72 

F. M. Smith 5 00 

Kensington, by S. M. Cowles 24 45 

Meriden, N. F., First Ch 5 00 

Middlefield, M. E. Lyman 60 00 

Monroe, by E. G. Beardsley 13 42 

New Haven, Howard Ave., by Rev. 

W. J. Mutch, for Salary Fund 35 00 

Mrs. J. Dwight 20 00 

Prof. CM. Mead 10 00 

A Friend 50 00 

New London, Estate of J. N. Harris, 
by R. Coit, H. R. Bond, and M. S 

Harris, Trustees 1,041 67 

Norwich, Broadway Ch.. "A Widow's 

Mite." by F. J. Leavens 5 00 

Greenville Ch., by F. H. Potter 10 00 

Park Ch., by H. L. Butts 26 00 

Old Lyme, First, by W. F. Coult 67 75 

Pomfret, First, by Mrs. C. C. Williams 165 50 
Salisbury, Arnica, $2.65 ; S. S. class, 

50 cents, by Rev. J. C. Goddard.. 3 15 

" Arnica " 2 00 

By J. R. Harrison 13 37 

Somerville, by W. H. Billings 9 00 

Sound Beach, Pilgrim, by Rev. M. 

Patton 5 00 

South Britain, by Miss M. C. Bradley. 16 95 

Southington, by J. F. Pratt 49 66 

Stratford. W. J. Peck 5 00 

Suffield. First, by W. E. Russell, 

toward L. Mp. of Miss C. E. Crane. 28 10 

Terry ville. Mother 500 

A Friend 1000 

Friends 26 25 

Wallingford, First, by W. H. Newton. 200 00 



April, ii 



The Home Missionary 



257 



West Hartford, from Estate of Maria 
Whitman, by Myron W. Andrews, 

Adm $1,76441 

A. P. Talcott Fund, by S. A. Gris- 

wold, Trustee 72 76 

Westport, Saugatuck Ch., by H. C. 

Woodwortb..' 58 44 

Windsor, First, by R. Grant 17 50 



NEW YORK— $1,505.87. 

Received by William Spalding, Treas.: 

Binghamton, Plymouth 16 40 

Black Creek 13 46 

Brookton, Mrs. F. E. Bates 15 00 

Brooklyn, John Boyle, special 500 co 

Brooklyn Hills 4 00 

Canandaigua 12 85 

Columbus, to const. Luke Burke a 

L. M 2500 

Elmira, St. Luke's 6 90 

Greene, Y. P. S. C. E 400 

Homer 6 50 

Lebanon 1 15 

Moravia 20 00 

Plainfield Center, Y. P. S. C. E. . .. 5 00 

Portland, Ch., $7.06 ; S. S., $6 1306 

Roscoe 1 50 

Siloam 1500 

Sloan 2 50 

Summer Hill, to const. H. Ranneya 

L. M 50 00 

Syracuse, Danforth 5271 

Primary Dept., General Howard's 

" Boys' and Girls' H. M. Army " 1000 

West Groton 22 50 

Willsborough, Ch., $7.34 ; Rev. and 

Mrs. P. N. Moore, $5 12 34 

Wilmington 2 00 

E. Curtis 11 75 



823 62 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. J. J. 

Pearsall, Treas. : 

Brooklyn, Ch. of the Pilgrims 100 00 

Churchville, S. S. Mission Circle... 10 00 

Franklin, C. E. S., special 18 00 

Middletown, First Ch. Ladies' Guild 103 51 
New York, Broadway Tabernacle, 

for Women's work 37 00 

Northville, Aux., to const. Rev. M. 

H. Fishburn a L. M 50 00 

3*8 51 

Angola, by J. H. Mallows 7 00 

Brooklyn, Willoughby Avenue S. S., 
branch of Clinton Avenue Ch., by 

G. R. Beard 50 00 

Y. P. S. C. E. of the Tompkins Ave. 

Ch., by E. R. Hilton 1000 

Glen Spey, by Rev. J. F. Whitney ... 300 

Honeoye, by T. A. Stubbins 10 00 

Ithaca, First, by S. D. Sawyer 5 00 

Jamesport, Y. P. S. C. E., by W. S. 

Woolworth 4 50 

Lysander, by W. C. Van Doren 11 90 

Moravia, Ch., $10 ; Y. P. S. C. E., $10, 

by Mrs. I. Buller 2000 

New Village_, First, by J. B. Gould. . . 10 00 

New York City, Dr. C. I. Fisher 10 00 

Northville, by J. B. Downs n 25 

Orient, by Rev. J. N. Taft 50 00 

Oswego, by W. B. Couch 38 48 

Oxford, by J. W. Thorp 4200 

Parishville, H. J. Sanford 10 00 

Perry Center, by W. K. Selden 211 

Rochester, by G. L. Hanscom 6 27 

Spencerport, First Ch. and S. S., by 

A. Mclntyre 2723 

Utica, Bethesda Welsh, by W. W. 

George 10 00 



Warsaw, Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Barber, 

toward L. Mp. of M. M. Barber $20 00 

West Brook, Mrs. T. S. Hoyt 5 00 



NEW JERSEY-$354.3 4 . 

Woman's H. M. Union of the N. J. 
Asso., Mrs. J. H. Denison, Treas. : 
Orange Valley, for Salary Fund 52 00 

Bound Brook, by P. V. Bergen 64 34 

Closter, First, by I. H. Demarest .... 12 00 

East Orange, Rev. C. H. Everest 1 00 

" K." 100 00 

Upper Montclair, Christian Union 

Ch., by G. W. Bostwick 125 00 



PENNSYLVANIA— $94.88. 

Woman's H. M. Union of the N. J. 

Asso., Mrs. J. H. Denison, Treas. : 

Philadelphia, Central Ch., for Salary 

Fund 

Edwardsdale, Bethesda Ch., by J. 

Bunney 

Mahanoy City, Bethel, Welsh, by J. D. 

Davis 

Minersville, S. S. of the First, by T. 

R.Richards 

Nanticoke, Bethel Ch., by Rev. W. 

Smith 

Plymouth, Elm Ch., by Rev. T. M. 

McKay 



MARYLAND-$5S5. 7 9. 

Baltimore, First, by C. S. Houghton. 
Canton ch., by Rev. T. M. Beaden- 

koff 

Frederick City, Miss M. K. Wiestling 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA— $109.00. 

Woman's H. M. Union of the N. J. 

Asso., Mrs. J. H. Denison, Treas. : 

Washington, D. C, First, for Salary 

Fund 

Washington, Y. P. S. C. E. of the 
First, by Miss A. L. Elmore, for 

Alaska 

R. Dunning 



GEORGIA— $74.37. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Miss M. M. 
Turner, Treas. : 

Atlanta, Central Ch 

Demorest, Ladies' Benev. Soc 



Amandaville, by Rev. M. G. Fleming 
Atlanta, Central Ch., by O. C. Fuller. 

Immanuel Ch., by Rev. S. C. 

McDaniel 

Baxley, Mt. Olivet Ch., by Rev. G. 

N. Smith 

Columbus, by Rev. G. W. Cumbus. . . 

Conyers, by Rev. J. C. Forrester 

Duluth, by Rev. W. F. Brewer 

Fort Valley, by Rev. J. F. Blackburn 

Hendrick, by Rev. W. H. Graham 

North Rome, by Rev. J. W. Gilliam.. 
Walker's Chapel, by Rev. G. Home.. 
Waycross, by Rev. J. S. King 



62 50 

2 00 

3 9 Z 

4 46 
19 00 

3 00 



15 00 
500 00 



48 00 



10 00 
51 00 



5 00 
7 84 



4 08 

22 35 

5 00 

2 5° 
2 5° 
2 50 
1 50 
10 00 

5 co 

1 00 

2 50 
2 co 



253 



The Home Missionary 



April, li 



ALABAMA— $11.90. 

Ashland, Christian Home Ch., and 
Millerville, Bethel Ch., by Rev. 
T. Wright 

Central, Balm of Gilead Ch.. and Kid, 
Union Ch., by Rev. J. C. Butler.... 

Clanton and Kingston, by Rev. C A. 
Milstead 

Dothen, Newton Chapel, Dundee, 
Echo, Zada Ch., and Watford, Bas- 
ford Ch., by Rev. M. V. Marshall.. 

Floy, Liberty Ch.. Lebanon, Liberty 
Hill Ch., and Tenbroeck, Union Hill 
Ch.,by Rev. J. M. Dobbs 

Hanceville, Mt. Grove Ch., Tidmore, 
Nectar and High Rock Chs., by 
Rev. J. D. Foust 

Hilton, Antioch Ch., and Rose Hill, 
New Hope Ch.,by Rev. T. A. Pharr. 

Spio, Mt. Pisgah Ch., by Rev. D. T. 
Ard 



LOUISIANA-S3.00. 
Roseland, by Rev. E. D. Curtis. 



FLORIDA— $69.74. 

Haines City, United Ch. of Christ, by 
Rev. S. J. Townsend 

Rev. S. J. Townsend 

Cottondale, County Line Ch.. by Rev. 

S. B. Judah 

Melbourne. Rev. E. W. Butler 

Milligan, Pyron Chapel, by T. A. 

Pharr 

Moss Bluff and Panasoffkee, by Rev. 

E. D. Luter 

Ocoee, by Rev. W. B. Hathaway 

Orange City, First, by S. M. Morse.. 

Tampa, by Rev. E. P. Herrick 

Winter Park, F. W. Lyman, for Salary 

Fund 



TEXAS— $16.85. 

Received by Rev. L. Rees : 

Paris, First Ch., $6.65 ; Ladies' 

Soc, $5.20 

Palestine, First, by Mrs. H. Sive- 

wright 



ARIZONA— $20.10. 
Prescott, First, by R. H. Burmister. 



OKLAHOMA— $107.79. 

Received by Rev. J. H. Parker, Hills- 
dale Ch 

Alpha, Parker and Otter,°by Rev. W. 

Kelsey 

Center View. S. S., by Rev. W. J. Siler. 
Choctaw City, by Mrs. A. H. Tanne- 

hill 

Darlington, Plymouth Ch.. by Rev. 

W. M. Wellman 

Downs, Central Ch., by Rev. J. D. 

Howell 

Guthrie Plymouth Ch., by Rev. W. 

L. Dibble 

Independence, by Rev. B. R. Turner. 
Med ford, First, by Rev. L. H. Ruge.. 

Mt. Zion, by C. R. Klingman 

Park and Bulah, by Rev. J. F. Rob- 

berts 



!>i 50 
3 °° 
1 25 

25 



2 00 

1 00 



3 

3 


5° 
12 


IS 


5° 
00 


1 


25 


1 


00 


1 


00 


17 
2 


11 

26 



11 85 

5 00 



15 


25 


9 


CO 


2 


5° 


6 


°3 


9 


27 


12 


88 


S 


00 


12 


00 


1 


21 



Pawnee, First, by Rev. J. W. Moats.. 
Seward, Ch., $4 ; W. H. M. U., $1.65, 

by Rev. L. S. Childs 

Tabor, by Mrs. A. Birch 

Waynoka, by Rev. J. W. McWilliams. 
West Guthrie, by Rev. G. M. Ravey. 



TENNESSEE-$ 3 6. 3 5. 

East Lake and Chattanooga, Central 
Ch., by Rev. T. S. McCallie 

Memphis, Strangers' Ch., by C. E. 
Coe 



KENTUCKY— $16.20. 
Berea, Ch. of Christ, by T. J. Osborne. 



90 OHIO— $791.13. 



Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, D.D.: 

Ashland, by J. O. Jennings 

Ashtabula, Finnish, by Rev. F. 

Lehtinen 

Austinburg, by M. Parker 

Center Belpre, A Friend, by Rev. 

H. O. Judd 

Chester, S. H. Bassett, special 

Cleveland, First S. S., by F. V. 
Anderson, for Bohemian Work. 

Euclid Avenue, by Justin Snow.. 
For Bohemian Work 

Capt. Thomas Wilson, special 

Plymouth, by S. H. Stilson 

For Bohemian Work 

S. C. Smith 

W. H. Watkins....: 

Bethlehem, Bohemian C. E., by 

Rev. J. Prucha 

Elyria, Second, by Rev. H. S. Wan- 

namaker 

Garrettsville, C. E., by Dr. Schauf- 

fler, for Bohemian Work 

Hudson, Mrs. H. E. Smith, by Miss 

E. E.Metcalf 

Lodi, by A. B. Taylor 

Madison, Central S. S., by A. S. 

Stratton, for Bohemian Work 

Mansfield, F. E. Tracy, special 

Marietta, Harmar, by Rev.V.Boyer 

Medina, A. I. Root, special 

Newark, Welsh, by Samuel J.Davies 
Oberlin, First, by A. M. Loveland. 

A. H. Johnson, special 

Painesville, First, by L. E. Judson. 
Ravenna, personal, by Dr. Schauf- 

fier, for Bohemian Work 

St. Mary, from sale of property of 

disbanded church 

Saybrook, Mission Band, by Miss 

Alta B. Hough 

Steubenville.H.G.Dohrman, special 

Wayne, by W. S. Sargent 

Wellington, S. S., by J. H. Rust. . . . 
Zanesville 

"Rural Union " Church 

Walter A. Snow 



Received by Rev. T. G. Fraser, D.D.: 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. G. R. 
Brown, Treas. : 

Springfield, First, C. E., by Mar- 
garet L Lawrence 

Akron, West Cong. S. S., by Miss C. 

E. Bingham 

Bellevue, First, by E. R. Stahl 

Cleveland, Pilgrim Ch. S. S., Jr. Dept., 

by K. Maclnnes 

Huntsburg, K. E. S 



m 75 

5 65 

2 50 
1 00 

3 75 



19 80 
16 55 



3 


00 


4 


25 


5 


00 


2 


00 


5 


48 


5° 


3 1 


53 


30 


25 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


25 


00 


5 


00 



5 


00 


14 


00 


10 


00 


3° 


00 


5 


15 


10 


00 


1 


60 


20 


00 


25 


00 


36 


69 


1 


00 


161 


62 


2 


25 


3 


00 


10 


00 


20 


00 


17 


00 


3 


3° 


3 


00 



607 92 



20 00 
66 41 



6 26 
17 69 



April, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



2 59 



$10 32 

5 2 S3 



62 
30 00 



50 62 



6 


00 


6 


00 


6 


00 


2 


So 


23 


00 


43 


5° 


9 


7S 



Marietta, First, by A. D. Follett.. . . 

Unionville, by C. W. Hardy 

Wellington, First, by A. R. Palmer. 



INDIANA— $103.87. 

Received by Rev. E. D. Curtis : 

Jamestown, Ch 

Terre Haute, First Ch 

By Rev. C. H. Percival 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. A. H. 

Ball, Treas. : 

Alexandria 

Elkhart, Y. P. S. C. E 

Indianapolis, Fellowship 

Trinity 

Mayflower 



Michigan City, German Emmanuel 
Ch., by Rev. H. W. Heinzelman 



ILLINOIS-$9o.6o. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Miss B. E. 
Crosby, Treas.: 

Chicago, Union Park 34 00 

Elgin, First 1000 

Odell, Y. P. S. C. E 3 50 

Rockford, Second 9 00 

56 S° 

Chicago, Mrs. M. A. Keep 29 10 

Princeton, H. L. Keyes. . S 00 

MISSOURI-$ 4 88.i 3 . 

Amity, by Rev. B. F. Logan 4 25 

Carthage, by Rev. A. J. Van Wagner 22 12 

Grandin, by Rev. M. J. Norton 9 05 

Kansas City, Beacon Hill, by J. E. 

Gaylord 15 97 

Kidder, by Rev. A. L. Gridley 5 46 

Rockville, Mrs. A. Haynes 1 00 

St. Joseph, Swedish Ch., by Rev. A. 

Swanstrom 6 00 

Y. P. S. C. E., by C. C. Chase.... 7 58 

St. Louis, First, by F. T. Knox, M.D. 219 34 

First Swedish Ch,, by Rev. N. J. 

Lind 3 00 

Pilgrim Ch., by G. L. Day 170 00 

Union Ch., by S. T. McKinney 3 00 

Webster Groves, First, by Mrs. E. 

Ticknor. . , 21 36 

MICHIGAN— $41.12. 

Ludington, by W. L. Hammond 41 12 



WISCONSIN— $42.19. 

Amery, Woman's Miss. Soc, by Mrs. 

J. Howe 6 00 

Birnamwood, Norrie and Eland, by 

Rev. J. L. Smith 9 24 

Bloomer, $3.02; Clintonville, $1.00; 

Embarrass, $3.79, by Rev. J. D. 

Whitela w 781 

Butternut, by Rev. J. D. Whitelaw. .. 3 56 

Curtiss, German Evan. Zion's Ch., by 

Rev. J. Schaerer 1 25 

Durand, by F. W. Goodrich 3 90 

Fifield, by Rev. J. D. Whitelaw 1 54 

Glenwood, Swedish Ch., by Rev. O. 

Ohlson 2 00 



Tomahawk, First, by Rev. S. M. Mac- 
Neill 



IOWA — $328.09 ; of which legacies, 



Des Moines, Estate of Mrs. H. R. 

Rollins, by S. A. Merrill 38 83 

Iowa Falls, Estate of Alfred Woods, 

by E. Nuckolls, Ex 267 13 

Shenandoah, by E. A. Read 15 76 

Williamsburg, S. S., by Miss M. 

Lewis 337 

Wilton Junction, C. Hess 3 00 



5 00 

4 3° 



5 00 
3 08 



9 5° 
3 9 2 
S 00 



4 °4 

5 00 



MINNESOTA-S51.84. 

Appleton, First, by Rev. J. L. Jones. 

Brainerd, First, by E. Robinson 

Duluth, Morley Ch., by Rev. F. D. 

Bentley 

Edgerton, First, by Rev. P. H. Fisk. . 
Granada and Fraser, by Rev. C. G. 

Oxley 

Grand Meadow, by Rev. T. W. Min- 

nis 

New Richland, by Rev. F. H. Oehler. 

Perham, Rev. W. E. Griffith 

Plainview, S. S. of the First, 82 ; 

C. E. Soc, $2.04, by Rev. F. J. 

Brown 

Silver Lake, Bohemian Free Re- 
formed Ch., T. Trutna, by J. S. 

Jerabek 



KANSAS— $108.42. 

Received by Rev. A. C. Hogbin, 
Treas. : 

Haven 

Lyons, Rev. B. D. Conklin 

Seneca " 

Anthony, by Rev. J. E. McClain. . . . 

Clay Center, Thomas Morse 

Fredonia, by Rev. H. C. Shoemaker . 
Louisville, $5 ; and Mt. Union, $5.35, 

by Rev. E. B. Smith 

Manhattan, First, by C. P. Blachly... 
Netawaka, by Rev. F. G. Mitchell . . . 

Osborne, First, by R. R. Hays 

Stockton, Y. P. S. C. E., by J. E. 

Dewey 

Wabaunsee, First Ch. of Christ, by 

J. F. Willard 



NEBRASKA-$ 3 52. 74 . 

Received by H. A. Snow, Treas. : 

Aurora 1 80 

Clarks 2 00 

Clay Center 7 04 

Friend, Ch., $22.40; S. S., $9.45 31 85 

Grafton 10 39 

Hastings 17 76 

Kilpatrick, Y. P. S. C. E 1 25 

Leigh 7 55 

Lincoln, Vine Street Ch 45 00 

Y. P. S. C. E 10 00 

Urbana 4 00 

Verdon 6 85 

Wahoo 7 00 

Weeping Water, to const. Mrs. R. C. 

Hanford a L. M 50 00 

202 49 



3 


00 


7 


00 


2 


75 


12 


75 


14 


00 


2 


00 


II 


00 


IO 


35 


II 


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8 


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7 


00 


10 


oo 


21 


5° 



260 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1899 



Arcadia, by Rev. W. H. Houston $13 50 

Butte, First, by Rev. J. Gray 1 50 

Camp Creek, Ch. and S. S., $32.15 ; 

Minersville Ch. and S. S., $12.85, by 

Rev. G. B. Spangler 45 00 

Carroll, Welsh Ch., by Rev. S. Jones. 2 00 

Danbury, First, by Rev. E. C. Hayes 2 50 

Eagle, by Rev. B. F. Diffenbacher. . . 13 35 

Germantown, German, by Rev. F. 

Woth 3 50 

Grand Island, First, by Rev. G. J. 

Battey .... 9 90 

Hastings, German Ch., by C. W. 

Wuerrschmidt . . 4 co 

Hay Springs, by Rev. B. H. Jones ... 5 00 

Lincoln. Swedish Emmanuel Ch., by 

Rev. J Johnson 2 00 

Palisade and Eureka, by Rev. J. N. 

Beitel 13 50 

Petersburg, by Rev. J. Roberts 10 00 

Silver Creek, bv Rev. W. S. Hampton 16 50 

Steelburg, Steele City Ch., by Rev. H. 

H. Avery 2 00 

Sutton, German Ch., $5.50 : Stock- 
ham. German, 50 cents, by Rev. G. 

Essig 600 



NORTH DAKOTA-898.11. 

Received by Rev. J. Sattler, Gen. Miss, 
to Germans : 

Glenullin, German Bethany 6 00 

Ebenezer German 2 25 

John Dittus, Jr 5 00 

Hebron, Bethesda. . 3 50 

16 75 

Cooperstown, Y. P. S. C. E. of Parks 
Ch., by Mrs. W. Bemis. for Alaska. 3 00 

Fessenden, First, by Rev. K. E. 
Compton 14 00 

Glenullin, German Chs.. Bethesda, 
Bethany. St. Marks and Ebenezer, 
by Rev. J. C. Schwabenland 12 50 

Hoffnungsvoll, $12; Eigenheim. $7.76; 
and Einheits, $4.85 : German Chs., 
by Rev. D. Neuensch wander 24 61 

Hope, by Rev. J. J. Davy 2 oo 

Jamestown, $2 ; and Eldridge, $2, by- 
Rev. C. H. Phillips 400 

Melville and Rose Hill, by Rev. W. 

N . J 1 >hnson 10 00 

Niagara, by Mrs. R. A. McQuarrie... 1 25 

North Dakota, Rev. S. F. Porter 10 00 



SOUTH DAKOTA— $391.02. 

Received by Rev. W. H. Thrall : 

Clark 5 80 

Huron 160 00 

Vermillion 5 00 

170 80 

Received by Rev. J. Sattler : 

Delmont, Christoph Wieland 1 00 

Scotland. Hoffnungsthal German .. 10 00 

Neuburg German 10 00 

Petersburg German 10 00 

Scotland German 10 00 

Seimenthal German 10 00 

Tyndall German 4 80 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. F. M. 
Wilcox, Treas.: 

Armour 

Badger Lake 

Columbia 

Huron 



55 80 



2 50 
11 41 



Lesterville 

Pierre 

Rosebud 

Wakonda 

Watertown 

Webster 

Academy and Kirkwood, by Rev. L. 

E. Camfield 

Aurora, First, by Rev. T. H. Hill.... 

S. S. of the First, by N. A. Batch- 
elder 

Bryant, by Rev. J . Stevens 

Canova, Cambria Ch, by Rev. T. P. 
Reese 

By Rev. G. E. Green 

Clark, by Rev. W. U. Parks 

Faulkton, by Rev. E. W. Jenney 

Lebanon and Springs, by Rev. C. H. 

Dreisbach 

Mission Hill, by Rev. D. B. Nichols.. 

Myron, by Rev. E. W. Jenney 

Spearfish, First, by Rev. J. A. Becker. 

Wakonda, by Rev. J. M. Bates 

Webster, by Rev. W. B. Hubbard... 
Worthing, by Rev. E. W. Jenney 



COLORADO-$9o. 4 i. 

Received by Rev. H. Sanderson 
Eaton 

Woman's H. M. Union. Mrs. B. C 

Valentine, Treas. : 
Denver, Boulevard 

Plymouth 

Highlandlake 

Longmont, S. S., for Alaska 

Colorado Springs, Second, by C. H 
Barnes 

Globeville, First German Ch., by Rev 
A. Trandt 



MONTANA— $15.00. 
Helena, First, by Rev. C. E. Watson. 



UTAH-$i.2 5 . 

Salt Lake City, Y. P. S. C. E. of Phil- 
lips Ch., by Miss D. Wake 



IDAHO— $4.00. 

Troy, Swedish Ch., by Rev. J. Ester- 
borg 



CALIFORNIA— $125.20. 

Belmont. Mrs. E. L. Reed, by M. L. 

Thompson 

Little Shasta, by Rev. G. M. Dexter.. 
Los Angeles, West End Ch., by Rev. 

F. A. Field 

Murphy, by Rev. M. J. Luark 

Pacific Grove, Mrs. H. S. Goldsmith. 

Pescadero, by Rev. E. Hoskins 

Porterville. by Rev. J. A. Milligan . 
Redlands, Terrace Ch., by J. Ogden. 

Rocklin, by Rev. W. C. Day.... 

San Diego, Second Ch., and La Mesa, 

First, by Rev. T. R. Earl 



$1 


So 


2 


00 


I 


00 


2 


00 


4 


00 


2 


5° 



48 91 



2 50 

15 OO 



6 


5' 


9 


00 


10 


00 


7 


00 


16 


00 


6 


00 



23 


So 


9 


00 


10 


00 


48 


36 


9 


45 


7 


60 



10 


00 


20 


00 


I 


65 


2 


40 


I 


00 


3 


1 10 


31 


25 


37 


00 


5 


75 



April, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



261 



OREGON-$ I34 .33- 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. C. F. 
Clapp, Treas'., to const. Mrs. E. 
Eggert a L. M 

Astoria, First, by Rev. E. S. Bollinger 

Eugene, First, by Rev. R. C. Brooks. 

Hubbard, $5.70 ; Elliott Prairie, $6 ; 

Smyrna, $14.36, by Rev. J. M. Dick. 



WASHINGTON— $167.63. 

Aberdeen, Swedish Miss., by Rev. M. 

Peterson 

Alderton, McMillen, Orting, and Kel- 

ley, by Rev. O. L. Fowler 

Eureka, by Rev. A. R. Olds 

Fremont, Edgewater Ch., by Rev. J. 

T. Nichols...., 



$53 27 

50 00 
5 00 



16 90 

5 20 



20 78 



Hillyard, First, by Miss R. M. Ed- 
wards $1100 

Marysville, First, by Rev. R. Bush- 

nell 4 50 

New Whatcom, First, by Rev. A. 

Rogers * 2110 

Pleasant Prairie, $18.10 ; Trent, $1.50, 

by Rev. J. Edwards ig 60 

Pullman, First, by Rev. H. C. Mason 37 25 

Ritzville, bv G. Graedell 2200 

Seattle, Taylor Ch., by Rev. G. H. 

Lee 2 50 

Steilacoom, by Rev. J. M. Lackey 2 00 

Tolt, by Rev. G. Kindred 2 00 

January Receipts: Contributions $17,654 93 

Legacies 7,226 05 

Interest 2,453 2 S 

Home Missionary 75 17 

Literature 573 

$27,415 13 



FEBRUARY, 1899 



MAINE-$9 5 .25. 

Gorham, C. E. Soc, by S. E. Redlon, 
for Alaska 

Harrison, C. E. Soc, $1.2=; ; No. 
Bridgton, $1.50. by Rev. A. G. Fitz. 

Portland, West Ch., by B. C. Fuller.. 
C. Richards and others 

Wells, Second, by W. H. Teel 



NEW HAMPSHIRE— $82.59. 

Boscawen, Y. P. S. C. E., by A. M. 
Pillsbury 

Concord, " Friend " 

East Brentwood, Rev. H. H. Colburn. 

Epping, by W. S. Mason 

Francestown, by A. Dovjnes 

Greenville, S. S., by M. Kimball 

Hopkinton, Primary S. S., by W. G. 
Taft .'. 

Marlborough, Mrs. H. M. Ball 

Nashua, Pilgrim Ch., by P. A. Ham- 
mond 



VERMONT— $102.05. 

Vermont Dom. Miss. Soc, by W. C. 
Tyler, Treas 

Bennington, Second, add'l, by C. B. 
March 

East Hardwick, by C. S. Mont- 
gomery 

Milton, G. N. Wood 

South Royalton, Y. P. S. C. E., by H. 
M. Goddard 

Weston, Mrs. C. W. Sprague , 

West Rutland, by A. G. Dodge 



iio 


00 


2 


75 


18 


00 


6l 


5° 


3 


00 



I 20 

5 00 
16 00 

1 00 
25 00 



25 00 

26 47 



3 °° 
2 00 
14 44 



MASSACHUSETTS — $1,394.59 ; of 
which legacies, $560. 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc, by Rev. E. 
B. Palmer, Treas. : 

By request of donors 345 35 

Western Foreign work 75 00 

420 35 
Woman's H. M. Asso., Miss L. D. 
White, Treas. : 
Springfield, A Friend 2000 



Amherst, C. E. H $5 00 

Auburndale, Golden Rule Y. P. S. 

C. E., by E. P. Stiles, for Alaska. . . 10 00 
Ayer, First, Y. P. S. C. E., by Miss 

M.H.Evans 90 

Boston, W. A. Wilde, for Salary Fund. 25 00 
Dorchester, Second, by Miss E. Tol- 

man 100 00 

Eastindale, Boys' and Girls' H. M. 

Army, by E. B. Hay ward 323 

Greenfield, Estate of "R. W. Cook, by 

H. W. Hubbard, Trustee 6o 00 

Hardwick, S. S., by F. W. Kimball .. 6 95 

Housatonic, " O. G " 25 00 

Monson, by E. F. Morris 17 31 

Montague, S. S., by K. C. Miner 15 00 

New Bedford, North Ch., by E. 

Holmes 57 60 

Northampton, Legacy of Francis Ed- 
wards, by W. I. Edwards 500 00 

Y. P. S. C. E. of Edwards Ch., by 

Miss F. M. Winchell 5000 

North Leominster, C. H. Haven, add'l 25 
Saxonville, Mission Band, by A. E. 

Dawson 2 00 

South Hadley, Mrs. L. H. Porter 5 00 

Springfield, O. Church 5000 

Ware, Silver Circle, by H. S. Hyde. .. 20 00 

Worcester, Mrs. W. H. Lanford 1 00 



CONNECTICUT— $2,520.48 ; of which 
legacies, $1,506.65. 

Miss. Soc. of Conn., W. W. Jacobs, 
Treas. ; of which for Alaska, $10 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. W. W. 

Jacobs, Treas. : 
Fair Haven, Second, Aux., by Mrs. 

C. L. Black, for Salary Fund 

Farmington, H. M. S., by Mrs. A. 

D. Voice, for Salary Fund 

Hartford, South Ch., by Miss G. M. 

Hills, special 

First, by Mrs. S. M. Hotchkiss, 

special 

First, Miss E. Bunce 

Asylum Hill Ch., by C. E. Thomp- 
son, for Salary Fund 

North Guilford, Miss R. D. Chitten- 
den, for Salary Fund 

North Haven, L. B. S., by Miss M. 
W. Eliot, for Salary Fund 



33 


40 


18 


00 


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22 


10 


00 


25 


00 


23 


15 


10 


00 


32 


58 



262 



The Home Missionary 



April, ii 



Sharon, Christmas Gift, special $2 00 

Willimantic, Aux., by Mrs. M. E. 
Lincoln 15 50 

178 8 S 

Ansonia, E.J. Barbour, special 1 00 

Black Rock, Y. P. S. C. E., by Mrs. 

H. F, Bunce, for Alaska 10 00 

East Hampton, by S. M. Bevin 18 40 

Hartford, A Friend 500 00 

Mrs. L. C. Dewing 50 00 

Ledyard, by G. Fanning 5 33 

New Haven, Legacy of Mrs. A. A. 
Leonard, by H. G. Newton and 
C. A.Sheldon. Exs 488 38 

Young Ladies' Miss. Soc. of the Ch. 
of the Redeemer, by H. S. Ward, 
for Alaska 1000 

W. E. Chandler 10 00 

New Milford, Y. P. S. C. E. of the 

First, by Rev. F. A. Johnson, for 

Alaska 10 00 

Norfolk, Young Ladies' Mission Band, 

by M. C. Seymour, for Salary Fund 25 00 

North Greenwich, Mrs. C. O. Banks.. 5 00 

Plymouth, Legacy of Elizur Fenn, by 

L. D. Baldwin. Ex 100 00 

Salisbury, " Meminiscor " 2 00 

Somers, Legacy of Laura A. Kibbe, 

by W. F. Seymour. 865 08 

Waterbury, Helen P. Camp, by W. 

H.Camp 100 00 

West Avon, by J. A. Hawley, for 

Salary Fund 15 00 

West Hartford, Maria Whitman, by 

M. A. Andrews, Adm 53 19 

Woodbury, Ladies of North Ch., by 

Mrs. J. N. Munson 1 50 



NEW YORK— $328.10. 

Brooklyn, Y. P. S. C. E. of Beecher 
Memorial Ch., by Rev. D. B. 

Pratt 5 00 

Y. P. S. C. E. of Park Ch., by H. M. 

Freeman 21 00 

Farmingville, by F. I. Terry 4 00 

Gaines, by H. R. Anderson 740 

L. H. Sanford 50 

Jamestown, by F. R. Moody 17438 

Middletown, First, by C. L. Boyd 11 47 

New York City, Little Morris's Birth- 
day Gifts. In Memoriam 2 00 

North Ch. S. S.. by J. Lindsay, Jr.. 25 00 

Rev. L. Dickerman, D.D 2500 

North Guilford, by C. E. Winsor 3 70 

Rodman, by Rev. J. Kincaid 22 21 

Salamanca, by B. B. Weber 14 19 

Warsaw, by Miss M. Barber 12 25 



NEW JERSEY— $153.00. 

Bloomfield, Mrs. R. P. Coe 2500 

Cedar Grove, Union Ch., by Rev. B. 

F. Bradford 20 00 

East Orange, Cash 100 00 

- Hoboken, Norwegian Free Ch.. by 

Rev. J. H . Pederson 3 00 

Newark, Bethlehem Ch., by Rev. C. 

H. Dickerson 5 00 



Parsons, by Mrs. M.J. Davies 

Pittsburg, Puritan Ch.,by F.Edwards 
Rendham, Nebo Ch., by Mrs. W. G. 

Gwyn 

Renovo, Swedish Miss., by Rev. G. 

O. Plant 

Spring Brook, Welsh Ch., by T. Elias. 

MARYLAND— $10.00. 
Baltimore, Fourth, by Rev. M. Wells. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA-$6i. 5 o. 

Woman's H. M. Union of the N. J. 

Asso., Mrs. J. H. Denison, 

Treas. : 

Washington, D. C, First, for Salary 

Fund 

NORTH CAROLINA— $12.00. 

Hendersonville, Miss S. R. Ives 

Tryon, by E. E. Missildine 

GEORGIA-50 cents. 
Strickland, by Rev. A. J. Lyle 

ALABAMA— $30.13. 

Art, Christian Hill Ch., and Asbury, 

Union Hill Ch., by Rev. T. R. 

Branan 

Blackwood, Echo. Friendship Ch., 

and Wicksburg, St. John's Ch., by 

Rev. W. H. Newton 

Clanton, Mountain Spring Ch., by 

Rev. J. L. Busby 

Edwardsville, Salem Ch., and Oxford, 

Union Grove Ch., by Rev. G. W. 

Vaughan 

Fort Payne, Emanuel Ch., by Rev. J. 

J. Bunnell 

Gate City, Memorial Ch., by Rev. H. 

L. Hargett 

Oak Grove, $2.50; and Rosehill, $5, 

by Rev. J. L. Stewart 

Talladega, Little Helpers' Miss. Soc, 

by Mrs. E. C. Silsby 

Verbena, Shady Grove Ch., by Rev. 

W. C. Culver 



LOUISIANA— $16.85. 

Woman's Missionary Union, Miss M. 
L. Rogers, Treas. : 
New Orleans, Aux., Straight Uni- 
versity 

" Lower Lights," Straight Uni- 
versity 

Lake Charles, Mrs. B. C. Mills 

ARKANSAS- $1.00. 
Siloam Springs, Y. P. S. C. E 



p2 OO 

5 00 



4 00 

5 °° 



61 50 



2 00 
10 00 



50 

1 25 
38 

S° 
5 00 

7 5° 
7 5° 
5 00 

2 50 



6 85 
10 00 



PENNSYLVANIA-$ 3 8. 7 9. 

Arnot, Swedish Ch., by Rev. C. J. 

Wideberg 2 15 

Delta, Welsh S. S., by T. C. Williams 3 70 
Edwardsdale, Welsh Ch., by Rev. T. 

C. Edwards 11 50 

Olyphant, by Rev. P. Roberts .,,,..,. 2 78 



FLORIDA— $99.04. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. W. D. 
Brown, Treas. : 



Interlachen, A Friend. 
Ormond 



4 00 
9 00 



April, i! 



The Home Missionary 



263 



Florida, W. H. M. Union, Mrs. W. D. 
Brown, Treas. : 
For Ybor City Mission: 

Jacksonville, annual meeting 

Haines City 

Longwood 

Mt. Dora, Y. P. S. C. E 

Melbourne . . 

Orange City, birthday offering. . . 
Orange Park, King's Daughters.. 

Orlando, Cong. Ch 

Ocoee 

Sherman, Conn., Ladies' AidSoc. 

Winter Park 

Ybor City 

F. Marti 

Hurobo, Forty-nine Pine Ch.,byRev. 

L. Miller 

Moss Bluff and Panasoffkee, by Rev. 

E. D. Lutor 

Pomona, Pilgrim Ch., by Rev. W. M. 

Gay 

Tampa, by Rev. E. P. Herrick 



TEXAS— $7.40. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. Green, 

Treas. : 

Dallas, Grand Avenue Ch 

South Park Ch., mission of the 

Grand Ave 



$8 


62 


3 


00 


2 


87 


8 


00 


S 


00 


1 


00 


1 


S° 


6 


2 5 


3 


00 


2 


00 


20 


00 


3 


10 


1 


00 


65 


34 




75 


2 


5° 


iS 


25 


2 


20 



OKLAHOMA-$ 7 .25. 

Okarche, First, by Rev. J. S. Murphy. 

Turkey Creek, by Rev. F. Foster 

Waukomis, by Rev. D. E. Todd 

New Mexico 

White Oaks, by Rev. E. H. Ashmun. . 



ARIZONA— $4.80. 
Jerome, by Rev. E. H. Ashmun. 



OHIO— $371.88. 

Received from Rev. J. G. Fraser, Sec. : 

Ashland, J. O. Jennings, special 

Ashtabula, Swedish, by Rev. C. A. 

Widing 

Col. by Rev. C. A. Widing 

Bluescreek, by W. B. Smith, Treas. 

Carmel, by David E. Evans 

Cincinnati, Lawrence St., by Benj. 

Davies 

Columbia, by G. P. Walker 

Cleveland, Pilgrim, by H. C. Holt, 

for Bohemian Work 

Pilgrim, by H. C. Holt 

Special 

Madison Ave., by Chas. Taylor, 

Treas 

Grace, by Rev. D. C. McNair 

(Col.) 

Lakewood, by C. E. Ferrell, Treas. 
Cyril Chapel, S. S., by Rev. J. 

Musil 

Collinwood, by Rev. G. R. Berry. 

Columbus, Washington Ave., Mrs. 

J. P. Williams' S. S. class, by Rev. 

J. P. Williams 

Coolville, Y. P. S. C. E.,by Rev. N. 

O. Judd 

Cuyahoga Falls, S. S., by Miss M. 
B. Clark 



6 25 
1 15 



2 75 
9 6 5 
9 65 



20 


00 


6 
2 


5° 
00 


1 
4 


50 
00 


20 
6 


00 

6S 


46 "84 
31 23 
25 94 


10 


40 


5 
5 


00 
26 


5 
9 


00 
00 



Granville, by Hannah Jones 

Jefferson, by Rev. L. J. Luethi 

Lawrence, by John Romire 

Lima, by Rev. I. J. Swanson 

Rockport 

Sheffield, by Mrs. W. A. Day 

Thomastown, by Miss Rachel Davis 

Vermillion, by Rev. J. A. Kaley 

Youngstown, Rev. J. B. Davies 

Rev. Irving W. Metcalf 



Woman's H. M. Union, by Mrs. G. 
B. Brown, Treas. : 
Cleveland, Bethlehem, W. M. L., 

Miss. Salaries 

First, W. H. M. S., Bohemian 

Work 

C.E., Alaska C. E. Work 

Hudson, C. E. Miss. Salaries... 
Kirtland, K. E. S., Miss, Salaries. 
Marietta, First, W. H. M. S., Boh. 

Work 

Rockport, W. M. S., Miss. Salaries 
Rootstown, W. M. S., Boh. Work. 
Sandusky, Plymouth C. E., Miss. 

Strongsville,' ' W'. ' M.' ' S.', ' ' Boh. 

Work 

Toledo, Washington St., W. M. 
U., Boh. Work $5 00 

Miss. Salaries 10 00 

West Williamsfield, W. M. S., 
Miss. Salaries 

Zanesville,W. M. S.,Miss. Salaries 

Burton, Mrs. N. L. Sumner.... 
Oberlin, Mrs. L. G. B. Hills.... 



INDIANA— $67.87. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. A. H. 
Ball, Treas. : 
Indianapolis, Ladies' Union of Ply- 
mouth Ch 

Alexandria, First, by Rev. J. C. 

Smith 

Amboy, by Rev. E. D. Curtis 

Cardonia, $10.50; S. S., $5.00 ; C. E., 

$3.50 ; and W. H. M. U., $1.00, by 

Rev. C. F. Hill 

Indianapolis, Fellowship Ch.,by Rev. 

F. M. Whitlock 

Marion, First, by Rev. H. B. Long. . . 



ILLINOIS— $26.75. 

Peoria, Rev. A. A. Stevens, $5.00 ; A 
Friend, $10.00, by M. H. Bradley... 

Lombard, First Ch., German, by Rev. 
M. E. Eversz 

Rockford, " The Little Sheldon Girls," 
Miss M. C. Foote 



MISSOURI— $93.47. 

Received by Rev. A. K. Wray : 

Amity 

Cole Camp 

Chillicothe, Union Ch., by Rev. J. P. 
Field 



»7 40 
11 00 
7 00 
5 00 
7 5i 
10 15 
2 00 

5 75 
5 00 
10 00 

278 24 



3 °° 

7 5° 
10 00 

2 00 

3 75 

10 00 

5 00 

4 39 

4 00 

5 00 



10 


00 


> 3 


00 


82 


64 


1 


00 


10 


00 



11 


25 


2 


12 


20 


00 


5 


00 


7 


00 



15 00 

6 75 
5 00 



4 


00 


10 


00 


14 


00 


1 


60 



264 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1899 



Kansas City, Plymouth Ch., by Rev. 

A. H. Rogers $6 50 

Lebanon, First, by Mrs. N. Ivey 22 20 

Neosho, First, by E. Skewes 23 50 

St. Louis, Olive Branch Ch., by Rev. 

W. Johnson 14 05 

Springfield, German Ch., by Rev. P. 

Burkhardt 10 02 

Pilgrim Ch., by Rev. O. A. Palmer. 1 60 



Wakarusa, Ch. by C. G. Miller. 
Western Park 



$2 00 
1 15 



MICHIGAN-$2 5 .oo. 
Michigan, A Friend. 



WISCONSIN-$i2 64. 

Clintonville. by Rev. J. D. Whitelaw. 

Embarrass, by Rev. J. D. Whitelaw.. 

Iron River, First, by Rev. L. A. Brink 

Unity, Easton, and Waupaca, Scands., 
by Rev. C. J. Jensen 

Wood Lake and Doctors Lake, Swed- 
ish, by Rev. F. G. Hagquist 

IOWA— $21.00. 

Macksburg, Mrs. I. W. Brownell 

West Bend, J. B. Happel, for Rev. M. 
E. Eversz 



KANSAS-$2 3 g.97. 

Received by Rev. L. P. Broad 
Dover, Ch., by C. G. Miller. 

Gaylord 

Junction City, Rev. J. Izard. 

Mrs. Minnie Outt 

Leona 

Linwood 

McPherson, Ch 

A Friend 

Mound City 

Osborne 

Partridge, S. S 



25 00 



MINNESOTA— $540.90. 

Received by Rev. J. H. Morley : 

Adkin 500 

Brainerd. First, $10 ; S. S., $1 . ... 11 00 

Dodge Center 7 62 

Groveland 1 65 

Minneapolis, Plymouth 27500 

Mrs. A. P. Stacy ico 00 

Oak Park, Ladies 5 00 

Mizpah 1 25 

Lyndale 470° 

Fifth Avenue 2 00 

Randall 2 00 

Sauk Rapids 300 

Winona, First 30 00 

Winthrop 2 00 

49 z 52 
Benson, Pilgrim Ch., by Rev. J. L. 

Nott 4 25 

Brownton and Stewart, by Rev. J. W. 

Danf ord 3 46 

Glyndon, Ch. and S. S., by C. G. 

Tracy 6 79 

Lake City, Salem Swedish Ch., by 

Rev. E. A. Anderson 7 38 

Mankato and Kasota, Swedish Chs., 

by Rev. E. V. Bjorklund 6 00 

Minneapolis, 38th St. Ch., by Rev. S. 

J. Rogers 4 50 

Selma, by Rev. E. C. Lyons n 00 

Wadena, Y. P. S. C. E. of Cong. Ch , 

by A. L. Rice, for Alaska 5 00 



1 00 

3 79 
5 00 

1 35 
1 50 



1 00 
20 00 



3 
3 


00 
65 


1 


00 




25 


2 


02 


5 6 


10 


3 


27 


5 


00 


S 
6 


00 
60 


3 


29 



3 
80 


29 
00 


1 


35 


86 


64 


15 


5° 


40 


00 


1 


00 


13 


5° 


5 


..10 


6 


00 



Received by Rev. A. C. Hogbin, 
Treas. : 

Highlander. C. E 

Olathe 

Sabetha 

Sycamore 



Blue Rapids, by L. B. Tibbetts 

Leavenworth, by Mrs. J. W. Johnson. 
Neosho Falls, by Rev. S. B. Dyck- 

man 

Seabrook and Pauline, Sunnyside Ch., 

by Rev. P. B. Lee 

Topeka, Sale of watch, by Rev. L. P. 

Broad 

Valencia and Plymouth Rock, by 

Rev. C. E. Roberts 



NEBRASKA-$ 7 88. 3 4. 

Received by H. A. Snow, Treas. : 

A Friend 500 00 

Ashland 20 00 

Dewitt 6 15 

Franklin 48 30 

Fremont 25 00 

Free water, Wilcox 13 40 

Greenwood 300 

Long Pine 775 

Omaha, St. Mary's Avenue 5761 

Paisley, Unadilla 12 50 

Park, S. S 2 08 

Scribr.er 1830 

Wattsville, Monroe 1100 

Wilcox 3 40 

728 49 

Less expenses 21 54 

706 95 

Franklin, by A. C. Hart 5 00 

Germantown, German Ch., by Rev. 

M. E. Eversz 4 20 

Hastings, German Ch., by Rev. C. W. 

Wuerrschmidt 20 00 

Nebraska City, by Rev. A. Farnworth. 11 00 
Strang and Shickley, $12.14 ; Bruning, 

$9.63, by Rev. A. L. Squire 21 77 

Superior, German Ch., $2; Liberty 

Creek, German Ebenezer Ch., 

$3.75 ; C. E. S., $1.25 ; Beaver 

Creek, German Ch., $1.75, by Rev. 

P. Lich 8 75 

Wolbach, German Ch., by Rev. M. E. 

Eversz 2 92 

Wymore, Ch. of Christ, by Rev. T. C. 

Moffatt 7 75 



NORTH DAKOTA-$6i.7 9 . 

Received by Rev. J. L. Maile : 
Cooperstown, Ladies' Miss. Soc. , 
by Mrs. M. M. Fisher 2 05 

Antelope, $1 ; Dwight, $12.85, by Rev. 

O. P. Champlin 13 85 

Argusville, by Rev. J. R. McConne- 

hey T. . . 164 

Carrington, Y. P. S. C. E.. by M. 

Beaty, for Alaska 3 00 

Dawson, by Rev. J. E. Tones 10 00 

Kulm, G. Roedel, for Rev. M. Trei- 

ber. by Rev. M. E. Eversz 6 00 

New Rockford, First, by Rev. O. W. 

Roberts 25 25 



April, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



265 



SOUTH DAKOTA-$i 92 .8 3 . 

Received by Rev. W. H. Thrall : 
" Friends " to the S. D. H. M. S. . . 

Received by Rev. T. L. Riggs : 
Cheyenne River 

W. M. S 

Little Morran 

Moreau River 

W. M. S 

Oahe 

Virgin Creek 

Bon Homme, by J. H. Olmstead 

Canton, First, by Rev. J. Hamerson. 

Columbia, United Ch., by Rev. H. 
W. Webb 

Erwin, by Rev. R. M. Coate 

Frankfort and Turton, by Rev. F. E. 
Van Liew 

Ipswich, by Rev. E.I. Grinnell 

Keystone, by Rev. J. M. Brown 

Lead, First Ch., $9.30 : S. S., $4.00, by 
Rev. T. J. Woodcock 

Letcher, 79 cts. ; Firesteel, $5.13 ; Lis- 
bon, $2.53; Bethel, S2.13, by Rev. 
C. F. DeGroff ■ 

Milbank, S S. Birthday box, by Rev. 
W. H. Thrall 

Parkston, Zion's German Ch.,by Rev. 
M. E. Eversz, D.D 

Sioux Falls, First, by Rev. L. Kings- 
bury 

Tyndall, First, by J. H. Olmstead!... 

Watertown, Rev. H. T. Williams, by 
Rev. W. H. Thrall 



COLORADO— $70.01. 

Colorado Springs, First, by F. B. Tif- 
fany 

Harmon, Union Ch., by Rev. H. M. 
Skeels 

Littleton, Woman's Miss. Soc, by 
Rev. C. H. Harger 

Lyons, First, by Rev. D. F. Bright... 

Trinidad, by R. T. McRorey. 



WYOMING— $20.80. 

Douglas, by Rev. O. L. Corbin 

Rock Springs, A Friend 

A Friend 

IDAHO— S41. 00. 

Challis, Y. P. S. C. E., by L. H. John- 
ston, for Alaska 

Weiser, by Rev. C. W. Luck 



$75 00 



CALIFORNIA— $2,125.47. 

Received by Rev. J. K. Harrison : 

Alameda, Ch 

S. S 

Bethany 

Black Diamond 

Bonny Doon 

Byron, W. H. M. S 

Campbell 

Cherokee 

Clayton 

Cottonwood 

East Oakland, Pilgrim, W. H. M. S. 

Eureka 

Ferndale 

S. S 



2 


70 


I 


00 




78 


I 


41 


2 


5° 


I 


00 




70 


IO 


°9 


I 


02 


6 


00 


8 


90 


2 


5°" 


2 


41 


5 


10 


2 


00 



10 58 



16 50 

7 48 



51 


23 


7 


08 


5 


00 


3 


CO 


3 


70 



2 60 

9 00 

g 20 



5 °° 

36 00 



82 69 
12 61 

1 2 5 

10 00 

1 2 5 



12 50 
36 go 
20 00 



Field's Landing $3 00 

Fitchburg 10 00 

Fresno 2 50 

Friend 15 00 

Friend... ._, 1 15 

Fruitvale. ..' 290 

'Grass Valley 1670 

Green Valley, Y. P. S. C. E 2 00 

Likely, S. S 210 

Lincoln 5 50 

Little Shasta 22 co 

Lockef ord 12 50 

Mission San Jose 1 30 

Nevada City 5 05 

North Berkeley 15 

Oakland, First Ch., $97 ; Mrs. Mil- 
ler, $5 102 00 

S. S 6 80 

Young Ladies 10 00 

Oakland, Plymouth Avenue, by 

Mrs. G. Moore '. 5 00 

Pacific Grove, Ch 7 00 

W.H. M. S 16 65 

Palo Alto 535 

Paradise 1500 

Rio Vista, S. S 4 00 

Y. P. S. C. E 5 00 

Rohnerville 2 50 

Sacramento 6 00 

Santa Cruz 18 20 

Y. P. S. C. E 10 00 

Santa Rosa, W. H. M. S 5 75 

San Francisco, First, W. H. M. S.. 139 25 

Plymouth Avenue 12 80 

Y. P. S. C. E 8 40 

W. H. M. S 7 00 

Bethany 50 

Soquel 11 co 

Wallace, S. S 2 00 

West Side, S. S 6 co 

Y.P.S.C.E 5 55 

Woodland 12 80 

C. Holbrook, $100; Mrs. S. M. Lem- 
ing, $1 ; J. H. Ansel], $20; Rev. 
F. B. Perkins, ,$5 ; Mrs. H. Blake, 
$100; Mrs. Surryhune, 50c; Rev. 
J. Rowell, $10 ; Edward Cole- 
man, $500 736 50 



1,500 00 



Woman's H. M. Union, Southern 
California, Mrs. M. M. Smith, 
Treas.: 
For Salary Fund : 

Avalon, Y. P. S. C. E 

Claremont,S. S 

Chula Vista, Y. P. S. C. E 

Compton, S. S 

Highland, Jr. C. E 

Pasadena, First, Y. P. S. C. E.. .. 

S. S 

Redlands, S. S 

Santa Ana, Y. P. S. C. E 



I 


75 


3 


00 


3 


35 


7 


00 


5 


00 


15 


00 





5° 


7 


00 


49 


70 


6 


00 


'5 


00 


r 7 


50 


4 


00 


102 


20 



Avalon 

Pasadena, Young Woman's Soc. 
Riverside, Woman's H. M. Soc. . 
Santa Ana, Woman's Miss. Soc. . 



Etiwanda, by Rev. A. W. Thompson. 2 15 

Fitchburg, by Rev. F. C. Krause 15 00 

La Canyada, by Rev. J. T. Ford 2 00 

Los Angeles, Bethlehem Ch., by Rev. 

D. W. Bartlett 5 6° 

Nordhoff, by Rev. F. F. Pearse .-. 10 75 

Norwalk, Bethany Ch., by Rev. G. 

H. De Kay 2050 

Redlands, First, by C. M. Hall 394 42 



266 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1899 



San Diego, Mrs. E. E. Wiggin 

San Rafael, First, by Rev. W. H. 

Atkinson 

Spring Valley, C. E. S.,by Rev. I. W. 

Atherton 

Stockton, Rev. Dr. Holbrook 

Sunol Glen and Mission San Jose, by 

Rev. W. H. Cooke 

OREGON— $51.06. 

Forest Grove, Rev. D. Staver 

Freewater, First, and Ingles Chapel, 

by Rev. W. Hurlburt 

Portland, Hassalo Street Ch., by H. 

Binuian 

WASHINGTON-$iS 7 .25. 

Colfax, by Rev. T. W. Walters 

Medical Lake, First, by Rev. J. D. 

Jones 

North Yakima, First, by the Rev. T. 

J. Dent 



il2 


60 


4 


5° 


5 


75 


20 


00 



5 


00 


4 


00 


42 


06 


17 


00 


15 


41 


10 


00 



Pleasant Prairie, Y. P. S. C E. of the 

First, byR.Worthington, for Alaska $10 00 
Port Townsend, First, by Rev. J. C. 

Young 10 00 

Seattle, Plymouth Ch., by Rev. A. J. 

Bailey 4218 

Spokane, Westminster Ch., by Rev. 

A. J. Bailey 25 35 

Stafford, Wm. Schatz. by Rev. M. E. 

E versz 5 00 

Tacoma, First, by Rev. A. J. Bailey.. 43 31 
Walla Walla, German Free Soulh Ch., 

by Rev. J. Hergert 3 00 

West Ferndale, by Rev. O. S Haines. 5 00 

Yelm, by Rev. W. A. Arnold 1 00 

February Receipts: Contributions $7,846 35 

Legacies 2,066 65 

Annuity 39 83 

Interest 497 00 

Home Missionary. 28 20 

Literature 1 20 



810,479 2 3 



DONATIONS OF CLOTHING, ETC. 



Received in December, iJ 



Baltimore, Md., First Ch., by Eliz. C. 

Glover, box $115 00 

Bound Brook, N. J., L. M. S. of First 

Ch., by Mrs. Geo. Stryker. barrel 62 25 

Bridgeport, Conn., Woman's Benev. 
Org. of First Ch., by Annie H. Her- 

rick, box 15000 

Ladies' Union of Park St. Ch., by 

Mrs C. K. Bishop, box 14439 

West End Ch., by Mrs. C. W. More- 
house, box and cash 87 00 

Bridgewater, Conn., L. M. S., by Mrs. 

Warren Morse, box 31 65 

Bridgewater, Vt., L. A. S., by Sarah D. 

Carpenter, barrel 48 96 

Bristol, Conn., Y. P. S. C. E. of First 
Ch., by Mrs. A. E. North, box. 
W. H. M. Aux.of First Ch.,by Mrs. 

A. E. North, two barrels 143 37 

Brooklyn. N. Y.. L. B. S. of Tompkins 
Ave. Ch. by Mrs. Sarah M. Higgins, 

two barrels and package 274 42 

Woman's Union of Beecher Memorial, 

by Mrs. J. E. Smalley, barrel 75 00 

Buffalo, N. Y., Y. P. S. C. E. of Ni- 
agara Square People's Ch., by Mrs. 

Jessie R. Wilson, two boxes 47 59 

Chicago, 111., Woman's Asso. of South 

( h.. by Mrs. J. A. Root, two barrels. 146 33 
Cleveland, O., W. M. S. and Young 
Ladies' Soc. of Bethlehem Ch., by 

Mrs. C. H. Burgess, barrel 67 50 

Home Dept. of Ladies' Asso. of Eu- 
clid Ave. Ch..by Mrs. A.J. Smith, 

two barrels and package 123 90 

Hough Ave. Ch., by Mrs. J. G. Per- 
cy, two barrels 35 06 

Clinton, la.. First Ch., by Mrs. E. J. 

Scott, barrel 31 78 

Concord, N. H., Ladies' Social Circle of 
South Ch.. by Miss M. F. Nutter, bar- 
rel ... 181 43 

Decorah, la., Ladies' Soc. of First Ch., 

by Mrs. B. B. Greene, barrel 54 95 

Dover, N. H., L. H. M. S.. of First Ch., 

by H. E. Wyatt, two barrels 133 93 

Glastonbury, Conn., L. A. S., by Mrs. 
G. D. Bartlett, barrel and cash 105 00 



Groton, N. Y., L. M. S., by Mrs. Emma 

L. Bliss, box $2300 

Hancock. Mich., by C. L. D. Johnson, 

twi 1 barrels 137 25 

Hanover, N. H., Ladies, by Mrs. Susan 

A. Brown, box. 
Hartford, Conn.. L. B. S. of Asylum 

Hill Ch.. by Mrs. H. P. Kline, box. 175 00 
Ladies' Aid Soc. of First Ch.,by E. C. 

Curtis, barrel. 
Ladies' Sew. Soc. of South Ch. ,by Mrs. 

John D. Candee, two barrels 165 61 

Homer, N. Y., L. A. and H. M. S., by 

Mrs. L. H. Tuthill, barrel 42 08 

Ithaca, N. Y., Society of First Ch.. by 

Ellen C. Reed, box, barrel and cash. . 42 60 

Irasburgh, Vt., W- M. A., by E. S. 

Wheeler, barrel and cash 30 00 

Jamestown, N. Y., L. H.M. S. of First 
Ch., by Mrs. J. H. Tiffany, two bar- 
rels 115 00 

Lewis, la., Woman's Home and Foreign 
Miss. Soc, by Mrs. M. E. McElroy, 

box '3 5° 

Lockport, N. Y., by Lillie M. Simmons, 

box 115 00 

Loraine, O., W. M. S., by Mrs. E. M. 

Pierce, barrel 50 00 

Montclair. N. J., Y. W. M. S. of First 

Ch., by G. L. Dunlap, two barrels . 130 41 
W. H. M. S. of First Ch., by Mrs. W. 

M. Brown, three barrels 250 00 

New Britain, Conn., First Ch. of Christ, 

by Mrs. Emma L. Pickett, box 18 00 

New Fairfield, Conn.,W. M. S., by Mrs. 

Carry T. Penny, box 1700 

New London, Conn., Dorcas Soc. of 
Second Ch., by Cornelia W. Chapell, 

box 130 00 

New Milford, Conn., Ladies' Sew. Soc, 

by Mrs. F. A. Johnson, barrel 93 75 

Ladies, by Rev. E. P. Herrick. barrel. 
New Haven. Conn.. L. H. M. S. of First 

Ch., by Mary E. Bennett, six boxes 1,165 36 
Howard Ave. Ch., by Mrs. W. J. 

Mutch, box 65 00 

L. A. S. of Humphrey St. Ch., by 
Mrs. F. S. Burnett, two barrels 87 98 



April, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



267 



Norfolk, Conn, W. H. M. S.,by Mrs. R. 

I. Crissey, two barrels 

North Woodstock, Conn.,Y. P. S. C. E., 

by Rev. E. P. Herrick, barrel. 
Norwich, Conn., Home Miss. Soc. of 
Park Ch., by Mrs. L. G. Lane, box 
and cash 

H. M. S. of Second Ch., by Jennie H. 

Bushnell, box 

Norwich Town, Conn., W. H. M. S. of 

First Ch., by Mrs. Herbert L. Yer- 

rington, barrel 

Oakville, Conn., L. A. S., by Mrs. W. 

W. Robinson, barrel 

Patchogue, N. Y., L. H. M. S., by Mrs. 

J. A. Potter, barrel. 
Peacham, Vt., L. H. M. S., by Mrs. 

Elsie C. Merrill, barrel and cash .... 
Peoria, 111., L. M. S. of First Ch., by 

Mrs. Zilla F. Stevens, box 

Portland, Me., Benev. Circle of Willis- 
ton Ch. , by Addie Wyee, barrel 

Putnam, Conn., W. H. M. S., by Mrs. S. 

Lizzie Clarke, two barrels and box. . . 
Rockville, Conn.. L. A. S. of Union Ch., 

by Mrs. C. E. McKinley, box 

St. Louis, Mo., First Ch., by Amelia J. 

Anderson, barrel 



St. Joseph, Mo., Tabernacle Ch., by 

5221 35 Mrs. Stephen E. Coombs, box $77 00 

Salisbury, Conn., Sunday-school, by 

Mrs. Sarah A. Clark, barrel 66 50 

Southampton, Mass., Sunshine Band, 

by Caroline Edwards, box 80 00 

loi 00 South Windsor, Conn., H. M. S., by 

Mrs. Eliz. W. Sperry, box 45 58 

152 50 Swanton, Vt., by Mrs. Marcia C. Smith, 

box 86 89 

Terryville, Conn., Young Ladies' Mis- 
60 00 sion Circle, by A. S. Gaylord, box ... 73 23 

Thompson, Conn., Ladies, by Mrs. J. S. 
40 44 Lewis, barrel. 

Vergennes, Vt., by Mrs. Willard Bristol, 

barrel 100 59 

Wethersfield, Conn., L. A. S., by Mrs. 

43 70 Augusta M. Smith, barrel 102 80 

Wilton, Conn., L. H. M. S., by Mrs. 
20000 Edw. Olmstead, barrel and cash . ... 6800 

Woodbridge, Conn., L. B. S., by Flor- 
6287 ence C. Blatchley, box 48 25 



74 79 
66 50 



[Erratzim : Barrel credited in Jan- 
uary number to Sharon, Pa., by Mrs. 
O. E. Dyer, should be credited to 
Sharon, Conn., by Mrs. E. O. Dyer.] 



Received in January, 1 Sgg 



Akron, O., W. M. S. of West Hill Ch., 

by Mrs. S. D. Bingham, barrel $22 14 

Bangor, Me., Ladies Asso. of First Ch., 

by Mrs. Sarah A. Pearson, barrel . . 36 68 

Brooklyn, N. Y., L. B. S. of Central Ch., 
by Harriet E. Haight, three barrels 
and two boxes 201 50 

L. B. S. of South Ch., by Sarah L. 

Towle, two boxes 18286 

Chaplin, Conn., L. A. S., by Mrs. E. S. 

Lincoln, barrel 37 72 

Cheshire, Conn., L. A. S., by Mrs. Emily 

E. Dickerman, barrel 67 65 

Cleveland, O., Hough Ave. Ch., by Mrs. 

J. G. Percy, barrel 37 07 

Collinsville, Conn., W. H. M. S., by 

Alice R. Williams, box 107 03 

Conway, N. H., by Mrs. S. A. Evans, 

package 16 00 

East Jaffrey, N. H., Cheerful Helpers, 

by Mrs. H. F. Hodge, box 50 00 

Ellington, Conn., L. B. S., by Mrs. S. T. 

Kimball, barrel 69 72 

Fairfield, Conn., by Jane A. Kippen, 

box and package 185 00 

Fernandina, Fla., Mrs. E. F. Richard- 
son, barrel 17 00 

Flushing, N. Y.,. Ladies' Working Soc, 

by Mrs. J. R. Beetem, box 70 00 

Franklin, Vt., L. H. M. S., by F. L. 

Hopkins, barrel 47 7+ 

Glenbrook, Conn., Home and Foreign 

Miss. Soc. of the Union Memo. Ch., 

by Mrs. K. White, barrel 56 00 

Hampton, N. H., W. M. S., by Mrs. 

Albert Shaw, barrel 35 19 

Hartford, Conn., L. A. S.of Wethersfield 

Ave. Ch., by Mrs. L. W. Burt, barrel 45 00 

C. E. C. and Others, box 102 13 

Mansfield, Mass., Junior C. E., Miss 

Alice Cole, two barrels and box 89 39 

Middletown, Conn.. L. H. M. S. of First 

Ch., by Mrs. A. R. Crittenden, two 

boxes and two barrels 256 00 

Moravia, N. Y, L. H. M. S., by Mrs. T. 

T. Tuthill, box 40 00 

Morrisville, N. Y., L. H. M. S., by Lucy 

A. Dana, barrel ... n 50 

New Haven, Conn., L. H. M. S. of First 

Ch., by Mary E. Bennett, four boxes 779 94 



L. A. S. of United Ch., by Mrs. H. A. 
De Forest, four boxes $615 80 

L. B. S. of Dwight Place Ch., by Mrs. 

H. S. Higby, two barrels 100 00 

L. A. S. of the Ch. of the Redeemer, 

by Harriet A. Miller, box 56 00 

North Fairfield, O., L. M. S., by Mrs. 

M. M. Wells, barrel 2650 

Norwich, Conn., L. H. M. S. of Park 

Ch., by Louisa G. Lane, box 125 00 

Orange, Conn., L. B. S.,by Mrs. B. M. 

Ailing, box 38 50 

Philadelphia, Pa., W. H. M. S. of First 

Ch., by Mrs. A. W. Goodell, two 

barrels. 
Portland, Me., Ladies' Miss. Sew. Circle 

of State St. Ch., by Harriet N. Hob- 
son, box 100 79 

Ravenna. O., W. M. S., by Sarah C. 

Hart, box and barrel 5364 

St. Albans, Vt., W. H. M. S. of First 

Ch., by Minnie L. Hogan, barrel and 

package 66 00 

St. Johnsbury, Vt., North Ch., by Mrs. 

P. H. Stone, four barrels 229 80 

St. Louis, Mo., L. A. S. of First Ch.,by 

Amelia J. Anderson, barrel 77 00 

Ladies' Asso. of Central Ch., by Mrs. 
A. R. Cahoon, two barrels 155 00 

W. H. M. S. of Ladies' Asso. of Pil- 
grim Ch., by Mrs. Samuel Owens, 

two barrels and box 1S2 02 

Saxton's River, Vt., by Isabelle S. Cha- 

pin, barrel 25 00 

Sharon, Conn., Ladies, by Jane M. 

Goodwin, barrel 85 00 

Stamford, Conn.. First Ch.. by Mrs. G. 

H. Chase, two barrels 65 co 

Syracuse, N. Y., L. M. S. of Geddes Ch., 

by Mrs. H. A. Flint, two boxes 90 00 

Traer, la., by Mrs. Anna B. Conrad, 

two barrels and box 175 00 

Ware, Mass.. Friend, three packages. 
Warsaw, N. Y., C. H. M. S., by May D. 

Jenks, box 113 66 

Woodstock, Vt„ W. H. M. S. of First 

Ch., by Caroline A. Munger, box.... 21 50 

$4,94i 55 



268 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1899 



Received in February, 1899 



Brooklyn, N. Y., L. B. S. of Central 

Ch., by Harriet E. Haight, barrel $22 00 

Chicago, 111., Woman's Asso. of South 
Ch., by M. E. L. Root, two barrels 

and box 138 50 

Colchester, Conn., L. B. S., by Mrs. 

Fannie S. Curtis, box. 
East Orange, N. J., Woman's Soc. for 
Christian Work of First Ch., by Har- 
riet C. Hinds, two barrels 14896 

Hartford, Conn., Ladies' Sew. Soc. of 
South Ch,, by Mrs. J. D. Candee, 

barrel and package 113 25 

L. B. S. of Asylum Hill Ch.,by Mrs. 

S. M. Capron, two boxes 306 70 

L. A. S. of Windsor Ave. Ch.. by Mrs. 
T. J. McRonald, two boxes and two 

barrels 206 67 

Haworth, N. J.. Woman's Aid Soc, by 

Mrs. L. M. C. Addoms. box 50 00 

Kittery Point, Me., S. S. class of six 
small girls, by E. S. Emmons, box. . . 10 00 



Montclair, N. J., W. H. M. S. of First 
Ch., by Mrs. W. M. Brown, two bar- 
rels $200 00 

Morrisville, N. Y., L. H. M. S., by Mrs. 
Lucy A. Dana, barrel 25 08 

New Britain, Conn., W. H. M. S. of 
South Ch., by Mary E. Bingham, 
three boxes 149 78 

New Haven, Conn., L. H. M. S. of First 
Ch., by Mary E. Bennett, four 

boxes 593 49 

L. A. S. of Grand Ave. Ch., by Mrs. 
Minna R. Bishop, two barrels 133 55 

Ware, Mass., Mrs. Sargis' S. S. Class, 
by Miss M. A. Barlow, barrel. 

Washington. D. C, H. M. S. of First 
Ch., by Mrs. M. A. Miles, box and 
barrel 129 17 

Woodbury, Conn., Ladies of North Ch., 
by Mr:,. John N. Munson, barrel. 



AUXILIARY STATE RECEIPTS 

VERMONT DOMESTIC MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Receipts of the Vermont Domestic Missionary Society from November 20 to December 20, 
1898. Wsi. C. Tyler, Treasurer 



Barton $8 54 

For C. H. M. S 8 54 

Brookfield, First, Y. P. S. C. E 5 00 

Chester 12 84 

Cornwall 13 00 

Craf tsbury 4 00 

Franklin 22 96 

Lyndonville, Rev. J. C. Bodwell 10 00 

Newport 10 32 

Pittsf ord — 60 co 

Randolph West, First, Hannah Wood 

fund 12 09 



Rupert, C. H. M. S $2025 

St. Johnsbury, South Church 42 38 

For Evan, work 31 83 

Thetford 9 25 

Vershire, Boys' and Girls' H. M. Army. 1 50 

Wallingford 32 15 

From ladies 20 12 

Westminster, Banks fund 50 

Vermont Missionary 14 95 

Interest 64 00 



Receipts from December 20, 1898, to January 20, 1899 



Bennington, Second 

Brattleboro, West 

C. H. M. S 

Burlington, College St 

Cambridge, Second, Jeffersonville. 
Chelsea 

S.S 

Dorset, S. S 

Harvard, Mass., Rev. C. C. Torrey. 

Hyde Park 

Jericho Center, S. S 

First 

Lowell 

Ludlow, C. H. M. S 

Marlboro 

Newbury, First 



24 


93 

82 


25 


00 


54 


36 


1.5 


00 


17 
11 


94 
84 


4 


15 


S 


00 


10 


00 


3 
T 9 


55 
06 


11 


25 


7 
6 


02 

24 


3 1 


40 



S. S 

Rochester, Mrs. L. S. Martin. 

Rutland 

Simonsville 

South Hero and Grand Isle. . . 
Townshend 

West 

Wallingford. additional 

Washington, South 

Wolcott, Y. P. S. C. E 

W. H. M. U 

Vermont Missionary 

Insurance 

Interest 



$10 


00 


5 


00 


5° 


00 


5 


00 


T 5 


00 


10 


00 


15 


00 


1 


25 


1 


5° 


5 


00 


159 


20 


29 


45 


10 


00 


93 


90 



$712 86 



Burlington, First 

College St 

Cornwall, for C. H. M. S 

Essex, First 

Essex Center, Miss T. Morgan 



Receipts from January 20 to February 20, iS 

East 



25 00 
3 22 
3 °° 



Fairfield, 
Hartland 

Johnson 

Ludlow 

Newport, First. 



»G 75 
2 00 
33 18 
10 53 
14 10 



April, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



269 



Norwich $15 00 

Pownal, North 5 00 

Rev. F. V. D. Garretson 15 00 

Rutland, S. S. P. F in 31 

Swanton 9 00 

Waterbury 11 79 

W. H. M. U 5000 



Legacy, Mrs. A. F. Campbell, Brat- 

tleboro $500 00 

Vermont Missionary 40 61 

Interest.... 156 25 



$1,178 74 



MASSACHUSETTS HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Receipts of the Massachusetts Hotne Missionary Society in December, 1898. Rev. 
Edwin B. Palmer, Treasurer 



Acton, by H. F. Tuttle $15 00 

South, by Wm. F. Hale 7 03 

Amherst, A Friend 2 00 

North, by E. H. Dickinson 71 95 

Andover, Chapel, by W. F. Draper, to 
const. Herbert L. W. Snell, Harriet 
Blake, Florence Merrill and Mary 

E. Ryder L. Ms. of C. H. M. S 293 25 

Theo. Sem. Students, byW. F. Draper 18 75 

West, by F. S. Boutwell 14 73 

S. S., A Member, by F. S. Boutwell. 1 00 

Arlington, by E. H. Norris 13505 

Attleboro, Second, by David L. Low. . 140 88 

Bank Balances, Oct. Int. on 9 62 

Barnstable, West, by Rev. E. B. French 10 00 

Barre, Evan., by Abner C. Mott 123 05 

Beverly, Dane St., Williston C. E. Soc, 

by Chas. L. Odell 10 00 

Billerica, Orth., by J. F. Bruce 1 00 

Blackstone, Jr. C. E. Soc, $2.00 ; Sen. 

C. E. Soc, $5.00 7 00 

Ch., $15.00 ; S. S., $3.88, all by C. H. 

Lee 18 90 

Blandford, First, by W. E. Hinsdale. .. 34 10 

Boston, Allston, by F. B. Wheeler 125 55 

Brighton, A Friend, Christmas 25 00 

A. F. S 10 00 

Dorchester, Central, by Rev. P. B. 

Davis 31 00 

Mrs. Jacob Fullerton 15 00 

Pilgrim, by A. Dempsey 37 32 

Second, Edw. B. Wilder, by Miss 

E. Tolman 5 00 

- East, Baker, S. S., by Rev. J. C. 

Young 7 71 

Maverick, by J. W.Brown 2 51 

Jam. Plain, Central S. S., H. M. 

Army, by J. W. Farmer] 11 97 

Mt. Vernon, Member 7500 

By Mrs. C. A. Jellison 10 00 

Neponset, by H. Tucker 10 00 

Old South, by Jos. H. Gray (of which 

$300 for Rev. Mr. Foster) 1,400 00 

Park St., by Geo. M. Butler.. 21393 

Rosltndale, by W. H. Warner 35 21 

Roxbury, Eliot, by F. C. Russell 307 00 

Highland 1000 

T. G 30 co 

Union, by W. H. White, add'l 10 00 

Brookfield, by J. M. Grover 6 53 

Brookline, Harvard, by J. H. Shapleigh, 

Special for Italian work. . 25 89 

Leyden, by Geo. E. Adams, add'l.... 2 00 
Cambridge, Armenian Residents, by H. 

M. Pilibbesian, for local Arm. work. . 50 00 

Cambridgeport, Friends 150 00 

Pilgrim, by N. H. Holbrook 11 49 

Carver, North, by Benj. W. Robbins.. . 26 00 
Charlemont, East, S. S. Rally off'g, by 

John Kendrick 3 40 

Chelsea, Miss A. M. Dutch 5 00 

Chester. Second Church. $1.04 ; C. E. 

Soc, $4.60, by Rev. T. D. Murphy... . 5 64 

Chicopee, Third, by W. J. Fuller 3 15 

Clinton, by J. A. Field 31 00 



Cummington," West, by Mrs. S. D. Ben- 
jamin $10 00 

Dalton, by H. A. Barton, to const. J. J. 
Beiseigal, Chas. Carpenter, Henry R. 
Edgecomb, and Mary E. P. Allen L. 

Ms. of C. H. M. S 20000 

Danvers, First, by Geo. Tapley 35 18 

Deerfield, First, by Rev. Andrew Camp- 
bell 1600 

Dudley, First, by W. H. Upham 4 50 

Easthampton, by W. H.Wright 11 12 

Easton, Evan., by W. H. Andrews 11 57 

S. S., by H. D. Purinton 21 05 

Edgartown, by Mrs. Wm. Pent 10 00 

Fitchburg, Mrs. E. J. and Miss Grace 

U. Davis 3 00 

Rollstone, C. E. Soc, two-cents-a-day 

pledges, by Martha S. Wright 7 50 

Foxboro, Bethany, A Friend, by Horace 

Carpenter 5 00 

Framingham, Plymouth, by J. H. Tem- 
ple 74 6 5 

Frost, RufusS., Fund, Bank tax rebate 12 30 
Grafton, Saundersville, by Rev. David 

Howie 10 00 

Great Barrington, by C. R. Sabin 39 78 

Greenfield, Second, by Miss L. A. Spar- 
hawk 73 76 

Gurney, R. C, Fund, Bank tax rebate.. 29 20 

Hadley, First, by Miss Agnes Ayres 23 67 

Hale, C. J. M., Fund, Income of 54 22 

Hamilton, by J. P. Lovering 9 35 

Hanson, by Miss Abbie J. Clark 6 00 

Holyoke, Second, by J. N. Hubbard 189 63 

Hyde Park, Clarendon Hills, by John 

Holden 5 00 

First, by E. A. Runnells 15 37 

Lawrence, Law. St., by W. L. Warden. 8 25 

For local Armenian work. 150 00 

Riverside, by Henry E. Oxnard 5 00 

Lee Church and S. S., by J. L. Kilbon.. 630 co 

Lenox, by Frank J. Barrett 29 14 

Leverett, Morris Corner, by Rev. J. C. 

Wightman 6 00 

Lexington, Hancock, by Alvah C.Stone 147 93 

Lincoln, by Rev. E. E. Bradley 209 20 

Littleton, Orth., by J. S. Hartwell 13 00 

Lowell, First, by J. W. Griffin, " for 

Western work " 40 00 

Lynn, Central, by Isaac K. Harris, (w. 
p. g.) to const. Edward L. Pease 

and Henry P. Emerson L. Ms ... 50 00 
By I. K. H., for local Armenian 

work 25 00 

First, by Miss C. M. Staton, for local 

Armenian work 25 00 

Maiden, A Friend 5 00 

Marshfield, First, by H. B. Sprague 113 99 

C. E. Soc, by H. B. S 2 00 

Hills, Ladies' Bible Class, by Miss C. 

Tilden, for needy miss'y 6 00 

Massachusetts, C. Hill (of which $200 for 

West) 300 00 

Melrose, S. S., Infantdep't. H. M. Army, 

by Miss A. M. Chapin 6 00 



270 



The Home Missionary 



April, ii 



Merrimac, by F. O. Davis $3481 

Middleborough, Central S. S., by E. S. 

Hathaway 371 

Middleton, by C. B. Stiles 1 80 

Milford, by Geo. G. Cook 52 41 

Millbury, Miss Louisa S. Putnam, by 

Rev. Geo. A. Putnam 5 00 

Monson, W. S. Nichols, Est. of. delayed 

rental 36 00 

Montague, by Sanford Marsh 24 46 

Monterey, E.-c.-a-day Band, by Miss 

Jessie A. Townsend 12 00 

New Braintree, by Chas. A. Gleason. . . 20 00 

Newburyport, Cash 1 70 

North, by J. B. Creasey 1475 

New Marlboro, Mill River, by E. W. 

Rhoades 10 41 

Newton, Eliot, by Geo. N. Putnam 50 00 

Newtonville, Central, by E. W. 

Greene 191 00 

Warner, John. Est. of. by C. E. Eddy 

and C. Maria Warner. Fxs 2,000 00 

West, Second, by J. J. Eddy 787 03 

Norfolk, Union, by W. E. Mann 5 00 

Northampton, First, by J. H. Searle. . . . 231 85 
North Attleboro, Oldtown, by C. E. 

Jordan 2 73 

Trinity, by R. G. Temple 16 36 

Peppercll, by C. Crosby toconst. Rupert 

Blood a L. M. ofC. H. M. S 64 95 

Phillipston, by Mrs. T. H. Chaffin 7 31 

Pittsfield, First, by F. W. Dutton 80 00 

Flainfield, by Rev. Geo. C. Bliss 5 37 

Quincy, Bethany, by C. S. Hubbard ... 60 00 

Raynham, First, by M. G. Shurtliff 13 10 

North, by Rev. S. K. B. Perkins 3 00 

Reading, by Dean Peabody 40 48 

Reed, Dwight, Fund, Bank tax rebate.. 49 17 

Rochester, North, by Geo. H. Randall . 5 00 
Rockport, First, by Zeno A. Appleton 

(of which §5 from Z. A. A.) 15 85 

C. E. S., by Miss A. Hutchins (of 

which $10 for Alaska > 2000 

Pastor's S. S. Class, by Rev. I. Ains- 

worth 12 50 

Pigeon Cove, Swede Ch., by A. 

Anderson 2 00 

Rowley, by Woodbury Smith 19 50 

Royalston, South, by E. L. Rich 6 64 

Salem, South, by Joseph A. Dane 134 55 

Tabernacle, by C. R. Washburn 25 34 

Saugus. Central. S. S., by Rev. J. C. 

Labaree, for Alaska 8 00 

Somerville, Winter Hill, by S. A. 

Underhill 5 54 

Southboro. Southville, by S. R- Day 2 50 

South Hadley Falls, by A. N. Chapin. . 17 30 
Springfield, Emmanuel. Dea. N. Lom- 
bard, by D. L. Kibbe 2 00 



Faith, by Saml. S. Pease for Fr. Am. 

College $13 88 

Memorial, by H. N. Bowman 19 80 

Olivet, by Geo. B. Kilbon 23 60 

Sterling, by Rev. G. H. Pratt i960 

Swampscott, by J. W. Butcher, add'l. . . 7 95 

Taunton, East, by Rev. H. H. Loud ... 2 00 

West, B. and G. H. M. Army, by L. P. 

Luther 2 00 

Templeton, Trin., by Church Treas.... 14 30 

Wakefield, by W. P. Preston 25 29 

Wall Fund . Bank tax rebate 24 59 

Wellesley Hills, by L. V. N. Peck 10 00 

Wenham, by Mrs. Frances Perkins 21 50 

West Brookfield, by C. E. Smith 17 22 

Westfield, Second, by R. L. Scott (of 

which $25 thank-off 'g from a friend 1. 57 77 

Westminster, by D. W. Hill 33 5° 

Westwood, Islington, by Rev. W. F. 

Bickford 4 00 

Whitcomb, David, Fund, income, $150; 

Bank tax rebate, $136.82 286 82 

Wilbraham. First, by F. E. Clark, w. p. 

g. to const. Mrs. Wells L. Phelps a 

L. M. of C. H. M. S 18 00 

Williamsburg, Haydenville. S. S., H. M. 

Army, by P. J. Thatcher 7 50 

Williamstown, First, by C. S. Cole 89 12 

White Oaks, by W. R. Stocking 3 12 

S. S., H. M. Army, by W. R. S. . . . 9 24 

Winchendon. First, by Mrs. C. J. Rice. 25 13 

North, by H. S. Allen 121 92 

Winchester, "Maps'' 1 00 

Windsor, by Rev. Geo. Sterling 13 00 

Winthrop, by Chas. H. Perkins 9 75 

Worcester, Estate of Harriet W. Damon, 

by Exs. and Trustee 410 92 

Plymouth, by F. W. Chase 60 64 

Union, by C. B. Green 104 02 

Yarmouth, West, by Abbie B. Cro- 

well 5 00 

Zoar, thro. Charlemont, First Ch., by 

Rev. W. R. Joyslin 1300 

Woman's Home Miss. Association, by 
Miss M. L. Woodberry, Ass't 
Treas. : 

Grant toward Salary of , Mrs. I. N. 

Tillinghast of the Fr. Am Coll 50 00 

Boston, Rox., Wal. Ave. Aux., for 

Salary of Rev. S. Deakin 6200 

Newton, Eliot, Aux., for Italian Mis- 
sion 2100 



Home Missionary. 



51133 00 

$11,764 27 
4 So 

$11,768 77 



Received in January, 1899 



Abington, First, by J. T. Richmond 

Agawam, by R. DeWitt 

S. S. by Mrs. C. L. Hay ward 

Amherst, College, by Levi H. Ehvcll... 

Andover, Free Christian, by Mrs. J. N. 

Cole 

South, by John Alden (of wh. $200 for 

sal. of Rev. R. B. Wrightl 

Arlington, Rally Collection, by Rev. S. 

C. Bushnell 

Ayer, An invalid 

Barnstable, Centerville, by Mrs. Owen 
Crosby . . .• 

Hyannis, by Minnie B. Eldridge 

Bartholomew, Mrs. L. A. Remnant 

Berkley, First, by Rev. F. K. Beem, 

Taft thank-offering 

Berlin, C. E. Society, by E. A. Merrill. 
Beverly, Washington Ch., by Sam'l L. 

Abbott 

* Received 



$625 Boston, Allston, S.S.,by J.E. Lounsbury §13 83 
28 00 Armenian Pop'n., by Rev. M. S. Nes- 
10 00 hilian. for local Arm. Work, $13.00.* 

78 95 Dewing, Benj. F. . 50 00 

Dorchester, Second, J. L. Barry, by 

10 00 Miss E. Tolman 10 00 

E.-c.-a day Band,byMiss E.F. Merrill 5 00 

22537 Leonard, Miss M. F 1000 

Old South, Miss A. H. Chamberlain, 
7 00 by Jos. H. Gray, for salary of Rev. 

3 00 Foster 300 00 

Roxbury, Eliot, by F. C. Russell 5 00 

1000 Wal. Ave , by C. H. W. Wood 141 00 

300 Miss S. Russell 200 

70 '"Wall" 2000 

Bradford, First, by S. W. Carleton. ... 50 00 

970 Braintree, First, by A. B. Keith 216 

2 12 Bridge water. Central Sq., by A. G. Boy- 
den 12 53 

5700 Brockton, H. B. P. '■ Memorial " 375 

and credited on special accounl. 



April, 1 1 



The Home Missionary 



271 



Waldo, by S. E. Nickerson 

Brookline, Harvard, by Jas. H. Shap- 

leigh 

Cambridge, Pilgrim, by Nathan H. Hol- 
brook 

Prospect St., by Wm, F. Hunter 

Carlisle, by Miss Sarah L. Davis 

Chatham, C. E. Soc, by Rev. D. W. 

Richardson 

Dalton, Crane, Miss Clara L 

Crane, Mrs. Jas. B 

Crane, Miss Mollie 

Crane, W. M 

Crane, Zenas 

Crane, Mrs. Z. M. 

Dana, by N. L. Johnson 

Danvers, Maple St., Miss Louise Tap- 
ley, by Rev. E. C. Ewing 

Dedham, First, by Geo. W. Humphrey. 

Allin, Evan. S. S., by H. A. Guild.... 
Dennis, C. E. Society, by S. Evie Hall.. 

Douglas, East, by T. H. Meek 

FaU'River, First, by E. S. Thayer 

Falmouth, North, by Ward Eldred 

Fitchburg, Rollstone, by David Lowe. . 
Foxboro, Mrs. Mary N. Phelps, to const. 

Mrs. Anna K. Allen a L. M. of C. H. 

M.S : 

Framingham, Plymouth, E. H. Bige- 

lovv, by John H. Temple 

Frost, Rufus S., Fund, Income of 

Gloucester, Trinity, by Joseph O. Proc- 
ter 

Goshen, by C. N. Shaw 

Granby, by Rev. R. C. Bell 

Hardwick, Gilbertville, add'l, by A. H. 

Richardson 

Howard, by J. W. Bacon 

Haverhill, West, by Walter F. Poore. . , 

S. S., by Heury A. Poore 

Y. P. S. C. E., by E. A. Emerson 

Holbrook, Holbrook friend. Remnant.. 
Ipswich, First, by Miss L. R. Farley. . . 

Jessup, C. A., Fund. Income of 

Lancaster, Evan., by Leander Rowell. . 

S. S., penny contributions, by Miss E. 

F. Merrick 

Lawence, Arm. pop'n for local Armenian 

Work, by W. E. Wolcott, $50.00.* 

Leicester, First, by David Bemis 

Leverett, First S. S., byC. H. Beaman.. 
Lincoln, by Rev. E. E. Bradley (add'l). 
Lowell, First Trin., by I.Warren Bisbee 
For Local Arm. work $25.00.* 
Greek work, $10.00.* 

Swede Ch., by Nels O. Dellgren 

Lynn, Central, Currier C. E. Soc 

First, Add'l, by Miss C. M. Staton. .. 

" Friend " 

Maiden, A Friend 

Mansfield, C. E. S.,by W. F. Hanaford, 

for Alaskan work 

Medfield, Ch., $6 ; C. E. Soc, $4, by 

Rev. L. M. Pierce 

Medford, Mystic, by John McPherson.. 

West, C. E. Soc, by H. M. Clapp .... 
Med way (West), Second, by Jas. M. 

Fales 

Milford, by Geo. G. Cook 

Millbury, First, by Miss Carolyn C. 
Waters 

Second, by A. Armsby 

Natick, First, by Miss Bertha L. Ran- 
dall 

Newburyport, Whitefield, Tyler Mission 

Circle, by Miss L. E. Pierce 

Newton (Center), First, by J. E. Rock- 
wood 

Eliot, by Geo. N . Putnam 

C. E. Soc, by P. H. Robinson 

S. S., by Geo. R. McFarlin 

Highlands, " X. Y. Z." 



$7 S3 
991 28 



7 


43 


26 


49 


5 


00 


7 3° 


300 


00 


200 


00 


150 


00 


250 


00 


250 


00 


300 


00 


12 


00 


2 


00 


147 


69 


16 


99 


3 


00 


43 


20 


142 


19 


24 


00 


27 


59 



25 


00 


3° 


00 


108 


88 


8 


91 


16 


00 


9 


5° 


12 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


2 


J 7 




70 


«3 


J 3 


150 


00 


34 


46 



21 


00 


25 


00 


9 


00 


2 


75 


1 


00 


S° 


00 


100 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


277 
8 


20 

00 


2 


50 


2 


5° 


20 
32 


37 
16 


I 5° 


00 


n 


00 


171 


66 


308 

29 
21 


13 
69 
81 


5° 


00 



Northbridge, Whitinsville, E.-c-a-day 

Band, by Mrs. C. E. Whitin 

North Brookfield, First, by H. F. Moore 

E.-c-a-day Band, by H. F. Moore, 

for Alaskan work 

Oakham, by Wm. S. Crawford 

Orange, North, by Maria L. C. Blodgett 
Oxford, by Rev. A. E. Bradstreet, to 

const. Mrs. Harriet A. Chadwick and 

Alfred L. Stone L. Ms 

Palmer, Three Rivers Union, by A. S. 

Geer 

Parkhurst, E. C, Fund, Income of 

Pittsfield, First S. S., by Miss Mary W. 

Redfield 

Plymouth, Chiltonville, by Rev. F. B. 

Noyes 

Reed, Dwight, Fund, Income of 

Richmond, by C. H. Dorr 

Royalston, First, by Colin McKenzie.. . 
Samokov, Bulgaria, Rev. J. F. Clarke.. 

Sharon, by D . W. Pettee 

Somerset, First, S. S., by C. E. Norris.. 
Southampton, S. S., by W. A. Parsons. 

Scuthboro, A Friend 

Southbridge, by Edwin S. Swift 

Spencer, First, by F. E. Dunton, Taft 

thank off'g 

Sutton, Wilkinsonville, A Friend, to 

const. Rev. C. P. Pierce, of East 

Douglas, L. M. of C. H. M. Soc 

Templeton, Baldwinville, Ladies' Mis- 
sion Circle, by Mrs. E. E. B. Smith... 

Truro, S. S., by Eben F. Paine 

Walpole, Orth., Ladies' Benev. Soc, by 

Mrs. M. H. Piper 

Waltham, Trin., by T. W. Temple 

Wendell, by Mrs. E. L. Baker 

West Boylston, by E. Beaman Rice 

Westport, Pac Un. S. S., by J. C. Ma- 
comber 

Weymouth, East, by C. B. Cushing .... 

South, Old South, by Rev. H. C. Al- 

vord 

Whitin, J. C, Fund, Income of 

Wilbraham, North, Grace, by H. W. 

Cutter 

Williamstown, Franklin Carter, LL.D.. 
Winchester, First, by H. A. Wheeler... 

Special, for For. pop'n work, $98.62.* 

Woburn, First, by J. W. Fox 

Wollaston, Blank : 

Worcester, Central, by G. W. Mackin- 
tire 

Damon, Harriet W., Est. of, by div'd 
on remnant, by F. H. Wiggin, Tr.. 

Immanuel, B. and G. S. S. Army, by L. 
Pratt 

Piedmont, by A. W. Eldred 

Plymouth, Ladies' Miss. Aux., by Mrs. 
R. P. Beaman 

Union, by C. B. Greene 

Yarmouth, First, by E. D. Payne. ...... 

Womam's Home Missionary Associa- 
tion, by Miss M. L. Woodbury, 
Ass't Tr. : 

Grant to Cong. H. M. Soc. . $500 00 

Grant toward salary of 
Mrs. I. N. Tillinghast of 
the French- Am. College.. 5000 

Grant toward sal'y of Miss 
Junek, Polish Teacher, 
Ware 36 00 

Roxbury, Wal. Ave. Aux. 
toward salary of Rev. S. 
Deakin 17 oo — ■ 



$17 85 
37 es 

10 00 

55 69 
8 00 



78 19 



23 44 
15 00 



5° 75 
152 5° 
12 89 
IS 5° 
18 00 
15 32 

7 20 
22 07 

5 00 
18 42 

213 37 



25 


CO 


10 


39 


3° 
31 

7 
12 


00 
26 
00 
5° 


11 
3° 


5i 
00 


12 


00 


120 


00 


3 
100 
44 


55 
00 

85 


277 

S 


18 

CO 


344 


68 


4 


17 


J 7 
65 


7 1 

74 


19 
p. 5 


00 
00 


75 


00 



567 00 



Home Missionary. 



.553 36 
7 So 



,560 86 



* Received and credited on special account. 



272 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1899 



Received in February, 1S99 



Adams, First, by T. K. McAllister 

Amesbury, Union, by J. T. Bassett. . . 

Andover, A Friend, for needy Con- 
gregational ist missionary 

Bank balances, interest on 

Barnstable, Hyannis, Rev. A. H. Mul- 

nix% over-payments 

Boston, Boylston, by G. E. S. Kinney.. 

Dorchester, Village. Ladies' H. M. 
Soc, by Mrs. Reuben Swan. w. p. g. 
for L. Mp. of Mrs. Ira M. Clay 

Mrs. M. A. Jones 

Roxbury, Eliot, by F. C. Russell 

Bridgewater, East Union, by Geo. M. 

Keith 

Cambridge, North Ave., by Adam K. 

Wilson 

Cambridgepo.rt. E. D. Leavitt 

Carver, North, by L. M. Robbins 

Charleston, by F. O. Wakefield 

Concord, Norwegian, by Rev. O. O. 

Thorpe 

Fitchburg, Sweden, Evan., by Nels P. 

Nelson 

Foxboro, Orth.. " H<»nnah Pay son 

Annuity." by T. B. Browne 

Hanover, Second, by A. M. Barstow. . . . 
Hyde Paik, Clarendon S. S., Birthday 

Money, by C. D. Griggs 

Ipswich, South, by Rev. T. Frank 

Waters . 

Ludlow, Union, by A. H. Halford 

Marlboro, Union, by Wm. A. Dudley . 
New Hampshire, H. M. S.. Return for 

Armenian Service, $75.00.* 

Newton, Auburndale, a Friend 

Mrs. Crawtord 

Highlands, by Geo. May 

Peabcdy. South, C. E. Soc, by Alice E. 
Trask 



^5 

6 


35 
00 


2 

iS 


01 > 

13 


8 

54 


34 
Bo 


12 


00 


4 

-0 


70 
00 



300 


a 1 


5 


00 


14 


00 


9 


00 


4 


7^ 


S 


00 


1 


5« 


7 


.0 


S° 


00 


18 


t> 1 


10 


12 


5 


On 


2 


1. i.j 


119 


38 


10 


OO 



Rockland, First, by L. D. Perkins, to 
const. Betsey R. Bradford a L. M. 

of C. H. M. S 

Shelburne Falls, by Rev. J. Coit 

Shirley. Mary A. Park 

Springfield. Hope, Prim. Dept. of S. S., 

by Z. Willis Kemp 

Olivet, by J. W. Nourbcrn 

South S. S., by Wm. C. Lawton 

Ware, First, by W. L. Brakinridge, 

Wellesley, Miss M. E. Horton 

Westhampton, by A. D. Montague... 

Weston, by F. N. Hastings 

West Springfield, Park St., by Sam'l 

Smith 

A Friend, by Sam'l Smith 

Whiicomb. David. Fund, Income of 

Williamsburg, Haydenville, by C. D. 

Waite 

Winchendon. North, by Henry S. 

Allen (add'l) 

Worcester, Old South, by Hollis W. 

Cobb 

Xenophon. for work of Rev. Dr. H. 

A. Schauffler 

Woman's Home Missionary Associa- 
tion, by Miss M. L. Woodbury, 
Asst. Treas. : 
Grant toward salary of Miss I. N. 

Tillinghast 

Miss Josephine Junek, 3530.00.* 
ToC.H. M. S 



5 


00 


1 


00 


19 


08 


23 


°3 


CO 


00 


16 


5° 


4 


70 


16 


04 


13 


00 


4 1 


34 


7 


50 


98 


5° 


4 


53 


10 


00 


:2o 


76 


10 


00 



50 OO 
qoo OO 



Home Missionary, 



$1,658 69 
7 7° 

$1,666 39 



THE MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF CONNECTICUT 



Receipts of the Missionary Society of Connecticut in December, 1S9S. 

Jacobs, Treasurer 



Ward \V, 



Andover. by Rev. Oliver Brown 

Y. P. S. C. E 

Ansonia, German S. S , by Rev. John 
Fred. Graf 

A Friend 

Bridgeport. Bethany Mission, by Rev. 

W. F. White 

Chaplin, by I. Lester Eaton 

Colebrook, by J. M. Grant 

Danbury, Second, by J. Herbert Hoi 
ton 

Y. P. S. C. E 

Eastford, by H. Trowbridge 

East Haddam, First, by E. W. Chaffee. 

Hadlyme. by Charles H.Rich 

East Hartford, First, A Friend 

East Windsor, First, by E. G. Morton. 

Guilford, First, by E. W. Leete 

Hamden, Whitneyville, by James M. 

Pavne 

Hartford, Park, by Willis E. Smith.... 

Fourth, by F. W. Hawley 

Danish, by Rev. S. K. Didriksen 

Killinglv. Dayville. bv Rev. Tohn Deans. 

South Killingly.by Rev. C. H. Pease. 
Killingworth, by N. H. Evarts 



"4 


7S 


3 


-5 


3 


70 


2 


OO 


6 


no 


16 


S5 


12 


00 


5 


20 


1 
8 


25 


4 
5 


20 
28 


75 
29 


62 


12 


OO 


24 
28 


OO 

80 


1 


S7 


5 


r I. > 


3 


OO 


5 


OO 



Litchfield. Milton, Y. P. S. C. E., by 

Rev. W. E. Page $5 00 

Primary Class in S. S 200 

Middletown, First, by E. P. Augur 30 85 

New Britain, South S. S., by Edward 
H. Case 8 00 

New Haven, Davenport, by G. F. Bur- 
gess 42 09 

Ne v London, First, by George Whit- 
tlesey 2771 

North Haven, by Whitney Elliott 50 00 

Norwalk, First, by E. L. Boyer '5000 

Norwich, Broadway, by F. J. Leavens. 457 70 
Park, by H. L. Butts ($25 is for Boz- 
rahville Society ) 39 04 

Orange, West Haven, by Rev. S. J. 

Bryant 1532 

Somers, Somersville, bv William H. 
Billings ' 7 75 

Sprague, Hanover, by Rev. L. H. Hig- 
gins 1 1 88 

Stamford, Long Ridge, by Stephen S. 
Crane 4 50 

Stonington, First, by Rev. J. O. Bar- 
n nvs 8 00 

Tho-.naston, First, by H. A. Welton 23 55 



: Received and acknowledged on special account. 



April, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



273 



Torrington, Third, by Frank M. Wheel- 
er $1622 

Vernon, Talcottville, by M. H. Talcott. 175 00 

ForC. H. M. S 179 80 

Washington, New Preston Hill, by W. 

L. Birkins 10 00 

Waterbury, Second, by John A. Boyd.. 591 26 



West Hartford, by E. S. Elmer 

Wethersfield, by S. F. Willard 

Windsor, Poquonock, by L. R. Lord.. 
Woodstock, First, by Henry T. Child. 



28 66 

95 

8 00 



Received in January, ii 



Ansonia, First, by H. H. Porter 

Bethel, by A. H. Knox 

Bridgewater, by Elmer Frost 

Pyramid Tent boxes 

Thank offering, album 

Durham, Y. P. S. C. E., by Caroline G. 

Newton 

Enfield, First, by F. A. King 

ForC. H. M. S. 

Fairfield, Southport, cash 

Glastonbury, South Glastonbury Ch. 

and S. S., by H. D. Hale... 

Griswold, by Rev. F. E. Allen 

Y. P. S. C. E., for C H. M. S 

Hartford, First, Mrs. E. A. Smith 

Ernest W. Smith 

Herbert Knox Smith 

Sunday-school, by Knighton Smith 

Asylum Hill, by Charles E. Thomp- 
son 

Kent, First, by Charles L. Spooner .. 
Killingly,Danielson, by Charles Phillips 



$28 

6 


91 
33 


9 
8 


12 

35 


5 


00 


5 


50 


s 


00 


47 


75 


3° 


00 


22 


87 
60 


3 


00 


100 


00 


TOO 


00 


IOO 


00 


IO 


00 


3 2 3 


5° 


4 
42 


11 
83 



ForC. H. M. S 

Lyme, First, by Rev. E. F. Burr 

Meriden, First, by H. M. Billard 

Middletown. First, by E. P. Augur 

Montville, First, by Henry A. Baker. . 

New Britain, First, by William P. Felt. 
South, by P. M. Bronson 

New Haven, Howard Avenue, by Rev. 
W. J. Mutch 

New London, Second, Estate of Jon- 
athan N. Harris, \ of || of income 
from Trust Fund 

Norwich, Park, by H. L. Butts 

Old Lyme, by William F. Coult . . 

Orange, by S. D. Woodruff 

Southington, by J. F. Pratt 

Willington, by C. H. Hobby 

Wilton, by T. F. Gilbert 

Wolcott, by Harry L. Andrews . . . 

Woodbury, First, by J. H. Linsley 



25 00 

78 25 

22 51 

8 50 

IOO 00 

263 97 

5 24 



1,041 


b 7 


s 


00 


18 


00 


13 


55 


14 


59 


5 


00 


35 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 



£2,553 81 



Received in February, i3gg 

East Hartford, First, by E. C. Geer $20 00 Thomaston, First, by H. A. Welton, for 

East Lyme, Niantic, by Herman W. C. H. M. S $3 38 

Smith s 860 Torrington, Third, by Frank M. 

Goshen, S. S., by Frank J. Seaton 437 Wheeler 13223 

Guilford, North Guilford, by Benjamin 

Rossiter 650 W. C. H. M. U. of Connecticut, Mrs. 

ForC.H.M.S 650 George Follett, Sec. : 

Haddam, Higganum, by R. J. Gladwin 19 00 Hartford, First, Junior Aux., by Mrs. 

Hartford, First, by Charles T. Welles. . 14934 M. W. Jacobus 60 co 

ForC.H.M.S 20 co 

"Hawes Fund," for C. H. M. S 3525 $1,01569 

Y. P. S. C. E., for C. H. M. S., for 

work in Alaska, by Victor J. ■ {Correction: In Conn. Aux., October receipts 

Klinger 10 00 in January number, " Voluntown, Ekonk by Rev. 

Second, by H. E. Harrington 40000 John Elderkin, $8.00," the "by" should be 

Madison, First S. S., by Adella Wilcox. 5 00 omitted, the $8.00 being Mr. Elderkin's personal 
Middletown, First, by E. P. Augur 29 57 offering. In same society's statement for No- 
Monroe, by E. G. Beardsley 3 80 vember, "Norfolk, by Stephen Selden, $79.16," 

Norwich, First, by Lewis A. Hyde 102 01 should read Stephen A . Selden.] 



ILLINOIS HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 



Receipts of the Illinois Home Missionary Society in July, 1898. 

Treasurer 



Aaron B. Mead, 



Chicago, First, Y. P. S. C. E. 

Dallas 

DeKalb, Swedish 

Farmington 

Galesburg, Central 

Galva 

Granville 

Hamilton 

Hinsdale (A Friend, $20) 

Kewanee 

Nora 

Paxton, Y. P. S. C. E 

Rockton 

Rollo 



$2 85 
8 26 
2 25 

32 90 
25 00 

33 75 
20 00 

2 55 
37 17 
59 67 

3 25 
6 87 
5 °° 

11 30 



Wilmette $13 00 

Woman's Home Missionary Union : 

Amboy goo 

Chicago, New England 2 00 

Lincoln Park 3 50 

Evanston, First 400 

Galesburg, Central 63 02 

Hmsdale, Young People's Soc 100 00 

Oak Park, First 7 co 

Second 4 00 

Payson 5 00 

Waverly 10 00 



I47 1 34 



274 



The Home Missionary 



April, ii 



Received in August, 1S98 



Chicago, Pilgrim, A Friend. 

Clifton 

Gridley 

Half Day, Rev. S. H. Gray.. 

Hazel Grove 

Henry, A Friend 

Lyndon. A Friend 

McLean 

Naperville 

Newtown 



S15 00 
8 77 
7 60 
5 00 
2 50 

1 00 
25 00 

5 00 
35 5o 

2 61 



Pana 

Princeton, A Friend. . , 
Somonauk. Y. P. S. C. 

Streator, First 

Winnebago , 

Woodstock 



Woman's Home Missionary Union. 
Miscellaneous 



$2 66 
100 00 

1 25 
3 96 

2 50 
18 45 

5 00 
160 12 

$401 92 



Received in September, \l 



Batavia 

Chicago, First, S. S 

Church 

Cornwall 

Edelstein 

Elgin, Prospect St.. 

Griggsville 

Healey 

Henry 

Lockport 

Morton 



71 00 New Windsor , 



5 


40 


37 


35 


2 


50 
80 


10 


00 


28 
3 


44 
80 


7 


OO 


10 


CO 


4 


15 



Oak Park, First (Mr. George Walker, 

§25) 

Providence 

Rantoul 

Sycamore, A Friend 

Toulon, Y. P. S. C. E 



Woman's Home Missionary Union 



$1655 

116 58 
12 00 
7 52 

100 00 
10 00 



Received in October, 1S98 



Atkinson 

Austin, First 

Swed ish . . . 

Belvidere 

Chicago, First. A Friend 

Central Park, Y. P. S. C. E 

Leavitt Street, A Friend 

Union Park, Y. P. S. C. E 

Earlville. J. A. D 

Glen Eilyn (W. B. Lloyd and wife, 

S4.00) 

Hinsdale 

Huntley 

Kangley 

La Grange 

Lawn Ridge 

Naperville, S. S 

Oak Park, Third, Y. P. S. C. E 

Second, S. S 

Peoria, German 

Rockefeller 



Rockford, Second 

Sandoval 

Sterling, Junior C. E. S. 
Wythe 



$6 29 

7 2 5 

3 14 

7 00 

25 00 

2 00 

25 00 

15 00 

25 00 

12 10 
17 17 
2 35 

1 CO 

50 70 

1 08 



15 25 

1 82 Miscellaneous. 
15 00 

5 00 

6 50 



Woman's Home Missionary Union : 
Chicago, New England. 

Lincoln Park 

Douglas Park 

Evanston, First, S. S 

Mendon 

Oak Park, Second, Junior C. E. S. 

Rockford, Second 

Wheaton, First, Y. P. S. C. E... . 



$98 09 

2 16 

2 00 

10 22 



33 00 
3 25 
1 00 

27 21 

19 30 
60 

13 00 
5 00 

$102 36 

300 00 

$758 48 



Received in November and December, ii 



Abingdon, Y. P. S. C. E 

Alton, Church of the Redeemer 

Annawan 

Ashkum 

Bloomington 

Bowen 

Buda 

Byron 

Carpentersville (S S., £4.65) 

Champaign (Senior and Junior Y. P. S. 

C. E., $2. 60) , 

Chebanse 

Chesterfield 

Chicago, First 

New England 

Union Park 

Pilgrim ( Tohn Mables, $35.00) 

Mr. and Mrs. T- C Kilner 

Crawford, Y. P. S. C. E 

De Kalb, Swedish 

Delavan, A Friend 

Dover 

Dundee 

D wight 

Elm wood 



?4 


00 


20 


MO 


2 


55 


4 


= 5 


!4 


5° 


II 


00 


46 


00 


13 


c 5 


'5 


00 


51 


60 


2 


25 


ao 


92 


32 


72 


26 


KS 


20 


00 


37 


5° 


20 


00 


2 


5° 


4 


'4 


20 


00 


5 


( 


13 


63 


5 


00 


8 


CO 



Fall Creek 

Geneva , 

Genoa Junction, Wis 

Granville (S. S., $5.00) 

Half Day, Rev. S. H. Gray 

Hinsdale 

I vanhoe 

Joy Prairie 

Kirkland 

La Grange ( Y. P. S. C. E. S5.00) 

Loda (Junior and Senior Y. P. S. C. E 

$2.00) 

Moline, First 

Morris 

Neponset 

Oak Park, First 

Odell 

Olney, Rev. S. J. Malone , 

Oswego 

Park Ridge, First .'. 

Payson (Edward Seymour, $10.00) 

Peru 

Pittsfield, Rev. J. O. Emerson 

Plymouth 

Port Byron 



$30 00 
50 00 
4 50 

20 00 

3 00 
17 19 

4 25 
35 ™ 
13 62 

21 00 

8 55 

144 88 

7 50 

22 61 

25 
25 00 

5 °° 

3 00 
2 74 

39 °4 

5 25 

10 00 

5 49 

4 86 



April, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



275 



Providence, Y. P. S. C. E $10 00 

Richmond 1 70 

Rock Falls 805 

Rockford, First, A Friend 100 00 

Sen. and Jr. Y. P. S. C. E 550 

Rockford, Second, Y. P. S. C.E. (special) 10 00 

Rockton, S. S 2 00 

Sandwich 104 53 

Shirland 5 40 

South Danville 2 50 

Sterling' 33 51 

Stillman Valley 24 03 

Toulon (S. S., $13.83) 32 08 

Waukegan, German . . .- 1 00 

Waverly 9 01 

Winnebago 5 00 

Woman's Home Missionary Union : 

Big Rock S 00 

Big Woods 450 

Champaign 27 57 



Chicago, New England $25 00 

Ravenswood 20 00 

Rogers Park 12 25 

Decatur 5 co 

Evanston, First 1 00 

Harvey, Jun. CT E 1 00 

Kewanee 10 50 

La Grange 20 00 

Lockport 3 00 

Loda 5 00 

Oak Park, First 21 00 

Second 975 

Peoria, First 1 co 

Plainfield 10 00 

Rockford, First 1000 

Second 15 00 

Seward, First and Second 10 75 

111. W. H. M.Union 32 38 

Miscellaneous 265 38 

$1,779 61 



MICHIGAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Receipts of the Michigan Home Missionary Society in Deceniber, 1898. Rev. John P. 

Sanderson, Treasurer 



Ada, Second $1150 

Bedford 11 00 

Belding 17 05 

Benzonia 40 10 

Breckenridge, Boys' and Girls' H. M. 

Army 4 75 

Calumet 68 92 

Charlotte zo 00 

Chassell, O. D. Bentley 10 00 

Clarksville 6 95 

Clinton 1768 

Custer , . . 8 78 

Detroit, First 375 00 

Jr. Y. P. S. C. E T 5 00 

Dexter, Dennis Warner 30 00 

Douglas 19 00 

East Gilead 4 41 

Eaton Rapids 26 26 

S. S 2 84 

Gaylord 16 00 

Grand Blanc 30 40 

Grand Ledge, Y. P. S. C. E 3 00 

Hart, S. S 5 00 

Hancock 100 00 

Helena 385 

Hersey 1 70 

Hudson 4 co 

Jackson, Plymouth 4 50 

Kalamazoo ng 88 

S. S. Birds' Nest 7 00 

Lamont, Y. P. S. C. E 11 00 

S. S 2 50 

Lansing, Plymouth 93 33 



Y. P. S. C. E $15 00 

Pilgrim 18 00 

Leonidas 5 00 

Merrill 293 

Y. P. S. C. E 2 00 

New Baltimore 1 88 

Omena, Y. P. S. C. E 5 00 

Pine Grove 12 00 

Pittsford s 50 

Pontiac, Y. P. S. C. E no 

Rosedale 10 00 

St. Clair 10 50 

Sandstone 25 50 

Y. P. S. C. E... 8 00 

Sheridan, Y. P. S. C. E 3 00 

Solon 2 50 

Vicksburg, Friends 5 00 

Webster , 5 75 

White Cloud 1 75 

Whittaker 677 

Williamston 1 00 

W. H. M. U., by Mrs. E ,F. Grabill, 

Treas 275 41 



FOR THE DEBT 



Allegan, Rev. F. W. Hullinger. . 

Grand Rapids, First 

D. F. Bradley... 



$1,500 99 



5 °° 
100 00 

5 00 



Received in January, 1899 



Alamo 

Allendale 

Bangor, First 

Bangor West, S. S. 

Bradley ' 

Bridgman 

Chase 

Chelsea 

Clinton 

Detroit, First 

East Paris 

Eaton Rapids 

Fenwick 



4 20 

2 07 
9 00 

5 3° 

3 40 
2 00 

54 5o 

5 00 

103 15 

5 00 

25 00 
5 00 



Flat Rock $2 00 

Fruitport 1 00 

Gaylord 9 00 

Grand Haven 16 41 

Hartland 13 34 

Howard City 7 72 

Jackson, First 115 20 

S. S 4 35 

Laingsburg 500 

Lake Odessa, Y. P. S. C. E 500 

Ludington, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. N. Stray, 

to const. Miss Catherine Burtt a L. M. 

of C. H. M. S 50 00 



276 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1899 



Nunica 

Olivet 

Port Huron, S. 
Roscommon ... 

Rosedale 

St. Johns 

Shelby 

Vanderbilt . . . 

Vienna 

Wheatland.. . . 

A Friend 

A Friend 

Michigan 



00 Rev. James Vincent, Tecumseh 



3 °° 

2 4 r 
6 00 

1 00 
28 53 
11 32 

3 3° 

2 50 

4 82 
100 00 

94 13 
40 00 



W. H. M. U. of Michigan, by Mrs. E. 
F. Grabill. Treas 



FOR THE DEBT 



Grand Rapids, First, H. A. Toren. 

Mrs. S. J. Pierce 

Kalamazoo 



Sio 00 

1,052 99 
K816 12 



$1 25 

5° 
10 00 

$21 75 



Received in February, 1899 



Ada. First . 

Allegan 

Ann Arbor 

Bay City 

Benzoma 

Chester 

Chesterfield . . ...... 

Coral 

Durand 

Ellsworthy 

Grand Junction 

Grand Ledge 

Grand Rapids. First 

Hancock. S. S 

Kalamazoo 



$18 


55 


7 


OS 


32 


06 


Si 


°7 


12 


00 




80 


15 


00 


11 


42 


1 


00 


3 


5° 


s 


00 


6 


25 


100 


00 



Lake Odessa 

Lansing. Plymouth 

Levviston, Jr. Y. P. S. C. E 

Litchfield 

New Baltimore 

Y. P. S.C. E 

Oakwood 

Oxford 

Ovid, Y. P. S. C. E 

Wheatland. . 

A Friend 

W. H. M. U., Mrs. E. F. Grabill, Treas. 



»3 °° 
37 00 
10 00 
14 21 

2 00 

3 °° 
10 00 
30 00 

7 00 

4 00 
100 00 
3°3 °5 



21 



WOMAN'S STATE HOME MISSIONARY 
ORGANIZATIONS 



OFFICERS 



1. NEW HAMPSHIRE 



FEMALE CENT INSTITUTION 

Organized August, 1804 

and 

HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized June, 1890 

President, Mrs. W. D. Knapp. Somersworth. 

Secretary, Mrs. M. W. Nims, 16 Rumford St., 

Concord. 
Treasurer, Miss Annie A. McFarland, 196 No. 
Main St., Concord. 



4. MASSACHUSETTS AND RHODE 
ISLAND * 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY ASSOCIA- 
TION 
Organized February. 1880 
President, Mrs. C. L. Goodell. 607 Congregational 

House. Boston. 
Secretary, Mrs Louise A. Kellogg. 607 Congrega- 
tional House. Boston. 
Treasurer, Miss Lizzie D. White, 607 Congrega- 
tional House, Boston. 



2. MINNESOTA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized September, 1872 



5. MAINE 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY AUXILIARY 

Organized June, 1880 



President, Miss Catherine W. Nichols, 230 E. 9th President, Mrs. Katherine B. Lewis. So. Berwick. 

St.. St. Paul. Secretary, Mrs. Gertrude H. Denio, 168 Ham- 

Secretary, Mrs. E. R. Shepard, 2931 Portland mond St., Bangor. 

Ave., Minneapolis. Treasurer, Mrs. Rose M. Crosby, 64 Grove St., 

Treasurer, Mrs. M. W. Skinner, Northfield. Bangor. 



3. ALABAMA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized March, 1877 

Reorganized April, 1889 

President, Mrs. G. W. Andrews, Talladega. 
Secretary, Mrs. J. S. Jackson. Montgomery. 
Treasurer, Mrs. E. C. Silsby, Talladega. 



6. MICHIGAN 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1881 

President, Mrs. I. P. Powell, 76 Jefferson Ave., 

Grand Rapids. 
Secretary, Mrs. E. N. Thorne, 212 So. Union St., 

Grand Rapids. 
Treasurer, Mrs. E. F. Grabill, Greenville. 



* While the W. H. M. A. appears in the above list as a State body for Massachusetts and Rhode 
Island, it has certain auxiliaries elsewhere. 



April, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



277 



7. KANSAS 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1881 

President, Mrs. R. B. Guild, 1336 Dillon St., 

Topeka. 
Secretary, Mrs. M. H. Jaquith, 1157 FilmoreSt, 

Topeka. 
' Treasurer, Miss May Wilkinson, Ottawa. 

8. OHIO 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1882 

President, Mrs. C. W. Carroll, 48 Brookfield St., 

Cleveland. 4 

Secretary, Mrs. A. H. Williams, 227 Princeton St., 

Cleveland. 
Treasurer, Mrs. George B. Brown, 2116 Warren 

St., Toledo. 

g. NEW YORK 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1883 

President, Mrs. Wm. Kincaid, 483 Greene Ave., 

Brooklyn. 
Secretary, Mrs. Wm. Spalding, 513 Orange St., 

Syracuse. 
Treasurer, Mrs. J. J. Pearsall, 153 Decatur St., 

Brooklyn. 

10. WISCONSIN 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1883 

President, Mrs. E. G. Updike, Madison. 
Secretary, Mrs. A. O. Wright, Madison. 
Treasurer, Mrs. L. E. Smith, Madison. 

n. NORTH DAKOTA 

WOMAN'S- HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized November, 1883 

President, Mrs. J. L. Maile, Fargo. 
Secretary, Mrs. Silas Daggett, Harwood. 
Treasurer, Mrs. J. M. Fisher, Fargo. 

12. OREGON 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY-UNION 

Organized July, 1884 

President, Mrs. F. Eggert, The Hill, Portland. 
Cor. Sec, Mrs. D. D. Clarke, 447 E. 12th St., No. 

Portland. 
Treasurer, Mrs. C. F. Clapp, Forest Grove. 



13. WASHINGTON 

Including Northern Idaho 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized July, 1884 

Reorganized June. 1889 
President, Mrs. A. Judson Bailey, 1614 Second 

Ave., Seattle. 
Secretary, Mrs. W. C. Wheeler, 424 South K St., 

Tacoma. 
Treasurer, Mrs E. B. Burwell, 323 Seventh Ave., 

Seattle. 



14. SOUTH DAKOTA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized September, 1884 

President, Mrs. C. E. Corry, Columbia. 
Secretary , Mrs. K. M. Jenney, Huron. 
Treasurer , Mrs. F. M. Wilcox, Huron. 

15. CONNECTICUT 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized January, 1885 

President, Miss Ellen R. Camp, 9 Camp St., New 

Britain. 
Secretary, Mrs. C. T. Millard, 36 Lewis St., 

Hartford. 
Treasurer, Mrs. W. W. Jacobs, 530 Farmington 

Ave., Hartford. 

16. MISSOURI 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1885 

President, Mrs. Henry Hopkins, 916 Holmes St., 

Kansas City. 
Secretary, Mrs. L. F. Doane, 3319 East Ninth St., 

Kansas City. 
Treasurer, Mrs. K. L. Mills, 1526 Wabash Ave., 

Kansas City. 

17. ILLINOIS 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1885 

President, Mrs. Sidney Strong, 234 N. Elmwood 

Ave., Oak Park. 
Secretary, Mrs. A. O. Whitcomb, 463 Irving Ave., 

Chicago. 
Tr.asurer, Miss B. E. Crosby, 416 N. Oak Park 

Ave., Oak Park. 

18. IOWA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized June, 1886 

President, Mrs. L. F. Berry, Ottumwa. 
Secretary, Mrs. H. H. Robbins. Grinnell. 
Treasurer, Miss Belle L. Bentley, W. Grand Ave., 
Des Moines. 



19. CALIFORNIA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Organized October, 1887 

President, Mrs. E. S. Williams, Saratoga. 

Secretary, Mrs. F. B. Perkins, 546 24th St., Oak- 
land. 

Treasurer, Mrs. J. M. Haven, 1329 Harrison St., 
Oakland. 

20. NEBRASKA 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized November, 188" 

President. Mrs. D. B. Perry. Crete. 
Secretary. Mrs. H. Bross, 2904 Q St., Lincoln. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Charlotte C. Hall, 1318 C St., 
Lincoln. 



278 



The Home Missionary 



April, i! 



21. FLORIDA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized February, 1888 

President, Mrs. S. F. Gale. Jacksonville. 
Secretary, Mrs. J. H. Phillips, Melbourne. 
Treasurer, Mrs. W. D. Brown, Interlachen. 



27. GEORGIA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized November, 1888 

New Organization October, 1898 

President, Miss M. L. Graham, Savannah. 
Secretary, Miss Jennie Curtis, Mcintosh. 
Treasurer, Miss Mattie Turner, Athens. 



22. INDIANA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1888 

President, Mrs. W. A. Bell, 223 Broadway, In- 
dianapolis. 
Secretary, Mrs. D. F. Coe, Elkhart. 
Treasurer, 



28. MISSISSIPPI 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized April, 1889 

President, Mrs. C. L. Harris, 1421 31st Ave., Me 
ridian. 

Secretary, - 

Treasurer, Mrs. L. H. Turner, 3112 12th St., Me- 
ridian. 



23. SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized May, 1888 

President, Mrs. Warren F. Day, 949 So. Hill St., 

Los Angeles. 
Secretary, Mrs. Kate G. Robertson, Mentone. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Mary M. Smith, Public Library. 

Riverside. 



24. VERMONT 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized June, 1888 

President, Mrs. W. J. Van Patten, 386 Pearl St., 
Burlington. 

Secretary, Mrs. M. K. Paine. Windsor. 

Treasurer, Mrs. Rebecca P. Fairbanks, St. Johns- 
bury. 



25. COLORADO 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized October, 1888 

Hon. Pres., Mrs. J. W. Pickett. Whitewater. 

President, Mrs. E. R. Drake, 18 Mack Block, 
Denver. 

Secretary, Mrs. Addison Blanchard, 3023 Down- 
ing Ave., Denver. 

Treasurer, Mrs. B. C. Valentine, Highlands. 



26. WYOMING 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 18S8 

Reorganized December, 1892 

President, Mrs. J. A. Raner. Chevenne. 
Secretary, Mrs. W. L. Whipple. Cheyenne. 
Treasurer, Mrs. A. E. Kiran, Rock Springs. 



29. LOUISIANA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized April, 1889 

President, Mrs. L. St. J. Hitchcock, 2436 Canal St., 

New Orleans. 
Secretary, Mrs. Matilda Cabrere, 2419 Conti St., 

New Orleans. 
Treasurer, Miss Mary L. Rogers, 2436 Canal St., 

New Orleans. 



30. ARKANSAS, KENTUCKY, AND TEN- 
NESSEE 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION OF THE 
CENTRAL SOUTH ASSOCIATION 

Organized April, 1889 

/'resident, Mrs. Ella S. Moore. Box 8, Fisk Uni 
versify, Nashville, Tenn. 

Secretary, Miss Mary L. Corpier, Florence. Ala. 

Treasurer, Mrs. Preston Burrus, 815 Cedar St., 
Nashville. 



31. NORTH CAROLINA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1889 

President, Mrs. S. S. Sevier, McLeansville. 
Seer eta ry I 

and ;-Miss A. E. Farrington, Oaks. 
Treasurer, ) 



32. TEXAS 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized March, 1890 

President, Mrs. Eunice Heflin. Sherman. 
Secretary, Mrs. Donald Hinkley, Dallas. 
Treasurer, Mrs. A. Geen, Dallas. 



April, li 



The Home Missionary 



279 



33. MONTANA 38. INDIAN TERRITORY 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, zSgo Organized April, 1892 

President, Mrs. V. F. Clark, Livingston. 

Secretary, Mrs. H. J. Miller, Livingston. President, 

Treasurer, Mrs. W. S. Bell, 410 Dearborn Ave., Secretary, Miss Louise Graper, Vinita. 

Helena. Treasurer, Mrs. Raymond, Vinita. 



34. PENNSYLVANIA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized June, 1890 

President, Mrs. C. F. Yennie, Ridgway. 

Secretary, Mrs. C. F. Chamberlain, Cambridge- 
boro. 

Treasurer, Mrs. T. W. Jones, 511 Woodland Ter- 
race, Philadelphia. 



39. NEVADA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1892 

President, Mrs. L. J. Flint, Reno. 
Secretary, Miss Margaret N. Magill, Reno. 
Treasurer, Miss Mary Clow, Reno. 



35. OKLAHOMA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1890 

President, Mrs. J. H. Parker, Kingfisher. 
Secretary, Mrs. Joel Harper, Oklahoma City. 
Treasurer, Mrs. A. B. Hammer, Oklahoma City. 



36. NEW JERSEY 

Including District of Columbia, Maryland, 
and Virginia 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION OF 
THE NEW JERSEY ASSOCIATION 

Organized March, 1891 

President, Mrs. Isaac Clark, cor. Fourth and Col- 
lege St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Secretary, Mrs. F. J. Goodwin, Glen Ridge. 

Treasurer, Mrs. J. H. Denison, 150 Belleville Ave., 
Newark. 



37. UTAH 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1891 

Reorganized December, 1892 

President, Mrs. Hemphill, 23 H Street, Salt Lake 

City. 
Secretary, Mrs. L. E. Hall, 78 East First North 

Street, Salt Lake City. 
Treasurer, Miss Anna Baker, 654 East Third South 

Street, Salt Lake City. 



40. NEW MEXICO 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized November, 1892 

President, Mrs. E. H. Ashmun, Albuquerque. 
Secretary, Mrs. F. A. Burlingame, Albuquerque. 
Treasurer, Mrs. M. McClaskey, Albuquerque. 



41. BLACK HILLS, SO. DAKOTA 

BLACK HILLS WOMAN'S MISSIONARY 
UNION 

Organized October, 1893 

President, Mrs. J. B. Gossage, Rapid City, Black 

Hills, South Dakota. 
Secretary, Mrs. C. W. Barron, Rapid City, Black 

Hills, South Dakota. 
Treastirer, Mrs. E. L. Billings, Lead. 



42. IDAHO 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1895 

President, Mrs. R. B. W r right, Boise. 
Secretary, Mrs. C. E. Mason, Mountainhome. 
Treasurer, Mrs. L. H. Johnston, Challis. 



280 The Home Missionary April, 1899 



SECRETARIES OF YOUNG PEOPLE'S WORK 



f Young Ladies' Work, Mrs. B. W. Smith, 600 West Thirty- 
second St., Minneapolis. 



Minnesota. 

Christian Endeavor Work, Miss Bertha Hanneman, 521 Ninth 

[_ St., Minneapolis. 

Mass. and R. I Miss Bertha M. Shepard, 607 Congregational House, Boston. 

Michigan Mrs. W. J. Gregory, 459 Third St., Manistee. 

Kansas Miss Harriet Broad, Topeka. 

Ohio Miss M. C. Smith, 853 Doan St., Cleveland. 

New York Mrs. Geo. R. Haines, 978 Delaware Ave., Buffalo. 

North Dakota Mrs. E. S. Shaw, Cooperstown. 

Oregon . . .Mrs. W. D. Palmer, 546 Third St., Portland. 

Washington Mrs. W. C. Davie, 423 North N St., Tacoma. 

South Dakota Mrs. Grace Burleigh, Mitchell. 

Illinois Mrs. J. T. Blanchard, 232 Walnut St., Aurora. 

Missouri..... Mrs. A. K. Wray, 2220 E. Eighth St., Kansas City. 

Iowa Miss Fannie Spencer, Alden. 

California. Miss Caroline A. Potter, 600 Seventeenth St., Oakland. 

Nebraska Mrs. J. N. Ilyder, 1520 U St., Lincoln. 

Southern California. . .Miss Phebe Mayhew, 4 Barnard Park, Los Angeles. 

VERMONT Mrs. C. L. Smith, 159 Pine St., Burlington. 

Colorado Mrs. A. D. Blakeslee, 145 South Lincoln St., Denver. 

Montana Mrs. E. E. Esslestyn, Red Lodge. 



SECRETARIES OF CHILDREN'S WORK 

Minnesota Miss Carrie S. Pond, 608 Canada St., St. Paul. 

Michigan Mrs. Henry Marsh, Olivet. 

Kansas Miss Hattie Booth, Newton. 

Ohio Mrs. O. H. Gates, 257 Elm St., Oberlin. 

North Dakota Mrs. O. J. Wakefield, Wahpeton. 

South Dakota Miss Emily N. Perrin, Armour. 

Illinois Mrs. J. A. Thome, 1006 Garfield Blvd. , Chicago. 

Nebraska Mrs. H. D. Neely, 4371 Hamilton St., Omaha. 

Southern California. . .Miss Emily M. Peck, 920 W. Eighth St., Los Angeles. 



Congregational Home Missionary Society 

Field Secretaries 

Rev. W. G.Puddefoot, South Framingham, Mass. 
Rev. C. W. Shelton, Norwalk, Conn. 

Superintendents 

Rev. Moritz E. Eversz, P.D., German Department, 153 La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 

Rev. S. V. S. Fisher, Scandinavian Department, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Rev. Henry A. Schauffler, D.D., Slavic Department, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Rev. Edw. D. Curtis, D.D Indianapolis, Ind. Rev. John L. Maile Fargo, N. Dak. 

Rev. S. F. Gale , Jacksonville, Fla. Rev. H. Sanderson Denver, Col. 

Rev. Alfred K. Wrav, D.D Kansas'City, Mo. Rev. C. T. Brown Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Rev. L. P. Broad Topeka, Kan. ' Rev. J. K. Harrison San Francisco, Cal. 

Rev. E. H. Ashmun .... . . ..Albuquerque, N. M. Rev. James T. Ford Los Angeles, Cal. 

Rev. A. Judson Bailey Seattle, Wash. Rev. C. F. Clapp Forest Grove, Ore. 

Rev. Homer W. Carter, D.D Beloit, Wis. " r> j. vy y ONFS . T) r> 'J 5 11 Woodland Terrace, 

13 4 a t> n # f Black Hills and Wyoming. ' ' ' J '••■'( Philadelphia, Pa. 

Key. A. A. JiROWN. . . - ( Hot Spr i n g Si South Dakota. Rev. W. S. Bell Helena, Mori. 

Rev. Harmon Bross, D.D Lincoln, Neb. Rev. J. Homer Parker Kingfisher, Okl. 

Rev. S. F. Gale (Act'g Supt. Ala.), Jacksonville, Fla. . Rev. A. G. Upton Weiser, Idaho 

Rev. W. H. Thrall Huron, S. Dak. 

Secretaries and Treasurers 

of the Auxiliaries 

Rev. David P. Hatch, Secretary Maine Missionary Society. . .First Nat. Bk. Bldg., Portland, Me. 

W. P. Hubbard, Esq., Treasurer " " " ....Box 1052, Bangor, Me. 

Rev. A. T. Hillman, Secretary New Hampshire Home Miss. Society Concord, N. H. 

Hon. Lyman D. Stevens, Treasurer " " " " " ... .Concord, N. H. 

Rev. Charles H. Merrill, Secretary Vermont Domestic " " St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

W11. C. Tyler, Treasurer '. " " " " ... .St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

Rev. Joshua Coit, Secretary Massachusetts Home " " .... I 609 Cong'l House, 

Rev. Edwin B. Palmer, Treasurer l " " " "....•..( Boston, Mass. 

Rev. J. H. Lyon, Secretary Rhode Island " " " Central Falls, R. I. 

los. Wm. Rice, Esq., Treasurer " " " " ... .Providence, R. I. 

Dea. David N. Camp, Secretary Missionary Society of Connecticut Hartford, Conn. 

Ward W. Jacobs, Esq., Treasurer " " " Hartford, Conn. 

Rev. Ethan Curtis, Secretary.. .... New York Home Miss. Society Syracuse, N. Y. 

William Spalding, Treasurer " " " " Syracuse, N. Y. 

Rev. J. G. Fraser, D.D. , Secretary Ohio, " " " Cleveland, Ohio. 

Rev. J. G. Fraser, D.D., Treasurer " " " " Cleveland, Ohio. 

Rev. James Tompkins, D.D., Secretary Illinois " " " ) 153 La Salle St., 

Aaron B. Mead, Esq., Treasurer " " " " 1 Chicago, 111. 

Rev. Homer W. Carter, D.D. , Secretary. .. .Wisconsin " " " Beloit, Wis. 

C. M. Blackman, Esq., Treasurer. .. , " ." " " ■ Whitewater, Wis. 

Rev. T. O. Douglass, D.D. , Secretary Iowa " " " Grinnell, Iowa. 

J. H. Merrill, Esq., Treasurer " " " ■' Des Moines, Iowa. 

Rev. William H. Warren, D.D., Secretary. .Michigan Home Miss. Society Lansing, Mich. 

Rev. John P. Sanderson, Treasurer " "',■""" " Lansing, Mich. 

Geo. H. Morgan, Secretary Cong. City Miss. Society St. Louis, Mo. 

Rev. A.- K. Wrav, Superintendent " " " " Kansas City, Mo. 

Lewis E. Snow, Treasurer " " " " St. Louis, Mo. 

Communications 

relating to general business of the Society may be addressed to either of the Secretaries for Correspondence. 
Communications relating to the Editorial Department of The Home Missionary or of the Home Missionary 
section of Congregational Work, may be addressed to Rev. Alex. H. Clapp, D.D. Correspondence of the 
Woman's Department may be addressed to Mrs. H. S. Caswell, Congregational Rooms, New York. 



Donations and Subscriptions 



in Drafts, Checks, Registered Letters, or Post-Office Orders may be addressed to Wm. B. Howland, 
Treasurer, Fourth Avenue and 22d Street, New York. 

A PAYMENT OF $50 CONSTITUTES A LIFE MEMBER 

Form of a Bequest 

I bequeath to my executors the sum of dollars, in trust, to pay over the same, 

in months after my decease, to the person who, when the same is payable, shall act as Treasurer 

of the Congregational Home Missionary Society, formed in the City of New York, in the year eighteen hundred 
and twenty-six, to be applied to the charitable use and purposes of said Society, and under its direction. 



Congregational Home Missionary Society 
Fourth Ave. and 2 2d St., New York 



Major-General Oliver O. Howard 

President 

Secretaries for Correspondence 
Rev. Joseph B. Clark, D.D. 

Rev. Washington Choate, D.D. 

Rev. Alexander H. Clapp, D.D., Editorial Secretary 

Mr. WILLIAM B. Ho\VLAND, Treasurer 

Executive Committee 

Win. Ives Washburn, Esq., Chairman 

Asa A. Spear, Esq., Recording Secretary 

Mr. Joseph Wm. Rice 

Rev. Charles H. Richards, D.D. 

Mr. George P. Stockwell 

Rev. John D. Kingsbury, D.D. 

Mr. George W. Hebard 

John H. Terry, Esq. 

Mr. John F. Anderson, Jr. 

David A. Thompson, Esq. 

Mr. Wm. H. Wanamaker 

Rev. Charles M. Lamson, D.D. 

Rev. Charles A. Savage 

Rev. Robert J. Kent, D.D.' 



Press of J. J. Little & Co., Astor Place, New York 



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